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Dr. Michelle Fine on Willful Subjectivity and Strong Objectivity in Education Research - Long View on Education
"In this interview, Dr. Michelle Fine makes the argument for participatory action research as a sophisticated epistemology. Her work uncovers the willful subjectivity and radical wit of youth. In the last ten minutes, she gives some concrete recommendations for setting up a classroom that recognizes and values the gifts that students bring. Please check out her publications on ResearchGate [https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michelle_Fine ] and her latest book Just Research in Contentious Times (Teachers College, 2018). [https://www.amazon.com/Just-Research-Contentious-Times-Methodological/dp/0807758736/ ]

Michelle Fine is a Distinguished Professor of Critical Psychology, Women’s Studies, American Studies and Urban Education at the Graduate Center CUNY.

Thank you to Dr. Kim Case and Professor Tanya L. Domi."
michellefine  reasearch  dispossession  privilege  resistance  solidarity  participatory  participatoryactionresearch  ethnography  education  benjamindoxtdatorcritical  pedagogy  race  racism  postcolonialism  criticaltheory  imf  epistemology  research  focusgroups  subjectivity  youth  teens  stories  socialjustice  criticalparticipatoryactionresearch  sexuality  centering  oppression  pointofview  action  quantitative  qualitative  injustice  gender  deficit  resilience  experience  radicalism  incarceration  billclinton  pellgrants  willfulsubjectivity  survivance  wit  radicalwit  indigeneity  queer  justice  inquiry  hannaharendt  criticalbifocality  psychology  context  history  structures  gigeconomy  progressive  grit  economics  victimblaming  schools  intersectionality  apolitical  neoliberalism  neutrality  curriculum  objectivity  contestedhistories  whiteprivilege  whitefragility  islamophobia  discrimination  alienation  conversation  disengagement  defensiveness  anger  hatred  complexity  diversity  self-definition  ethnicity 
november 2018 by robertogreco
From AI to IA: How AI and architecture created interactivity - YouTube
"The architecture of digital systems isn't just a metaphor. It developed out of a 50-year collaborative relationship between architects and designers, on one side, and technologists in AI, cybernetics, and computer science, on the other. In this talk at the O'Reilly Design Conference in 2016, Molly Steenson traces that history of interaction, tying it to contemporary lessons aimed at designing for a complex world."
mollysteenson  2016  ai  artificialintelligence  douglasenglebart  symbiosis  augmentation  christopheralexander  nicholasnegroponte  richardsaulwurman  architecture  physical  digital  mitmedialab  history  mitarchitecturemachinegroup  technology  compsci  computerscience  cybernetics  interaction  structures  computing  design  complexity  frederickbrooks  computers  interactivity  activity  metaphor  marvinminsky  heuristics  problemsolving  kent  wardcunningham  gangoffour  objectorientedprogramming  apatternlanguage  wikis  agilesoftwaredevelopment  software  patterns  users  digitalspace  interactiondesign  terrywinograd  xeroxparc  petermccolough  medialab 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Common-place: Common Reading: Undisciplined Reading: Finding surprise in how we read, Matthew P. Brown
"I read and teach novels regularly. But is the linear novel the only way one gets lost in a book? Consider those reference works that captivate you: a cookbook, a sports trivia volume, or a recordings guide. You open these books and escape into the pleasure of the cross-reference, the serendipitous, the transport to the known and the unknown. When I open David Thomson's New Biographical Dictionary of Film, forty minutes later the hard-boiled eggs are hard and boiling over, the cats are draped over the sleeping three-year-old, the dishes are still in the sink. Other than in Thomson's massaging, prickly prose, I know not where I am. The faint motion sickness I feel is from the cascade of ideas, memories, and anticipations, so different from the psychological and physiological response to channel- or Web-surfing, comparable fragmented modes of consumption. But reference-book reading of this sort assumes connoisseurship—that fancy word for heavy-panting, lighter-waving fandom—a habit of mind profoundly disciplinary.

I should feel shame about my disorderly reading, but I don't. In fact, I'd like to defend it as a reading practice of depth, rather than superficiality. Disorderly reading mimics the mind's generative activity of thought and discovery, those instances where you know something is happening but you don't know what it is. We might better call it discontinuous or nonlinear reading and acknowledge its long history, a history that reveals the fact that nonlinear reading lends itself to routinized procedure as well.

