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My website is a shifting house next to a river of knowledge. What could yours be? – The Creative Independent
"The web is what we make it

While an individual website could be any of those metaphors I mentioned above, I believe the common prevailing metaphor—the internet as cloud—is problematic. The internet is not one all-encompassing, mysterious, and untouchable thing. (In early patent drawings depicting the internet, it appears as related shapes: a blob, brain, or explosion.) These metaphors obfuscate the reality that the internet is made up of individual nodes: individual computers talking to other individual computers.

[image]

The World Wide Web recently turned 29. On the web’s birthday, Tim Berners Lee, its creator, published a letter stating the web’s current state of threat. He says that while it’s called the “World Wide Web,” only about half the world is connected, so we should close this digital divide.

But at the same time, Berners Lee wants to make sure this thing we’re all connecting to is truly working for us, as individuals: “I want to challenge us all to have greater ambitions for the web. I want the web to reflect our hopes and fulfill our dreams, rather than magnify our fears and deepen our divisions.”

[image]

“Metaphor unites reason and imagination,” says George Lakoff and Mark Johnson in their book, Metaphors We Live By (1980). “Metaphors are not merely things to be seen beyond. In fact, one can see beyond them only by using other metaphors. It is as though the ability to comprehend experience through metaphor were a sense, like seeing or touching or hearing, with metaphors providing the only ways to perceive and experience much of the world. Metaphor is as much a part of our functioning as our sense of touch, and as precious.”

Instead of a cloud, let’s use a metaphor that makes the web’s individual, cooperative nodes more visible. This way, we can remember the responsibility we each have in building a better web. The web is a flock of birds or a sea of punctuation marks, each tending or forgetting about their web garden or puddle home with a river of knowledge nearby.

If a website has endless possibilities, and our identities, ideas, and dreams are created and expanded by them, then it’s instrumental that websites progress along with us. It’s especially pressing when forces continue to threaten the web and the internet at large. In an age of information overload and an increasingly commercialized web, artists of all types are the people to help. Artists can think expansively about what a website can be. Each artist should create their own space on the web, for a website is an individual act of collective ambition."
laurelschwulst  knowledge  webdev  webdesign  internet  web  online  2018  websites  design  flexibility  purpose  creativity  learning  howwelearn  accumulation  accretion  making  murmurations  metaphor  clouds  birds  georgelakoff  markjohnson  completeness  unfinished  wonder  fredrogers  storage  archives  html 
may 2018 by robertogreco
From Tape Drives to Memory Orbs, the Data Formats of Star Wars Suck (Spoilers) | Motherboard
"Why on Earth are ports standardized but data storage isn’t? Why are data storage formats wildly variable, but file formats are readable across enemy lines? Why is it that I have to carry five dongles so my Macbook can play a PowerPoint presentation but a decades-old Rebel droid needs zero to stay interoperable with an enemy’s state-of-the-art battle station?

I don’t know the answers to these questions, but I at least have a theory about why the Empire keeps its backups on magnetic tape.

You see, the Scarif facility is just too badly designed for it all to be a coincidence. It doesn’t appear to be patterned after Old Republic systems. The tape format never appears again in the movies. The incredibly large files contained on the tape can be stored on palm-sized, paper-thin disks, meaning the tapes are unnecessary. The claw-machine system makes no sense. The antenna tower makes the Scarif facility easy to target in a military attack.

In other words, the archival system on Scarif appears to be designed in a deliberate act of sabotage by anti-Imperial archivists attempting to undermine Palpatine’s rule. Like Galen Erso, the archivists chose to remain embedded inside the Empire, and as their act of resistance, build the most useless, asinine archival system the galaxy had ever seen.

As part of their plan, they adopted a magnetic tape format, to maximize the size of the facility and make it necessary to manufacture massive amounts of interoperable technology to support the tapes. Given that the tapes are never seen before or after Rogue One, it may be that the archivists developed the tape format using military funding, in hopes that diverting money away from weapons and into a bad R&D project would, in the grand scheme of things, save lives.

This is absolutely the only rational explanation for the data storage formats depicted in Rogue One, and I look forward to seeing the prequel about the heroic rebel archivists."
archives  media  facebook  interoperability  2016  startwars  rogueone  sarahjeong  archivists  mediatypes  standardization  data  datastorage  storage 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Haunted By Data
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAXLHM-1Psk
https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/haunted-by-data ]

"You're thinking, okay Maciej, your twelve minutes of sophistry and labored analogies have convinced me that my entire professional life is a lie. What should I do about it?

I hope to make you believe data collection is a trade-off. It hurts the people whose data you collect, but it also hurts your ability to think clearly. Make sure that it's worth it!

I'm not claiming that the sponsors of this conference are selling you a bill of goods. I'm just heavily implying it.

Here's what I want you do specifically:

Don't collect it!

If you can get away with it, just don't collect it! Just like you don't worry about getting mugged if you don't have any money, your problems with data disappear if you stop collecting it.

