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Magic & Pasta (@__magicandpasta) • Fotos y vídeos de Instagram
"A cultural art & conversation space in Berkeley, CA. Welcoming POC/women/LGBTQ+ and their allies."

[See also: https://tinyletter.com/magicandpasta ]
berkeley  art  lcproject  openstudioproject  sanfrancisco  culture  studios 
14 days ago by robertogreco
LOKI
"LOKI is a multidisciplinary design and communications studio working at the intersection of graphic design and social change. Our practice is rooted in social justice principles, focusing on collaboration and community building, cultural production and publishing, activist research and political mobilization. LOKI creates images, objects, and experiences that engage, empower, and oppose.

The studio is based in Montreal / Tiohtià:ke and was founded in 2014 by graphic designer, educator and community organizer Kevin Yuen Kit Lo. LOKI’s work has been widely published, exhibited and awarded, and Kevin regularly presents on design theory and grassroots activism.



LOKI est un studio de design et de communication multidisciplinaire travaillant à l’intersection du design graphique et du changement social. Notre pratique est ancrée dans les principes de justice sociale et met l’accent sur la collaboration et le développement communautaire, la production culturelle et l'édition, la recherche militante et la mobilisation politique. LOKI crée des images, des objets et des expériences engageantes, encourageantes et contestatrices.

Le studio est situé à Montréal / Tiohtià:ke et a été fondé en 2014 par Kevin Yuen Kit Lo, designer graphique, éducateur et organisateur communautaire. Le travail de LOKI a été largement publié, exposé et récompensé et Kevin se prononce régulièrement sur la théorie du design et l’activisme populaire."



"Team

Kevin Yuen Kit Lo (Principal & Creative Director) has been working in graphic design since 2001. His experience bridges art direction, graphic and interactive design at leading agencies, to creating campaigns and visuals for front-line social justice movements and grassroots community organizing work. He is a member of Memefest, Artivistic, and Howl Arts, co-initiated the Imaging Apartheid poster project, and has previously been a member of the boards of ARCMTL and Articule. Between 2004 – 2014, he published the experimental literary arts zine Four Minutes to Midnight. Kevin holds an MA in Graphic Design from the London College of Printing, and a Graduate Certificate Degree and BFA from Concordia University, where he currently teaches in the Design and Computation Arts department.

Marie-Noëlle Hébert (Graphic Designer) is specialized in print design and typography. Her personal research practice explores the dialogic function of aesthetic practices and aims to uncover how the language of graphic design can be used to stimulate disciplinary and socio-cultural discourse. In addition to her position at LOKI, she acts as communications coordinator at the Cinema Politica Network, a non-profit committed to exhibiting and supporting independent political documentary across the globe. Marie-Noëlle holds a Master of Design from York University, a BFA in Design Art from Concordia University, as well as a CÉGEP degree in photography.

Lolo Sirois (Outreach Coordinator, Illustration) has been working in art/design and education since 2006. Their practice includes illustration in wet and dry media, silkscreening, lino-cut, hand lettering, sign painting, stencil-making and graphic design for both grassroots groups and questionable food production companies. They strive to make resources in art and design more accessible to affect social change through collective projects such as the Sidetracks Screenprinting Collective, and Sounding Out! 2SLGBTQ+ Youth workshops in Sci Fi Podcasting. Lolo holds a BFA in Design Art from Concordia University and is a member of the Solidarity Across Borders Network.

Thy Anne Chu Quang (Operations & Admin) works in project management where she currently supports the development of community infrastructure and works to improve social housing in a Northern Indigenous community in Quebec. She enjoys making maps to advance First Nations' priorities in governmental negotiations. Thy Anne also serves as the Head of Operations of Atelier Céladon, a nonprofit art organization prioritizing creators who are underrepresented by mainstream media production. She holds a BA in Political Science from McGill University.

KNGFU (Interactive Production partner) is a multi-platform content producer that LOKI collaborates with on interactive projects of scale. All their projects share common values: a social message, a blend of cultures, and a singular approach to story and treatment. Since its foundation in 2005, the company's work has been dedicated to meaningful new forms of storytelling, partnering locally and internationally with broadcasting platforms, social and cultural institutions, and fellow content producers who are passionate about exploring new narrative spaces and approaches."

[via: https://are.na/block/2273195 ]
design  lcproject  multidisciplinary  graphicdesign  socialchange  montreal  studios  kevinyuenkitlo  marie-noëllehébert  lolosirois  thyannechuquang  kngfu  criticaldesign  collaboration  community  activism  grassroots  publishing  openstudioproject  print 
july 2018 by robertogreco
ALENA MUSEUM
"Alena Museum is nonprofit 501(c)3 creative space that houses multi-disciplinary arts and work studios to cultivate the cultural richness of the African Diaspora. In the African language of Tigrinya Alena translates to  “we are here!"  Alena Museum declares that "we are here" by providing access for the African Diaspora to create original work and keep dedicated space for creative expression, in the face of the rapid displacement of these communities as a result of gentrification. We are empowering our community to be active players in this new economy in order to directly  mitigate displacement and marginalization."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/alenamuseum/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
lcproject  openstudioproject  art  arts  coworking  gentrification  studios  africandiaspora  diaspora  oakland  bayarea  tovisit  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Outlet
"Part illustration, part workshop, part retail, part library, ALL FUN. Promise. "

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/outletpdx/ ]
portland  oregon  lcproject  openstudioproject  libraries  workshops  studios  katebingaman-burt 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Paris Review - Chris Marker’s Studio, Adam Bartos and Ben Lerner
"Chris Marker, whose name was not “Chris Marker,” was a play of masks and avatars, an artist who leapt, like one of his beloved cats, from medium to medium. If, as Walter Benjamin said, a great work either dissolves a genre or invents one, if each great work is a special case, Marker produced a series of special cases. He invented the genre of the essay film; he composed what is widely considered the greatest short film ever made, La Jetée, in 1962; in the late nineties, he issued one of the first major artworks of the digital age, the CD-ROM Immemory. Even Marker’s relation to his own celebrity was an evasive masterpiece: until his death in 2012, at ninety-one, he was everywhere and nowhere, refusing both the haughty fantasy of nonparticipation and the seductions of spectacle. How do you ­memorialize an artist who refused to remain identical to himself? How do you remember one of the great philosopher-artists of memory?

Adam Bartos’s photographs of Marker’s Paris studio offer a powerful answer; they are beautiful portraits from which the subject has gone missing.

In Bartos’s photographs, people are everywhere and nowhere. The first of his books I encountered was International Territory (1994), a series of ­images of the UN building in New York. Emptied of people, the architecture is left to dream its modernist dream of a future that never arrives. In many of the images, a distinctly postapocalyptic feeling obtains: without a speaker atop it, the General Assembly podium appears like a giant tomb; the subtle signs of aging infrastructure—cracks in the walls, peeling paint—make the building look less momentarily vacated than abandoned. I can’t quite decide, for instance, whether the coat hanging in the photograph of the Russian Translation Service indicates that someone is working just beyond the frame or whether the garment has been hanging there for years. The healthy-­looking office plants that appear in several images look less like ­reassuring signs of habitation than ominous indications that nature is starting to reclaim the buildings of a depopulated city. And the single rose in a vase at the center of the image of the Delegates Dining Room—is that freshly cut or plastic? Bartos’s photographs are full of such ambiguities, undecidable temporalities. Across his projects, I experience the contradictory sense that the human figure is just about to reenter the picture and that the architecture and furniture will never again be occupied. Of course, this shifting sense of presence and absence isn’t an effect merely of what’s depicted, but of how: Bartos’s images feel both perfectly composed and simply found, patterned and yet unmanipulated, which means that my awareness of someone “­behind” the camera dims and intensifies and dims again as I look.

