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robertogreco : students   306

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xian franzinger barrett on Twitter: "@TheJLV The first time I was observed as a student teacher. I was quite nervous. My students asked why, "We observe you every day and we are more im… https://t.co/8QEUi6A0nx"
"The first time I was observed as a student teacher. I was quite nervous. My students asked why, "We observe you every day and we are more important observers". I remember than every time I'm observed, even in harassment. Our students know the teaching they need. Much love."

[added:
"☛ “We observe you every day and we are more important observers.”

Cf. _I Learn from Children_ http://groveatlantic.com/book/i-learn-from-children/ … and “Who are you now?” http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/748734074"
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/933096514351534082 ]
xianfranzingerbarrett  teaching  howweteach  carolinepratt  observation  children  students  relationships  everyday  learning  unschooling  deschooling  education  pedagogy  conversation  2017 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Data collected about student behaviour doesn't help improve teaching or learning
"Universities and schools around the world face constant pressure to find measures that demonstrate their impact on student learning. Most recently, they are devoting immense amounts of time, money and other resources to a new measurement approach called learning analytics.

Learning analytics captures data about student and teacher behaviour, most frequently from the learning management software systems (LMS) used by schools and universities to design, manage and deliver their programs and courses.

The data includes tweets, file uploads, downloads, logons and participation in LMS blogs and chat rooms. This data is frequently augmented with information from other systems like student records and administration.

The goal of learning analytics is to establish what works to improve learning and teaching in the same way other fields use analytic approaches to predict the behaviour of shoppers, banking fraudsters and stock traders.

The idea of using data to understand and predict better learning and teaching makes complete sense, so what’s the problem?

The problem is that the learning analytics data gathered is not much about learning or teaching.

When analytics systems monitor the behaviour of shoppers, or fraudsters, or stock traders, they are watching what people do when they shop, commit frauds or make trades; the behaviour the analysts are interested in predicting.

In learning analytics, the concept is the same – to predict whether students learn well and teachers teach effectively.

However, the quality of learning and teaching cannot be determined from the behaviours being watched and counted by an LMS or related systems.

Why? Because knowing how many times a student tweeted or used a chat room has little to do with how teachers teach or the ways students learn.

The current learning analytics approach is like deciding whether a medical practice is successful by counting whether people attend their appointments or pick up their prescriptions, instead of focusing on doctors interacting with patients and the quality of what happens when they do.

No data to show it works

Not surprisingly, there is no body of evidence showing that LMS and other system data improve student learning or teaching.

It is not the case that current learning analytic data is irrelevant. It is correlated with student engagement and participation and may offer general indicators of student needs. It just does not inform teachers or learners what they need to do better or differently to make learning happen.

Focusing on things that do not make an important difference to student learning means we are not paying attention to the things that do.

Over 50 years of research on learning and teaching has told us about what makes a lecture active, how students work best in groups, the strategies that help students learn most effectively, and what makes for quality assessment.

These things among many others are well known, while data about them can be gathered from the interaction among teachers and students face-to-face or online.

Most importantly, they are powerful predictors of student learning. The issue is worthy of serious concern because the things we measure focus our attention, shape our priorities and can ultimately determine what we understand and how we behave. This is a big problem if you are not gathering the right data.

Learning analytics data and the systems that gather it have become proxies, surrogates for what we should be measuring to improve student learning.

Three ways to solve the problem

1. Pay attention to the over 50 years of research about learning and teaching that show visible effects on student achievement, including what makes co-operative and teacher-led learning most effective.

2. Build technology tools that help teachers to design, deliver and evaluate what they do in ways that include effective learning and teaching approaches. A growing body of research is showing that technology can be used in a different way to assist teachers design and deliver more effective learning experiences. This approach offers the potential of a new kind of learning analytics data that focuses on what learners and teachers do.

3. Gather data directly from the people involved – the students and teachers. Ask them to give feedback when they are designing, delivering and participating in learning and teaching, instead of surveilling them. This feedback emerges all the time from the day-to-day interaction among students and teachers.

We know that doing something about these things can make a big difference in student learning. Implementing the three solutions means focusing on the evidence we need instead of the data we have.

We can gather data on how well programs and courses are designed, whether effective practices are being employed, whether assignments line up with what is taught, and whether all those efforts are improving student learning outcomes.

The problem with learning analytics is not simply another example of education wastefully impersonating other fields for little benefit.

These types of data and the systems that gather them are defining what learning and teaching mean. At present, quality is being defined by the data that is available instead of the feedback we need about learning and teaching in schools and universities."
students  schools  data  behavior  2016  learninganalytics  teaching  learningoutcomes  howweteach  surveillance 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Some Rules for Teachers – The New Inquiry
"after John Cage

1. only ask the questions to which you really need answers

2. demonstrate uncertainty

3. reconstruct for your students your own previous errors of thought and elucidate to your students what factors lead to a changed mind

4. do not let the terms with which you understand the world get in the way of understanding it

5. give up any desire to be the smartest person in the room

6. remember that students have bodies and that bodies require movement, sustenance, rest, and relief

7. leave an inheritance of dialectic

8. preserve and sustain whatever delusions you’ve found necessary to behave in good faith

9. every student is a genius

10. do not be afraid to state the obvious

11. a socratic bully is still a bully

12. thoroughly prepare class, including making preparations to abandon your preparations entirely

13. listen with your body

14. suspect charisma

15. conduct yourself in such a way that your students can eventually forget that you exist"
pedagogy  anneboyer  johncage  2015  teaching  howweteach  education  unschooling  deschooling  charisma  uncertainty  questionasking  questions  questioning  understanding  learning  dialectic  bodies  movement  students  genius  askingquestions  body 
september 2015 by robertogreco
The Student Bill of Rights
"We believe that all students should have a voice, and that all students should have the ability to vote on issues in their schools that matter to them. The Student Bill of Rights is a way for students and education stakeholders to do exactly that. Below, you’ll find a list of a variety of different issues that matter to students. To make your voice heard, simply select one and share your thoughts, or add new ideas to vote on. Sign up for the email list below to stay updated on our pilot launch."
students  education  rights  billofrights  studentbillofrights  humanrights  expression  safety  well-being  learning  howwelearn  agency  information  privacy  security  surveillance  employment  assessment  technology  inclusivity  inclusion  diversity  civics  participation  studentvoice  voice  inlcusivity 
march 2015 by robertogreco
What You Should Know This Week
"Although e-books, including digital textbooks, have added to new features to make them more attractive to readers – the ability to add highlights, the ability to search the entire corpus – these are secondary to students, who still prefer making their own notes and being able to flip to indexes and Tables of Content. And neither print not digital textbooks have managed to address the big problem that college students face: the rising cost. (That is, digital textbooks tend not to be much cheaper.)

Often we tell a story of technology that posits it’s all inevitable: e-books will mean the end of print; computers will mean the end of paper. But technology development and technology adoption do not necessarily march forward like that. We also assume that younger students – labeled “digital natives” as The Washington Post does in its coverage of Baron’s book – necessarily want more technology because they’re more comfortable and more adept with it.

“My major concern,” Baron told TNR, “as a person in higher education, is that we’re not listening. We’re assuming we’re being helpful by lowering price, by making it more convenient, by helping the environment, but we don’t bother asking our students what they think.”"
audreywatters  teaching  learning  pedagogy  print  digital  books  education  students  studentvoice  2015  listening  input  howweteach  howwelearn  technology  edtech  screens  naomibaron  ebooks 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Why (Not) Wearables
"Students are watched. They are monitored. They are assessed. They are quantified.

Calls for a “quantified student” are connected in part to the “quantified self” movement, whose proponents use various technologies – apps, sensors, and wearables – to monitor aspects of their daily life (most commonly related to health and wellness, tracking things like caloric intake, sleep quality, and physical activity). The notion of the “quantified self” isn’t new – there are merely new devices for tracking, new ways to count “what counts.” “What counts” remains largely the same.

So even if a student gets to track for herself her own data there’s still, again, a very limited sense of “what counts,” based in part on the education system’s existing data demands and measurements. (This is one of the great ironies of disrupting “seat time”: we’re turning to other similarly flawed metrics.)"