Reading seems ineluctably bound up in discipline, in customary behavior that precedes and structures the significance of the reading. But how then does reading become a means to the new, the unknown, the undiscovered? If even messy reading falls into predictable patterns and outcomes, how might what we read, or rather how we read, surprise us?

My contention is that one might use discipline to escape discipline, that freeing the mind is achieved by entering into restrictive procedures that liberate thinking. Let's begin by assessing that literary form most associated with the unknown, the undiscovered, or the novel—that is, the novel. Then we'll turn to early modern disciplines, finding analogies in them for contemporary reading scenes. Our guide here will be that Other to the twenty-first-century secular intellectual: the seventeenth-century English devout, those bigoted regicides and colonial Malvolios known—not without controversy, now and then, now perhaps more than then—as "Puritans.""



"Another reading discipline of surprise derived from Puritan mores is the conventicle. Conventicles were extramural religious meetings of select congregants within a church, most famously practiced in early America by Anne Hutchinson during the Antinomian controversy. (A quiescent version of conventicling from contemporary church history is the cellular model of Rick Warren's organization, the Saddleback megachurch.) Rooted in the idea that reading matter rather than institutional authority could be a source of spiritual sustenance, conventiclers absorbed scripture, repeated sermons, and sang psalms. Conventicling operated along a spectrum from conservative to separatist. And, like puritan, conventicle was a rhetorically charged word that could mean devout private gathering or conspiratorial unlawful assembly, depending upon who did the labeling.

Pious or riotous, conventicling illuminates a classroom dynamic familiar to current undergraduate literature professors. My rough sense is that in research universities and non-elite colleges, a majority of the students in each course are cats we herd unsuccessfully, while a largish minority learn something in a rote way. The remnant is the conventicle, actual or virtual students who meet with their minds in class discussion, with each other outside of class, and with the professor after sessions. When I read Susannah Rowson or Herman Melville or Toni Morrison or Richard Powers for class preparation, I have the majority in mind, as I gather the three points I want to get across in the fifty minutes. Reaching and teaching this majority is one of the real pleasures of my professorial life. But, in the reading prep, I have the conventicle in mind, for that is where the surprise happens."
via:asfaltics  reading  howweread  matthewpbrown  2007  books  chaos  messiness  linearity  novels  behavior  orderliness  rules  academics  academia  pedagogy  nonliner  structure  structures  puritans  conventicles  oulipo  authorlessness  linear 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Amazing Structure: A Conversation With Ursula Franklin - Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic
"The gender issue is really a postwar issue. Women, wherever they were, what side or what in the war situation, stepped into the places that men had left. And they were competent, and they could do it. It was only after the war, when the men came back, that they needed the mystique—that she’s a girl, and so oughtn’t [to be] there, this is a man’s job. The gender issue, in practical terms—either who [could be] in school or who thought they could do which job, which science, which math—is a postwar issue anywhere in the world.

And it’s the issue of a large number of well-organized men, who often got their training in the army during the war, returning and needing both work and justification for their organized maleness in a very hierarchical structure. These guys came out of the military, and brought skills, but mostly brought demands.

There were women who had coped—often very well in very technical [positions]—but what was needed now was a distinction between those who came out of a culture of order, discipline, and minimal consideration of an individual’s contribution. So you had to get the women out of the workplace. And that’s when that question—they can’t do math, or they are frightened of machines—that’s where all that crap comes from. But it’s there, and it took until the late ’50s when women said: “Ah ah! What’s going on here?”

It’s the collectivity—with some consciousness-raising, you see—that actually, the personal is political. It’s not that our skirts are too short or too long; it’s just that we are being pushed around and maybe we have to put a stop to it collectively. But that gender-based look at knowledge and competency is postwar.

So my school experience: It was ‘so what?’ "



"There’s no question that somebody who was in the position I was when my son was born, and said to somebody, ‘I’m pregnant.’ There’s legislation now; they have to keep your job; they have to give you that much maternity leave; you have a medical insurance system that picks up some of those expenses; and no employer can say no. That’s an enormous change.

The salary thing is still a question where one may have to struggle, but it is not that a priori a woman gets paid less for work of equal value. And there are laws that one can change. Not that people who need to challenge have the power to do so, but that exists. I mean if you see the number of women—school principals and university presidents—that is the change.

I constantly emphasize that the issue is not essentially gender. The issue is patriarchy. I must say that I myself have been surprised at the rapid rise of lady patriarchs. And of course there are lady patriarchs. I was surprised how easily young women who have all options open for patriarchy become as much the patriarch in a hierarchical structure as any man does; and conversely, how many men—how many men, not that many—have found a collaborative structure convenient and don’t pull rank. 