Switch from the hoarder's mentality of 'keep everything in case it comes in handy' to a minimalist approach of collecting only what you need.

Your marketing team will love you. They can go tell your users you care about privacy!

If you have to collect it, don't store it!

Instead of stocks and data mining, think in terms of sampling and flows. "Sampling and flows" even sounds cooler. It sounds like hip-hop!

You can get a lot of mileage out of ephemeral data. There's an added benefit that people will be willing to share things with you they wouldn't otherwise share, as long as they can believe you won't store it. All kinds of interesting applications come into play.

If you have to store it, don't keep it!

Certainly don't keep it forever. Don't sell it to Acxiom! Don't put it in Amazon glacier and forget it.

I believe there should be a law that limits behavioral data collection to 90 days, not because I want to ruin Christmas for your children, but because I think it will give us all better data while clawing back some semblance of privacy.

Finally, don't be surprised. The current model of total surveillance and permanent storage is not tenable.

If we keep it up, we'll have our own version of Three Mile Island, some widely-publicized failure that galvanizes popular opinion against the technology.

At that point people who are angry, mistrustful, and may not understand a thing about computers will regulate your industry into the ground. You'll be left like those poor saps who work in the nuclear plants, who have to fill out a form in triplicate anytime they want to sharpen a pencil.

You don't want that. Even I don't want that.

We can have that radiant future but it will require self-control, circumspection, and much more concern for safety that we've been willing to show.

It's time for us all to take a deep breath and pull off those radium underpants.

Thank you very much for your time, and please enjoy the rest of your big data conference."
maciejceglowski  data  privacy  surveillance  bigdata  2015  storage  radioactivity  datacollection  maciejcegłowski 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Parsons :: Exhibitions and Events :: The Sheila C. Johnson Design Center :: Exhibitions :: Current and Upcoming Exhibitions
"Much of our common stock of knowledge -- from the inscriptions of early civilizations, the classic texts of the ancient world, the manuscripts of the Middle Ages, and the maps and scientific treatises of the Renaissance, to the tweets and open data sets of today -- now resides in The Cloud. That Cloud seems to have no boundaries, no place; it floats above us, bringing its intellectual riches to those of us who are connected to it, wherever we might be. Yet The Cloud isn’t nearly as ubiquitous as the weather. Its accessibility is limited by protocols and cables, and its “content” has to be shaped, formalized through various interfaces, in order for us to perceive and process it. While artists, designers, and researchers have acknowledged that The Cloud has an architecture -- from the routers generating wisps of wifi in our homes, to the massive data centers storing that “rain of data,” to the cables and satellites that function as the system’s plumbing -- we’ve paid little attention to the places where The Cloud meets our individual bodies. Furnishing the Cloud considers both how we have historically imagined the architectures and containers of our common stock of knowledge -- the universal library, the endless bookshelf, the collective brain, among other structural/architectural metaphors -- and proposes new infrastructures for storing, accessing, and processing The Cloud. What are our new ergonomics of reading and viewing and auditing digital content, and how can we design to support those postures and modes of perception? How might we Furnish the Cloud?

Related programs:

SENSORY INFRASTRUCTURES Roundtable Discussion
Friday, March 13, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
“Bark Room,” Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, 2 W 13th Street, Ground Floor
Free and open to the public; no RSVP required

How do we perceive the presence of data? How do our bodies interface with information streams and the digital technologies that bring them to us? What aspects of “the cloud” are rendered sensible to us — not only visible, but also audible and tangible? Join the curators for “Furnishing the Cloud,” Kimberly Ackert, Orit Halpern, Shannon Mattern, and Brian McGrath, who will offer short provocations, exploring the exhibition’s themes from the perspectives of furniture and exhibition design, history, media studies, architecture, and urbanism.

http://furnishingthecloud.net

Presented by the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, with funding from the Provost Office Research Cluster Grant and the School of Constructed Environments, Parsons the New School for Design. With additional support from Historical Studies, New School for Social Research, and the School of Media Studies, New School for Public Engagement.

Exhibition Designers: Kimberly Ackert, with assistance from Jordana Maisie Goot
Curators: Kimberly Ackert, Orit Halpern, Shannon Mattern, and Brian McGrath
Web Development:Daniel Udell
Curatorial Assistant: Nadia Christidi
Students from Kimberly Ackert's Furniture, Detail and Space course: Dhafar Al-Edani, Mariam Alshamali, Tanyaporn Anantrungroj, Derick Brown, Felipe Colin, Kristina Cowger, Jo Garst, Jennifer Hindelang, Jacqueline Leung, Pei Ying Lin, Valter Lindgren, Mochi Lui, Matilda Maansdotter, Emmanuela Martini, Simon Schulz, Whitney Shanks, Raquel Sonobe
Web Projects: Zachary Franciose, Laura Sanchez, Eishin Yoshida
Students from Orit Halpern’s Making Sense: Methods in the Study of Media, Attention, and Infrastructure course: Jeffery Berryhill, Nicholas Cavaioli, Raquel DeAnda, Joseph Goldsmith, Angelica Huggins, Ian Keith, Kate McEntee, Awis Nari Mranani, Erika Nyame-Nseke, Kevin Swann, Shea Sweeney, Daniel Udell, Michal Unterberg, Kyla Wasserman"