"And so education technology opts to track more data. Rarely do we stop to ask to whom all this is being revealed or to what end. If both education and education technology view students as objects – objects to be tracked and monitored and shaped and surveilled – what role can we expect wearables to play?"
surveillance  audreywatters  2015  horizonreport  hype  policy  rfid  wearables  quantification  data  recording  video  googleglass  gps  students  schools  tracking  control  fitbit  edtech  technology  education  altschool 
january 2015 by robertogreco
I Start the Year with Nothing
"When students make the rules, classroom community soars."

"Middle school is a scary thing for our students—it’s the first time since kindergarten that they’ve been forced into classes with strangers. Every year, as my new students wander in, toss their bags and find a seat, I take stock of the amazing collection of visibly different ways the age 12 can look on a human, and I wonder if I have the tools to bring those kids together.

My colleagues sometimes think, because I’m an artist, that I’ll have colorful bulletin boards in my room, but each year I leave my room bare and unadorned. I start the year with nothing but a giant piece of paper and a marker. And I ask one question: “If you could do anything you wanted in school this year, what would it be?”

This year was the same as usual. The response was silence. I tried again, “Anything? Come on! You’re the boss this year.”

Nothing. I sat on the floor. “Come here, please, and sit where I can see everyone.” Without my help, the students formed a circle, bending their heads around their neighbors, making sure they could see each other, sliding back to make space.

“She can’t see this guy! Move over!” The energy changed.

“Please,” I interjected.

“Huh?”

“Move over, please.”

“Oh, sorry. Move over—please.”

“Thank you,” we both said simultaneously and laughed.

“I don’t feel like writing. Can somebody else do that for me?” I said and tossed the marker to a kid sitting near the back. I took his spot on the floor, forcing him forward with my decision. He took charge right away, flaunting his power. I reminded him to pose the question again, “If you could do anything you wanted in school this year, what would it be?”—and this time the answers poured forth.

“I wanna be the teacher!” Hysterical laughter.

“Write it down,” I directed the new “teacher.” He did, but his spelling wasn’t great and he knew it. He seemed a little scared, and his bravado was fading.

The kids yelled at him, hoping to be recognized: “I want to grade the papers!” “Sit at the teacher’s desk!” “Field trips! Oh yeah, Hershey Park!” “No, I wanna go to the beach!” The new teacher couldn’t keep up with the rest of the kids, “his” students. When he was about to give up, I suggested he get help. A zillion “Ooh, ooh, me! Pick ME!” shouts later, he realized he not only needed a writer but some crowd control, too. I told him, again, to ask for help. He picked two others the class decided to name “bouncers.” At my prompting, the new teacher asked the question again, “Okay, what do you guys want to do this year?”

The bouncers insisted on manners and, amazingly, the class proceeded without me until their paper was filled with ideas: a homey classroom with real furniture, plants, lamps, painted walls, beanbags, FOOD!, a drinking fountain in the classroom, a fridge, students running the class, teaching, grading, deciding what to learn, field trips, parties, FUN! FREEDOM! POWER!

Eventually, the students started to get tired and a little bummed out. Their lists seemed ridiculous and impossible. It was time for me to step back in as facilitator.

“Nice job,” I said, but they were quiet. Then they accused me of lying to them. Their eyes followed me as I stepped to a cabinet and removed a roll of paper. I asked someone to go in my desk and find me some tape, and, suddenly, the energy was on the upswing. They couldn’t believe I had let someone in my desk! I used the tape to hang up a wish list created by one of my classes from the previous year.

“This is the wish list from last year’s class. Everything that’s crossed out, they did.” Next came a barrage of, “They did THAT? REALLY?” I assured them it was true, and then someone asked, “Well, HOW did they do that?”

It was my opening: “What do you think you’d need to do in order to be able to do that?” I asked, and the ideas poured out. I drew a T-chart on the board with the words “want” and “how to get what we want,” and the students dissected the process behind one of the other class’s projects.

I continued the conversation all morning, building the ground rules by which our class would function over the course of the coming year. By the time we finished, my colleagues were well into their second subject, but we’d done something as or more important—we had successfully set the foundation for a democratic classroom.

We had determined the structure and process of future weekly class meetings. We, as a class, decided to insist on making time for these meetings, which would follow a pattern: 10 minutes of gripes/complaints, 20 minutes for planning something from their wish list, and 10 minutes of sharing and compliments.

By the end of the month, my classroom was decorated and beautiful and homey and productive. Eventually, we had a full library (run by students) and a publishing center (run by parents). We made birdhouses in geometry and painted them and sold them for $20 each to fund a whale-watching trip. We groomed and rode horses at a farm. We painted a 40-foot mural in the cafeteria promoting our favorite books, and we made a video for new students and English language learners showing them around the building and introducing them to the faces of the nurse, the principal and the teachers. We invited the members of our ever-changing community to share food and culture and professional expertise with us. We built, painted, constructed and invented. We learned academics, respect, tolerance and the meaning of democracy in action. Our classroom was a place where all things were possible, including bridging differences in race, culture, language and financial resources.

By the end of the year, we could barely remember what it was like to feel like strangers, and we knew that, although we might have started the year with nothing, we’d learned to create everything together."

[See also:http://www.tolerance.org/student-voice

"When invested and empowered, students can be equal partners in creating a productive and meaningful learning environment. This toolkit provides an inventory to allow you to reflect on how student voices and input are integrated into your classroom and school community.

Given the opportunity, students can be equal partners in creating a productive and meaningful learning environment. This classroom and school inventory provides the tools necessary to assess how student voice and input are integrated into the culture and community and includes suggestions for how to improve student empowerment and investment.

Essential Question

1. How does involving student voice, input and agency in the classroom change the learning process for students and teachers?

In the classroom

• Are students involved in decorating the classroom?
• Do you have a process for establishing joint expectations about classroom norms and values?
• Are students allowed to express their expectations of the teacher?
• Is there a process for shared decision-making about consequences when agreed-upon classroom expectations or guidelines are broken?
• Do students lead some of the lessons in your classroom?
• Do you solicit student feedback on your lessons?
• Do you assign student roles and responsibilities in the classroom?
• Do you hold classroom meetings to discuss concerns, news, events and changes?

In our school community:

• Are students involved in decorating the hallways or other common spaces?
• Are there opportunities for students to lead schoolwide meetings or assemblies?
• How are students involved in setting the general guidelines for conduct at the school?
• Do student representatives sit on any adult-led school committees?
• If there is a student government association, how does that group collect concerns, ideas or feedback from their peers?
• If there is a student government association, how do those elected leaders share the concerns of their peers with school leadership? ]
rules  howweteach  tcsnmy  nancybarnoreynolds  2014  studentvoice  empowerment  cv  education  teaching  students  middleschool  classroom  classrooms 
december 2014 by robertogreco
The Kids Are As Smart As You | Practical Theory
"Back when I was in the classroom full-time, a student paid me what I thought was about the best compliment I’d ever been paid as a teacher.

“Mr. Lehmann, other teachers try to prove to us how smart they are. We know you’re really smart, but in your class, you’re always making us feel that we’re as smart as you. Thank you.”

The coolest thing about being an educator is and should be that you get to spend your life with amazing young people every single day. And if you do it right, you get to view the world through their eyes and listen as they explain their views of the world to you and to their classmates.

When we do that, we learn about how many different views on the world there are, and that, no matter how smart you may think you are as a teacher, the kids bring ideas and intelligences and experiences that are every bit as powerful and important — and smart — as your own. And when we listen with an open mind, an open heart, and a true excitement for those ideas and experiences, we model social learning in the best possible way – by learning from our students.

Learning how to listen hard to the kids is a skill we all need to practice every day. From Zac Chase I learned the difference between “What do you mean?” and “Say more….” The second opens the door to more than just explanation, but to a deepening of the ideas, which – I have learned – can be infinitely more powerful.

And when we listen deeply to all our students, we open ourselves up to the powerful intelligence that exists in every classroom. We honor the wisdom and intelligence of the room when we build communities of practice where everyone – students and teachers alike – are better and smarter for the fact that they all have spent the time together.

The power of a classroom should never been that kids walk away thinking about how smart their teacher is… the power of a classroom is best when the students walk away with the confidence of knowing how smart and capable they — and all their classmates — are."
chrislehmann  listening  teaching  howweteach  children  students  learning  respect  2014 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Meet the makers: How my iSchoolers turned curiosity into circuits | Chalkbeat
"I know nothing about physical computing. But that doesn’t mean my students aren’t learning about it.

I know a little about cartography, design and feminism, which I teach at the NYC iSchool in Manhattan. But physical computing — the programming of physical objects that humans can interact with, like a bike helmet that lights up when it gets dark outside — is beyond what I feel comfortable teaching.