The architecture dreams, the chairs expect—on a variety of scales, Bartos can reveal how collective fantasies about the future are sedimented in materials. A few people do appear in Boulevard (2005), for instance, a book that juxtaposes images of Los Angeles and Paris—two historical centers of image making—but the pathos belongs to objects. Parked cars in an empty lot in Los Angeles and an unoccupied table for two at a Parisian restaurant (shot through the window from the street, but at an angle from which the photographer is not reflected in the glass, adding to the sense the image was taken by a ghost) seem to “wait without hope”—to quote Eliot, whom Marker loved—for drivers and diners. The sense of waiting in Bartos’s work is key: What appears, appears to wait for the return of the human, but since nothing is as human as waiting, as the experience of duration that is boredom, I begin to invest things with feelings. And then the things look back at me.

Crucially, most of what appears in Bartos’s photos is dated; he depicts old futurisms, a special case of anachronism. Kosmos (2001)—I see a copy of this book on Marker’s shelf in one of the studio photographs—shows us the technologies and uniforms of Russian cosmonauts; Yard Sale Photographs (2009) explores that ritual suburban purging of barely resalable junk and memory. The shape of a fender, the linoleum of a counter, the outmoded ergonomics of an empty office chair, the now archaic instantaneity of the Polaroid, color schemes that register the collective affect of another age—we see in Bartos’s work period styles falling out of their periods. And Bartos is always depicting other media within his medium: books, cameras, keyboards, old audio technology, et cetera. The quietly managed motif of discarded ­media makes each image feel time sensitive—the older technologies are, among other things, memento mori for Bartos’s camera, which adds an element of fragility to each picture’s quiet confidence.

Bartos’s most recent book, Darkroom (2011), gathers many of these concerns. His sense of composition can make even a photograph taken in the open air seem like an interior carefully arranged by a ghostly presence; a darkroom, typically an interior within an interior, is the nude of rooms, a site of exposure exposed. It is also the most dated of spaces, as digital technology has eliminated the dialectic of light and darkness once constitutive of the photographic art. Darkroom is an elegy for process and for patience, although, like many elegies, Bartos reinscribes the values he mourns, as his own photographs evince a sensitivity that makes nostalgia for a previous moment in the medium beside the point. These images of the displaced origin of images are again subtle evocations of distinct temporalities: the time required for a photograph (of an instant) to develop in a chemical bath, technological developments that supplant that process in historical time. No photographer ever appears within the photographs, and Bartos’s touch is so light, it’s almost as if he’s given his camera a moment alone with the darkroom so that it can pay its last respects.

Marker’s studio is a kind of (light-flooded) darkroom located off a Parisian boulevard and is as full of formerly futuristic keepsakes as a cosmonaut’s yard sale—that is to say, Bartos has been preparing, without knowing it, to shoot Marker’s studio for decades. The studio is both remarkably cluttered and remarkably clean. There is no trash (although there is plenty of kitsch), no dust; the thousands of books, VHS tapes, and CDs, the multiple computers, monitors, keyboards, and other production technologies all seem in their place. A sense of highly personal order prevails; Marker, I feel, would have just the right texts and images and totems at hand, but anyone else would be at a loss regarding how to navigate his systems. And while Marker isn’t at home, from every corner something gazes at us: his cats and owls, Kim Novak in a signed photograph (Vertigo was Marker’s favorite film), the paused image of an actress on a monitor (in these images, Marker will forever almost be right back), masks of various sorts, stuffed animals, et cetera. Marker’s mind seems spatialized here, as though we were looking into his memory palace, an elaborate, idiosyncratic mnemonic become a memorial. But a joyous memorial: joyous first, because Marker’s signature mix of seriousness and playfulness is palpable—we see a thousand grins and winks—and second, because Marker, instead of becoming the fixed ­object of elegy, has again given us the slip, allowing us an intimate glimpse, but of privacy. "
chrismarker  studios  adambartos  howwework  2016  benlerner  photography  lajetée 
september 2016 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Journal: 'In Studio: Recipes for Systemic Change' book, and Helsinki Design Lab
"In particular, much strategic work for government clients in particular suffers from a major flaw—the lack of a ‘hinge’ connecting the work to a clear pathway to projects, or further work. If the workshop is free, as it often is in new, challenging, transformational areas where there is no clear understanding of value from previous efforts, it's particularly difficult, Here, the client is barely a client at all in one of the more meaningful senses i.e. they haven’t paid for it, they don’t have ‘skin in the game’.

Equally, studios can usefully bring together multiple stakeholders. Yet with complex interdependent problems requiring holistic thinking and action—e.g. climate change, health, urbanisation, education—this can lead to no one body taking responsibility, and so potential solutions fall through the cracks between organisations or within one organisation's architecture (fig.2 below) i.e. education is no longer the sole responsibility of the Department of Educaiton; it's more complex, hybrid, layered, networked than that (add your descriptor of choice).

Finally, workshops or studios lend themselves to a particular kind of focus, based on conversation and collaboration—yet they rarely provide the depth of analysis to tightly define an issue such that it can be developed into action. This often requires subsequent work, by which time the potential client has left the building and achieved escape velocity, easily side-stepping momentum generated in the workshop. The workshop model, which is often the foot-in-the-door for consultancies in this field, is intrinsically flawed.

The Helsinki Design Lab studio model is designed to side-step or otherwise deal with many of these problems. This is partly due to the nature and position of Sitra itself, particularly if strategic connections can be generated across relevant government bodies. Sitra has, to some extent, the capacity to can reach into and manipulate the 'dark matter' of organisation, governance, culture, industry (fig.3). [PS. "Dark matter" is a phrase I've been using in recent presentations and conversations (drawn from Wouter Vanstiphout in a great interview with Rory Hyde) and one I'll return to. It's not as bad as it sounds, just like real dark matter. Though it can be.]"



"The Helsinki Design Lab approach, which we're developing rapidly now, is an attempt to flesh out many strands of strategic design that we're pursuing. This first aspect, the studio, is about sketching vision. The idea of studio itself is at least three-fold, simultaneously conjuring up the idea of a space, a team or organisation, and an act of being 'in studio'."