[via (with images): https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/574656819517394944
https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/574653891184345088 ]
kimberlyackert  orithalpern  shannonmattern  brianmcgrath  2015  design  cloud  data  furniture  architecture  media  mediastudies  urbanism  reading  howweread  digital  datacenters  storage  access 
march 2015 by robertogreco
We're sharing more photos but getting less in return
"Theoretically, we could have an up-to-the-minute photo database of any popular location. We'd just need Instagram to include more metadata by default and allow users to sort by location (or let a third-party app do the same).

If we were properly organizing the photos we're already putting online, I could see how a festival was going, and Google Maps could show me all the photos taken from the Eiffel Tower in the last five minutes. I could even see if a popular bar is crowded without any official system. We'd be able to see the world right now, as clearly as we see its past on Google Street View, as quickly as news spreads on Twitter.

We have the data and the technological infrastructure, but we're stuck because no developer can access all the data.

If anyone was going to deliver these capabilities, it would be Flickr. In 2006, it was the canonical destination for photos. If you wanted to see photos of a certain place or subject, that’s where you went. But Facebook replaced Flickr as a social network, killing it on the desktop, and Instagram released a simpler mobile app, killing it there too. That would have been fine if Facebook and Instagram kept their photos data-rich and fully exportable. But both services give fewer tagging, grouping, and other sorting options, and they built their photos into incompatible databases. Facebook won't organize photos any way but by human subject or uploader. Instagram has just a few view options and focuses solely on the friend-feed.

We're photographing everything now, building this amazing body of work, but we're getting less and less out of it.

We do get some benefits from not having one monopoly in charge of photo sharing: Instagram did mobile better than Flickr, Facebook can link a photo of someone to their whole social profile, and Foursquare efficiently arranges photos by location. These advantages, however, have replaced Creative Commons licensing, advanced search, and any other tool that relies on treating the world's photo pool as a mass data set rather than a series of individualized feeds.

Twitter, Tumblr, and Imgur siphon off bits of the photo market without giving them back into the mass set. Meanwhile, any photo service that dies off (RIP Picasa, Zooomr, Photobucket) becomes a graveyard for photos that will probably never get moved to a new service.

Why are we giving up this magical ability to basically explore our world in real-time? The bandwidth is lower than streaming video; the new-data-point frequency is lower than Twitter; the location sorting is less complicated than Google Maps or Foursquare. But no one service has an incentive to build this tool, or to open up its database for a third party. Instead they only innovate ways to steal market share from each other. Flickr recently downgraded its mobile app, removing discovery options and cropping photos into squares. The new app is an obvious Instagram imitation, but it won't help Flickr recapture the market. If any photo service beats Instagram, it won't be by making data more open.

Our collective photo pool suffers from a tragedy of the commons, where each service snaps up our photos with as few features as it can, or by removing features. (Snapchat, for example, actively prevents photos from joining the pool by replacing the subscription model with a one-to-one model, efficiently delivering photos straight from my camera to your feed.) We are giving our photos to these inferior services, they are making billions of dollars from them, and what we're getting back is pathetic.

The best agnostic tool we have is the archaic Google Image Search, which doesn't effectively sort results, doesn't distinguish between image sources, and doesn't even touch location search. The lack of agnostic metadata is keeping us in the past. As Anil Dash pointed out in 2012, the photo pool (like blogs and status updates) is becoming fragmented and de-standardized. Everything we're putting online is chopped up by services that don't play well together, and that's bad for the user.

Dash wrote, "We'll fix these things; I don't worry about that." I do. I don't think technology has to work out right. We can build expressways where we should have built bullet trains. We can let an ISP monopoly keep us at laughable broadband speeds. We can all dump our memories into the wrong sites and watch them disappear in 10 years. We can share postage-stamp-sized photos on machines capable of streaming 1080p video.

Even if we do fix this, it will not be retroactive. There are stories about whole TV series lost to time because the network stupidly trashed the original reels. Now that we take more photos than we know what to deal with, we won't lose our originals—we'll just lose the organization. When Facebook and Instagram are inevitably replaced, we'll be left without the context, without the comments, without anything but a privately stored pile of raw images named DCIM_2518.JPG.

Just a heap of bullshit, really."
nickdouglas  flickr  metadata  photography  2014  instagram  tags  tagging  search  storage  facebook  tumblr  imgur  twitter  picasa  zooomr  photobucket  archives  archiving  creativecommons  realtime  foursquare  googlemaps  snapchat  anildash  googleimagesearch  technology  regression  socialmedia  fragmentation  interoperability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
ownCloud.org | Your Cloud, Your Data, Your Way!
"ownCloud provides universal access to your files via the web, your computer or your mobile devices — wherever you are.