However, I believe curiosity is enough to drive a class, and I had a hunch that physical computing would be an incredible opportunity for teaching programming, electronics, craft, design, prototyping and an entire list of other skills like persistence and collaboration.

So in September, I launched a quarter-long class (then called Media Lab, after MIT’s home of tech/design experimentation) that asked students to experiment with three different platforms: sewable circuits, using the Lilypad Arduino; conductive interfaces, using the MaKey MaKey; and 3D printing using a MakerBot. I didn’t know what I was doing, but I learned from teachers I follow on Twitter that I should do it anyway, so I did.

The 18 students in that first class really had to teach themselves. Because I didn’t have the answers, they had to find them elsewhere. This was an empowering — but also often frustrating — experience, and the lack of structure led to spontaneous collaborations. The student who knew the most about sewing helped everyone else with that, while the students who were more comfortable with programming shared their skills.

Towards the end of the course, I asked if anyone would be interested in sharing their unusual experience in the class with others, and five students took the lead in putting together a workshop.

Since then, the “iSchool Five” have been invited to talk about their experience at conferences in Philadelphia and Boston. Their workshops introduce educators to “maker education” — a model grounded in the belief that we learn best by making physical things with accessible tools — by teaching them how to make paper circuits, like the kind you can find in greeting cards that light up or play music.

Their goal with these workshops is to take educators through the learning process they experienced in my class: some basic instruction followed by lots of figuring it out. They want participants to leave with the confidence needed to bring this approach back to their classrooms."
christinajenkins  education  teaching  physicalcomputing  learning  howweteach  2014  students  makeymakey  3dprinting  makerbot  arduino  lilypad  notknowing 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Change That Doesn’t Last | The American Conservative
"Because students compartmentalize in this way, faculty members in other disciplines often come up to those of us who teach English writing to complain that we haven’t taught students the basics of research, organization, grammar, and style. When we say that we do indeed teach all those skills, and that the very students who are so manifestly incompetent in their classes were once competent in ours, we’re greeted with disbelief. But it’s true. Students forget what they’ve learned — often.

But here’s the thing: when college students forget what they learned about writing in their freshman comp class, or when Chicago teenagers forget what they learned about nonviolent options in their group therapy sessions, they don’t do nothing: instead, they do something that they learned to do at an earlier point, something that they fall back on as natural. So, for example, college students frequently set aside everything they learned in their freshman-year composition class and resume the way they were taught to write in high school.

Now, this is not all just a matter of age and mental development. One reason high-school models of writing stick with students is that that tend to be inflexible and highly rule-based, and so are relatively easy to follow. But still all these examples raise for me a key question: when and how do young people form those strong and lasting habits — the ones that prove so difficult to dislodge later on?

Nobody is ever too old to learn, and I feel that I have had a good deal of success over the years in teaching my students new habits, but by the time people reach their nineteenth year they are remarkably, and often alarmingly, fully-formed in their mental approach to the world. So who are the teachers, and what are the social and familial and cultural forces, that are getting to young people at the age of maximal impressionability? And what might that age be for the various skills and tendencies that we want young people to form — or not to form?"
change  persistence  learning  teaching  schools  forgetting  compartmentalization  students  frustration  2013  alanjacobs  writing  retention 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Why Kids Should Grade Teachers - Amanda Ripley - The Atlantic
"A decade ago, an economist at Harvard, Ronald Ferguson, wondered what would happen if teachers were evaluated by the people who see them every day—their students. The idea—as simple as it sounds, and as familiar as it is on college campuses—was revolutionary. And the results seemed to be, too: remarkable consistency from grade to grade, and across racial divides. Even among kindergarten students. A growing number of school systems are administering the surveys—and might be able to overcome teacher resistance in order to link results to salaries and promotions."
why  leadership  management  administration  schooling  schools  students  grading  amandaripley  ronaldferguson  professionaldevelopment  pd  teaching  teacherevaluation  evaluation  education 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The importance of not knowing: reflections of a designer tutor « SB129
"1. Teaching is really difficult…

2. Learning is all about the process, not the product…

3. Reflection has different temporalities… Real-time… Postmortem… Meta-level analysis…

4. Sparking imagination…

5. Research into teaching… How does your own intellectual drive become apparent to your students…

6. Debunking complexity…

7. Contextualisation…

…of ideas… …of their learning…

8. Humor / Humility…

9. Visual stimulation…

10. Good timing… in terms of when to introduce certain ideas…[and] the pace and length of each session…

11. Organisation and communication…

12. Shifting pace, flipping roles, experimenting…

13. Let them lead way…

14. Never patronise, never underestimate…

15. If you’re not learning from your students, you’re probably doing something wrong…

16. It’s all about mediating/encouraging curiosity…

17. It’s all about questions, not answers

Never pretend to know everything, ask more questions that you give answers…"
goldsmithscollege  2012  mattward  pedagogy  superiority  socraticmethod  questioning  mediating  mediation  students  communication  organization  timing  listening  stimulation  humor  humility  curiosity  complexity  contextualization  context  imagination  tcsnmy  reflection  product  process  learning  howweteach  education  design  canon  cv  teaching 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Standing the chance « Cooperative Catalyst
"…so much of the resistance struggling learners bring to the classroom isn’t personal at all, and that it’s not productive, effective, or especially right to feel slighted by behaviors that students have developed to cope with adults (teachers) and environments (schools) that have judged them since kindergarten…

…some of my students’ positive affects towards school are coping mechanisms, as well…

The best I can do is to be delegitimized as an authority-figure and known as a person and learner by my students. “The work” isn’t there to isolate resistant students, to assert my control, or to protect my feelings like a curtain wall; it’s there to be torn to pieces and remixed or discarded as we build our relationships and community together.

In school, relationships and community are just two tacit and inarticulate ideas standing against myriad standards, but they are the only things that stand a chance of saving us all."
environment  authority  community  tcsnmy  relationships  students  howweteach  cv  2012  chadsansing  power  learning  schools  education  teaching 
august 2012 by robertogreco
10 things parents should unlearn… « What Ed Said
"10 things I think (some) parents should unlearn…

1.  Learning is best measured by a letter or a number.

2. Product is more important than process and progress.

3. Children need to be protected from any kind of failure.

4. The internet  is dangerous for children.

5. Parents and teachers should discuss students without the learner present.

6. Homework is an essential part of learning.

7. The school is responsible for the child’s entire education.

8. Your child’s perspective is the only one.

9. Learning looks the same as when you went to school.

10. Focus on (and fix) your child’s shortcomings, rather than their successes."
unlearning  parenting  unschooling  deschooling  2012  ednasackson  process  processoverproduct  tcsnmy  learning  assessment  testing  standards  standardization  responsibility  education  cv  teaching  studentdirected  students  failure  risk  risktaking  howwelearn  howweteach  schools  lcproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Why Good Classes Fail [Digital Ethnography blog]
"So rather than focusing on emulating particular techniques and methods, we should be doing everything we can to embrace, inspire, and use our own empathy in order to better understand and relate to our students. It is only from this space that we can effectively generate and use the appropriate techniques and methods for any particular task. In this way, there is no “recipe,” “secret sauce,” or “silver bullet” for teaching effectively that can be used by anybody, anytime, anywhere. Instead, I’m proposing a “generative” method, one in which we “generate” the appropriate method that takes into consideration the broadest range of factors that we can manage to accommodate."
howweteach  howwelearn  method  carlrogers  2012  listening  interestedness  disinterest  disconnection  disengagement  engagement  gardnercampbell  pedagogy  students  connection  reproductiion  scalability  personality  approach  silverbullets  de-scripting  unschooling  highereducation  education  learning  teaching  empathy  michealwesch  interested  scale 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Why the Facebook Group My Students Created for Themselves is Better than the Discussion Forum I Created for Them. « Douchy’s Weblog
"While at first, the control-freak in me wanted to send them all back to the “official class discussion forum”,  The advantages of the Facebook group have become increasingly compelling and I’m wondering whether it’s time to let the forum I created go the way of cassette tapes and typewriters.  Why is a Facebook group better? For one thing, Facebook is a digital home for many students.  So a group based there is comfortable to them – it’s on their virtual turf. Because of this, the Facebook group is even more of a desire path than my discussion forum is.