"I think, I hope, that it suggests one possible meaningful way forward for design itself, as well as suggesting new cultures for the public sector, for thinking about complex, interdependent problems, and for rapidly creating practical yet compelling visions built on a clear understanding of 'the architecture of the problem', as we call it. "



"More fundamentally though, we intend that this is the first in a series of projects which describe how design can be used beyond these details of production of space, realisation of product or service. Often, of course, design is used in this traditional if limited role of process improvement and problem solving—the realisation of 'the thing'—without addressing the core issue, the core strategy, the vision and organisations behind 'the thing' in the first place. We think design has a role to play before we even know what the questions are, never mind the solutions. That's what this book begins to address. Subsequent projects—some products/services/things, some events, some discussion—will develop this idea."
danhill  2011  lcproject  openstudioproject  culture  decisionmaking  process  studios  studioclassroom  strategicdesign  design  vision  organization  organizations  bryanboyer 
february 2016 by robertogreco
The Department of the 4th Dimension
"The Department of the 4th Dimension is an award winning company that's dedicated to fostering a more inspired humanity through storytelling.

We partner with our clients to craft branded content and digital media experiences that are meaningful to their business and grow audiences.

Methodology

We innovate and engage audiences across a wide range of media: from local brands to Fortune 500 companies, from the size of a cell phone to the side of a skyscraper, and online branded content that has earned over a million plays with zero media dollars spent."
film  losangeles  storytelling  studios  lcproject  openstudioproject  media  filmmaking  digitalarts 
december 2015 by robertogreco
No Dickheads! A Guide To Building Happy, Healthy, And Creative Teams. — Medium
"There is a perpetuated myth within the design community, that a single visionary is required to build great products. Rubbish. Great teams build great products; moreover, in my experience, the greatest teams prioritize and nurture a healthy and positive internal culture because they understand it is critical to the design process itself.

In 20 years of leading design studios and teams, ranging from a small boutique consultancy to several in global corporations, I have become obsessed with the differences between a successful studio and a merely effective one. Inevitably what makes or breaks a studio depends on its ability to evolve skills and competencies while remaining fastidiously creative. However, simple adaptability is not enough. In an ever-changing hyper-competitive landscape, what I’ve found to be even more important is the value of laughter, empathy, a collective responsibility and a distinct lack of ego.

My measure of success — beyond incredible products — has been creating studios and a studio culture where the creative capacity of the collective team is palpable; where designers love to come to work, and visitors remark how positive and creative it feels.

The following, is an attempt to create a guide for the (often-overlooked, humanist leaning) behaviors that make a studio happy, functional and sustainable. I believe there is a straight line between how the studio feels, how we as designers treat each other, and the innovative impact of the team. The value of articulating the characteristics of an effective studio will hopefully make each team member a more conscientious contributor. Of course, these characteristics will ebb and flow to varying degrees and should not be considered concrete rules. Rather, these behaviors serve as a guideline for creating a consistently positive, and as a result, a consistently more creative place to work.

SAY GOOD MORNING AND GOOD NIGHT … While it may appear trivial, the act of observing (and even encouraging) these subtle cultural rituals increases a studio’s functionality by making it more personal.

BE OPTIMISTIC, EMBRACE FAILURE, AND LAUGH MORE… Design, through a humanist’s lens, sees optimism as a choice and creativity as an optimistic act. Therefore, constant optimism is a key ingredient to iteration. It fuels the persistence and tenacity necessary for sustaining the creative process, especially during challenging times. For example, the difficulty of innovating within a large corporation reflects a work environment where people often say, “No” or “I don’t understand” because change in corporate culture is often uncomfortable and slow. As a result, negativity must be confronted and countered — not just in a brainstorming session or during a proposal — but on a daily basis. …

EAT AND COOK TOGETHER … Team events within a big corporation are set up to facilitate these informal conversations but often do the opposite: you go to a nice restaurant, everyone orders expensive food and lots of wine, they drink until they get drunk, and you go back to your hotel room. One year, our budget ran low so we thought, “What if we did the opposite? Go to the wilderness, buy food, and cook for each other.”

What happened next was amazing! Somebody invariably took responsibility for cooking, another for preparing food, and someone else for laying the table. Without much discussion the whole team was buzzing around the kitchen, like a hive working towards a common goal. There’s something inherently vulnerable about cooking together and for each other. It’s humbling to serve and to be served.

GOOD STUDIOS BUILD GOOD WALLS It is important when you walk into any studio that you feel as much as see what is being built — the studio should crackle with creative energy. Specifically, I believe you can determine the health of any design studio simply by looking at its walls. …

READ FICTION … As designers we are often asking people to take a leap of faith and to picture a world that doesn’t quite exist. We are, at our essence, doing nothing more than creating fiction and telling good stories — an essential part of human communication. Wouldn’t it then make sense to, at the very least, invite fiction into the studio or at the most encourage it to flourish?

Storytelling is a craft. It’s emotional and it’s part of the design process. We should therefore read and study fiction.

DESIGN THE DESIGNING There’s one very simple rule when innovating: design the process to fit the project. …

EMBRACE THE FRINGE I believe creative people want “to make”. In corporations or complex projects, the products we make often take an inordinate amount of time. As a result, I assume that most designers (myself included) work on fringe projects — creative projects made outside of the studio. …

MIND YOUR LANGUAGE Language defines the territory of projects. It is therefore important to constantly check that people share the same understanding of a word, phrase or name. Ideally at the outset of the project you should define the language, almost to the point of giving each person on the team a list: when we say this, this is what ‘this’ means. This pedantic approach is particularly important in multicultural studios where a diverse language encourages multiple, sometimes volatile, interpretations …

MEET OUT IN THE OPEN There are very few highly confidential things in an effective studio, so why go in a room and close the door? Instead, move most conversations out in the open. They will be better as a result. …

EVERYONE LEADS AT SOME POINT … At any point everyone should feel the responsibility, or the opportunity, to lead. It is so important to be collectively responsible. No one person can lead these dynamic projects effectively in a studio because they are never two-dimensional. …

INVERT EVERYTHING Designing products for people requires that you get inside their minds, feelings, motivations and values. To do so, a smart designer must invert their own worldview and see the world through someone else’s eyes in order to empathize with them. This ability to empathize with others, a very humanist behavior, is perhaps the most important capability and characteristic of both a studio and a designer. …

HIRE A BOOKIE Competition motivates a team, that’s a given. But betting on shit seems to be galvanizing and brings a team together. …

BRING THE OUTSIDE, INSIDE … We spend most of our time with our colleagues at work rather than with our partners or families. So whether we like it or not, we are all going through this life together. We should embrace that fact.

Yes, I understand people value privacy and you must respect that boundary. But the reality of the modern studio is that boundaries often blur. In fact, I think it is good that they are blurred. Children, pets, and hobbies — shared human connections and interests — promote this intimacy. …

….. ALLOWED! … I believe it is a perpetuated myth that great products are built by a single visionary. Often the people who think they are visionaries are just egomaniacal Dickheads. I honestly believe that great teams build great products and that careers are made by people that prioritize great products first, not their own ambition. …

FIND A GOOD MIRROR The studio mirror is a distinct role and a job title. In our studio Luke’s role was to archive our work and reflect it back to the team in a unique way, much like the documentation of these principles. Pursued with persistence and the eye of a journalist, the Studio Mirror should capture not only WHAT is being made but HOW and by WHOM. This isn’t simply dumping files on a server but rather curating the content in a way that is compelling and consumable for the team. For example, our studio created a quarterly magazine. You can read ADQ2.1: The Launch Issue here."
rhysnewman  lukejohnson  teams  creativity  studios  openstudioproject  lcproject  2015  collaboration  tcsnmy  leadership  open  openness  transparency  process  fun  play  intimacy  sharing  language  storytelling  fiction  walls  design  place  work  food  optimism  failure  laughter  howwework  conviviality  cohabitation  facetime  relationships  publishing  reflection  documentation  jpl  omata  culture  fringe  display  planning  outdoors  criticism  connection  conflict 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Kin
"Founded in 2008, we are a research and design studio in Farringdon, London. There are 14 of us, we come from a diverse set of backgrounds and are made up of designers, developers and makers.