It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web."



"ownCloud gives you universal access to your files through a web interface or WebDAV. It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web. Installation has minimal server requirements, doesn’t need special permissions and is quick. ownCloud is extendable via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins.

ownCloud started with a keynote by Frank Karlitschek at Camp KDE’10 where he talked about the need of a self-controlled free and open source cloud."
cloud  dropbox  opensource  php  sync  storage  bookmarks  calendars  onlinetoolkit  rollyourown 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Curiosity Cabinet - Commonplace Studio
"Curiosity Cabinet #1 is the first cabinet in a series that appropriates the structure of historical curiosity cabinets of the sixteenth century in a contemporary context. Throughout the Renaissance, objects representative of god (naturalia) and man (artificialia) were displayed in cabinets as an index of their proprietors’ world view. Since today we are no longer concerned with the dichotomy of nature and art, but with the duality of the material and the virtual, these cabinets brings together both physical and digital space in one archival system.

This cabinet intersperses sixteen drawers for physical objects, and sixteen boxes with embedded memory and RFID tags for saving and presenting digital information. To view the digital content, one must simply place a digital box near the computer."

[Other project of note by Jon Stam:
Cabinet of the (Material& Virtual) World: http://commonplace.nl/CABINET-OF-THE-MATERIAL-VIRTUAL-WORLD
An Imaginary Museum: http://commonplace.nl/AN-IMAGINARY-MUSEUM
Bioscope: http://commonplace.nl/Bioscope
Save as Mine: http://commonplace.nl/Save-As-Mine ]
furniture  jonstam  cabinets  cabinetofcuriosities  curiosities  digital  virtual  rfid  design  art  digitalphysical  photography  video  cameras  memory  memories  archives  storage 
april 2013 by robertogreco
» Seeds Are the New Books - Blog of the Long Now
"The Basalt Public Library in western Colorado has recently started lending seeds out to members. The members “borrow” the seeds with their library card, grow the plants, and harvest the best fruits’ seeds to give back to the library. The library gets better seeds back, while the members get to enjoy most of the harvest and learn more about the embodied art of gardening in the process.

Saving seeds itself is not a new idea–it is an ancient practice that goes back to the invention of agriculture. But combining a seed bank with the modern library is a novel answer to the threat of digital irrelevance, and one that can help preserve the thousands of endangered heirloom varieties that we have cultivated over civilization’s history.

As books and other media start to make the cloud their permanent home, libraries inevitably face the question of how to stay relevant in the future. Part of the answer will probably always be free access to information resources, but the trend seems to suggest that this will become far less pertinent with the proliferation of ebooks, online classes, book-scanning projects, and general free digitalized information.

It is easy to forget that libraries are some ways, very radical institutions. It’s true, you have to be quiet, but the idea that everyone should have access to as much information as possible is a beautiful and powerful concept. When one considers that seeds and the DNA they contain are one of the original information storage devices, it’s almost hard to understand why libraries haven’t always included seeds."
longnow  seeds  planting  plants  libraries  colorado  basaltpubliclibrary  ariculture  gardening  2013  information  storage  civilization 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Harvard cracks DNA storage, crams 700 terabytes of data into a single gram | ExtremeTech
"A bioengineer and geneticist at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have successfully stored 5.5 petabits of data — around 700 terabytes — in a single gram of DNA, smashing the previous DNA data density record by a thousand times.

The work, carried out by George Church and Sri Kosuri, basically treats DNA as just another digital storage device. Instead of binary data being encoded as magnetic regions on a hard drive platter, strands of DNA that store 96 bits are synthesized, with each of the bases (TGAC) representing a binary value (T and G = 1, A and C = 0).

To read the data stored in DNA, you simply sequence it — just as if you were sequencing the human genome — and convert each of the TGAC bases back into binary. To aid with sequencing, each strand of DNA has a 19-bit address block at the start (the red bits in the image below) — so a whole vat of DNA can be sequenced out of order, and then sorted into usable data using the addresses…"
chemistry  biology  sequencing  srikosuri  georgechurch  memory  2012  datastorage  science  storage  dna 
november 2012 by robertogreco
TBA Festival Box Office - PICA [Claire L. Evans: RESTORE FROM BACKUP]
"Every relationship leaves a trace. In a world of data, even the most intimate relationships are now externalized, backed up. The Web voraciously holds onto our memories, even when we want to let go. Ending romantic engagements, breaking up with friends, avoiding a sworn enemy: these are all antithetical to the industry of our sprawling social networks. Introducing RESTORE FROM BACKUP, a service for precisely this problem. With RFB, a relationship can be completely excised from the Web and all the data contained in a physical object of the customer’s design. If you could gather every single bit of this relationship data and turn it into an object, what would you do with that object? Would you hold it in your hands, feel its depth and weight, and summon from a patchwork of sensory and fallible recollections your ever-shifting, foggy, and surreal memories of the person? Or would you destroy it?