The developments flow from there. The main development is legislation—and that hand-waving isn’t good enough."



"[Q] And when you say “lady patriarchs,” what do you mean?

I mean women who behave as if they are generals or bishops. It makes no difference in many ways if it’s a woman or a man. In particular positions, a woman can be as inconsiderate a lady patriarch as a male patriarch would have been. So the issue is the hierarchical structuring; the issue is patriarchy.

[Q] You were also involved in strontium testing. Did that float out of your social work in the ’60s, your work as a citizen?

What you are referring to is the sense that one is a citizen first and happen to be a professional in one area or another, but you don’t stop being a citizen because you are a highway engineer or a professor of metallurgy, but you also don’t leave all your scientific knowledge when you are a resident in the district that is suddenly heavily influence by pollution from another plant; or, globally, from fallout or chemical pollution.

When you object to things like that, you bring the skills that you have to have professionally to it, as do all the others who may provide citizen input or position. The whole fabric of the democratic process comes from citizens who are competent in various ways, and my competency happens to be science. I have a certain skill in teaching to make it clear to people without using jargon what certain inevitable things, such as nuclear fallout or river pollution, mean, and that the half-life of uranium doesn’t change when you change governments. Somebody has to say that at the right place in the right language, and I’ve always taken these opportunities and, like others, contributed with the best I had.

So I’ve very much been a part of women’s peace organizations and very much meet in the most active form of pacifism—the prevention of situations that lead to war. So the pacifism, elective pacifism, are all the political and social measures against injustices that in the end drive hatred and violence.

[Q] Once you were at the University of Toronto, and got into archeometry and teaching, I suppose that followed the reforms in Canada. Did you see the university change over your time there, and just generally what was it like to be a female professor of engineering during the ’70s and ’80s?

Well… pretty lonely. You know the real difficulty is to protect and advance your women students, and to see that they are in a hassle-free learning environment. When I came to the university, I’d been around long enough to know that I wasn’t one of the gang, and I never would be. I didn’t have a desire to be one of the boys.

But the great wish—to give my women students a hassle-free, happy learning environment—that’s what’s difficult. The culture of engineering is not a culture of acceptance and understanding of anything that is female and—at the same time—equal. So that’s… that’s a real job. It was a long and hard [work] in this, and it’s by no means yet all done."

[See also Annes post about Ursula Franklin: http://designculturelab.org/2012/07/17/from-the-plsj-archives-an-extraordinary-mind/ ]
ursulafranklin  robinsonmeyer  2014  interviews  feminism  partiarchy  gender  hierarchy  hierarchies  law  legal  women  science  structures  management  organizations  history  canada  highered  highereducation  labor  regulation  standards  quakers  pacifism  peace  equality  quaker 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Tokyo Tanuki: Learning from Mythical and Real Urban Animals | This Big City
"Investigating urban animals offers unexpected insights for remaking city life so that it is more adaptable and responsive to interaction and sharing. Like buildings and people, animals also have a history in the city, with dimensions that include layers, time, and context. Animal architecture helps us look past materials and structures, and turn our focus to cohabitable microspaces, pleasures, pranks, and cross-species relationships."
fruit  architecture  landscape  structures  malleablestructures  habitat  japanese  myth  relationships  cross-speciesrelationships  pranks  habitation  microspaces  context  time  layers  animals  urbanism  urban  japan  jessmantel  jaredbraiterman  chrisberthelsen  tanuki  multispecies 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Architizer Blog » Singapore’s Steel ‘Supertrees’ Rise over Marina Bay
"Describing the reign of the mechanistic, Talorized new state order and its transmogrification of nature in his dystopian scare novel We, Yevgeny Zamyatin wrote how, under the sovereign gaze of the “One-State”, all livings things were remade, cast anew by the Machine: “All was new, made of steel: a steel sun, steel trees, steel people.” The dreary (and admittedly, awesome) reality has found a home in Singapore, amid steel “Gardens by the Bay”, foregrounding Moshe Safdie’s gargantuan Marina Bay Sands.

