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Downes Theory of Education - Bryan Mathers
"I’ve always found Stephen Downes weekly summary of all things learning tech related a source for all sorts of goodies. Here’s one of his statements that I thought deserved an visualisation."

"To teach is to model and demonstrate."
"To learn is to practice and reflect."
stephendownes  learning  teaching  howwelearn  howweteach  education  unschooling  deschooling  modeling  practice  reflection  demonstration  sharing  schools  tcsmny  connectivism 
may 2015 by robertogreco
A MOOC is not a Thing: Emergence, Disruption, and Higher Education - Hybrid Pedagogy
[Note: this is a link-rich post, none of which are noted here.]

"A MOOC is not a thing. A MOOC is a strategy. What we say about MOOCs cannot possibly contain their drama, banality, incessance, and proliferation. The MOOC is a variant beast — placental, emergent, alienating, enveloping, sometimes thriving, sometimes dead, sometimes reborn.

There is nothing about a MOOC that can be contained. Try as they might, MOOC-makers like Coursera, EdX, and Udacity cannot keep their MOOCs to themselves, because when we join a MOOC, it is not to learn new content, new skills, new knowledge, it is to learn new learning. Entering a MOOC is entering Wonderland — where modes of learning are turned sideways and on their heads — and we walk away MOOCified.

“There is a relational aspect to learning.” There’s an invisible network (or potential network) underneath every learning community. The best MOOCs make the networks patent. The worst MOOCs are neutered, lost objects that float unabsolved in the ether as capital “L” Learning, abstract and decontextualized.

MOOCification: to harness (in an instant) the power of a nodal network for learning. Rather than creating a course to structure a network, MOOCification relies on nodes to power a learning activity (or assignment). MOOCification also refers to a pedagogical approach inspired by MOOCs that is unleashed in an otherwise closed or small-format course.

Chris Friend writes, in “Learning as Performance: MOOC Pedagogy and On-ground Classes”, “The promise of MOOCs lies not in what the format lets us do, but in what the format lets us question: Where does learning happen? What are the requirements of effective collaboration? How can assessment become more authentic? How much structure and direction are best in a classroom?” These questions stir and circle back upon themselves in endless repetition as we and everyone grapples with what the MOOC is and what it does. These are important questions, exactly the right ones at exactly the right time; but there’s a deeper one that underlies our conversation. The question that needs tending to now, as the furor around MOOCs builds to a roar.

Are organized attempts to harness learning always and necessarily frustrated? Does learning happen modally at all? Is learning the demesne of any institution, organization, or formal community; or does it happen regardless of these, unmonitored, unfettered, uncontrolled, and does the rise of the MOOC point to this? Have we created MOOCs, or have we just discovered them, emerging from their cave, where they’ve always lived? Is it, as Roger Whitson writes, that “there is nothing outside the MOOC”? Without threatening to spin into intellectual nihilism (or relativism), we need to worry for the entire enterprise of education, to be unnerved in order to uncover what’s going on now. And not now this year. But now exactly this moment. Because just this second something is awry.
True stability results when presumed order and presumed disorder are balanced. A truly stable system expects the unexpected, is prepared to be disrupted, waits to be transformed. ~ Tom Robbins

Pete Rorabaugh writes, “The analysis, remixing, and socially engaged construction of personally relevant knowledge — often happens when the institutional framework is disrupted, diverted, or left in the dust.” Many hackles are rightly raised by the ubiquity of this word “disruption”, and its implications for the business of higher education; but the best MOOCs do not deal in the bourgeois concept of disruption, they deal in a very real rupture that is confusing to us all. Something convulsive. A monstrous birth.

The MOOC is a dialectic. It invites us in with a curled finger, as sinister as it is salient.

Learning isn’t (and has never really been) in the hands of academics, administrators, institutions, corporations, Forbes magazine, the Chronicle of Higher Education. It’s in the hands of Rosemary Sewart, and people like her. The ones who come fully alive to learning without being told when and where it’s going to happen, without being placed obediently on a board like a pawn. The ones who throw wide the classroom doors, who hack schooling, or learn by reflecting on the flurry of input in their everyday lives; as Rosemary says, “learning … where life happens.”
We are all schoolmasters, and our schoolhouse is the universe. To attend chiefly to the desk or schoolhouse while we neglect the scenery in which it is placed is absurd. If we do not look out we shall find our fine schoolhouse standing in a cow-yard at last. ~ Henry David Thoreau

While we’ve all focused our consternation on how MOOCs may take down the walls of the university, or how they may represent the MOOCDonalds of higher ed., we are missing the most important, and most frightening, potential of MOOCs. They force us to reconsider the very fabric of how we think about learning — its occurrence, emergence, habitat, and administration.

From August 12th to August 18th, 2012, Hybrid Pedagogy ran MOOC MOOC, a now infamous mini-MOOC, meta-MOOC, MOOC about MOOCs that garnered not only a good bit of attention for its efforts, but also built a lasting community that remains curious about emerging ideas of MOOCification, the place of mini- and micro-MOOCs, and the implementation of open learning environments in traditional higher ed. classrooms. As well, MOOC MOOC set a precedent for MOOCish conversations about MOOCs, and spurred us to think deeply about where online education is headed.

It would be easy to contend, at this early stage in their evolution, that every MOOC has been a MOOC about MOOCs — that every MOOC is a meta-MOOC, a MOOC MOOC. The early connectivist MOOCs pioneered by folks like George Siemens and Stephen Downes were, whether explicitly or implicitly, exploring the form, the pedagogy, and the process of MOOCs.

At the same time, we were unaware of anyone who had done a MOOC unflinchingly trained on the MOOC phenomenon. A MOOC that explored unhesitatingly — even a bit recklessly — the potential, pitfalls, drawbacks, and advantages of this approach to teaching and learning. MOOC MOOC aimed to expose all of us to the grand experiment of MOOCs by having us participate directly in that grand experiment, albeit in a concentrated, one-week format. (And there was mighty participation. Andrew Staroscik created this interactive graph of tweet volume on the #moocmooc hashtag.) Rather than a knee-jerk critical reaction to the march of the MOOCs, we encouraged participants to inhabit the MOOC, exploring its pedagogical potential as an exercise in discernment but not judgment.

For one week beginning January 6, 2013, MOOC MOOC will return for a continued examination of the MOOC phenomenon, now grown well beyond a rising surge into a more perfect storm. This new iteration, which we’re fondly (and absurdly) calling MOOC MOOC [squared], will inspect not only the broadened landscape of MOOCs (including Coursera’s swelling presence and for-credit bid, Udacity’s flash mob-style on-ground gatherings, and the rise of LMS-based MOOCs like Instructure’s Canvas.net), but also will turn the lens on itself, repurposing and remixing the original course and the conversations and artifacts that arose from within the course. MOOC MOOC will be housed once more within the Canvas LMS, fueled by the ongoing discussions of the MOOC MOOC community.

There is no good or evil inherent in a MOOC, only in what it will or will not unleash. We must stop thinking of education as requiring stringent modes and constructs, and embrace it as invention, metamorphosis, deformation, and reinvention. This is the territory of the inventor always, the territory of the pugnacious and irreverent. Learning in MOOCs should be cohesive, not divided, and it must happen multi-nodally. The parsing of learning that formal education has always relied on will give way to something, if not holistic, then simultaneous, distributed, alive in more than one place at a time. If the best MOOCs show us that learning is networked, and that it has always been, then learning is more rampant than we’ve accounted for."
mooc  moocs  seanmichaelmorris  jessestommel  2012  education  highered  pedagogy  highereducation  dialectics  learning  howwelearn  teaching  howweteach  udacity  coursera  canvas.net  chrisfriend  edx  moocification  networkedlearning  networks  rogerwhitson  tomrobbins  thoreau  rosemarystewart  hybridpedagogy  georgesiemens  stephendownes  connectivism 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Learning’s first principle – the most important thing i learned this year ~ Stephen's Web
"I see education less as an enterprise in making people do what they don't want to do, and more as one of helping people do what they want to do. And there's something wrong with the selection mechanism when a student can pay and spend four years at a university and still not be engaged in learning."
stephendownes  2014  education  learning  caring  howweteach  pedagogy  purpose 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Reclaiming Innovation
"Udell notes: "There's a reason I keep finding novel uses for these trailing-edge technologies. I see them not as closed products and services, but rather as toolkits that invite their users to adapt and extend them.""