…a design fiction presentation, a pitch for a speculative service that would restore…"
2012  speculativeservices  socialnetworks  data  restorefrombackup  relationships  backups  storage  memory  designfiction  events  pica  design  claireevans 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Book written in DNA code | Science | The Guardian
"Scientists have for the first time used DNA to encode the contents of a book. At 53,000 words, and including 11 images and a computer program, it is the largest amount of data yet stored artificially using the genetic material.

The researchers claim that the cost of DNA coding is dropping so quickly that within five to 10 years it could be cheaper to store information using this method than in conventional digital devices.

Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA – the chemical that stores genetic instructions in almost all known organisms – has an impressive data capacity. One gram can store up to 455bn gigabytes: the contents of more than 100bn DVDs, making it the ultimate in compact storage media."
technology  2012  science  coding  ebooks  bbooks  dna  storage  books 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: The Coming Century of War Against Your Computer - The Long Now
"Recognizing that we are necessarily transitory Users of many systems, such as everything involving Cloud computing or storage, Doctorow favors keeping your own box with its own processors and storage. He strongly favors the democratization and wide distribution of expertise. As a Fellow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (who co-sponsored the talk) he supports public defense of freedom in every sort of digital rights issue.

"The potential for abuse in the computer world is large," Doctorow concluded. "It will keep getting larger.""
storage  propertyrights  rights  content  property  cloudcomputing  cloud  internet  computing  web  ownership  2012  corydoctorow 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Aperture card - Wikipedia
"An aperture card is a type of punched card with a cut-out window into which a chip of microfilm is mounted. Such a card is used for archiving or for making multiple inexpensive copies of a document for ease of distribution. The card is typically punched with machine-readable metadata associated with the microfilm image, and printed across the top of the card for visual identification. The microfilm chip is most commonly 35mm in height, and contains an optically reduced image, usually of some type of reference document, such as an engineering drawing, that is the focus of the archiving process. Aperture cards have several advantages and disadvantages when compared to digital systems. Machinery exists to automatically store, retrieve, sort, duplicate, create, and digitize cards with a high level of automation. While many aperture cards still play an important role in archiving, their role is gradually being replaced by digital systems."
aperturecard  data  microfilm  punchcards  computers  metadata  storage  automation  history 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Instapaper Inventor Links Inattentive Reading to Information Obesity | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"“People love information,” Arment said. “Right now in our society, we have an obesity epidemic. Because for the first time in history, we have access to food whenever we want, we don’t know how to control ourselves. I think we have the exact same problem with information.”…