Our design philosophy is at the heart of everything we do – our work, the way we structure our studio, and the way we decide who we work with.

We believe that through an intrinsic understanding of the way technology works, and the continuous study of society and culture we have the opportunity to make the things we put into the world more meaningful. In short we care about the stuff we make and we want it to have value.

Our work has been published numerous times and has won many awards, including a D&AD yellow pencil. We were shortlisted for Designs of the Year at the Design Museum in 2011 and our work featured in Time Magazine’s Top 10 of Everything 2010.

We are closely connected to education, through teaching and regularly run workshops at leading academic institutions both nationally and internationally.

This [http://idealstudio.represent.uk.com/studios/4 ] is good reference for understanding what we believe in and how we operate."

[See also: http://kin-design.tumblr.com/
https://twitter.com/kindesign ]

[Text from http://idealstudio.represent.uk.com/studios/4 :

"Kin is a research and design studio founded in 2008 which works with clients as diverse as fashion brands, museums and electronics companies. Its nine staff are based over four floors of an old warehouse in Farringdon.

Matt Wade, co-founder and director of Kin, on...

The dangers of unsociable hours...

“Firstly, it's unhealthy and we need to be healthy to be able to think and function efficiently. Then secondly, we all need to feed our minds and we can't do that if we're always at work. I'd rather a designer was hanging out with their friends, going to see a show, reading a book, or just watching TV, and letting the world into their lives rather than pushing things around a page until midnight every night. Then come to work fresh, do great work and go home at the end of a 'normal' day.”

The best kind of stimulating environment...

“It needs to be dynamic – and not always predictable. Too many design studios look like offices. They're stiff, formal environments – maybe out of a desire to look grown up, or from a desire to externalise discipline and rigour. I find chaos much more interesting than order. I think we need places for our mind to go. A good design studio should be more Woodstock than Sandhurst.”

“It’s about not having rigid rules. I was talking to someone recently about design studios where you have to have the right pen and he said that we sounded like the kind of studio where it was more important to have the wrong pen. The space is not crafted – we don’t have an inspiration wall of box shelving full of Japanese objects – we just have a lot of shit.”

“We have the workshop and the sound design area as well as two design studios and each floor feels different to each other which I quite like. We don’t have a style we adhere to – we don’t say our look is green with plywood and a certain type of furniture.”

“At Imagination I loved the fact they had a model shop, photographic studio, roof terrace and gallery. The variety was really stimulating.”

Creating a shared sense of purpose...

“I'm interested in shared responsibility and ownership. There are nine full-time employees at Kin, and each one has a share in the business. They get a share of any profits and we decide as a group who we should and shouldn't work with.”

“We have lots and lots of discussions and arguments about design philosophy and Kev and I have people challenging us the whole time – there’s no reverence because we’re the bosses.”

Keeping things fresh in a small team...

“People do not sit in the teams in which they are working on something – we want everyone to be able to see what they are doing.

“Also I think breaking out of the design bubble is really important because the work we do is not for designers, it’s for normal people. It is really important that we get enrichment and understanding of other areas of life that influence our design work. There’s only nine of us – we all look at the same stuff, we probably have duplicate copies of the same books and pathetically even listen to the same type of music, so we need to create diversity wherever we can.”

Managing client feedback...

“We have a weekly workshop with clients to review the work where we can show prototypes, get feedback and change direction if necessary. We know when those sessions happen and we do not really encourage the clients coming in the rest of the time.”

The ideal studio...

“More like an amazing art school than a place of work, full of interesting people all with a common sense of purpose.”"]
kindesign  design  london  technology  openstudioproject  lcproject  studios  mattwade  small 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Hooked on labs
[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2014/12/05/filtered ]

"From startups to venture capital, arts to social policy, everyone wants to experiment and to do so they want labs…

To understand labs we need to go back to 1660 where Robert Hooke's experimenting went hand-in-hand with discussion

Labs are places where people conduct experiments to test out theories. The new labs proliferating outside the hard sciences are a symptom of the spread of experimentalism as an ideology for how we should shape the future.

Curiosity is at the core of experimentalist culture: it holds that knowledge should develop by being testable and therefore provisional; and that the best theories should be designed to be examined by both data and open debate. That commitment to experimentalism is at the leading edge of a wide range of fields. …

Having a lab is a way to signal an attachment to experimentalist culture, testing our way into an uncertain future…

The most prolific, Nobel Prize winning labs of the 20th century were places where people debated…

New social labs around the world are trying to kindle the hope of finding clear and authoritative ways to solve problems…

"Some of our biggest challenges transcend the laboratory, demanding new kinds of experiments"



"Over the next few years inner-city labs will sprout all over the world, from the ambitious plans of Novartis, the pharmaceuticals giant based at a research campus in Basel to lean biotech startups in San Francisco. In downtown Stockholm a giant life sciences cluster is taking shape in Hagastaden, an area with four universities; the Karolinska University Hospital; 5,300 life scientists; and more than 100,000 students to recruit from both for work and for clinical trials. This is a science district which markets its credentials by noting that Stockholm is held in high regard by Monocle magazine. A major highway will be covered over to create the area known as Stockholm Life, with its slogan “greater science, greater business, greater life.”

The resurgence of inner-city science does not just mean that labs will return to the heart of cities, rather than being located in lifeless suburban science parks. It marks a further shift in urban culture, lifestyles and patterns of work towards an explicit and deliberate experimentalism. But this is anything but a new idea. When the scientists at the Crick Institute and the Google campus start migrating into Kings Cross they will feel modern, in their gleaming new buildings replete with computers, WiFi, gene sequencers, servers, teleconferencing, smartphones, 3D printers and much more. Yet the fundamentals of the way they work, the way they assemble knowledge, the culture they create, even the lifestyles they aspire to will be following a path first taken by that remarkable, irascible bohemian eccentric who frequented the taverns and coffee houses of Bishopsgate in the 1660s, Robert Hooke: the original pioneer of the experimental life."
charlesleadbeater  labs  laboratories  studios  lcproject  openstudioproject  2014  1660  roberthooke  experimentation  uncertainty  debate  social  howwelearn  problemsolving  science  experiments  curiosity  knowledge 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Filtered for top-notch long reads ( 5 Dec., 2014, at Interconnected)
"1.

This well-illustrated piece on Chinese Mobile UI trends [http://dangrover.com/blog/2014/12/01/chinese-mobile-app-ui-trends.html ] is full of great nuggets.