"Rather than framing everything at the course level, we should be deploying these technologies for the individual."

"Viewed as a whole, the web today bears little resemblance to the innately democratic and decentralized network that seduced and enticed us a decade ago."

"Railing against the academy's failure to embrace a perceived risk can be dismal fun for many of us, but an honest appraisal of our own missteps has to be in the mix."
2014  jimgroom  brianlamb  audreywatters  internet  web  highered  highereducation  it  ict  technology  mooc  moocs  disruption  open  edupunk  lms  openpublishing  publishing  adomainofone'sown  diy  decentralization  anildash  georgesiemens  stephendownes  jonudell  benjaminbratton  vendors  silos  security  privacy  venturecapital  tonyhirst  timberners-lee  bryanalexander  openness  reclaimhosting  indieweb 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Open Ed 12 - Gardner Campbell Keynote - Ecologies of Yearning - YouTube
[See also: https://storify.com/audreywatters/ecologies-of-yearning-and-the-future-of-open-educa ]

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steps_to_an_Ecology_of_Mind and
PDF http://www.edtechpost.ca/readings/Gregory%20Bateson%20-%20Ecology%20of%20Mind.pdf ]

[References these videos by a student: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmFL4Khu2yJoR0Oq5dcY5pw ]

[via: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:e91b15f323b8

"In his keynote at the 2012 OpenEd conference, Gardner Campbell, an Associate Professor of English at Virginia Tech, talked about the “Ecologies of Yearning.” (Seriously: watch the video.) Campbell offered a powerful and poetic vision about the future of open learning, but noted too that there are competing visions for that future, particularly from the business and technology sectors. There are competing definitions of “open” as well, and pointing to the way in which “open” is used (and arguably misused) by education technology companies, Campbell’s keynote had a refrain, borrowed from “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”: “That is not it at all. That is not what I meant, at all.”"]

"30:29 Bateson's Hierarchy of learning

30:52 Zero Learning:"receipt of signal". No error possible

31:37 Learning I: "change in specificity of response by correction of errors of choice within a set of alternatives". Palov, etc. Habituation, adaptation.

32:16 Learning II: Learning-to-learn, context recognition, "corrective change in the set of alternatives from which choice is made, or.. in how the sequence of experience is punctuated". Premises are self-validating.

34:23 Learning III: Meta-contextual perspective, imagining and shifting contexts of understanding. "a corrective change in the system of sets of alternatives from which choice is made" Puts self at risk. Questions become explosive.

36:22 Learning IV: change to level III, "probably does not occur in any adult living organisms on this earth"

38:59 "Double bind"

44:49 Habits of being that might be counter-intuitive

51:49 Participant observers constructed Wordles of students' blogs"

[Comment from Céline Keller:

"This is my favorite talk online: Open Ed 12 - Gardner Campbell Keynote - Ecologies of Yearning +Gardner Campbell

This is what I wrote about it 7 month ago:

"Academia is to knowledge what prostitution is to love; close enough on the surface but, to the nonsucker, not exactly the same thing." Nassim Nicholas Taleb

If you care about education and learning don't miss listening to Gardner Campbell!

As described on the #edcmooc resource page:

"(This lecture)...serves as a warning that what we really want - our utopia - is not necessarily to be found in the structures we are putting in place (or finding ourselves within)."
Love it."

I still mean it. This is great, listen."]

[More here: http://krustelkrammoocs.blogspot.com/2013/02/gardner-campbell-sense-of-wonder-how-to.html ]
2012  gardnercampbell  nassimtaleb  academia  web  participatory  learning  howwelearn  hierarchyoflearning  love  habituation  adaption  open  openeducation  coursera  gregorybateson  udacity  sebastianthrun  mooc  moocs  georgesiemens  stephendownes  davecormier  carolyeager  aleccouros  jimgroom  audreywatters  edupunk  jalfredprufrock  missingthepoint  highered  edx  highereducation  tseliot  rubrics  control  assessment  quantification  canon  administration  hierarchy  hierarchies  pedagogy  philosophy  doublebind  paranoia  hepephrenia  catatonia  mentalhealth  schizophrenia  life  grades  grading  seymourpapert  ecologiesofyearning  systems  systemsthinking  suppression  context  education  conditioning  pavlov  gamification  freedom  liberation  alankay  human  humans  humanism  agency  moreofthesame  metacontexts  unfinished  ongoing  lifelonglearning  cognition  communication  networkedtranscontextualism  transcontextualism  transcontextualsyndromes  apgartest  virginiaapgar  howweteach  scottmccloud  michaelchorost  georgedyson  opening  openness  orpheus  experience  consciousness  pur 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The MOOC of One
"I want to begin by asking the question, "What does it mean to be one person?" What does it mean to be, say, Valencian? What does it mean to be a doctor? We have this intuitive idea that we think we understand when we begin to educate someone, we're going to make somebody a doctor, but what does that mean? I'm not sure we even know, and a major part of the reason we developed the MOOC is to challenge our thinking around some of these ideas.

In the traditional course, and that includes the traditional online course as well as the traditional offline course in traditional education (Pape talked about it as well) we have this idea that there is the authority at the center who will throw content at you - lots of content, piles of books, piles of video, and hope some of it sticks.

Even the MOOCs, the Massive Open Online Courses, that have followed the MOOCs that were developed by George Siemens and myself, the courses offered by Khan Academy, Coursera, Udacity, Udemy, and the rest are all based on the idea of some body of content.

Is being one being the same? That's kind of a hard question. It's not even clear what I mean when I ask that. Let's take doctors. Does being a doctor mean having exactly the same knowledge as every other doctor? No.



When we design these MOOCs, we realized every single person taking our course is going to be different. Some use Internet Explorer, some of them use Firefox, some use Opera, who knows why, some even use Safari (and nothing works in Safari! [laughter]). Different languages, different cultures. Some people want to get the knowledge, some people want to socialize, some people want to meet other people."



"In our MOOCs, there's no constructor of things. MOOCs (and people) are self‑organizing networks that process and organize perceptions in a natural automatic way given that they are provided proper nutrition, diversity, openness, autonomy, and the rest.

From the student's perspective, if they're taking the MOOCs - reflect on your own experience here for a second - they're right at the center. Goodness, they might even be taking more than one MOOC at a time. From different institutions at the same time, I know it's heresy but they might be doing that. They might be communicating on WordPress or on Flickr delicious, posting videos on YouTube, but they're always at the center of their Internet sphere.

That's basically how we, in developing the next phase - remember I promised a new technology after MOOCs - but here is what it looks like. It's really MOOCs Mark II, but now we're telling the story from the perspective, not of the education provider, but from the perspective of the individuals who are participating in the learning.

We understand that they are perceiving and reasoning self‑organizing networks. They will be coming into this with that capacity, but with those needs, and therefore what we're attempting to do, we're creating something called learning and performance support system (I'm really sorry about the name) to provide that measure of support."



"And finally to be one is to be you. Now, everybody talked about massive open online learning. I don't care about the massiveness of open online learning. It's important - that there are seven billion people in the planet, whatever we do has got to work for everyone of them - but it's only going to work for every one of them, one person at a time. There's no other way of doing it. 

 There's no other way of doing it because there's no other way that's going to be genuine. There's no other way that's going to be effective. What makes the MOOCs special is that each person taking the MOOCs makes it their own. They create and shape their own learning according to thier own needs and their own interests, their own values, their own objectives. And that to me is what learning and education is all about."
stephendownes  mooc  moocs  scale  2014  self-directed  self-directedlearning  learning  education  georgesiemens  self-organizedlearning  individuality  individualized  participatory  networks  networkededucation  audiencesofone 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Technology Integration in K-12
Q: I'm curious as to what you think the three most important things for new
teachers to know about technology integration in k-12?

"1. Community - teaching can be a lonely profession, and it's easy to think you face problems nobody else faces. One of the greatest aspect of the internet is its ability to connect people who are isolated in just that way. A teacher who is able to find an online network will find support and resources. The exact technology doesn't matter much, and has evolved over the years, from the days of email mailing lists, to community bulletin boards, to social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook.