Some other advantages of the Facebook group over the discussion board I created are: …"
facebook  teaching  interaction  learning  collaboration  students  2011  ict  lms  studentcentered  discussion  forums 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Bassett Blog, 2011/09: Insights from the College Front [Bassett gets it right, but seems to take credit for ideas that predate him & are contrary to some of what he pushed during his first many years at NAIS.]
"The university leaders also confirmed…that 30–40% of the undergrads on anti-depressants, and 10% of girls suffered from eating disorders. While the university leaders were quick to point out that their universities were mirroring national data, it is particularly interesting to me that the students at these colleges had already “won the lottery” by matriculating at places that were nearly impossible to get into for mere mortals, and yet so many were still stressed beyond belief and needing medication (prescribed or, probably in much larger numbers, self-medicating — see the next bullet point).

Footnote to “success-driven parents and college counselors”: beware what you wish for: What we actually do well is place students in the “best match” college, where they will be successful and can pursue interests that will keep them engaged and balanced."

[Also covered: alcohol abuse, demonstrations of learning / digital portfolios, foreign language requirements…]
patbassett  2011  criticalthinking  creativity  communication  admissions  highereducation  highered  collegeadmissions  technology  collaboration  character  antidepressants  students  parenting  education  stress  schools  learning  policy  balance  society  competition  digitalportfolios  nais  alcohol  demonstrationsoflearning  resilience  risktaking  foreignlanguage  languages  fluency  testing  standardizedtesting  self-medication  eatingdisorders  socialnorming 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Alfie Kohn: What We Don't Know About Our Students -- And Why We Don't Know It
"It was particularly disconcerting for me to realize that when the priorities of adults and kids diverge, we simply assume that ours ought to displace theirs. Stop wasting your time learning song lyrics when you could be doing important stuff -- namely, whatever's in our lesson plans: solving for x or using apostrophes correctly or reading about the Crimean War. We tell more than we ask; we direct more than we listen; we use our power to pressure or even punish students whose interests don't align with ours. This has any number of unfortunate results, including loss of both self-confidence and interest in learning. But let's not forget to number among the sad consequences the fact that many students quite understandably choose to keep the important parts of themselves hidden from us. That's a shame in its own right, and it also prevents us from being the best teachers we can be."
education  motivation  lcproject  alfiekohn  tcsnmy  learning  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  choice  students  passion  passion-based  student-centered  schooliness  schools  engagement 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Google+ Audrey Watters on Cell Phone Bans in Schools
"A little rant here: my iPhone is my most important computing device. It's mobile, so I have it with me always. It contains all my information -- or, rather, access to all my data -- all my Google Docs, all my Evernotes, all my address book, the e-books I'm reading, the story articles I'm working on, photos, etc. It's a camera. It's a video camera. It's a phone. At my fingertips, I have access to the Web and by extension access to just everything -- Hooray for knowledge. Hooray for WiFi, for 3G, etc.

So it boggles my mind, yes, but mostly it just infuriates me that schools would tell students that the mobile computing devices they carry -- devices that likely contain just as personal and important information for them -- are forbidden. Or worse: that they're subject to confiscation and search…"

[Response to: http://mindshift.kqed.org/2011/08/to-ban-or-not-to-ban-schools-must-decide-cell-phone-policies/ ]
audreywatters  education  schools  mobile  phones  policies  learning  iphone  howwework  howwelearn  rights  students  studentrights  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Stump The Teacher: I Blew It
"Rather than talking about…classroom rules, we talked about dogs & little sisters. Instead of …standardized test prep, we met new friends & learned something new about each other. When we probably should have been discussing learning standards, we…discussed books we read over the summer. During passing periods when I should have been yelling at kids to get to class, I…help[ed] w/ locker combos & piles of supplies. In class when I should have been going through grading scale…[instead] telling them grades don’t mean that much to me & I just want them to learn. Kids walking into my room were not greeted w/ walls full of catch phrases & spelling rules, but blank walls that I asked them to decorate & own. In my off period I did not go down & memorize every test score & data point in my students’ file, but decided to let them be their own data point & show me every day who they are. I made the decision to not start building students today but rather begin building relationships."
firstday  teaching  learning  relationships  education  tcsnmy  schools  joshstumpenhorst  students  conversation 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Hope Survey
"Background: Research shows students engagement & motivation decreases as they progress through secondary school. This disengagement & lack of motivation is a key concern for educators. In searching for an explanation for this decline, educational researchers have examined the nature of school environment & determined school environments can exert influences on student motivations & engagement through their support or lack of support for students’ developmental needs. These needs include autonomy, belongingness & competence (measured by goal orientation).

"Purpose: The Hope Survey is a unique tool, which enables schools to assess their school environment through the eyes of their students by measuring student perceptions of autonomy, belongingness & goal orientations as well as their resulting engagement in learning & disposition twd achievement. The Hope Survey can diagnose whether a school culture has the components that encourage higher levels of engagement in learning."
via:steelemaley  thehopesurvey  schools  education  assessment  engagement  autonomy  democracy  democraticschools  belonging  measurement  surveys  students  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  shrequest1 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Blogging About The Web 2.0 Connected Classroom: Reflections On #ISTE11
"Why would I not go to hardly anything yet still think I had a successful conference? How could that be? Because maybe all the learning doesn't happen in the sessions…

I go to places like ISTE & other conferences for the people…meeting…sitting…talking…learning, debating & sharing…allows me to catch up with people who I only get to see once a year…face-to-face interactions…are the most meaningful to me.

On a side note, one thing I did see more of this year was kids. There were students all over because there was (what seemed liked) an expanded Student Showcase. I did spend some time walking through there & listening to all the cool things kids are doing in their schools. That is one thing this conference needs more of. Kids. If there are model lessons, they should be kids involved. BYOL? Kids. So if you are going to put in for a session next year try to include kids…think about how awesome it would be to be in sessions run by kids sharing their learning & why it's important."
students  cv  iste2011  conferences  facetoface  inperson  learning  conversation  professionaldevelopment  2011  education  tcsnmy 
july 2011 by robertogreco
What does your school stand for? « Re-educate Seattle
"What does it stand for? What is its mission? What does it believe in? What outcomes does it consistently deliver? Is there a match between what the school offers & what kids & families want?…

Finally, it’s unlikely that a match exists between the school & families because the school has never really figured out what it’s trying to accomplish. Many families have reduced their hopes to merely surviving the ordeal w/ a minimum amount of pain.

One of the best things we can do to help transform our schools is figure out—specifically—what they’re trying to accomplish. & that doesn’t mean all schools should have the same mission. In fact, each school should have its own unique mission.

Once that’s established, schools can go about the business of connecting w/ families that are a good fit for their particular mission. Either that, or they can continue declaring “academic achievement for all” & stumbling on the never-ending “reform” treadmill."
education  values  mission  missionstatements  tcsnmy  clarity  purpose  outcomes  lcproject  teaching  learning  community  parents  students  stevemiranda  pscs  publicschools  2011  pugetsoundcommunityschool 
june 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The art of seeing (Part II) The Practice
"When I observe a school I start by watching how I, and how kids, approach it. I watch how the corridors operate, both when filled with movement and (if) when empty. Empty corridors during a school day speak loudly to me. So do classrooms with one kind of seating, one kind of lighting, or one "teaching wall." I watch the feet of kids in a class. I watch them fidget… [many more examples]…

This multiply-focused kind of observation helps me to begin to deep map a school…

the linearity and single-focus of traditional education has, perhaps, robbed you of, or severely limited, your human observation skills. Tens of thousands of hours of single subject lessons, of staring at teachers, of conference sessions divided into "tracks," have stunted the human abilities you had before you entered school. So, if you feel out of practice, here are a few ideas: Eavesdrop…Look for something you haven't looked for before in a place you've been a million times…Stare…Talk to strangers"
irasocol  noticing  observation  learning  schools  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  schooldesign  lcproject  tcsnmy  students  perspective  eavesdropping  staring  strangers  conversation  understanding  2011  howto  tutorials  adhdvision  adhdwalk  deepmapping  sensemaking  publicschools  sla  chrislehmann  pammoran  children  people  howwework  howwelearn 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Real Change Agents
"In fact, here is my hard-line: stop saying it is about the students if you haven’t asked the students what they need, what they want, and what is the reality of their world. Just say it is about you or the school and what you find relevant. If you are okay with that, great.

Personally, I’m not.