My favourite is that companies have adopted automated "chat" as their official public face. Each brand is a bot that runs inside one of the several apps that users in China have instead of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, etc. How it works:
You can send any kind of message (text, image, voice, etc), and [the bot will] reply, either in an automated fashion or by routing it to a human somewhere. The interface is exactly the same as for chatting with your friends, save for one difference: it has menus at the bottom with shortcuts to the main features of the account.

A couple more features:
Other than that, every feature you can use in a normal chat is available here. WeChat even auto-transcribes the voice messages (mentioned before) into text before passing them to the third-party server running the account. Official accounts can also push news updates to their subscribers. Every media outlet operates one ...

I'm into this, I'm into this. Our western way for interacting with companies (assuming the shitty voice menu things are wildly out-dated) is websites, which we browse. But instead of browsing, a conversation?

So... cultural difference between China and the west, or just one of those forks in the road? Or a glimpse of the future?

2.

Hooked on Labs [http://thelongandshort.org/issues/season-two/hooked-on-labs.html ] (thanks Iain) draws a line between the practice of Robert Hooke in the 1660s and the modern trend for companies to have "labs."
Labs are places where people conduct experiments to test out theories. The new labs proliferating outside the hard sciences are a symptom of the spread of experimentalism as an ideology for how we should shape the future. Curiosity is at the core of experimentalist culture: it holds that knowledge should develop by being testable and therefore provisional ...

I like that the answer to "how should we invent?" can be not a process but a location. Other answers might be "a studio," and "the field," both of which suggest a variety of processes and practices without being pinned down.

I guess my recent preoccupation with coffee mornings is about the same thing. Can the "coffee morning" as a place, with all its informality (which I am desperate to preserve), be a way to dowse the scenius, to allow invention to occur without process?

Also coffee.

And this bit:
One vital source of this conversational approach to science was Copenhagen and the culture that Niels Bohr created around his institute for theoretical physics and his nearby home.

...which reminds me of this terrific story about the development of the theory of electron spin and how it came together as Bohr travelled across Europe by train.

At the beginning of the trip:
Bohr's train to Leiden made a stop in Hamburg, where he was met by Pauli and Stern who had come to the station to ask him what he thought about spin. Bohr must have said that it was very very interesting (his favorite way of expressing that something was wrong), but he could not see how an electron moving in the electric field of the nucleus could experience the magnetic field necessary for producing fine structure.

And as Bohr travels from town to town, he meets scientists, hears arguments, develops his view, and carries information. Great story.

I think of the interactions between scientists as the hidden particles that don't show up in the traces of a cloud chamber. They're there, busy - multiple - far denser and richer and messier than the clean interactions of the citations in scientific papers or at conferences - the invisible trillions of forks that are left out of Feynman diagrams. Those interactions are what really matter, and their stories are the most interesting of all."
mattwebb  2014  china  chinese  interface  input  chat  communication  internet  web  online  browsing  conversation  wechat  labs  openstudioproject  charlesleadbeater  nielsbohr  experiments  experimentation  experimentalism  curiosity  classideas  invention  place  studios  lcproject  informal  informallearning  informality  scenius  process  howwelearn  messiness  interaction  culture  difference  frontiers  us 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Recess
"Recess is a nonprofit artists’ workspace open to the public.  At once a studio and exhibition space, Recess initiates lasting connections between artists and audiences, presenting ambitious projects that embrace experimentation and focus on process.

Our signature program, Session, invites artists to use our storefront space to realize long-term projects that take advantage of our built-in public audience.

Expanding upon Session’s goal to define contemporary art in collaboration with an active audience, Recess hosts performances and event series, a critical writing program, online programs, and enjoys meaningful partnerships with likeminded institutions."



"Mission

Recess’s mission is to support the rigorous process of the contemporary artist by creating a space for productive activity that initiates a partnership with the public.

Our model combines studio and exhibition platforms, offering artists flexible space in which to generate new work. With agency to determine the visibility of their project and the parameters of its presentation, Recess artists realize ambitious goals in dialogue with an inquisitive audience.

Free and open to the public, Recess offers critical exposure for the artists we support while fostering an approachable environment that promotes valuable visual and intellectual interactions.

History

Recess was formed in May of 2009 to align with evolving conditions of creative practice and its public reception. When searching for an ideal location, we were acutely aware that emerging artists cannot afford to live or work in proximity to exhibition communities. Securing a platform to gain visibility and develop their creative goals and professional career is often an insurmountable task.
On site in Soho, we began challenging the established arts community to embrace changing modes of artistic production that were taking advantage of an active public. Recess eagerly stepped into the liminal space between polished gallery and private studio to take on ambitious projects that don’t “fit” squarely within the boundaries of these customary contexts.

In February of 2011, we received a wonderful invitation to collaborate with Charlotte Kidd and Dustin Yellin of Kidd Yellin Studios in Red Hook. Kidd Yellin offered Recess a project room in their dynamic art space to serve as second site for Session. With access to Kidd Yellin’s gallery, studios and vibrant artists community, Session artists began working to further Recess’ mission in this neighborhood. Recess’s final project at Kidd Yellin Studios concluded in December, 2011.

In summer of 2012, Recess began collaborating with Dustin Yellin by opening an additional space for Session at Pioneer Works, Center for Art & Innovation, the new arts space at 159 Pioneer Street in Red Hook, one of Brooklyn’s prominent arts destinations."
stuidos  art  openstudioproject  openstudio  audience  recess  nyc  collaboration  lcproject  studios  glvo 
august 2014 by robertogreco
guiding principles for an adaptive technology working group | Abler.
"I’ve been thinking about the studio/lab/workshop environment I want to foster at Olin. So herewith a manifesto, or a set of guiding principles, for young engineers and designers working critically, reflexively, in technology design and disability.

1. We use the terms “adaptive” and “assistive” technologies interchangeably when speaking casually or with newcomers to this field, but we use the terms of adaptation as often as possible. Why? Assistance usually implies linearity. A problem needs fixing, seeks a solution. But adaptation is flexible, rhizomatic, multi-directional. It implies a technological design that works in tandem, reciprocally, with the magnificence that is the human body in all its forms. Adaptation implies change over time. Adaptive systems might require the environment to shift, rather than the body. In short, we believe that all technology is assistive technology—and so we speak in terms of adaptation.

2. We presume competence. This exhortation is a central one in disability rights circles, and we proceed with it in mind as we work with our design partners. We don’t claim our end-users are “suffering from” their conditions—unless they tell us they are. We speak directly to users themselves, not to caregivers or companions—unless we’re directed to do so. We speak the way we’d speak to anyone, even if our partners don’t use verbal language in return—until they request we do otherwise. We take a capabilities approach.

3. We are significantly public-facing in our disposition. Doing open and public research—including in the early stages—is central to our conviction that design for disability carries with it enormous political and cultural stakes. We research transparently, and we cultivate multiple and unusual publics for the work.

4. We spend some of our time making things, and some of our time making things happen.¹ A lot of our effort is embodied in the design and prototyping process. But another significant portion of that effort is directed toward good narrative writing, documentation, event-wrangling, and networked practices. Design can be about a better mousetrap; it can also be—and indeed more often should be—a social practice.