Instapaper, like Twitter, also shows the continuing versatility and relevance of text in a multimedia age: “It’s a very flexible and pliable medium. You can skim or search. You can copy and paste. You can read at your own speed. It’s simple and cheap to produce and store and share. That’s what gives it its power. Even when you bring media into a high-computing era, you can still do a lot more and more easily with text than you can with video or audio or software.”
attention  information  instapaper  timcarmody  text  marcoarment  twitter  infooverload  reading  email  dropbox  storage  synchronization 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Bike Shelf «
"While visiting many friends small apartments here in SF and more so in NY, I noticed that there is a void when it comes to elegant bike management. Bikes always get in the way – either in the hall, or leaning up against a bookshelf or something. So, I decided to design something to fix that problem. Until I think of a better name, I am calling it the Bike Shelf."
bikes  biking  design  furniture  wood  storage 
october 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
waterwall tanks
"rainwater reservoirs are nothing new, but the waterwall fatboy manages to hold 650 gallons of water in
homes  housing  design  materials  water  function  storage 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Clive Thompson on Remembering Not to Remember in an Age of Unlimited Memory
"Mayer-Schönberger argues that we need to stop creating tools that automatically remember everything. Instead, we need to design them to forget...here's what makes Drop.io unique: When you upload a file, the service asks you to put an expiration date on it. It could be a month, a few hours, even "after five people have seen it." If you don't set a date, the default is one year. And when that time arrives, the file is deleted...Another case of intentional forgetting is the Guest Pass feature on Flickr...Being required to think about whether to retain or discard a digital memory will have another side benefit: It will make us pay closer attention—in real time!—to our experiences. If you decide a sunset or a conversation is going to live only in your mind instead of on your hard drive, you'll probably savor it more richly. Just ask Marcel Proust."
memory  forgetting  clivethompson  technology  socialmedia  history  future  privacy  flickr  drop.io  software  storage 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Schneier on Security: Privacy in the Age of Persistence
"Society works precisely because conversation is ephemeral; because people forget, and because people don't have to justify every word they utter. ... Privacy isn't just about having something to hide; it's a basic right that has enormous value to democracy, liberty, and our humanity. ... Just as we look back at the beginning of the previous century and shake our heads at how people could ignore the pollution they caused, future generations will look back at us – living in the early decades of the information age – and judge our solutions to the proliferation of data.
bruceschneier  privacy  technology  memory  forgetting  society  future  information  security  persistence  surveillance  storage  freedom  identity  data  policy  datamining 
april 2009 by robertogreco
DiskAid - Transfer Files betwen your Computer and your iPhone or iPod Touch. Disk Mode for your iPhone and iPod Touch.
"DiskAid is a tool (freeware) for PC and Mac which enables to use your iPhone or iPod Touch as external Disk. With DiskAid you can transfer files and folders via USB between your device and your Computer."
iphone  applications  diskaid  macosx  mac  osx  backup  storage  freeware  filesharing  ios 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: cheer up it's Archigram
"I’ve been particularly taken with the Botteries: The World’s Last Hardware Event by David Greene & Mike Myers ... a vision of returning to the English countryside, with everything you require brought by bots of all sorts: communication, rooms, walls, even pets. ... we’ve actually reached a place very similar ... rapidly seeing a world of use as needed, rather than purchase & storage. Blu-Ray is the world’s last media hardware event, it’s download from now on. Netflix & Lovefilm ... Spotify ... We’re starting to live in a world that would have been unimaginable 5 years ago, where ownership is severely debased as a good quality. We’re even seeing the world’s last physical retailers disappear. ... Russell ... was talking about how everyone has a junk room. What if you could ship that to Amazon or someone & pull bits back as you need them? We don’t want cloud computing, we want Big Yellow Internet Storage. & then you could have a smaller house or flat. It struck me as very Archigram-ish."
archigram  chrisheathcote  storage  postmaterialism  netflix  cloudcomputing  amazon  postownership  ownership  stuff  things  gamechanging  spotify  delivery  architecture  books 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Pixelpipe - Free your media, upload and share anywhere
"Liberate your media with Pixelpipe and get your content out to your favorite social network, photo/video and blog service. We support popular destinations and provide a number of applications to free your media from your desktop and mobile."
onlinetoolkit  aggregator  microblogging  pixelpipe  hosting  storage  sharing  software  media  tools  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  photography  video  online 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Macworld | iPhone Central | Review: File storage and viewing apps for iPhone
"Storing media like photos, music, and video on your iPhone is a snap: after all that’s what the device was designed for. But when it comes to carrying around other types of documents, or files that aren’t in your iTunes or iPhoto library, the iPhone falls woefully short. You can always send PDFs, Microsoft Word documents, and Excel spreadsheets to yourself, but since the Mail app lacks a search function, finding the one message with the file you want often means picking through long lists of e-mails. A trio of worthwhile programs have sprung up to fill this void, allowing you to store and view documents of your choice on the iPhone or iPod touch. It's strictly a "look, don't touch affair," though, since the iPhone’s software does not yet allow editing of these documents."
iphone  applications  storage  files  ios 
september 2008 by robertogreco
oyayubizoku » Two Must Have iPhone Apps
"DataCase for iPhone: Allows you to mount your iPhone over a WIFI network as an NAS drive, and copy multiple file formats over for transport… so useful and so simple! I tried and you can also mount it as a share via your “Go” menu in Leopard! + Barcode for iPhone: I am a huge QRCode fanatic as you can tell from other posts (1, 2, 3 and 4) on my blog, but this one takes the cake as the coolest and least buggy to use…"
iphone  applications  qrcodes  storage  data  csiap  ios 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- Long Now - Very Long-Term Backup
"As durable as paper is, its inherent limitations in storing digital data are clear. Pity the person who would need to find something if the only backup of the web was a paper printout that filled several airline hangers. What we need are media that have the durability of paper and the accessibility of a floppy disk (or better!).