The voices of change rest with the scholars in your building, every student that enters those doors each morning. Are you listening? Are you bringing them to the table and leveraging their insights? If you want real, lasting change, the answers can only be yes.

And, when you bring them to the table, are you vested in their thoughts?  Are we willing to challenge our own beliefs about learning and teaching based upon their beliefs? Will we leverage their ideas to shape a better present and future?

The time is now to tap into the potential of students as leaders, as change agents, and as powerful voices with amazing ideas and unmatched enthusiasm."
ryanbretag  students  tcsnmy  teaching  pedagogy  deschooling  unschooling  control  student-centered  studentdirected  student-led  learning  schools  lcproject  hypocrisy  desirelines  elephantpaths  meaning  relevance  reality 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Reading Readiness—A Little Bit on A Lot
"…the student seeks out the master & their tutelage. More than tips, tricks, & practices, the understanding is that the thing of enduring value that is being transmitted is knowledge & wisdom, which opens a way to method. The student arrives & the master questions their abilities. Often, the student gets turned away. The purpose of the master turning away the student or questioning their intentions is to underline the importance of readiness."

"The lesson of the master is that if one isn’t ready to face a large task (say, a wall of text), they should not even try. “Go away,” the master usually says. Come back later, when you have more presence and mindfulness, Frank. Readiness may be in 20 minutes, later in the week, in a few months, possibly never."

"We should allow ourselves to leave behind the things we are not ready for; we may come back to it later. Instead, we should read hard on the things to which we are ready. It is then that we may be better students."
teaching  learning  justinintimelearning  writing  wisdom  reading  attention  blogs  blogging  readiness  life  knowledge  apprenticeships  unschooling  deschooling  timing  education  students  tcsnmy  lcproject  meaning  sensemaking  audiencesofone  frankchimero 
may 2011 by robertogreco
A learning mash-up.
"We need them….dedicated and passionate teachers and learners who see learning as a design that the learner moves, shapes and feeds forward as positive action in our world….educational communities need them, those with social imagination….experts, yes experts."

[Thomas is too kind — flattered to be mentioned amongst the likes of Dennis Littky, Dougald Hine, and Leigh Blackall.]
thomassteele-maley  leighblackall  dennislittky  dougaldhine  ego  cv  collegeunbound  ivanillich  unschooling  deschooling  learning  teaching  education  democraticschools  democracy  schools  tcsnmy  openstudio  student-centered  self-directedlearning  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  studentdirected  students  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy8  modeling  criticaleducation 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Declaration of Education | Write Your Declaration
"What is the Great American Teach-In?

A day to remind ourselves and our students that citizenship means asking questions, finding answers and standing up for what you believe in... and that education must mean that too.<br />
Every classroom, every student, every school... draft a declaration of educational rights.<br />
When it comes to education, what are the truths you hold self evident? Let's make time to talk about these ideas within our learning communities.

Then, let's document these truths, and continue the hard work of making a high quality public education accessible to all who want it."
education  students  rights  teachin  democracy  classideas  2011  citizenship  civics  questioning  learning  studentrights  community  publicschools  publiceducation 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee - Wikipedia
"The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) ( /ˈsnɪk/) was one of the principle organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged from a series of student meetings led by Ella Baker held at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina in April 1960. SNCC grew into a large organization with many supporters in the North who helped raise funds to support SNCC's work in the South, allowing full-time SNCC workers to have a $10 a week salary. Many unpaid volunteers also worked with SNCC on projects in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas, and Maryland."

[Motivated to pull this up through a tweet by Tim Carmody ]
civilrights  history  us  nonviolence  classideas  sncc  1960s  ellapbaker  stokelycarmichael  society  students  change  progress 
march 2011 by robertogreco
If you want to truly engage students, give up the reins - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Learning
"Harnessing entirely pupil-led, project-based learning in this way isn't easy. But all of this frames learning in more meaningful contexts than the pseudocontexts of your average school textbook or contrived lesson plan, which might cover an area of the curriculum but leave the pupil none the wiser as to how it applies in the real world.

There is a line that haunted me last year: while pupil-led, project-based learning is noble and clearly more engaging than what we do now, there is no time for it in the current system. The implication is that it leads to poorer attainment than the status quo. But attainment at High Tech High, in terms of college admissions, is the same as or better than private schools in the same area."
ewanmcintosh  education  creativity  students  citizenship  ict  prototyping  gevertulley  sugatamitra  ideation  projectbasedlearning  hightechhigh  synthesis  tcsnmy  cv  lcproject  studentdirected  student-led  immersion  designthinking  engagement  schools  change  time  making  doing  problemsolving  criticalthinking  growl  pbl 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Stump The Teacher: Innovation Day 2011
"Today was the actual “Innovative Day” as students came to school with their supplies, resources, and an abundance of enthusiasm. We broke the students into working areas based on their topics of choice and the resources needed. There was a section for building, art, music, technology, videos, cooking, physical education, and more. Variety was the name of the game as there were over 200 different learning projects being worked on over the course of the day. Many students were working independently but there were plenty of learning groups that developed throughout the day as well. Students started helping each other with projects and ended up learning more than they even originally planned. Here is just a sample of the great work that was done."
unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  cv  openstudio  interestdriven  studentdirected  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  schools  curriculumisdead  curriculum  innovationday  2011  students  google20%  unstructuredtime 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Reading, Writing, and Willpower : Education Next
"Ultimately, Zoch maintains, all education is self-education. The secret of academic success is no different from success in other fields of endeavor, and it involves hard work, the will to succeed, and practice, practice, practice. Yet when students fail or become bored, critics insist that it is the teacher's fault. Zoch shows persuasively and in great detail that progressives derided instruction but never held students accountable for their own learning; it is always the teacher who is to blame if the children aren't motivated. Consequently, students have come to expect that their teachers must entertain them. As one of Zoch's students said to him one day, "Maybe if you'd sing and dance, we'd learn this stuff.""
education  students  parenting  self-education  learning  teaching  motivation  effort  schools  policy  dianeravitch  paulzoch  books  toread  progressive  passivity  edutainment  success  behaviorism 
march 2011 by robertogreco
geek.teacher » Blog Archive » On #edcampoc
"I sat in some great sessions. Rob Grecco did something awesome: he brought his middle school students from his private, progressive school, & had them do a panel discussion on Student-led Urban Adventures. The students had to plan their itineraries and keep to a strict budget on a weeklong field trip to San Francisco. They were intelligent & insightful, doing a great job of representing their school. Afterwards one of the students, Taylor, came over & introduced himself to me. The students were a class act all the way."

"The standout moment of the whole session [Things That Suck] was when one of Rob’s students participated in our discussion on disciplinary practices. She described the way things are handled at her school and described traditional practices like having students sit in the corner as “ineffective.” Love it."
edcampoc  dancallahan  edcampoc2011  edcamp  tcsnmy  cv  ego  pride  students  education  learning  classtrips  discipline  thingsthatsuck 
january 2011 by robertogreco
EdCampOC 2011 | Organic Learning
"Students & teachers from The Children’s School in San Diego shared how their school, centered around project based learning, allows students to follow their passions in learning. Teachers shared their learning spaces on Tumblr (see sidebar on this blog for other classes) & talked about how their one-to-one program was about learning & not about technology. Students were articulate & open about their learning & had an easy, comfortable relationship with their teachers. Oh, how I wish this could happen in all of our schools. I thought it funny that some were referring to this school as the “hippie school”. I could relate. It was great to see that the students were actively participating in other sessions throughout the day. They truly were cultivating life long learning not only with their words, but with their actions."

"especially liked tweet by Matt Arguello, commenting on one of students from TCS, on discipline…"
janicestearns  tcsnmy  ego  students  edcamp  edcampoc  edcampoc2011  schools  education  teaching  projectbasedlearning  cv  pride  learning  progressive  pbl 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Bad Signs
"I’d love to see a research study that counted the number of motivational posters (along with other self-help, positive-thinking materials and activities) in a school and then assessed certain other features of that school. My hypothesis: the popularity of inspirational slogans will be correlated with a lower probability that students are invited to play a meaningful role in decision-making, as well as less evidence of an emphasis on critical thinking threaded through the curriculum and a less welcoming attitude toward questioning authority. I’d also predict that the schools decorated with these posters are more likely to be run by administrators who brag about the school’s success by conventional indicators and are less inclined to call those criteria into question or challenge troubling mandates handed down from above (such as zero-tolerance discipline policies or pressures to raise test scores)."
alfiekohn  signs  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  education  learning  schools  administration  students  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  authority  whatmatters 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Edmodo | Secure Social Learning Network for Teachers and Students
"Edmodo is a social learning network for teachers, students, schools and districts.