2. Educational Resources - you want your use of the internet to be of practical value, and typically that means finding a quick and easy way to find resources for your classes. It is often a lot easier to find something than to create something. But it's important to do something better than just searching on Google; that can drain more time than you can imagine. Communities often support resource-sharing sites, or members can at least point to one.

3. Course Tools - the original LMS was called 'Web Course Tools' and the name was apt, because the desire here is to provide access to tools that make teaching in a class easier. Simple course tools can be one of the teacher's greatest assets - a place to store course documents and handhouts, to keep records and possibky grades, to develop a profile over time on each student. These tools *may* be accessible by students, in classes that have good technology integration, but the greatest value will be to help the teacher stay organized.

You'll note that I haven't included any presentation tools, like online video, or talked about having the whole class use blogs or Facebook. That's because of the question you asked, which focuses on new teachers and technology integration in the classroom. It is in my mind unwise to attempt to use technology to teach until after you have already learned to use technology for personal development and productivity.

This is partially because it is essential to develop an easy facility with technology before using it in the classroom, and partially because teachers without that experience tend to use technology as a type of television (or presentation tool). But as can be seen from the three points above, technology for personal learning and development is about connecting to community, leaning to find resources, and supporting improved productivity."
community  tools  lms  education  teaching  learning  technology  professionaldevelopment  presentations  stephendownes 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The Robot Teachers
"There is an ongoing and incessant campaign afoot to privatize education. In the United States, education is almost the last bastion of public expenditure. In Canada, both health care and education face the forces of privatization and commercialization.

The results are wholly predictable. In all cases, the result will be a system that favours a small moneyed elite and leaves the rest of the population struggling to obtain whatever health and education they can obtain with their meagre holdings. As more wealth accumulates in the hands of the corporations and the wealthy, the worse health and education outcomes become for the less well-off in society.

(Indeed, from my perspective, one of the greatest scams perpetrated by the wealthy about the education system is that it has a liberal bias. …)"

But here's where the challenge arises for the education and university system: it was designed to support income inequality and designed to favour the wealthy."
via:tealtan  economics  policy  politics  schooling  oligarchy  wealth  wealthy  sorting  tonybates  liberalbias  criticalthinking  higherorderskills  texas  california  corporations  corporatism  bias  corruption  influence  wealthdistribution  poverty  inequity  disparity  capitalism  adaptivelearningsystems  mitx  udemy  coursera  learninganalytics  programmedlearning  universalhealthcare  healthcare  deschooling  publiceducation  onlinelearning  canon  cv  technology  scriptedlearning  robotteachers  democracy  highereducation  highered  moocs  pedagogy  hierarchies  hierarchy  inequality  schools  education  privatization  privilege  us  canad  2012  stephendownes  mooc 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Badges: talking at cross purposes? ~ Stephen's Web
"The world is a complex place. The only way to deal with it is is to simply - to create abstractions, or as I would say, to identify and recognize patterns in the phenomena. When we teach, we often take the short-cut of teaching these simplifications directly, rather than having students identify and recognize them for themselves. This may be more efficient - there's no shortage of studies that show this - but each time we teach a simplification, we make it harder for students to recognize new or alternative patterns in the same phenomena. But complex phenomena are dynamic, changing, and the simplifications are rarely valid for long. It's better to learn how to recognize patterns for oneself, to cope with this changing phenomena. The use of badges to recognize learning exaggereates that problem, because badges tend to privilege the learning of simplifications."

[Click through for references.]
2012  abstraction  badges  dougbelshaw  terrywassall  davecormier  criticalthinking  efficiency  simplicity  complexity  patterns  patternrecognition  stephendownes 
april 2012 by robertogreco
elearnspace › A few simple tools I want edu-startups to build [Quote is just one of three tools discussed]
"Geoloqi for curriculum…it combines your location with information layers. For example, if you activate the Wikipedia layer, you’ll receive updates when you are in a vicinity of a site based on a wikipedia article. One of the challenges with traditional classroom learners is the extreme disconnect between courses and concepts. Efforts to connect across subject silos are minimal. However, connections between ideas and concepts amplifies the value of individual elements. If I’m taking a course in political history, receiving in-context links and texts when I’m near an important historical site would be helpful in my learning. Mobile devices are critical in blurring boundaries: virtual/physical worlds, formal/informal learning."
georgesiemens  stephendownes  geoloqi  geolocation  rss  email  grsshopper  visualization  2011  informallearning  learning  education  patternrecognition  sensemaking  connections  place  meaning  mobilelearning  atemporality  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  wikipedia  media  context  location 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Access :: Future — Practical Advice on How to Learn and What to Learn an e-book by Stephen Downes ~ Stephen's Web
"Anya Kamenetz responds to my review saying "I've never read anything you've written (& yes, I've read plenty of your writing) that would be particularly useful, comprehensible or interesting to a bright 19 year old like Weezie, much less a 64 year old trying to earn a community college degree, like Melvin Doran, the LearnerWeb participant." Given all the practical advice I've offered in this space over the years, this seems a bit unfair. <br />
Still, recognizing that it would be helpful were my advice offered in one place, I offer a compilation of my popular & useful work:

Access :: Future Practical Advice on How to Learn and What to Learn an e-book by Stephen Downes http://www.downes.ca/files/AccessFuture.pdf

This is just one book. I also have a ton of other material on really practical hands-on stuff…which I'll compile & post some time in the future. & maybe I'll release the 'open education' book, the 'connectivism' book, etc. in the weeks ahead, if there's any demand for it."
stephendownes  education  learning  autodidacts  online  ebooks  toread  unschooling  deschooling  2011  anyakamenetz  connectivism  howto  diy  edupunk 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Review: The Edupunks' Guide, by Anya Kamenetz
"I have now had the chance to read The Edupunks' Guide and can now form some opinions based on what I've seen. And if I were forced to summarize my critique in a nutshell, it would be this. Edupunk, as described by the putative subculture, is the idea of 'learning by doing it yourself'. The Edupunks' Guide, however, describes 'do-it-yourself learning'. The failure to appreciate the difference is a significant weakness of the booklet."
education  learning  diy  edupunk  diyu  anyakamenetz  stephendownes  subculture  2011  onlinelearning  autodidacts 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Discussion: The Edupunks' Guide [See the rest of the thread, which is likely to continue expanding.]
"When I read the title of the book, I immediately thought this was yet another example of how (formerly radical) subcultures are put to work to valorize and bring the practices of everyday life under capital.

It would be interesting to know whether and how the author of this book addresses this potential contradiction. Personally, I see punk and other oppositional subcultures as expressing and disclosing forms of life and self-learning that are powerful precisely because they are informal, uncodified and untranslatable into student credits.

In this case, there is also the additional risk that the DIY attitude may be mobilized as a form of endorsement "from below" of the rising online education industry sponsored by Republican governors such as Tim Pawlenty and Rick Perry. Or even worst to justify government cuts to spending in lower and higher education. After all, if we no longer need schools to learn why should we use taxpayers money for education?…"
anyakamenetz  edupunk  reform  policy  politics  stephendownes  jimgroom  marcodeseriis  mikecaufield  2011  appropriation  punk  radicalism  radicals  valorization  monetization  capitalism  capital  contradiction  subcultures  self-directedlearning  self-learning  unschooling  deschooling  spending  education  informal  informallearning  highereducation  highered 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Lurking is Not a Static State ~ Stephen's Web
"Adding to some of the recent discussion on lurking in online learning, Sahana Chattopadhyay questions the "pejorative connotations" of lurking and points to Wenger, White and Smith's concept of "legitimate peripheral participation... a crucial process by which communities offer learning opportunities to those on the periphery." Valuable lurking behaviours include active lurking, where they "may take something from the community and pass it along to others using different channels," and network building through the creation of commonality. This points to the key role of lurking. "By virtue of being distant from the core of the activities, they may spread themselves thinly across multiple communities and are in the key position to know what is happening where." Good post, well researched."