This problem of long-term digital storage seemed a crucial hurdle for any civilization trying to act generationaly. How could a society think in terms of centuries unless there was a reliable way to transmit and store its knowledge over centuries?"
kevinkelly  longnow  storage  data 
august 2008 by robertogreco
DataCase - iPhone File Server and Viewer
"The iPhone and iPod Touch keep your media close, but what about the rest of your data? DataCase keeps your files close by turning your iPhone or iPod Touch into a hand held wireless drive. Keep your data with you wherever you go and access it when and where you need, on any available computer (Mac, PC, Linux), no upload program or server configuration necessary."
iphone  data  applications  software  mobile  storage  filesharing  wireless  backup  networking  via:preoccupations  ios 
august 2008 by robertogreco
'Major discovery' from MIT primed to unleash solar revolution - MIT News Office
"Until now, solar power has been a daytime-only energy source, because storing extra solar energy for later use is prohibitively expensive and grossly inefficient. With today's announcement, MIT researchers have hit upon a simple, inexpensive, highly efficient process for storing solar energy.
via:preoccupations  photosynthesis  science  energy  power  storage  solar  solarpower  sustainability  innovation  green  mit  economics  environment  future  technology  plants  cleanenergy  biomimicry  fuelcell  electricity  biomimetics 
august 2008 by robertogreco
DataCase iPhone App Video: Turn Your iPhone Into A Wireless Drive
"DataCase...will turn your iPhone into a wireless drive for file storage, and includes a viewer for most popular file formats (Office, PDF, etc.)"
iphone  applications  storage  ios 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Infoporn: Tap Into the 12-Million-Teraflop Handheld Megacomputer
"next stage in technological evolution is...the One Machine...hardware is assembled from our myriad devices, its software is written by our collective online behavior...the Machine also includes us. After all, our brains are programming & underpinning it"
computing  wired  cloud  kevinkelly  cloudcomputing  evolution  singularity  science  innovation  infodesign  collectiveintelligence  intelligence  computers  human  networks  mobile  mind  visualization  internet  future  brain  crowdsourcing  ai  data  it  learning2.0  trends  storage 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Bikestation [via: http://www.springwise.com/transportation/urban_bike_stations/]
"Bikestation is a not-for-profit organization that offers secure bicycle parking and related services to make cyclists' lives easier. Park your bike at one of our facilities and you can be assured that your vehicle is secure and covered. "
bikes  storage  activism  us  seattle  washingtonstate  losangeles  california  sustainability  transportation  commuting 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Bike Central [via: http://www.springwise.com/transportation/urban_bike_stations/]
"Whether your daily journey takes you from Papakura into town, or just rolling down from Parnell, we have the services to make it an enjoyable experience."
bikes  storage 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Purse Lip Square Jaw: Reminded of The Forgetting Machine
"Part of this involves the creative corruption of information - along the lines of bricolage or remixing - as well as the selective and wholesale deletion of information."
forgetting  memory  annegalloway  storage  information  remixing  technology  remixculture 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Drop.io: Simple Private Exchange
"enables you to create simple private exchange points called "drops." The service has no email signup and no "accounts." Each drop is private, and only as accessible as you choose to deliberately make it. Create multiple drops, add any type of media, and
webapps  sharing  filesharing  storage  tools  web2.0  onlinetoolkit  free  collaborative  messages  exchange  mobile  podcasting  dropbox  applications  record  video  audio 
april 2008 by robertogreco
File Dropper - The Simplest File Hosting Website Ever
"FileDropper.com was created as a fresh alternative to sites like MegaUpload and RapidShare. Unlike those sites, we do not reel the user in and make them wait for annoying countdown timers. We do not hide the download link with aggressively placed ads."
filesharing  onlinetoolkit  sharing  files  transfer  storage  free 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Software over the rainbow » Blog Archive » Mess up, dig for context, scatter… and find your stuff
"scattering could inject some healthy variety to our experience of digital information, giving us a richer context in which to manage our own data...we might be making our storage less efficient, but we’d be improving our memory of it."
storage  memory  data  bookmarks  tumblr  del.icio.us  bookmarking  digital  archiving  recall  search  context  scattering 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect: (Short Term) Memory Aids
"unintentional precursor to new class of object that you'll wonder how you did without, another small thing with a big future. The post-it or thumb drive of its time...Secondary & tertiary displays - optimised to support your (short term) memory."
memory  nokia  storage  post-its  displays  japan  electronics  gadgets  janchipchase  postits 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Click opera - From Stockhausen to stock repertoire
"Thanks to our conservative tastes and our advanced technology, we can't forget, can't purge, can't let stuff flow and go, can't rip it all up and start again, an act of destruction which is crucial to all acts of new creation."
music  momus  evolution  audio  art  memory  forgetting  creativity  progress  technology  storage  archiving 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The World In 2008 | Freeconomics: Online, there really is such a thing as a free lunch
"When the cost of serving a single customer is trending to zero, smart companies will charge nothing. Today, the disrupter’s motto is “Be the first to give away what others charge for”. If you listen to the technology, it makes sense."
bandwidth  free  storage  business  abundance  chrisanderson  trends 
november 2007 by robertogreco
GDrive: Three Ways it Could be a Game Changer
"1. Your files will become computable on a massive scale 2. Mobile access 3. Gears + GDrive"
cloud  google  sharing  storage  computing  gdrive 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - Perfect History: The ultimate strength of Wikipedia comes from its perfect history