The “supertrees”, as they are called, are part of the soon-to-be completed OCBC Skyway that weaves an aerial walkway through a grove of 18 arboreal structures, which range in height from 25-50 meters (82-164 feet). The steel trunks will collect and store rainwater for reuse and will also sport built-in solar panels to generate electricity, which will be used, among other purposes, to release hot air into the  ground conservatories…"
2012  structures  design  architecture  singapore  trees 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Tobias Revell / New Mumbai 2045
"In 2045, a synthetic biology research corporation, suspecting that its technology has been leaked, send out a research party to the slum city of New Mumbai to investigate. They find that the appalling living conditions of the city, coupled with the ingenuity and collective knowledge of the residents has spawned huge ingenuity in the synthetic fungi the corporation had been working on.

The residents have adapted the huge fungal structures to absorb sunlight and they use them as living power stations for their homes. They also absorb moisture from the air which can be drained off for consumption. Some of the genetic alterations making the fungi super-strong have even allowed them to be used as structures for living and growing crops on."
urbanism  urban  cities  newmumbai  sciencefiction  scifi  bioconstruction  slums  structures  syntheticbiology  biology  architecture  2045  fungi  mumbai  tobiasrevell 
february 2012 by robertogreco
FOUNDation
"Foundation, a concept by Rikkert Paauw and Jet van Zwieten is about collecting waste material and old furniture from the neighborhood, moving it to a waste container, reusing it to turn it into a small house (with the container as the foundation), to become a temporary meeting place for neighbors and passers-by. During the project, graphic designer Jet van Zwieten will give shape to a public journal that shows the progress and tells the story of the found material and its contributors. This site-specific and investigative approach to design and public space leaves room for unexpected local input and cooperation."

[Blogged here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/11855798582/foundation-projects-vienna-design-week-2010-see ]
FOUNDation  reuse  architecture  pop-upcafes  pop-uprestaurants  pop-upculture  design  tempworks  rikkertpaauw  jetvanzwieten  milan  vienna  glvo  temporary  temporaryspaces  structures  making  doing  popup  pop-ups  local  hyperlocal  openstudioproject 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Suburbs and Cubicles : peterme.com
"The cubicle farm strikes me as the real-world embodiment of the dehumanization represented in org charts. I’m reading Douglas Rushkoff’s Life, Inc., about the rise of corporatism. He mentions the flight to the suburbs (also mentioned in The McDonaldization of Society) and I wondered about the connection between the suburbs and the cubicle farm. Both contributed to the individualizing of America, our separation from one another.. Both strike me as products of Weberian rationalization, in that tract homes and cubicle farms are models of efficiency and quantifiability from the stand point of production… but ultimately isolating and damaging from the perspective of those who have to live in and use them."
suburbs  suburbia  cubicles  perermerholz  work  workplace  structures  industrialage  deschooling  unschooling  community  communities  separation  individualized  individualism  collaboration  corporatism  lcproject  tcsnmy  hierarchy  petermerholz 
april 2011 by robertogreco
what’s wrong with “prosthetics porn”? (part II) | Abler.
"How can technologies demonstrate an outward posture? I mean, how might they extend their forms and also their functions, beyond a single user? Couldn’t they both resolve & reveal, pose more questions than answers?…"

"A built environment, a city that accommodates—& indeed demonstrates—physical or cognitive interdependence doesn’t only call for limbs & ramps. We need wholly-spectacular impracticalities, & artistic research & collaboration, & public interactive art, & we need the most durable accessibility equipment we can design."