[Summary of this article: http://idreflections.blogspot.com/2011/07/lurking-is-not-static-state.html ]
lurking  stephendownes  community  communities  online  peripheralparticipation  behavior  networks  commonality  discussion  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - George Siemens on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
"George Siemens, at the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca Universityhas been running "Massive Open Online Courses" (MOOCs). I talk to him about what a MOOC is, how it works, and the educational philosophy behind it."
mooc  socialnetworking  opensource  connectivism  social  georgesiemens  howardrheingold  via:steelemaley  online  internet  networkedlearning  teaching  learning  education  moodle  elluminate  distributed  connectedlearners  connectedlearning  connectedness  grasshopper  stephendownes  sensemaking  messiness  self-directedlearning  self-directed  moocs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Twitter / @Downes: Why is curation wrong? Bec ...
"Why is curation wrong? Because it's not subtractive. Learning is not about filtering and organizing resources, it's about tearing them apart"
stephendownes  learning  curating  curation  resources  deconstruction  organization  subtractive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
CCK11: Educurator? « Connexions
"As a teacher/tutor, I will…create the space where learning can happen…create conditions that highlight know-how and “know-where.”…welcome learner interests…curate materials that learners may not know…model and demonstrate particular skills or approaches…enable learners to reflect and practice those skills or approaches…allow learners to teach each other (and me)…am extremely busy being present (an attentiveness to the network itself )."
connectivism  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  stephendownes  sugatamitra  via:steelemaley  curation  curating  learning  schools  presence  cv  studentdirected  interestdriven  modeling  accessibility  sharing  community  howwelearn  howwework  educurator  generalists  reflection 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Seven Habits of Highly Connected People ~ Stephen's Web
1. Be Reactive: …some time listening and getting the lay of the land. Then, your forays into creating content should be as reactions to other people's points of view…It's about connecting…

2. Go With The Flow:  When connecting online, it is more important to find the places to which you can add value rather than pursue a particular goal/objective…

3. Connection Comes First:  If you don't have enough time for reading email, writing blog posts, or posting to discussion lists, ask yourself what other activities you are doing that are cutting in to your time…

4. Share: The way to function in a connected world is to share without thinking about what you will get in return…

5. RTFM: "Read The Fine Manual"…means… people should make the effort to learn for themselves before seeking instruction from others…

6. Cooperate: …online communications are much more voluntary than offline communications…successful online connectors recognize this.…know the protocols…

7. Be Yourself…"

[via: http://steelemaley.posterous.com/greco ]
collaboration  socialnetworking  connectivism  education  stephendownes  ego  howto  advice  connectivity  online  internet  etiquette  netiquette  learning  2008  flow  cooperation  sharing  rtfm  self  identity 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Welcome to CCK11 ~ CCK11
"Connectivism & Connective Knowledge is an open online course that over 12 weeks explores the concepts of connectivism and connective knowledge and explore their application as a framework for theories of teaching and learning. Participation is open to everyone and there are no fees or subscriptions required.

The course will outline a connectivist understanding of educational systems of the future. It will help participants make sense of the transformative impact of technology in teaching and learning over the last decade. The voices calling for reform do so from many perspectives, with some suggesting 'new learners' require different learning models, others suggesting reform is needed due to globalization and increased competition, and still others suggesting technology is the salvation for the shortfalls evident in the system today. While each of these views tell us about the need for change, they overlook the primary reasons why change is required…"
connectivism  stephendownes  georgesiemens  elearning  learning  free  freelearning  deschooling  unschooling  informallearning  mooc  lcproject  pedagogy  education  moocs 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Apple (2010) Global crisis, social justice, and education
"Apple et al. use four regional case studies, the US, Japan, the Israel|Palestinian state , and Latin America to prove that critical educators (teachers, researchers, learners) and social movements are needed to countervail the neo-liberal, and neo-conservative designs (against social justice and progressive education) surfacing as reform movements around the world as entrenched facets of globalization."
deschooling  networkedlearning  freelearning  democracy  michaelapple  justice  neoliberalism  neo-conservative  reform  teaching  democratic  schools  education  learning  society  lcproject  activism  thomassteele-maley  criticaleducation  criticalthinking  leighblackall  florianschneider  stephendownes  georgesiemens  jamesbeane  curriculum  tcsnmy  progressive  humanism  humanity  unschooling 
february 2011 by robertogreco
RSS Is <s>Dying</s> Being Ignored, and You Should Be Very Worried ~ Stephen's Web
"Before getting too wrapped up in those wunderapplications now available on iPads and Blackberries, and before putting too much stock in Facebook and Twitter for your sourcing of online content, it may serve you well to heed the observations in this post. As the author notes, Firefox has basically killed the RSS subscription button, Chrome has no RSS reader, and the browsers are basically turning their backs on content syndication. And "if RSS dies, we lose the ability to read in private," argues Asa Dotzler. And I don't think it's a coincidence, either. As Kent Newsome writes in Why Big Media Wants to Kill RSS, "they can't make as much money if we read their content our way... as they can if they can force us to read it their way- at their site, complete with scads of browser-clogging tracking scripts and ads galore." Nor can they control the influence of competition from hundreds of smaller sites."
rss  web  internet  stephendownes 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Deinstitutionalizing education
"In 'Is What's Good for Corporate America Still Good For America?' Bruce Nussbaum ran though # of reasons why people are losing faith in corporations in US.…his list…has a wider applicability to institutions in general, including…governmental agencies, schools & universities.

People today are beginning to realize that solution of problem of institutional excess does not lie in creation of more institutions…solution to problem of corruption of mass movements does not lie in creation of yet another mass movement…solution to problems of greed & entitlement in our leaders & elites does not lie in creation of more leaders & elites…way to end war is to cease waging war; way to free us of our chains is to cease forging chains. We secure our own right in society by securing right of each & every member of society, by working not as in a bond, but by virtue of free association, of cooperative exchange of mutual value, with natural limits to the right to own, & possess, & control."

[Referring to: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2010/10/is_whats_good_for_corporate_am.html ]
stephendownes  brucenussbaum  organizations  institutions  learning  education  deschooling  unschooling  outsourcing  business  trust  greed  corruption  anarchism  democracy  ingratitude  freeassociation  cooperation  society  government  deinstitutionalization 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: What Is Democracy In Education [Four Principles]
"Autonomy: …Wherever possible, learners should be guided, and able to guide themselves, according to their own goals, purposes, objectives or values…

Diversity: …The intent and design of such a system should not be to in some way make everybody the same, but rather to foster creativity and diversity among its members, so that each person in a society instantiates, and represents, a unique perspective, based on personal experience and insight, constituting a valuable contribution to the whole.

Openness: …People should be able to freely enter and leave the system, and there ought to be a free flow of ideas and artifacts within the system…

Interactivity: …This is a recognition both that learning results from a process of immersion in a community or society, and second that the knowledge of that community or society, even that resulting from individual insight, is a product of the cumulative interactions of the society as a whole…"
autonomy  diversity  interactivity  openness  stephendownes  education  systems  unschooling  deschooling  learning  democracy  democratic  society  power  freedom  compulsory  relationships  communication  motivation  pedagogy  lcproject  tcsnmy 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Borderland › Raising the Black Flag
[Wayback link: http://web.archive.org/web/20120128151527/http://borderland.northernattitude.org/2010/10/26/raising-the-black-flag/ ]

"I’ve not studied anarchism as a political theory or philosophy before, nor the history of anarchism, so I’ve been reading up on it. & I find that anarchists are a fairly diverse group. Good thing, because there may be new opportunities for anarcho-educationists opening up soon, w/ all the teacher bashing that’s been happening in the media lately. I’ve been torn between keeping my head down or telling the bean counters to measure THIS, and let me get back to work.

Today the Dept. of Education issued an edict condemning bullying: [quote here]

Interesting, considering their support for mass firings of teachers, “rigorous interventions”, termination of teacher tenure rights, public humiliation of teachers in LA (via Larry Ferlazzo), and recommending hurricanes over public deliberation when you want to tear down a community’s schools. They should clean up their own house before they start pointing fingers…"

[Some book recommendations in the comments]

"I recommend reading Rebel in Paradise, by Richard Drinnon, about Emma Goldman.
http://www.amazon.com/Rebel-Paradise-Biography-Emma-Goldman/dp/B0000CL99G

I also recommend Starhawk’s Webs of Power
http://www.starhawk.org/writings/webspower.html
http://www.amazon.com/Webs-Power-Starhawk/dp/1897408137 "

"I recommend The Modern School Movement — http://www.amazon.com/Modern-School-Movement-Anarchism-Education/dp/1904859097 "
anarchy  namchompsky  alanmoore  anarchism  dougnoon  bullying  policy  barackobama  politics  society  hypocrisy  capitalism  privilege  privatization  paulgoodman  individualism  democratic  stephendownes  books  emmagoldman  richarddrinnon  margaretsanger  alexanderberkman  manray 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Stephen Downes: A World to Change
"But more than that: we need, first, to take charge of our own learning, and next, help others take charge of their own learning. We need to move beyond the idea that an education is something that is provided for us, and toward the idea that an education is something that we create for ourselves. It is time, in other words, that we change out attitude toward learning and the educational system in general.