5. We actively seek a condition of orchestrated adjacencies: in topics, scales, and methods. Some of our projects attempt to influence industry: better designs, full stop. And some of our projects address issues of culture: symbolic, expressive, and playful work that investigates normalcy and functionality. We want high-tech work right up alongside low-tech work. Cardboard at one end, and circuits and Arduino at the other. Materially and symbolically, adjacencies in real time create unusual resonances between and among projects. They expand the acceptable questions and categories of what counts as research. They force big-picture ideas to cohere with granular problem-solving.

6. We presume, always, that technology is never neutral. And accordingly, we seek to create tools for conviviality, in the sense that Ivan Illich laid out in his book of the same name. Tools that are “accessible, flexible, noncoercive.” We won’t be perfect at it, but we won’t shy away from hard questions: What will it cost? What might be unintended consequences? What have we overlooked?

Like life, this version is subject to change. More on the studio/lab/workshop in this earlier post.

1. “I went from making things, to making things happen.” That’s artist Jeremy Deller on how his art practice went from objects to conditions and situations."
art  design  making  sarahendren  2014  assistivetechnology  adaptivetechnology  olincollege  manifestos  rhizomes  adaptation  human  humans  bodies  criticaldesign  conviviality  ivanilllich  normalcy  functionality  orchestratedadjacencies  hitech  lowtech  agency  makers  socialpractice  transparency  questionasking  askingquestions  jeremydeller  studios  lcproject  openstudioproject  howwework  ethics  ideals  disability  disabilities  differences  time  change  conversation  principles  adaptive  body  low-tech 
august 2014 by robertogreco
About Steam Studio | STEAM | STUDIO
"STEAM STUDIO is a pop-up design studio and maker space for youth.

Following a successful pilot in 2013, STEAM STUDIO will present a Design Bootcamp at DePaul University in collaboration with Creativity for Good from Monday, July 15 to Friday, July 18. 

STEAM STUDIO will make its return to the Chicago Cultural Center beginning Monday, July 21 and ending Friday, July 25, 2014.  

STEAM STUDIO works with organizations and professional clients to create real world challenges where youth use a variety of design and production tools to create artifacts. STEAM STUDIO participants will also earn fashion focused digital badges in design, photography, collaboration, completing projects.
 
Following this week-long intensive, youth will showcase their creations at a Trunk Show at The Chicago Cultural Center on July 25th. Youth will return to the Cultural Center to present a full runway show of their collection which will be featured within the Chicago City of Learning Summer  Showcase on August 14, 2014."
chicago  pop-ups  lcproject  openstudioproject  design  studios  2014  2013  learning  photography  collaboration 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Everything Studio
"We are a multidisciplinary design firm in New York City, working in all areas of print and interactive design.

Everything Studio is the annoyingly self-aggrandizing name of our company, but don’t let it put you off. We’re not implying that we can do everything or know everything. We are people who hold many uncertain and contradictory ideas about design. It is impossible for us to ever settle on a house style or methodology so our name is deliberately indeterminate.

Our logo is a Bucky Fuller geodesic dome, which for us represents uplifting Modernist optimism. Some people miss our reference and see it as a jungle gym — an even more joyous and apt allusion for a design practice.

Jessica Green and Tom Griffiths are the proprietors of Everything Studio. They first met at Pratt Institute in 2000 while studying graphic design. In 2004 Tom went on to receive an MFA at Yale while Jessica started a design company in New York. In 2007 they joined forces and began designing under the name Everything Studio."

[via http://blog.tanmade.com/post/90074624316/versocovers-frederic-gros-a-philosophy-of
http://www.versobooks.com/books/1640-a-philosophy-of-walking ]
design  graphics  graphicdesign  studios  openstudioproject  nyc  print  interactivedesign  everythingstudio  jessicagreen  tomgriffiths 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Museum as Hub: Interview with Beta-Local by Ruba Katrib :: New Museum
[See also: http://www.conboca.org/2012/05/29/entrevista-a-michelle-marxuach-y-beatriz-santiago-de-beta-local/
and http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/14/greathomesanddestinations/14gh-puertorico.html ]

"Beta-Local is a nonprofit center for contemporary art initiated in 2009 and located in the heart of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. I met the three cofounders, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz, Michy Marxuach, and Tony Cruz in 2010 in their storefront space, which was filled with long tables and chairs, surrounded by bookshelves packed to the brim, sofas, and a small kitchen. While Beta-Local doesn’t exhibit art, it is an essential site that fosters interdisciplinary production and dialogue within Puerto Rico. While I was there, international visitors (myself included) were using the space to have studio visits with local artists; meanwhile, the São Paulo-based artist Carla Zaccagnini led a course. In a time when the university system in Puerto Rico is especially volatile, Beta-Local has become a safe haven for artists and others interested in education and exchange. I was invited to interview Beta-Local for Museum as Hub, who feature the space in their Art Spaces Directory.

Ruba Katrib: Can you talk a little bit about why you started and what you consider to be the central focus of your program?

Beatriz Santiago Muñoz: Beta-Local grew out of our interest in rethinking aesthetic thought and artistic practice from our local context. We began the project in 2009, during the economic crisis. We viewed the lack of local institutional support structures, such as contemporary galleries, museums, and art schools—along with the crisis in traditional modes of production and art economies—as an opportunity to develop alternative support structures for art and vernacular pedagogies. We insist on artistic practice and aesthetic thought as an essential social and political practice part of life.

Beta-Local is organized around three main programs: La Práctica, a nine-month production-based program, The Harbor, a residency program, and La Ivan Illich, an open school through which anyone can propose a class that they want to take or teach. These three programs generate many independent projects from performances to seminars, concerts to collective meals.

Our most important role is to support artists in making work. This making/thinking happens in the midst of projects, classes, lectures, and research. The multiple directions that the conversation can take can be disorienting, but we think this is a good thing.

We wanted to create a space that supported art-making—very broadly defined—and we wanted to do this while responding to and rethinking our physical context, the places where we live, our relationship to the people we collaborate with, their abilities and interests, as well as their imaginative visions of what was possible. We wanted to think about and create links across disciplines, and find connections between artistic practice and other ways of thinking and doing.

When we began the project, it was important for us to emphasize the lack of functionality in institutions, not a lack of exhibition space. We really looked to bring home the point that if there was no functionality in institutions, if the museums provided neither the resources, the relationship to a public, nor the critical context, than your living room—a street corner or a factory was just as good or perhaps an even better space for exhibition/presentation. We also wanted to de-emphasize the exhibition as the only point of contact between public and artist by opening up the process of production to the public, and allowing it to be challenged and enriched in the process.

We do actually orchestrate exhibitions/presentations when that is the logical end result of a project. We have brought in Alia Farid, a young curator living in Barcelona and Kuwait, to work with artist Rosalin Suero on the exhibition “Almacén/Habitación,” which took place in an industrial park. We also collaborated with the local Association of Architects to present Ashley Hunt’s lecture/performance Notes on the Emptying of a City and we presented Jeanine Oleson’s performance La Gran Limpia in contested public spaces and published a related text—these are just some examples. Generally, we don’t present work in our space; this forces us to create collaborations and open up other spaces for art. In general, these spaces have the resources, the space, and the electricity bills, they just don’t have the programming.