Edmodo is accessible online or using any mobile device, including DROID and iPhones.

Edmodo provides free classroom communication for teachers, students and administrators on a secure social network.

Edmodo provides teachers and students with a secure and easy way to post classroom materials, share links and videos, and access homework, grades and school notices.

Edmodo stores and shares all forms of digital content – blogs, links, pictures, video, documents, presentations, and more."
via:cburell  education  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  classroom  collaboration  edtech  e-learning  networking  students  teachers  technology  twitter  elearning  communication  ict  microblogging  blogging  classrooms 
august 2010 by robertogreco
What happened to studying? - The Boston Globe [Related: http://www.theatlanticwire.com/opinions/view/opinion/8-Theories-on-Why-College-Kids-Are-Studying-Less-4235]
"average student at 4-year college in 1961 studied ~24 hours/week. Today’s average student hits books for just 14 hours…

Whatever the reason, one thing is clear: The central bargain of college education — that students have fairly light classloads because they’re independent enough to be learning outside the classroom — can no longer be taken for granted. & some institutions of higher learning have yet to grapple w/, or even accept, the possibility that something dramatic has happened.

Studying has long been considered a key part of college student’s growth, both as a means to an end — a deeper understanding of subject matter — & as valuable habit in its own right. A person who can self-motivate to learn, academics argue, is not only more likely to be a productive worker, but more fulfilled citizen. As a result, universities for decades have stated—sometimes officially—that for every hour students spend in class each week they are expected to be studying for 2 on their own."
academia  studying  students  learning  college  culture  education  efficiency  technology  pedagogy  teaching  blendedlearning  philosophy  engagement  research  highereducation  highered 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The heart of what progressive education means « Re-educate
"“The faculty are interested in providing an environment of collaboration where faculty and learners will identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics.”
education  learning  schools  partnerships  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  collaboration  exploration  progressive  pedagogy  intrinsicmotivation  evergreenstatecollege  teaching  students  stevemiranda  toshare  topost 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Questions?: Creating a Culture of Questions
"So, I guess at the end of the day, I try to be as real with my students as I can. This all comes down to relationships founded on truth; a truth that we can only catch glimpses of. We often times beat ourselves up because we don't see the fruit of our labor. These "soft skills" (who coined that term, anyway?) are really the reason we do what we do. We spend a copious number hours finding ways to offer immediate feedback to our students but our feedback is much more slow cookin'. We won't know if the time we spend with our kids will pay them dividends down the road, especially when it comes to these "soft skills." That comes when we see our students after they have finished college (or maybe they didn't go to college and went straight to work) and started their own families. That's when we see the fruit. So be patient, the harvest is comin'."
tcsnmy  teaching  relationships  pedagogy  education  learning  inquiry  trust  transparency  togetherness  questioning  socraticmethod  time  slow  unschooling  deschooling  schooliness  students  blogging 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Editorial Observer - Cutting and Pasting - A Senior Thesis by (Insert Name) - NYTimes.com
"If we look closely at plagiarism as practiced by youngsters, we can see that they have a different relationship to the printed word than did the generations before them. When many young people think of writing, they don’t think of fashioning original sentences into a sustained thought. They think of making something like a collage of found passages and ideas from the Internet.
ethics  plagiarism  students  writing  remixing  classideas  tcsnmy  remixculture 
july 2010 by robertogreco
csessums.com » Blog Archive » Generation Meh: Empathy and College Students Today
"The implications for reported low empathy findings are complex. For teachers, the Times article & report provide an opportunity to discuss these findings w/ their students. The key here is opening up an opportunity for dialog w/ students allowing them to share their thoughts on the issue of empathy. Keeping a journal that shows what kids are doing w/ their time outside school & a class discussion around their findings might also be useful & revealing to students. Role-playing is another safe & pro-social way to engage students in a discussion which, in turn, can help deepen their knowledge of empathy & empathetic behavior. While these suggested activities only scratch the surface, developing empathy & empathetic behavior is a critical skill that cannot be overlooked. If we want this depressing news regarding empathy in children & young adults to change, then we need to act now. If we don’t, as the Times article suggests, “don’t expect the next generation to sigh over it, too.”
empathy  narcissism  entitlement  netgen  generations  students  culture  ego  christophersessums  stephendownes  society  millennials 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Advice for Teachers Scorned | Beyond School
"East Asia is blessed by Confucianism. When Han Dynasty...put political support behind [his] teachings...unknowingly rooted in Chinese spirit a devotion to education & scholarship...teachers, students, & schools.
politics  unschooling  schools  education  teaching  clayburell  confucius  confucianism  asia  china  korea  japan  respect  learning  academics  teachers  students  choices  braindrain  eastasia  priorities 
july 2010 by robertogreco
interactions magazine | Time Goes By, Everything Looks the Same.
"Working at the Annenberg Institute at Brown University, Elliot and I set up a small nonprofit, Big Picture Learning. Working with the commissioner of education in Rhode Island, we had the opportunity to start a high school, The Met, as a model of what the schools of the future should look like. We started with a simple concept: one student at a time and what’s best for kids?
bigpictureschools  dennislittky  interestdriven  student-centered  studentdirected  students  tcsnmy  learning  schools  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  curriculum  design  life  education  servicedesign 
july 2010 by robertogreco
10 ways to encourage students to take responsibility for their learning… « What Ed Said
"1. Don’t make all the decisions 2. Don’t play guess what’s in my head 3. Talk less 4. Model behaviors and attitudes that promote learning. 5. Ask for feedback 6. Test less 7. Encourage goal setting and reflection. 8. Don’t over plan. 9. Focus on learning, not work 10. Organise student led conferences"

[Sound advice. I'm happy to report that tcsnmy follows it.]
[Via: http://twitter.com/gcouros/status/17523402623 ]
education  leadership  learning  management  responsibility  teaching  technology  tcsnmy  motivation  unschooling  deschooling  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  assessment  evaluation  conferences  reflection  goals  planning  testing  feedback  conversation  listening  blogging  students 
july 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Impatience With Irresolution, pt 1: Part Of The Problem
"Nowadays, I don't much care what they answer. I'm disinterested. I want to get past their answer. My response to their answer is an automated "Why?" That's where the action is.

I have been asking questions lately like "If the students in our class are the domain of a relationship, is their hair color a function?" which you can successfully defend from either angle.

I like the debates. I like the fights. I'm happy that we're slowly detoxing off our addiction to easy answers, taking longer to answer questions that are worth more of our time."

[Rediscovering this stuff courtesy Basti. This one continues with part 2 at: blog.mrmeyer.com/?p=2971 ]
assessment  learning  patience  students  irresolution  uncertainty  ambiguity  danmeyer  glvo  tcsnmy  questions  questioning  pedagogy  socraticmethod  relationships  answers  davidmilch  belesshelpful  storytelling  narrative 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The Trouble With Teens | China Power
"Having skipped tumultuous teenage years, Chinese are forever doomed to live as teenagers all their lives. Whereas Americans may be stubborn, moody, quick to anger, insecure, impetuous, condescending, extreme, & paranoid in teenage years, Chinese may suffer from these psychological issues all their lives. The psychologists who wrote Reviving Ophelia, Raising Cain, & Real Boys may not be happy w/ how American families & schools are distorting emotional development of children, but if they came to China they’d faint in horror & despair."

[via http://twitter.com/janchip/status/15102206749 "wobbly sociology+sterotypes and/but interesting" ]
china  education  opinion  social  teens  youth  empathy  independence  self  identity  parenting  schools  tcsnmy  chinese  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  adolescence  management  business  cooperation  collaboration  aynrand  narcissism  well-being  socialemotionallearning  culture  students  us  socialemotional 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Apple - iPhone - Apps for Students
"Whether you want to define a word, learn the name of a bone, practice your French, or prep for the SAT, iPhone has the smartest apps around."

[Note to self: Need to make a list of apps that is not mostly about cramming, test prep, memorization...]
apple  ipodtouch  iphone  applications  education  tcsnmy  mobile  appstore  students  technology  ios 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Networked Study at bavatuesdays
Great discussion in the comments including this: "It’s hard to change the culture of education without getting the kids before their thinking processes begin to ossify, but in order to do that, you have to contend with their parents who, however well-intended, didn’t have the benefit of the kind education you’re trying to provide their kids and often see it as more of a threat than an opportunity."