"As more of our lives are recorded, stored, shared and banked in the perfect history of the One Machine, the inescapable memory will trigger powerful, and yet unappreciated forces on our souls."
kevinkelly  onemachine  wikipedia  lifelogging  waybackmachine  internet  online  web  memory  storage  technology  information  future 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium: Dimensions of the One Machine
"100 billion neurons in human brain..Today the Machine has as 5 X transistors than you have neurons in your head...Somewhere between 2020 & 2040 the Machine should exceed 6 billion HB. That is, it will exceed the processing power of humanity."
ai  brain  computers  technology  networks  singularity  future  internet  gamechanging  web  online  technium  kevinkelly  onemachine  human  processing  hardware  software  storage  mooreslaw 
november 2007 by robertogreco
The End of Cyberspace: A thought about the future of memory
"computer memory's impact on human memory isn't merely one of "offloading" or externalizing or digital amnesia: it's a story of a shifting of mnemonic resources, and a reconfiguration of the contents of our memories, not a simple shrinking of our memories
memory  mobile  tagging  storage  flickr  notetaking  writing  experience  navigation  gamechanging  cognition  brain  human 
november 2007 by robertogreco
TrustedReviews - Power To The People
"majority [of] people out there don't really care about [technology]...how those devices work...just about what they can do...it's that ubiquitous nature that makes a tech advancement great - fact that people don't see the tech, they just see the benefit.
technology  society  ubicomp  user  human  ipod  gamechanging  mobile  phones  storage  ux 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Basement.org: Enough With The Lists
"Just as Americans keep piling on stuff and putting it into storage (storage business booming), we just keep accumulating stuff with the desired intention to consume it later. The problem is we can't possibly consume at the pace we're producing."
lists  information  consumerism  consumption  overload  storage  sustainability  gamechanging  internet  online  web  happiness  depression  abundance  value 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Crossing the Deadline - MISSION ETERNITY
"MISSION ETERNITY is an information technology-driven cult of the dead"
etoy  death  future  internet  presentations  storage  data  newmedia  netart  afterlife  art  archive  design 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Move My Data
"Your content and data should be yours to manage and do with as you please. Your images, writing, tags, profile, blog entries, comments, testimonials, video, and music should be yours to download and move anyplace you want."
content  portability  opencontent  opendata  data  backup  flickr  utilities  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  software  management  opensource  storage  sync 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect: Consumption, Disposal Transparency
"looking towards a future imperfect where digital storage capacity is...unlimited, and government...consider it their duty to track/observe the minutiae of consumption. How long before digital delete button disappears completely...has it happened already?
ux  storage  memory  consumption  privacy  behavior  society  janchipchase 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Windows Live SkyDrive Beta
"Password-protected online file storage. Always available where you need it."
onlinetoolkit  storage  microsoft  backup  files  windows 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Mozy Online Backup: Free. Automatic. Secure.
"Download and install Mozy to ensure your data is safely backed up at a secure, remote location." first 2GB free
backup  free  software  storage  online  onlinetoolkit  files  tools 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Lost Format Preservation Society
"The society was founded in 2000 with the design of Emigre issue no. 57. It's sole purpose is to save formats from obscurity."
media  movies  music  recording  computers  collections  archive  analog  information  format  film  design  retro  storage  vinyl  technology  formats  archiving  digital  software  history 
june 2007 by robertogreco
BlogBackupOnline - Sign Up Now
"Until now, backing up your blog was complicated and tedious. BlogBackupOnline provides an effortless way to backup, restore, and export your blog."
backup  blogging  onlinetoolkit  online  storage  tools  utilities  web  free  blogs 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Format Exchange
"This will be a central repository and discussion space for file format conversion to aid in knowledge transfer. The goal is to build a community and tool to help allow the information we are all now creating digitally to move into the future."
tools  collections  exchange  file  format  software  conversion  culture  digital  language  media  storage  time  longnow 
february 2007 by robertogreco
A Head For Detail
"Gordon Bell feeds every piece of his life into a surrogate brain, and soon the rest of us will be able to do the same. But does perfect memory make you smarter, or just drive you nuts?"
brain  memory  life  research  profile  search  storage  technology  data  tracking  habits  microsoft  mylifebits  lifelogging 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Ourmedia Homepage | Ourmedia
"# Publish and store video, audio and other media that you created! # Share and discover independent media. Connect to a global community! # Learn how to create citizens media. Free storage & bandwidth forever! # Do NOT post other artists' copyrighted wor
audio  blogs  bookmarks  directory  collaborative  creativity  culture  digital  community  entertainment  free  folksonomy  learning  media  movies  mp3  music  online  opensource  participatory  photography  podcasts  portal  projects  share  sharing  social  socialsoftware  software  space  storage  tags  video  wiki 
april 2006 by robertogreco
Pando
"pando is a tiny app that lets you email any size file or folder to anyone, free."
web  online  internet  free  storage  technology  software  sharing  collaborative  tools  applications 
december 2005 by robertogreco
Backup, Sync and Listen to Your Digital Music Collection with an MP3tunes Locker @ MP3tunes.com
"MP3tunes is a MSP (Music Service Provider), providing individuals a personal music locker with unlimited storage online, making it possible to access one's music collection from any device. www.MP3tunes.com is the home of the MP3tunes Locker."
music  online  storage  tools  audio  files  services  web  utilities 
december 2005 by robertogreco

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