That is not to advocate throwing learners off the bus to fend for themselves. It is hard to be self-reliant, to take charge of one's own learning, and people shouldn't have to do it alone. It is instead to articulate a way we as a society approach education and learning, beginning with an attitude, though the development of supports and a system, through to the techniques and technologies that support that…

it's about a complete redesign of the system, from the ground up, using new technologies and new ideas…change does not come from the system."

[See also: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/a-turn-of-the-phrases/ ]
stephendownes  education  unschooling  deschooling  policy  reform  schools  schooling  learning  teaching  huffingtonpost  humanities  openeducation  distancelearning  21stcenturylearning  edtech  connectivism  self-directedlearning  autodidacts  lcproject  tcsnmy  change  gamechanging 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Effective Assessment in a Digital Age ~ Stephen's Web
"What does effective assessment look like in the digital age? This post links to a guide to technology-enhanced assessment and feedback (PDF, 64 pages) as well as a podcast. There's a lot of good stuff here, including for example an articulation of four major perspectives on assessment: associative, constructivist, social constructivist, and situative (see the diagram below). This is an excellent report, full of examples, case studies, and practical guides."
assessment  stephendownes  constructivism  socialconstructivism  situationist  association  teaching  learning  education  tcsnmy  lcproject 
september 2010 by robertogreco
The Staged Self-Directed Learning Model ~ Stephen's Web
"This presentation on Gerald Grow's staged self-directed learning model came up during today's Critical Literacies online discussion. It "proposes a way teachers can be vigorously influential while empowering students towards greater autonomy." The ideas is to map teaching methods to the learner's stage of self-direction. Grow describes four stages: dependent, interested, involved, self-directed. Of course, the model depends on getting the trajectory toward self-directed learning right. It does not account for multiple dimensions (and hence, multiple possible routes) to autonomy. But we saw today, in Paul Bouchard, that there can be as many as four dimensions of autonomy: conative, algorithmic, semiotic, and economic."
paulbouchard  stephendownes  geraldgrow  barbarastokes  self-directedlearning  self-directed  tcsnmy  autonomy  teaching  empowerment  dependent  interested  interestedness 
july 2010 by robertogreco
csessums.com » Blog Archive » Generation Meh: Empathy and College Students Today
"The implications for reported low empathy findings are complex. For teachers, the Times article & report provide an opportunity to discuss these findings w/ their students. The key here is opening up an opportunity for dialog w/ students allowing them to share their thoughts on the issue of empathy. Keeping a journal that shows what kids are doing w/ their time outside school & a class discussion around their findings might also be useful & revealing to students. Role-playing is another safe & pro-social way to engage students in a discussion which, in turn, can help deepen their knowledge of empathy & empathetic behavior. While these suggested activities only scratch the surface, developing empathy & empathetic behavior is a critical skill that cannot be overlooked. If we want this depressing news regarding empathy in children & young adults to change, then we need to act now. If we don’t, as the Times article suggests, “don’t expect the next generation to sigh over it, too.”
empathy  narcissism  entitlement  netgen  generations  students  culture  ego  christophersessums  stephendownes  society  millennials 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Collaboration and Cooperation
"I believe that you can draw a connection between the two distinctions. Collaboration belongs to groups, while cooperation is typical of a network. The significant difference is that, in the former, the individual is subsumed under the whole, and becomes a part of the whole, which is created by conjoining a collection of largely identical members, while in the latter, the individual retains his or her individuality, while the whole is an emergent property of the collection of individuals.

I have identified four major dimensions distinguishing the role of the individual in collaboration from the role of the individual in cooperation: ...

In terms of freedom, it is my belief that a cooperative network engenders greater freedom. This is because..."
collaboration  stephendownes  cooperation  groups  networks  networktheory 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Commentary: Why are so many research papers on serious games so boring? ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Clark Aldrich is quite right to wonder why people don't model the strategies they advocate. "My biggest gripe is how can a person unabashedly present information that breaks every rule they praise? How can a 400 page book containing one case study after another conclude that interactivity and dynamic content is necessary for effective learning? How can a lecturer drone on and on about the wonderfulness of social networks because they reward the individuality of the user, and still wait until the end to solicit questions?" In my own case - 90 percent of the teaching and learning I do, I do right here, on my website. Talks and stuff add some multimedia to the content. My site isn't a game because I'm not really advocating games. It is (a node in) a professional community, and that's what I model."
modeling  teaching  learning  tcsnmy  seriousgames  delivery  practice  advocacy  stephendownes 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The Most Important Question (2)
"From my own perspective, I don't see constructivist methodology to be a whole lot more liberating than traditional instruction. Students still receive a great deal of direction from the instructor. They are not free to pursue an alternative learning methodology. This is especially the case when the students are younger, but still applies in adult learning." ... "The models we learn from need not be human. There is, for example, a long and viable history of learning from, and studying, and emulating, nature. Much of my own learning takes place in this way. Other forms of learning even in social contexts may be supported not by interaction, but simply by observation."
education  learning  ideas  control  lms  stephendownes  constructivism  interaction  observation  modeling 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The Most Important Question
"I was asked, what are the most important questions that need to be resolved during, say, the next five or so years? There's only one: under what conditions can a learner manage his or her own learning? ... there is globally an even increasing onslaught of rich media and other content, including even inside schools, which is intended not to educate or to inform, but to sway or to sell. Against this, especially in web 2.0 circles, there is a school of thought modeled loosely along the lines of Freire's 'Pedagogy of the Oppressed' which suggests that people, working for their own benefit & creating their own association, can take charge of their own learning, and hence, their own understanding of the world. If it possible for people to effectively mount a counter to propaganda or corporate-based 'content learning' on their own, or is some manner of public intervention required, and to what scale."
education  future  stephendownes  trends  thinking  paulofreire  2010  highered  tcsnmy  lcproject  learning  self-directedlearning  economics  media 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Questioning Pedagogy
"my view on learning...is centered around richness & diversity of the learning experience. I am interested in the sorts of experiences that will manifest themselves in useful dispositions (or habits of mind) across a wide spectrum of disciplines, where these dispositions are not taught as content, but rather, acquired as habits, through repeated exercise in increasingly challenging environments. Thus learning (& pedagogy) as I see it is more about the development or creations of capacities (such as the capacity to learn, capacity to reason, capacity to communicate, etc) where these capacities are (again) not 'subjects' but rather complex developments of neural structures - more like 'mental muscles' than anything else...you can focus on a certain muscle, or you can focus on a certain sport, but only at the expense of your wider fitness - & a cross-training approach would be more appropriate.