[via: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/opportunity-not-threat/ ]
education  edupunk  diy  future  highered  learning  lms  networkedlearning  students  parenting  teaching  tcsnmy  lcproject  change  reform  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Children Are Not the Enemy: Learning with Ira : Dream With Me
"So, when I read Ira’s book, I am reminded that our own educational failures of policy, institutional capabilities, imagination, and management create and sustain a schooling culture in which our most fragile and vulnerable learners become the enemy. Thankfully, I am also reminded through Glasser’s work and my mentor’s long-ago words that we educators have far more choice and power in our actions than we sometimes acknowledge. While we can’t change how other people feel or think, we can make explicit in all we do that the Iras of our world deserve the best we have to offer- a place at the learning table within a community of their peers and committed, thoughtful educators. We can see all our young people through a capacity rather than deficit lens. In Ira’s young world, Alan Shapiro made a critical difference by seeing him, not as the enemy, but as a young person with value. Ira became one of the lucky ones."
irasocol  teaching  schools  learning  education  tcsnmy  lcproject  change  reform  students 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Who's programming the TiVo? - Preoccupations
"Two savvy, fast 13 year-olds, an impressed teacher and an excited class. Just before Jimmy Wales came to school, I found out that we have a young student likely to become a Wikipedia admin. If this happens, he’ll be the second student (to the best of my knowledge) to become an admin whilst still at school here. (Alex became one in his final year with us — 2007/8.) A parent wrote to me last week about his son editing Wikipedia: ‘in today’s interconnected way, this is the way to go and who knows what will happen then — expert status will allow him to develop other skills and is an asset in and of itself. It has also provided amazing learning for him.’ I find all this quite remarkable. We can grow so used to discussing change and the way young people now engage with the world, and we need experiences like those of last week to get us to look up and take stock again. Wikipedia has played such a part in bringing about these new kinds of engagement."
wikipedia  technology  teaching  schools  engagement  jimmywales  davidsmith  students  learning  change  gamechanging  online  web  internet  tcsnmy  edtech 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Catch-A-Teacher Day « Human
"Until last day, we had very few staff that came to expo. They would bring groups of students down but (most of them) didn’t quite engage w/ expo in any way. “That’s for kids, not us…” was general sentiment, w/ few notable exceptions. W/ whole thing PRIMARILY for staff, we weren’t making dent...matter was raised at regular morning ‘war briefing’. We made decision that last day was going to be ‘catch-a-teacher’ day.
professionaldevelopment  edtech  technology  students  studentsteachignteachers 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Educational Leadership:Meeting Students Where They Are:When Students Don't Play the Game
"When I am effective, I don't meet students where they are just once at the start of the year, or even just at the start of each new unit. I meet them where they are every day, and rarely as an entire class. To engage these students in learning that matters to them, I need to repeatedly ask the question, "Where are you?" and be prepared to step back and listen."
behavior  education  engagement  teaching  leadership  learning  motivation  students 
march 2010 by robertogreco
The Library, Through Students’ Eyes - Room for Debate Blog - NYTimes.com
"After a Room for Debate discussion last week, “Do School Libraries Need Books?” the comments from readers included some first-hand views from students. Below are excerpts of their observations on how studying has changed, how they use libraries (if at all) and how to use the space differently."
libraries  education  learning  technology  future  books  students  reading  controversy  debate  advocacy  architecture  bookfuturism 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Op-Ed: Advanced Pressure - Video Library - The New York Times
"The filmmaker Vicki Abeles features the stories of students and teachers of Advanced Placement classes and the pressures they face in our achievement-obsessed culture."
film  documentary  applications  ap  highschool  education  health  teens  students  achievement  pressure  stress  rotelearning  rote  tcsnmy  broken  schools  schooling 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Gawande’s Checklists: "I know what to do and why thinking". - Artichoke
"pedagogical tension btwn using “instrumental learning” processes where students are explicitly taught skills & strategies thought necessary for concept progression (more usually examination success in secondary schools) & using “relational learning” processes that build “I know what to do & why” understanding...tension that is particularly evident in secondary schools where the second approach is represented as time hungry, uncertain & inefficient. Many of those wanting to build relational understanding w/ students assume that spending time on rote procedural knowledge is an important precursor for developing deeper conceptual understanding. This seems like a common sense approach – a let’s keep a foot in both camps kind of approach. However, research findings in math education suggest otherwise. It seems more likely that, in maths education at least, time spent building prior instrumental understanding is an interference to, not an aid to, developing relational understanding."
cgimath  artichoke  education  learning  teaching  schools  curriculum  procedure  math  relationalunderstanding  students  understanding  design  atulgawande  medicine  rotelearning  tcsnmy  pedagogy  artichokeblog  pamhook  rote 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Docs for students - Google Docs Help
"Welcome to the Docs for students page! On this page, we'll be demonstrating how Google Docs can be used by many students for various classes and interests. We'll show you real examples of how useful docs can be in your personal and academic life."
via:preoccupations  education  googleapps  googledocs  teaching  google  learning  tcsnmy  projectideas  students 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Finding Your 'Element' With Sir Ken Robinson
“We have developed educational systems in the interests of the old industrial economy. They are industrialized systems, they are very linear, they are about standardizing. Really, human organizations are not like mechanisms, they are like organisms. A much better metaphor for education is agriculture. Farmers know, and gardeners know, they cannot make a plant grow. They can’t do it. Plants grow themselves. What they do is provide the conditions where that’s more likely to happen. And great teachers know you can’t force anybody to learn, but you can create the conditions where they’re much more likely to. If the conditions are right, it’s amazing what people will achieve.” [via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/01/16/education-is-like-agriculture/]
kenrobinson  adaptability  teaching  schools  unschooling  flexibility  change  education  schooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  society  standardization  organizations  growth  organisms  learning  students 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Grade 7: Remixing Historical Perspective | Connect!
"One of our grade 7 Humanities teachers, Dan McWilliam, just finished a project with his grade 7 students. In order to understand the concept of perspective in historical accounts, Dan had his students re-write a 'picture book' on colonialization from an alternate perspective."
via:TheLibrarianEdge  history  books  students  tcsnmy  classideas  projectideas  colonialism 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Barbarians with Laptops - robertogreco {tumblr}
Hi Katie. Thank you for the mention over at Clay Burell's blog and thanks for all the thought provoking quotes and links. I’ve got a few thoughts directed to you in a comment that doesn't appear to have made it through Clay's comment filter (not surprising given the length). So, I put it together with my previous comment and posted it to my not-quite-a-blog on Tumblr.

[commenting on: http://beyond-school.org/2009/12/29/barbarians-with-laptops-an-unreasonable-fear/ ]
comments  tcsnmy  laptops  1to1  learning  education  cv  clayburell  teaching  technology  content  skills  students  time  1:1 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Barbarians with Laptops: An Unreasonable Fear? at Beyond School
"I’ll start with saying I’m still uncomfortable with the opportunity cost notion. As a history teacher — which to me means “preparation for informed citizenship” teacher — I’m not sure I want to sacrifice time that could be used learning and drawing conclusions from human history on the altar of failed web 2.0 experimentation. ... Whatever your subject matter, I’d love to see specific examples of digital tools and practices that, either through research-based evidence or your own direct observation, you think enhance the learning of content or the development of skills in the classroom."

[my comments here too: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/309355692/barbarians-with-laptops ]
comments  teaching  technology  1to1  laptops  education  clayburell  content  skills  learning  students  time  tcsnmy  1:1 
december 2009 by robertogreco
On Using Technology without Understanding It at Beyond School
"Surely s/he knew that the 21st Century writer learns as much from the 21st Century reader as the reader does from the writer. (Because 21st Century readers — the best ones, anyway — write with the writer. Just look at Nobel-winning economist Paul Krugman’s blog, all the references he makes in his writing to what his readers are saying in comments. Look at Rolling Stones’ Matt Taibbi having conversations with his readers in the space beneath his articles — you know, those silly “forum”-like things. Just look.)

So yeah, I wanted to respond to it, and share to the world here on my (real) blog. I thought the writing and the critique of the rush to laptop use in the classroom were that good.