"Moreover, we might take the long view in order to get the short view more clearly in focus. This has long been said of science fiction in literature—that our ideas about the future are really an index of our attitudes in the present. I’m interested in futurism in prosthetics as an inquiry & spectacle, & I also want to make projects that help us harness our technologies for a more inclusive world."
abler  sarahendren  prosthetics  bikes  bikesharing  interdependence  cities  architecture  technology  assistivetechnology  art  publicart  accessibility  design  present  future  inclusiveness  inclusion  futurism  objects  objectfixations  prostheticsporn  modernism  utopia  structures  spatialagency  brunolatour  parasite  michaelrakowitz  rebar  adaptivetechnology  adaptive  eyeborg  eyewear  tandems  tandembicycles  biking  spoke-o-dometer  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Things We Like: A Veritable Playground Made Out Of Packing Tape. | Public Workshop
"It is a flexible and forgiving, an open system of design, and construction that encourages relentless testing, exploration and collaboration. Very much like our landscape weaving projects (here and here), the material itself is so disassociating to the design-builder that one is likely to drop their conceptions of possibility and the formal notions of space that they have accumulated over their lifetime. We’ve repeatedly seen in our own work how although the final structures may not be permanent, this type of design-build process is incredibly valuable as a piece of a larger learning or design process for getting groups of kids or community members to drop their assumptions and fully, openly explore the possibility of an idea or space."
packingtape  projectideas  architecture  space  structures  play  playgrounds  materials  testing  tinkering  experimentation  exploration  collaboration  design  alexgilliam  publicworkshop 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Architecture - Kisho Kurokawa’s Future Vision, Banished to Past - NYTimes.com
"Founded by a loose-knit group of architects at end of 50s, Metabolist movement sought to create flexible urban models for a rapidly changing society. Floating cities. Cities inspired by oil platforms. Buildings that resembled strands of DNA. Such proposals reflected Japan’s transformation from a rural to modern society...also reflected more universal trends, like social dislocation & fragmentation of traditional family, influencing generations of architects from London to Moscow...project’s lasting importance has more to do with structural innovations & how they reflect Metabolists’ views on evolution of cities. Each of the concrete capsules was assembled in a factory, including details like carpeting & bathroom fixtures...then shipped to site & bolted, one by one, onto concrete & steel cores that housed building’s elevators, stairs & mechanical systems...became a symbol of Japan’s technological ambitions, as well as of the increasingly nomadic existence of the white-collar worker."

[video here: http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/6972/kurokawas-capsule-tower-demolition.html ]
architecture  japan  1950s  technology  structures  nakagincapsuletower  design  prefab  modular  tokyo  society  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  cities  urban  urbanism  modernism  metabolists 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Here I see the ants on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"I think of my words, scattered over the world, where they are seen by other people but the mysterious order is only known to myself, the meaning of their placements, and then I think of something previously unconsidered: the far more intricate hollow in my own mind, created as the words have been excavated. What shape is that nest? How do I live there?"
mattwebb  ants  words  memes  ideas  structures  comments 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Ruins of the Present | Beyond The Beyond
"*We’ve long had a term of art for old buildings that are ruined...“ruins.” *However, we lack a term of art for “ruins” that are actually buildings never completed. Sometimes they’re completed buildings that are never sold...start falling over before they were ever inhabited...*Another version is the abandoned, incomplete high-rise...In Brazil a skeleton framework of this kind is called a “squelette.” *Occasionally squatters move into “squelettes” & bring in some breeze-block, corrugated tin and plastic hoses, transforming squelettes into high-rise favelas. This doesn’t work very well because it’s tough to manage the utilities, especially the water...*It bothers me to use clumsy circumlocutions like “unfinished ruins” or “partially built, yet abandoned structures” or “stillborn highrises” for a phenomenon that is so common and so obvious to billions of urban people, so henceforth I am going to call them “squelettes.” They don’t have to be Brazilian, French, or 80 stories tall, either."
brucesterling  neologisms  language  ruins  squellettes  culture  architecture  crisis  abandoned  abandonment  decay  squatting  unfinished  cutshort  structures  buildings  wabi-sabi 
june 2009 by robertogreco
MIT engineers find way to slow concrete creep to a crawl - MIT News Office
"In their PNAS paper, the researchers show experimentally that the rate of creep is logarithmic, which means slowing creep increases durability exponentially. They demonstrate mathematically that creep can be slowed by a rate of 2.6. That would have a truly remarkable effect on durability: a containment vessel for nuclear waste built to last 100 years with today's concrete could last up to 16,000 years if made with an ultra-high-density (UHD) concrete." [via: http://bldgblog.blogspot.com/2009/06/parking-lot-to-last-16000-years.html]
materials  concrete  longevity  engineering  structures  density 
june 2009 by robertogreco
scott javier: fingerprint pavillion
"the substructure consists of catenary derived ribs fabricated from a double thickness of spruce ply.
architecture  wood  glvo  structures  construction  make  plywood 
april 2009 by robertogreco
HUMANSHELTER.ORG
"Michael Jantzen is an internationally known artist/ designer whose work has been featured in hundreds of articles in books, magazines, and newspapers from around the world. His work has also been presented on various TV and radio programs, and in many galleries. Some of his designs have been exhibited at the National Building Museum, the Canadian Center for Architecture, and at the Museum of Modern Art in New York."
michaeljantzen  architecture  environment  sustainability  energy  wind  structures  homes  shelter  design  sculpture 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Shedworking
"Shedworking is the only daily updated guide to the lifestyles of shedworkers and those who work in shedlike atmospheres."
architecture  design  sheds  homes  housing  simplicity  prefab  diy  workplace  work  workspace  structures  buildings  workspaces 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Super Colossal » Cardboard Cubby
"To be honest, I am not really sure what they were after, but we produced a prototype for a flat-pack cubby house, made of cardboard that would could be recycled easily once it is no longer fun, or when it rains, whichever comes first."
architecture  cardboard  children  sustainability  play  structures  via:cityofsound 
february 2008 by robertogreco
wrapping up 2007 (28 December 2007, Interconnected)
"Stafford Beer in his book Platform for Change. Beer talks about social institutions such as 'schooling,'... These are self-organising and self-regulating systems. As their environment changes, how do they not collapse? How are they not sensitive to shock?