The role of technology is to place learners into these environments."
learning  pedagogy  information  stephendownes  personallearning  unschooling  deschooling  experience  tcsnmy  technology  dispositions  habitsofmind  teaching  workshop  cognition  bootcamp 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Student-led learning at Calgary school draws interest from Down Under ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
""The ability to let students decide how to approach their subjects encourages them to take ownership of their learning, said Danis. 'The more choice you give kids, the deeper the learning is,' he said." You know, people say I'm just an idealist for promoting student-directed learning, but I've been pointing to successful examples for years, and I've come to think that the impractical idealists are those who cling to the old and outmoded models of instruction in the faith that, unlike last year, it will work this year."
education  learning  self-directedlearning  self-directed  student-led  studentdirected  stephendownes  schools  schooling  alternative  change  idealism  tradition  lcproject  tcsnmy 
november 2009 by robertogreco
PhD: to what end? ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"The authors argue that philosophy grads from Canadian universities are at a disadvantage in landing tenure-track jobs. I never did finish my PhD in philosophy, but I spent five years pursuing it. One of the things that led me to move on to other things after I had written my dissertation proposal was the evident fact that people (and especially men) with the degrees simply weren't being hired; some very very good people were simply being shuffled through the system as sessionals and the rest just disappeared. "There is a deep incoherence here," write Groarke and Fenske. If a department considers a Canadian PhD a liability, how can it, in good conscience, busy itself producing more Canadian PhDs?" Of course, I did value my studies in philosophy (they prepared me for my current work). I just came to (deeply) mistrust the academic system that ostensibly offered me the education."
education  phd  stephendownes  markets  economics  employment  careers  philosophy  academia 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Leigh Blackall: On connectivism
"challenge...is to educationally consider the culture being recorded in these mediascapes, in such a way so as to ask...more than the obvious (& pointless) questions..."how can we use these tools to do what we're doing more effectively?" Questions like this miss bigger issue. In depth engagement w/ social media seems to lead many educators to the question, "is what I am doing even relevant anymore? what is my new relationship to this culture - if it becomes dominant in my society?" Journalism has asked itself, entertainment industry has, retail sector has, government arena is asking itself, why not the education sector? So far, too few of us are asking these questions, fewer still are exploring answers. But can we find & measure learning evidence in Social Media that is disciplined enough to warrant such serious rethinking in our institutionalised practices? Given that the work we do is economically protected & market regulated, what will the motivation be for asking such a question?"
leighblackall  connectivism  education  ivanillich  stephendownes  change  retail  government  socialmedia  media  journalism  entertainment  technology  internet  online  gamechanging  learning  learningtheory  theory  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  youtube  wikipedia  detachment  isolation  mediascapes  culture  society  irrelevance  reform 
november 2009 by robertogreco
The Higher Educational Bubble Continues to Grow ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Higher education, writes Karl Kapp, is in the grip of a bubble. The signs?

- core mission and fundamentals are ignored
- disproportionate compensation at the highest levels
- product value doesn't match marketplace expectations
- prices are manipulated without regard to market supply and demand
- perception of exclusivity
- a delusion that "this market is different"

I have long affirmed that such a crisis is coming and that it would arrive very suddenly after being years in the making. It is now very close - within a matter of months. 2010 some time, maybe (at the outside) 2011, at least in North America. Funding will dry up, there will be significant staff reductions, institutions will merge or close, and administrators will be desperate for alternatives. Not just in education, but education will be very hard hit, and at all levels."
education  future  stephendownes  highereducation  colleges  universities  2009  2010  crisis  bubbles 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Streams of Content, Limited Attention: The Flow of Information through Social Media ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
""For the longest time," writes danah boyd, "we have focused on sites of information as a destination, of accessing information as a process, of producing information as a task. What happens when all of this changes? While things are certainly clunky at best, this is the promise land of the technologies we're creating... This metaphor is powerful. The idea is that you're living inside the stream: adding to it, consuming it, redirecting it. The stream metaphor is about reaching flow. It's also about restructuring the ways in which information flows in modern society."
danahboyd  stephendownes  flow  information  socialmedia  media  power  democracy  homophily  clustering  reaction  stimulation  access  reflection 
november 2009 by robertogreco
California Is Burning ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"This is the leading edge of the crisis in education that is coming. A staggering 32 percent tuition increase - which will be nowhere near enough - has students in the streets. "The misery of tens of millions in every sector of the public -- in education, health, income security, could be swept away if we forced more bankers and executives to live like teachers and nurses for a year or two. That pent-up misery is volatile, though, and starting to flow around the feet of the bankers. More and more of us are waking up to one thought: It's the capitalism, stupid!" More on the occupation movement, students call it the death of public education, reaction from the right, Change.org, some snark from Kevin Carey, coverage from Jezebel, Inside Higher Ed, some good graphics from 10,000 words."
stephendownes  california  crisis  education  universities  colleges  publiceducation  tuition  2009 
november 2009 by robertogreco
When Innovation Gets Difficult ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"David Wiley comments on innovation in institutions. "Imposing your will on bits and bytes is "easy." Leading an established institution through the valley of the shadow of reform and up the opposite bank toward innovation is "hard." But it is absolutely critical work, and precious few people are in positions that afford them opportunities to provide this kind of leadership." My own take on the reason for this is that the process that select for "leaders" select people who precisely are not innovative. The greatest predictor for promotion in an organization is obedience. Creative thinkers are filtered out early in the process. That's why I still prefer to work outside the organizational framework - life is too short to spend trying to persuade people conditioned to conformity."
leadership  management  administration  change  innovation  obedience  tcsnmy  organizations  conformity  risk  institutions  stephendownes 
november 2009 by robertogreco
25 practical ideas for using Mobile Phones in the Classroom ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Good list of ideas, credited to Doug Belshaw (here is his new blog location). A lot of people promote the use of mobile phones in learning. But here's my take: I want to see something like a cost-analysis on this. How much does using a mobile phone (with unlimited data transfer, at decent (3G or better) speeds) as compared to using (free?) wifi and a netbook? Or as compared to a typical desktop with DSL or cable? Also, I would like to see a study of how much freedom a mobile phone user has to use software and access content as compared to a computer user. We're getting a lot of promotion for mobile phones - but honestly, I think moving in this direction in any serious way would be a big mistake."
mobile  phones  mobilelearning  education  stephendownes  mlearning 
november 2009 by robertogreco
We are Professionals, Aren't We? ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"I don't always agree with Will Thalheimer, but I think he mostly nails it with this list demonstrating the ways educators do not act as professionals:

- Our graduate schools prepare technicians, not thoughtful scientist-practitioners
- We don't measure the outcome of our work in ways that enable us to build effective feedback loops
- The work pressures we face combined with our tendency toward professional arrogance don't predispose us to keep learning
- Our trade associations, magazines, and conferences provide us with information that sells, not information that necessarily tells the truth
- Our consultants and vendors are a large source of our information, and we tend to think uncritically about their offerings
- Learning-and-performance research is not utilized
- Industry research is severely flawed, but we rely on it anyway
- Contests, awards, and best-of lists grab our attention"
education  professionalism  teaching  stephendownes 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Bunchberry & Fern: Learning Styles: fable-ous and tragic
"Here's a post/comment thread on Stephen Downes' blog where he has a lot to say on the subject of Learning Styles - or, more accurately, he criticises Daniel Willingham's 'facile treatment' of the subject on YouTube (and, elsewhere, Making up Facts). Like, Howard Rheingold, Stephen knows a thing or two about crap detection. Here are his own Principles for Evaluating Websites, for example, written in 2005. It's obviously something he's been thinking about a fair bit.*

But even if Stephen Downes is right and Daniel Willingham lying and facile (this is a very big 'if') then, surely, the dozens of Learning Styles Inventories can't all be right. But neither can they all be wrong? A practitioner who ignores all new ideas until they're 'scientifically proven' runs the risk of sabotaging innovation. Who are we to turn to?"
learning  information  learningstyles  cognition  cognitive  rationality  studies  science  existence  communication  stephendownes  howardrheingold  crapdetection  literacy  danielwillingham  education  research  howardgardner 
november 2009 by robertogreco
How I Would Organize a Conference ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"The structure would be more like a market or a fair. Mostly, there would not be a schedule. Participants would certainly not get a schedule; organizers would have a bit of one, in order to choreograph the event.