But the editorial was on that precious resource and traditional tool called — what was it? It’s been so long since I’ve written on it–oh yeah, paper, so no luck there (for me, or the forests, or the atmosphere, or the students’ future environmental situation)."
21stcenturyskills  students  digitalnatives  clayburell  publishing  tcsnmy  technology  luddism  teaching  learning  edtech  education  schools  writing  newmedia  21stcentury  21stcenturylearning  pedagogy  future 
december 2009 by robertogreco
PLAYBACK: Students Viewed as Participants, Not Victims, at Online Safety Conference ... » Spotlight
"Technology journalist Larry Magid describes a “watershed moment” that occured last week in online safety education. The third annual conference of the Family Online Safety Institute, writes Magid, “was different from previous years in that young people were viewed less as potential victims of online crimes and more as participants in a global online community.

“That’s not to say that participants didn’t worry aloud about youth safety, but instead of focusing on real and imagined dangers, we focused on how adults can work with young people to encourage both ethical and self-protective behavior. It’s all about media literacy, digital citizenship and critical thinking.”"
safety  victimization  students  online  web  tcsnmy  digitalcitizenship  criticalthinking  medialiteracy  ethics  behavior  parenting  education  schools  teaching  learning  technology 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Fortnightly Mailing: We must ..... a call to action to create the university of the future
"1. We must encourage the reuse and remixing of rich media. ... 2. We must embrace the full promise of mobile devices as learning platforms. 3. We must award credentials based on learning outcomes. 4. We must enable a culture of sharing. 5. We must take care that open resources include the context that will enable its use and understanding."
education  learning  teaching  students  sharing  pedagogy  openaccess  openness  colleges  universities  mobile  phones  mobilelearning  change  gamechanging  manifestos  remixing  reuse  credentials  learningoutcomes  access  highered  remixculture 
november 2009 by robertogreco
969. Finding Ways to Help Students Answer Their Own Questions « Tomorrow's Professor Blog
"Teachers who find ways to help their students answer their own questions are teachers who are helping their students become more metacognitive–or knowledgeable about and in control of their cognitive resources. Research on metacognition has focused on what students know about their thinking processes, what students do when trying to solve problems, and the development and use of compensatory strategies (1). The ability to reflect on one’s cognitive processes and to be aware of one’s activities while reading, listening, or solving problems has important implications for the student’s effectiveness as an active, planful learner. As an expert learner yourself, you automatically monitor your understanding and adjust by filtering irrelevant information and pursuing additional information as needed."
via:hrheingold  learning  criticalthinking  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  tcsnmy  teaching  students  questions  assessment  metacognition  pedagogy  knowledge  blogging 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Official Google Docs Blog: Day in the Life of a Docs Student
"The Google Docs team is getting ready for back to school. We've been doing our homework this summer to make your school year go a little smoother. Today we're launching a handful of features that will benefit both students and teachers. Speaking from experience, as students ourselves, we know that these features will come in handy on any given day. Check out the schedule below to see how."
spanish  googledocs  tcsnmy  cloudcomputing  education  learning  technology  teaching  google  edtech  writing  footnotes  googleapps  examples  students  scheduling  googlesites 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Human » Mr Kanamori teaches life
"I came across this incredible story today. (Still) think teaching is some mechanical, box-ticking, grade-chasing endeavour?
education  japan  teaching  happiness  students  video  documentary  well-being  tcsnmy  empathy  learning 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Smokescreen privacy game uses fun missions to show kids how data on social services can be used against them - Boing Boing
"Smokescreen is a privacy game for kids, it runs them through a series of clever online missions that serve to explain how information disclosed on social sites like Facebook can come back and bite you in the ass:"

[more: http://www.wonderlandblog.com/wonderland/2009/09/smokescreen.html ]
facebook  tcsnmy  privacy  students  games  seriousgames  socialnetworking  cybersafety  teens  education  security 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Serendipity at Bionic Teaching
"That’s what I want out of schools. I want them to create more opportunities for teachable moments, more chances for kids to follow their passions and interests, more pathways and more flexibility. I want schools orchestrating chances for serendipity.
serendipity  teaching  learning  self-directed  exploration  wisdom  schools  schooling  students  student-led  unschooling  deschooling  schooliness 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Clive Thompson on the New Literacy
""I think we're in the midst of a literacy revolution the likes of which we haven't seen since Greek civilization"...For Lunsford, technology isn't killing our ability to write. It's reviving it—& pushing our literacy in bold new directions...The fact that students today almost always write for an audience gives them a different sense of what constitutes good writing. In interviews, they defined good prose as something that had an effect on the world. For them, writing is about persuading & organizing & debating, even if it's over something as quotidian as what movie to go see. The Stanford students were almost always less enthusiastic about their in-class writing because it had no audience but the professor: It didn't serve any purpose other than to get them a grade. As for those texting short-forms & smileys defiling serious academic writing? Another myth. When Lunsford examined the work of first-year students, she didn't find a single example of texting speak in an academic paper."

[more here: http://snarkmarket.com/blog/snarkives/books_writing_such/reading_revolutions/ ]
writing  audience  research  teaching  schools  socialmedia  digitalliteracy  communication  clivethompson  21stcenturyskills  education  learning  technology  internet  trends  newliteracies  newliteracy  rhetoric  literacy  digital  blogging  texting  change  newmedia  students  tcsnmy 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Christopher D. Sessums :: Blog :: Substitute Students and Learning for Customers and What Do you Get?
"I enjoyed listening to Jeff Bezos, founder, chairman of the board, and CEO of Amazon (who recently acquired Zappos), talk about his philosophy for a successful business. While I am not insisting on a one to one correlation here, I think educators can learn a lot from thinking about what Mr. Bezos says in relation to students, learning, and the community of stakeholders associated with schooling. If educators were as dedicated to students and learning as Amazon and Zappos are to customers, imagine the level of learning and understanding that could be possible for everyone involved. This formula requires us to reimagine schooling from the ground up (i.e., please erase the current industrial model immediately).
jeffbezos  amazon  zappos  business  education  learning  teaching  tcsnmy  change  reform  students  community  longterm  criticism  focus  competition  gamechanging  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Education - Change.org: "Evaluate that!" - Schools for Children
"mixture [grade+narrative] allowed me to see great problem with evaluation of students even in best schools...Latin evaluation read: "best student in class...completed both Latin I & II...will need to take future courses at college to continue. Grade C-"...great writer could surely create book out of any student's year..."deep map" of learning experience...We don't encourage that...Instead...rubrics lead to 'consistent grading'...lead to letter grades & tick boxes...we can not free curriculum until we stop destructive assessment habits...remember children are "customers" in education. Not America's corporate elite. Not even the parents. We do not want our children limited by the hiring needs of GE, nor by expectations of parents who have themselves been victimized by system...schools need to be student centered, must embrace student choice & measure in human terms...stop tinkering around edges...begin real work of fundamental change."
irasocol  assessment  grading  grades  schools  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  students  schooling  testing  change  reform  schooliness  evaluation  tcsnmy  youth 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Progressive Education [don't miss the "sidebar"]
"It’s not all or nothing, to be sure. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a school — even one with scripted instruction, uniforms, and rows of desks bolted to the floor — that has completely escaped the influence of progressive ideas. Nor have I seen a school that’s progressive in every detail. Still, schools can be characterized according to how closely they reflect a commitment to values such as these: Attending to the whole child, Community, Collaboration, Social justice, Intrinsic motivation, Deep understanding, Active learning, Taking kids seriously...A school that is culturally progressive is not necessarily educationally progressive. ... What It Isn’t ... Why It Makes Sense ... Why It’s Rare ... A Dozen Questions for Progressive Schools"
progressive  education  learning  alfiekohn  nais  tcsnmy  philosophy  progressivism  politics  standards  teaching  schools  children  students  homework  schooling  lcproject 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Design Observer - An Open Letter to Design Students Everywhere
"If you don't already do it, start keeping a notebook. Travel everywhere with it, as you do with things like your camera and your cell phone: consider the notebook an extension of your mind and of your studio. Do not wait to get back to your desk to write things down or, better yet, to draw them. If you draw something every day, you will find, over time, that your facility with the pencil is a huge boon to thinking visually. If the notebook is with you all the time, you can afford to be a little unfocused. Later on, you'll look at what you wrote and saved and drew and you will realize that without even trying, you created a time-capsule that is, itself, a manifestation of what mattered. Instant, retroactive focus."
education  thinking  students  notebooks  learning  writing  design  tcsnmy 
june 2009 by robertogreco
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