Beer says that an ultrastable social institution will do one of three things in response to change:

1. It will change internally and still survive (I guess this is like scouting or soccer, both institutions that have changed minimally).

2. The institution's internal form will change, but its relationships to other institutions will remain. Perhaps this is like prisons, which have the same relationship to the population, police, courts and government... but operate internally very differently.

3. Dramatic change occurs. This makes me think of the Church: it has changed enormously internally and in its external relations over the last millennium, yet it's still the Church."
semanticweb  socialsoftware  markets  structures  mattwebb  lcproject  marketing  gamechanging  social  web2.0  trends  thinking  theory  technology  groups  future  organizations  simplicity  coding  science  computers  systems  collapse  institutions  society  change  reform  deschooling  staffordbeer  complexity  environment  evolution  flocking  cars  transportation  rfid  gps  physics  astronomy  astrophysics  nanotechnology  ultrastablesystems  progress  phenotropics  search  microformats  patterns  drugs  advertising  browser  web  internet  thermodynamics  freemarkets  capitalism  behavior  economics  modeling  identity  reputation  sharing  networks  networking  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  self  human  memory  forgetting  play  flickr  webdev  development  webdesign  experience  ux  flow  iphoto  interaction  design  radio  typologies  words  motivation  risk  abstraction  schooling  schools  2007  browsers 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Presentation: Gaming the Web: Using the Structure of Games to Design Better Web Apps
"Given yesterday at Voices That Matter 2007. It's not really web-centric--it applies to all application design, really."
applications  design  experience  gamedesign  games  gaming  interactiondesign  ux  mechanics  play  rules  structures  systems  webdev  webdesign 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Cool Hunting: Materials & Applications
"CH looks at some of the stunning works that have been shown there, from the attention-grabbing golden vortex of Maximillian's Schell to last year's interactive fountain piece. We also check out the current "Bubbles," which features white teardrop-shaped
video  architecture  design  materials  installation  structures  experiments 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Stephen Downes: Groups vs Networks: The Class Struggle Continues
"A group demands unity, where a network requires diversity. A group requires coordination, where a network is autonomous. A group is by its nature closed, where a network is open. The information in a group is distributed, where in a network it is in the
learning  education  homeschool  schools  schooldesign  structures  groups  networks  networking  online  internet  philosophy  administration  web  stephendownes 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Teach and Learn Online: Groups and/or networks... the future of learning in a networked world
"A group demands unity, where a network requires diversity. A group requires coordination, where a network is autonomous. A group is by its nature closed, where a network is open. The information in a group is distributed, where in a network it is in the
learning  education  homeschool  schools  schooldesign  structures  groups  networks  networking  online  internet  philosophy  administration  web  collaboration  social  systems  technology  ideas 
september 2006 by robertogreco
.:: the uchronians are back ::.
"The experience of transforming personal creativity to a unique object being a source of satisfaction. The Uchronia installation is gigantic. It consists of 150 km of timber with a floor span of 60 by 30 meters in the center, and a height of 15 meters. Pa
architecture  design  structures  burningman 
september 2006 by robertogreco
calendarlive.com: ART REVIEW - The structure of a relationship
"A joint display of work by Matta and Gordon Matta-Clark invites viewers to look for a link between father and son. Can it be found in Surrealism?"
art  architecture  structures  chile  matta-clark  gordonmatta-clark 
august 2006 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: A breeze-driven pavilion and some bridge-machines
"Michael Jantzen's Wind Shaped Pavilion is "a large fabric structure that can be used as a public or private pavilion. As a lightweight fabric structure, the wind slowly and randomly rotates each of the six segments around a central open support frame."
wind  sustainability  environment  architecture  energy  kinetic  structures 
august 2006 by robertogreco

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