The conference area itself would consist of a largish central area with various side areas with more or less privacy (the presumption is that while people will want to go to the side to chat, etc., they won't want to cut themselves off completely from the main event)."
education  stephendownes  unconferences  conferences  howto  tcsnmy  conferenceplanning  eventplanning 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Dave’s Whiteboard » Blog Archive » 21st-century skills: Downes’s OS for the mind
"The bottom line: while factual knowledge is helpful, certain key skills are essential; they are a kind of operating system for the mind, which can then work with data from the outside world."
stephendownes  education  learning  21stcenturyskills  informationliteracy  facts 
october 2009 by robertogreco
12 ways social media are screwing with bad work habits ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"OK, I get where Janet Clarey is coming from with this list. But if you get over your habit of casual lying, if you get over the fact that you're supposed to be afraid of your boss, if you get over worrying about being somehow less than perfect, there's no problem. It's like those scare stories about Facebook being bad because everyone can see your lewd drunken behaviour. The real problem is the lewd drunken behaviour - you should do it less, and other people should become less judgemental."
stephendownes  productivity  work  rules  administration  management  behavior  etiquette  facebook  online  web 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Children Largely Surf the Web Unsupervised. ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"OK, if these numbers reflect anything like similar trends over the last decade or so, shouldn't we have seen by now a wave of injury and trauma? I mean, if this sort of situation is dangerous, shouldn't we be seeing casualties by now? If 60 percent of children ran through red lights, we'd be hearing about it. So, given these statistics, what is the case for Internet Safety, properly so-called?"
stephendownes  children  safety  internet  data  supervision  parenting  filtering 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Insidious pedagogy: How course management systems affect teaching ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"She argues that Content management Systems (CMSs) "are not pedagogically neutral shells for course content." Indeed, "a CMS may not only influence, but control, instructional approaches." And "Few instructors are consciously aware that CMS design is influencing their pedagogy." This is a good paper, well-argued, and I agree with the conclusion."
cms  online  teaching  pedagogy  control  tcsnmy  freedom  influence  technology  web  closedsystems  stephendownes 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: An Operating System for the Mind [Stephen Downes on the Core Knowledge "Challenge to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills"]
Two quotes (not the whole story): "When you teach children facts as facts, & do it through a process of study & drill, it doesn't occur to children to question whether or not those facts are true, appropriate, moral, egal, or anything else. Rote learning is a short circuit into the brain. It's direct programming. People who study & learn, that 2+2=4, know that 2+2=4, not because they understand the theory of mathematics, not because they have read Hilbert & understand formalism, or can refute Brouwer & reject intuitionism, but because they know (full stop) 2+2=4." ... "We are in a period of transition. We still to a great degree treat facts as things & of education as the acquisition of those things. But more and more, as our work, homes and lives become increasingly complex, we see this understanding becoming not only increasingly obsolete, but increasingly an impediment...if you simply follow the rules, do what you're told, do your job & stay out of trouble, you will be led to ruin."

[summary here: http://www.daveswhiteboard.com/archives/2818 ]
knowledge  literacy  criticalthinking  skills  connectivism  education  stephendownes  programming  brainwashing  cognition  automatons  directinstruction  cv  tcsnmy  history  future  agency  activism  learning2.0  change  gamechanging  information  learning  truth  relevance  infooverload  filtering  unschooling  deschooling  psychology  brain  attention  mind  diversity  ict  pedagogy  e-learning  theory  elearning  21stcenturyskills  21stcenturylearning 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Falsebook ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"We are told repeatedly - most recently by President Obama - that we should watch out what we put in Facebook, because future employers may be looking. My own advice - that we should refrain from actually doing stupid things - doesn't get any airplay; people are far more concerned about the recording of stupid things than the doing of them. But this approach does suggest, as Alan Levine demonstrates, an effective strategy. Create a fake Facebook page, where we blatantly lie about our past. After all, since employers will be looking at these uncritically, this tactic is guaranteed to be successful. isn't it? "Who in their right mind will weigh your current achievements with the same consideration as what you were doing 20 years ago?" asks Levine. "It makes no sense to me.""
facebook  falsebook  stephendownes  society  truth  ethics  lying  documentation  morality  parenting  advice  youth 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Dumb Money or Dumb Coverage?
Stephen Downes takes down Newsweek's "Dumb Money" [http://www.newsweek.com/id/209962 ] analysis of education reform. Some great reference links in there too.
stephendownes  education  reform  newsweek  finland  toronto  canada  policy  us  germany  comparison  money  salaries  teaching  learning  schools  achievementgap  testing  assessment  classsize  technology  politics 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Your Pension Awaits...
"Don't plan on retiring, even if it is only a few years away. Take these last few years you have of something like secure employment and develop some marketable skills. Learn programming. Learn carpentry. Auto repair. Something."
retirement  work  socialsecurity  pensions  stephendownes  economics  finance  collapse 
august 2009 by robertogreco
On What it Would Mean to Really Teach Naked ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"I agree with this: "Eliminating technology produces not the effect of a more engaged literate student populous, rather it produces the reverse, an ill informed, uncritical, unengaged student populous who will become at the very best passive consumers of the technology being resisted, and at the worst its willing victims." Which is why it's a shame that the Chronicle's report on SMU professor Jose Bowen is framed as as an anti-technology stance, instead of what it really is, an effort to improve, not eliminate, technology."
stephendownes  technology  education  criticalthinking  teaching  laptops  learning  schools 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Remember Those Color Coded SRA Cards? [see also comment by Stephen Downes]
"I grew up in a small town in Central Pennsyltucky with 20% unemployment in the 70's, and we had all sorts of individualized programmed instruction. We had boxes of SRA cards in elementary school, I remember some kind of Star Wars branded package that let you work up yourself up to Jedi Knight status (although we didn't stick with it that long... I guess it was the precursor to everyone's fantasies about WoW-themed learning environments), the advanced 11th grade chemistry class was built around self-paced units, and of course, we all had Little Professors and Datamen.

No doubt the new stuff is much smarter, but please, this is not something that nobody has looked at. Or did everyone else just get a much more retrograde education than me? Doesn't Joel Klein know Lauren Resnick?"
whatsoldisnew  whatsoldisnewagain  progressive  education  curriculum  learning  schools  technology  individualized  tcsnmy  joelklein  tomhoffman  stephendownes  itsnotexperimental  projectbasedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  recyclingideas  philosophy  teaching  pbl 
july 2009 by robertogreco
We choose the moon ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"You know, I hear those objections, to our wind-power program, to Obama's health care plan, to open education and free learning, and the rest, and I just want to look at these people and say we choose to go to the Moon and make the arguments about ROI and effectiveness and data-supported decision-making just go away."
stephendownes  nobelprojects  progress  nasa  apollo11  roi  healthcare  climatechange  energy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Learning by Creating
"I think that, in general, creativity in its various forms - writing, film-making, etc. - is a much more powerful form of learning than any sort of passive receptivity or information transfer. Learning, as you say, in a bottle." and in the comments: "'programming' is what other people do to you. 'learning' is what you do for yourself."
stephendownes  learning  doing  tcsnmy  creativity  making  make  diy  propaganda  writing  projectbasedlearning  pbl 
july 2009 by robertogreco
What Makes a Good Fourth-Grade Reader? Knowledge ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"These were comparative literacy studies conducted of grade 4 students in 2001 & 2006. Willingham writes, "Hong Kong ranked 14th among 35 participating countries in the 2001 administration of the test. In 2006, HK students ranked second among 44 nations." In case you are wondering, the top-rated country according to the report was Russia. Not only that, Russia climbed from 528 in 2001 - the same place as HK - all the way to 565, one better than HK. Why not focus on Russia? Or maybe some other top-scoring jurisdictions, like Alberta & Ontario, Canada. That makes up your top four. But Willingham can't use that (or other countries, like Hungary, Luxembourg & Sweden, all of which fare better than the US) as his sample, because they don't support his hypothesis. Quite the opposite. What unites these countries - and differentiates them from the U.S. and other lower scoring countries - is social and economic equity (see figure 6 on page 14 where this correlation is very clearly established)."
testing  assessment  reading  class  economics  society  education  schools  research  stephendownes  comparison  international  global 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Students Prefer Real Classroom to Virtual World ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"it is important to recognize that students, as a demographic, are very conservative, especially higher up in the system. These are the people who have adapted very well to the current system. Why would they support change? I've said this before, that the best test of online learning is with the many people (the majority, actually, and the less wealthy) that the current system doesn't serve"
stephendownes  technology  virtualworlds  education  statusquo  change  resistance  class 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Surrender! Foucault and Twitter ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"I want to endorse the argument presented by Ian Delaney in this post, with one caveat: it is descriptive of social media as it currently exists. He observes, "where is transgression in social media? It is simply not allowed to exist in many cases... Minority views are excluded by the machine - only the recommended and personalised is allowed through. The stuff that dulls and comforts the political imagination." If you don't believe this, go read Boing Boing, Gawker or Kottke for a while and report back. So - crucially - the liberal democracy model of social media is flawed. What we need, want and must have is something more like the community of communities model referenced the other day - a model where dark recesses of cabals and dissent can exist. And it also requires an attitude where people are encouraged to investigate and explore these recesses for themselves, rather than to sit passively like a television audience waiting for reality to be streamed into the home."

[regarding: http://twopointouch.com/2009/05/27/surrender-foucault-and-twitter/ ]
stephendownes  socialmedia  minorityviews  kottke  gawker  boingboing  darkrecesses 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"You don't want to miss this - at the very least, view the image of the map of the sciences. And I'm really chuckling to myself over this. Because I was reading recently a post that characterized the whole 'Unity of Science' project from Logical Positivism as being so over - and it is. The reductive program based on underlying general principles (Gardner Campbell, are you reading?) was a complete failure - but now here is the unity of the sciences, in a full colour diagram, as a network of connected data, observations and concepts."

[related: http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2009/03/maps_of_knowled.php ]
maps  mapping  knowledge  stephendownes  kevinkelly  networks  science 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Informal Learning in Everyday Practice: Getting to Know a City and Its Symbols ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"I have in the past compared formal learning with exploring a city by being kidnapped and forcibly driven around a city, and informal learning with exploring a city in any other way: by joining a tour group, using a city map, riding a city bus, traveling with a friend, or (my favorite) wandering aimlessly without a map and only the vaguest idea of a destination. People, as Ignatia suggests, laugh at the concept of informal learning - but most would never explore a city any other way but informally."
informallearning  stephendownes  exploration  learning  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  schools  tcsnmy  cities  travel 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Goals Gone Wild: The Systematic Side Effects of Over-Prescribing Goal Setting ~ Stephen Downes
"Goal-setting, the gold standard in business methodology, is fraught with destructive side-effects. Among them: -too specific: "goals can focus attention so narrowly that people overlook other important features of a task" -narrow goals: "may cause people to ignore important dimensions of performance that are not specified by the goal setting system."
risk  risktaking  business  goals  management  assessment  evaluation  administration  tcsnmy  leadership  ethics  stephendownes 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The Monkeysphere Ideology
"Our falure is not a failure of business, which performed as intended (at least for those who made off with the wealth). It is a failure of the humanities, a failure of humanity, the study of which has been in notable decline throughout these last few decades, having, if you will, no measurable worth, no valuation, it being nothing more than a pastime and a recreation."
stephendownes  humanism  humanity  crisis  2009  compassion  society  change  reform  community  dunbar  collapse 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Education And Learning: A Paradigm Shift - Part 1 - Is Our Educational System Broken? - Robin Good's Latest News
"So, what's up everyone? Besides the few guys out there spending serious time researching and lecturing on today's educational challenges what are you doing to harmonize a little more what you have learned in the world of media and communication to the universe of learning and education your kids are immersed into? ... video clips I have asked a few friends to record ... Howard Rheingold, Jay Cross, Stephen Downes, George Siemens, Nancy White, Gerd Leonhard and Teemu Arina have all accepted to record a few short videos for me while addressing some of the issues relating to our educational system and its future.

[part 2: http://www.masternewmedia.org/education-and-learning-a-paradigm-shift-part-2/ ]
education  culture  elearning  change  future  self-directed  self-directedlearning  learning  unschooling  deschooling  connectivism  georgesiemens  stephendownes  teemuarina  jaycross  robingood  gerleonhard  colleges  universities  gamechanging  media  communication  nancywhite  academia  e-learning  degrees  credentials 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Activists
"When we seek to improve ourselves, to enhance our moments of happiness, to stay healthy and build a more secure future, we are doing this not in spite of the ultimate failure of all our endeavours, but rather, because of it. We rage against death, not because such rage will ever be effective, but because to acquiesce is to die immediately."
stephendownes  activism  meaning  life  civilization  society  learning  knowledge  death  collapse 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Kusasa Cancelled ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Lesson? If a project depends on teacher training, it will likely fail. Hard to think of a greater indictment of a profession."
teaching  professionaldevelopment  training  broken  stephendownes 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Natives ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"George Siemens offers this interesting quote from Chris Lott: 'Academics tend to err on the side of nuance and precision, eschewing generalizations and coarse labels. This is great for documenting cultural dynamics, but not so great for making interventions." Well, yeah - if interventions are what you want, then distortions and simplifications are what you're going to need. But perhaps in the light of this we should be questioning the ethics of making an intervention. Perhaps we should be asking what it means to do this, and to query whether we don't create more harm than good in the process."
stephendownes  danahboyd  netgen  digitalnatives  georgesiemens 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Creepy Treehouse Effect: Twitter & Facebook Suck When They're Required by Your Professor ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"As usual, it seems to me, the essential issue here is ownership. "A research exercise ... has just revealed, amazingly, that students want to be left alone. Their message to the trendy academics is: 'Get out of MySpace!'" So, what to do? "A better approach to education is the idea of a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) - which [students] can invite the professor into when they feel comfortable doing so."
stephendownes  ples  twitter  myspace  colleges  universities  teaching  students  learning  education  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  facebook 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Research Proves Power Corrupts ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Vicki Davis looks at research showing that people in positions of power abuse their power, and asks "How can we empower effective leaders?" and "how can they retain the skills of leadership that got them there in the first place." My response is: don't empower leaders. Take power away from them. And as for the second question, from what I've seem, the 'skills that got them there in the first place' are skills in the abuse of power. People become leaders by thinking of their own needs first, by ignoring the needs of their underlings, and by acting as though the rules don't apply to them."
leadership  power  abuse  management  administration  human  psychology  organizations  ego  selfishness  stephendownes 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Can New Media Be Taught in Schools? - ReadWriteWeb
""Academia tends to be woefully behind in almost everything it teaches. Experience in the private sector tends to be a faster and more effective method of learning almost anything. Hard sciences may be the exception. The internet is changing faster than almost anything in this world, so expecting academics to be capable of offering timely teaching in this field may lead to serious disappointment. That may be shortchanging a lot of hard working teachers fired up about the web, though....Looking at what Dr. Michael Wesch teaches college students, what the incredible Vicki Davis manages to do with Elementary school students and the internet and what popular education blogger Stephen Downes advises - it is clear that there is some powerful potential for teaching new media."
newmedia  technology  schools  curriculum  education  learning  teaching  socialmedia  collaboration  elearning  students  classideas  internet  media  tools  literacy  academia  stephendownes  michaelwesch  vickydavis 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Giving Up On Work E-Mail - Status Report On Week 24 (Six Months On!) ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Decisions about communications must be personal and based on one's own convictions. The minute you start telling people how they must communicate with one another, you've destroyed the organization."
email  communication  organizations  stephendownes 
july 2008 by robertogreco
When Learning It Really Happens ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"I'd rather see more discussion in educational communities of the wider contexts that support learning rather than the narrow focus on pedagogy (i.e., what the teacher does) that predominates today."
learning  students  teaching  pedagogy  education  community  brain  cognition  stephendownes 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: Individualism and Classism
"My epistemology is based, not on atomism, but rather, on a sense of connectedness between interacting individuals, each of which prings its own uniqueness, its own perspective, to the mix."
stephendownes  kant  individual  self  identity  learning  libertarianism  society  egoism  aynrand  connectivism 
july 2008 by robertogreco
What You Really Need To Learn - Stephen Downes
"Outline of ten things you really need to learn (the basics of an education), some discussion of how we have traditionally learned them and some things to watch for, and a description of how new technologies are helping us learn them now."
stephendownes  education  elearning  presentation  pedagogy  learning  homeschool  unschooling  lifelonglearning  learningnetworks  philosophy  lcproject  classideas  life  lifeskills  well-being 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Light, Agile and Flexible: Collaborating the Web 2.0 Way ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
Stephen Downes's presentation on web 2.0 collaboration. Illustrates the collaborative process, tools and technologies available, trends, and the benefits of using an open network"
elearning  stephendownes  open  ples  vle  learning  online  web2.0  technology  education 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Introducing Edupunk ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Edupunk, it seems, takes old-school Progressive educational tactics--hands-on learning that starts with the learner's interests--and makes them relevant to today's digital age, sometimes by forgoing digital technologies entirely."
edupunk  stephendownes 
may 2008 by robertogreco
The Obligatory Edupunk Post ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"It doesn't really matter whether the term 'edupunk' has any staying power, what matters - to me - is the awareness of the idea that it at least, for the moment, signifies." + multiple links
edupunk  stephendownes  education  learning  change  reform  movements  trends 
may 2008 by robertogreco
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