RK: With these different components comprising your structure, how do you balance the courses and workshops that are initiated by Beta-Local (that have your interests in mind) with the more “user-generated” elements of the program? Do these aspects of the program correlate or do you see them as separate initiatives entirely?

BSM: It is very hard to disentangle the two as there is a certain flow and synchronicity between them. Beta-Local has some clear interests—they are evident in the structure of Beta-Local, in the physical space, in our personal work as artists and cultural producers—but as the community of participants grows, those interests also grow, overlap, and meander. We follow our interests, but we leave all sorts of doors open for others to do the same. We are moved by the commitment of others to their own work and vision.

For example, we have received a lot of proposals related to bike culture, from mapping routes to bike mechanics. There is also a community of architects who are interested in experimental practices and architecture as research who participate regularly in programming, proposing, and leading classes; we have had classes and lectures proposed by economists, neuroscientists, ninety–year-old cooks, and teenagers. During 2011–12, we had a movement researcher participating in La Práctica. She initiated a project that involved the participation of many dancers, improvisers, and other movement researchers. This project opened the door to a local history of movement practices and all of a sudden we were in the middle of the dance community—not a place we could have anticipated at all. Similar instances have happened, all branching out in many directions—the space attracts like-minded people from other disciplines.

On the other hand, we also have found ways to pursue a sustained investigation into ideas of interest to Beta-Local. This year, we have begun a new series of intensive seminars anchored in our specific geography, local knowledge, and emerging art practices. This January, we are holding our first two-week session on the subject of land, place, and its visual representation. The ways in which our landscape is read and reinscribed through images is a subject that has come up a lot in the work of artists that we admire. The seminar puts together geographers, artists, and others who have been working on these ideas, including Chemi Rosado, Javier Arbona, and many others. We hope it will be the first of many. We have also pursued research and collaboration into experimental pedagogy, and have sustained long-term collaborations with artists and researchers whose work we are interested in exploring more in-depth.

In the most practical sense, we can do this because we are wiling to literally and figuratively lend them the keys. During our first and second year, we had so many proposals for courses (interesting ones!) and programming that we had to decide early on how to handle this. We would have collapsed if one of the three of us had to be there for everything. Andrea Bauzá, an architect who participated in La Práctica during our first year, organized an eight-week course on architecture, public space, and activism. We gave her the key to the space and from that point on we have done it many other times. On the one hand, it solves a practical problem, on the other, it really gives programming autonomy to the public school project. Also, all La Práctica participants have the ability to program the space and pursue their interests through programming. As we bring more people in, we have more and more reliable collaborators who can run programs, create projects, and teach classes.

RK: How do you believe Beta-Local’s program is perceived locally? There is a dynamic community of artists, curators, and collectors in Puerto Rico, what role do you think your program plays in the local art scene?

BSM: We have been very lucky to have the support and collaboration of the local community of artists and curators—as well as architects, designers, and non-art neighbors. They create programs and are our main audience and participants. Without their support and participation this simply would not work. This, in part, has to do with the fact that the public or La Práctica participants propose at least half of our programming. Establishing a steady connection with collectors is a bit trickier. We are not a traditional presenting institution. Some unconventional collectors avidly support our programs and regularly participate in events. We have also collaborated with Espacio 1414, a private collection, in creating a public program, which was very successful. But more conservative collectors may still be working on figuring out what we do and how this supports a healthy art community. Our place in the local ecosystem is as an engine through which new art and other relationships are forged, tested, and experimented with.

RK: Beta-Local is very integrated into the regional fabric; much of your program is a direct response to the immediate needs of the community in San Juan. But you also have international aspects to your program, how do you connect and communicate your activities to a broader contemporary art context?

BSM: We invite artists to Beta-Local whose work has interesting ties to or challenges local practices, Ana María Millán/Helena Producciones, Amílcar Packer, Carla Zaccagnini, Pablo Guardiola, Adriana Lara, Alia Farid, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Felipe Mujica, and … [more]
via:javierarbona  2014  beta-local  sanjuan  puertorico  beatrizsantiagomuñoz  art  openstudioproject  lcproject  glvo  tonycruz  michymarxuach  studios  studioclassroom  freeschools  education  community  ivanillich  residencies  rubakatrib  funding  fundraising  galleries  local  pedagogy  vernacularpedagogies  openschools  open  place  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  multidisciplinary 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Seventeen-day Studio
"Seventeen-day Studio writes about books, experimentation & experience. "

"The Seventeen-day Studio began on March 29, 2013 and ended seventeen days later on April 14. We formed the studio as an exploration in collaboration, an exhibition of the design process, and an evaluation of the field as we know it. What came from the studio greatly outweighs what we put into it, due to the kindness and generosity of our colleagues, advisors, and all those who stopped by."



[Projects]

"Studio as critique.

As much as the studio is about showing designers in their element, we felt a need to be critical about what we do. Through open collaboration with each other and visitors, we embrace the loss of explicit authorship. We recognize our own ego but do not believe in solitary genius. To achieve this we developed projects which spanned the 17 days. These parts of the studio are meant to challenge the traditional notion of the graphic designer through our relationships with clients and the greater public.

Posters, books, and logos are quintessential so we began there. To explore our use of technology, media, and medium as they relate to the deliverable, we created these systems of making and interaction. The Poster Machine, Logo Parlor, and Bookshop as we called them produced work for a walk-in clientele. They act as introduction to basic concepts of design[ing] and being designed for in a way that was personal for each visitor.

We want to expand the space of graphic design criticism. Through our studio space and by working in the gallery, performing, we present design, the verb, to more than our peers. We used one of our 23 ft high walls to proclaim a diagnosis of the field. Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers, toward eccentric perceptions, unusual actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.

Bookshop.

The print-per-request Book Shop interprets an individual’s reading preferences and habits. We posit that reading is distracting, because it is plastic, creative work that is affected by methods of publishing and the devices we use. Visitor input went into editing and producing a 100 page book that focuses on the parts of books and reading that cannot be read or are routinely glanced over, though contribute the how a reader reads.

The poster machine, an alternative interface.

The poster machine was made to challenge the digital tools that designers conventionally use in making. A series of knobs and switches are used by the machine’s operator to alter the mood and layout of their poster. Each poster is then handmade and machine-made. After playing with the machine the maker sends her poster to print, where it is also automatically fed to our website for all to see.

Logo Parlor, a generative identity system.

The logo parlor generates a logo and 20 business cards in 8 minutes. The piece was developed based on a system in which visitors fill out a form where they rank different skill sets in a scale of 1 to 10. The skill sets are gathered from a survey of most repeated characteristics mentioned by prospective candidate during interviews across different fields. During the exhibition visitors were encouraged to fill out a form and spend 8 minutes with the designer as the process of creating their customized logotype unfolded."



"Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers toward eccentric perceptions, inappropriate actions and feelings, our withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation."
design  designprocess  classideas  projectideas  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  books  making  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  manifestos  workshops  events  studios  printing  publishing  eventideas 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Beta-Local
"Beta-Local es una organización sin fines de lucro dedicada a apoyar y promover la práctica y el pensamiento estético a través de varios programas:

La Práctica, una programa post-académico centrado el pensamiento estético y la producción artística mediante el cual becarios de diversas disciplinas llevan un proyecto desde conceptualización hasta presentación mediante procesos abiertos y frecuentemente colaborativos.

The Harbor, un programa de residencias artísticas, a través del cual artistas, arquitectos y otros hacedores residen en Beta-Loca y desarrollan proyectos o talleres.

La Ivan Illich, una plataforma mediante la cual cualquier persona puede proponer una clase que puede ofrece o que quiere tomar,

y un nutrido programa público de exhibicions, charlas, Pin-ups (críticas abiertas), muestras, exhibiciones y publicaciones.

Nuestra biblioteca de consulta, La Esquina está abierta al público un día a la semana y por cita."

[video (in English): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXEfZ3rxEck ]

"Beta-Local is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and promoting aesthetic thought and practice through various programs:

La Práctica, a post-academic study and production program, through which Fellows coming from diverse disciplines take a project from concept to production.

The Harbor: a residency program for visiting international artists, architects, designers and other cultural producers. Visitors to Beta-Local, develop projects, workshops and offer lectures on a variety of subjects related to art and other creative disciplines to the general public and to La Práctica Fellows.

La Ivan Illich, an open experimental school through which the participating public suggests, requests and creates courses and workshops.

and a full schedule of public programming which includes exhibitions, lectures, Pin-ups (open critiques), screenings and publications.

We also have a small reference library, La Esquina, focused on art and designopen once a week to the general public."
puertorico  ivanillich  education  art  arts  learning  colearning  via:javierarbona  studios  residencies  lcproject  freeschools  artmaking  materials  society  research  workinginpublic  tonycruz  pabloguardiola  michymaxuach  toolsforconviviality  conviviality  bosqueauxiliar  tooltotool  collaboration  socialpracticeart  walking  politics  beta-local 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Anagrama | Brand Intelligence Group
"We are an international branding firm with offices in Monterrey and Mexico City. Our clients include companies from varied industries in countries all around the world.

Besides our history and experience with brand development, we are also experts in the design and development of objects, spaces, software and multimedia projects.

We create the perfect balance between a design boutique, focusing on the development of creative pieces paying attention to the smallest of details, and a business consultancy providing solutions based on the analysis of tangible data to generate best fit applications.

Our services reach all of the branding spectrum from strategic consulting to fine tune brand
objectives for the company to logotype, peripherals and captivating illustration design.

Since our creation, we decided to break the traditional creative agency scheme, integrating multidisciplinary teams of creative and business experts.

A well managed and positioned brand represents a powerful asset for the company´s total
value. It is a sales tool and a client loyalty promoter.

We love new challenges and we address them accordingly with an experienced team of collaborators focused on adding value to all of our projects. To know more about our points
of view, work process, and new ways we can help you, please visit our contact section."
design  garphicdesign  branding  identity  mexico  monterrey  studios  portfolios 
december 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Fabrica 2013 Informal Annual Review: Exhibitions
"So Sam's team devised some modular furniture elements, a modular graphic system, and a modular web service, each of which related to the other but could be taken apart by incoming teams subsequently. Then, working with local students, a series of furniture elements emerged—benches, shelves, chairs, crates and so on—with customised graphic identities alongside.

This of course ticks several boxes for me, such as modular, adaptive components, collaborative design processes, open platforms and so on. But better was to see the buzz of activity when I visited on the closing Saturday and Sunday, with highly imaginative adaptations created in collaboration."



"What's Sam's studio does very well is use exhibitions to drive the rhythm of the studio. By giving themselves these immovable deadline of showing in public, they get stuff done. It's hard work, but productive, and the researchers really appreciate that. As do I.

We're increasingly using exhibitions to get Fabrica out and about, and watch out for more on that front, big and small. For instance, we're currently working hard on a very big, very top secret, quite design fiction-esque exhibition, for next February. More when I have it, but that is also using an exhibition to develop particular new skills and new perspectives inside Fabrica, through partnering with great design firms, and homing in on new thematic areas.

Another post along shortly.

Insights
Use exhibitions to turn Fabrica inside-out.
Use exhibitions to drive the rhythm of the studio.
Use exhibitions to acquire new skills, new perspectives."
exhibitions  2013  danhill  cityofsound  fabrica  sambaron  modular  modularity  adaptability  collaboration  design  openplatforms  open  studioclassroom  studios  tcsnmy  presentationsoflearning  rhythm  howwework  deadlines  productivity  openstudioproject  lcproject  learning  howwelearn  public  workinginpublic  projectorientedorganizations 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Eike König, Hort, Berlin - YouTube
"my rules:

1. enjoy what you are doing
2. get paid
2. don't work with assholes
4. only accept work that challenges you and you can build up a relation to
5. don't work 'for' people but 'with'
6. be honest to your client and yourself
7. keep on searching and exploring
8. quit when you don't enjoy it anymore

I like to invest in relationships rather than money and success"

[Presentation outline]

"1. Who the **** is Eike König? [0:07:47]
2. How to create a creative space
3. Bauhaus is dead, long live Bauhaus. [0:30:44]
4. Is it magic? [0:45:36]
5. How can you reach excellence? [0:51:28]
6. Create your own future [0:59:39]
7. Don't fear the future [1:14:34]"

[The Hort Band]

"1. collaboration is essential
2. the Hort band is in a state of constant evolution
3. repetition dulls creativity
4. the moment is more important than the documentation"

[See also:
http://blogs.walkerart.org/walkerseen/2013/03/14/designers-on-site-eike-konig/
http://www.walkerart.org/channel/2013/eike-koenig-hort-berlin
http://www.walkerart.org/calendar/2013/insights-eike-koenig-hort-berlin
http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/48414988312/this-is-eike-konig-of-hort-speaking-at-the-walker
http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/48414385349/hortfolio-mark-prendergast ]
eikekönig  hort  making  2013  walkerartcenter  design  burnout  graphicdesign  openstudioproject  work  howwework  money  relationships  studios  education  learning  dropouts  studiodesign  openspaces  bauhaus  collaboration  glvo  presence  attention  documentation  evolution  change  repetition  creativity  arial  courier  typography  fonts  success  play  fun  community  risk  risktaking  fear 
april 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Journal: Fabrica
"a type of school, or studio, or commercial practice, or research centre. Fabrica, hovering between all these things yet resisting the urge to fall into becoming any one of them, is perhaps genuinely without parallel. This makes it a little tricky to explain, but this ability to avoid pigeonholes is also to its credit."

"hybrid organisation—part communications research centre…but also part arts and design school, part think-thank, part studio. My kind of place."

"While I might occasionally characterise Fabrica as the pugnacious upstart, or startup, whose agility might challenge the established institutions, it’s clear we also have a lot to learn from the likes of the exemplary creative centres like the RCA, and from Paul in particular. His experience across the Design Museum, Cooper Hewitt and the RCA will be invaluable, and he’s beginning to draw together a great advisory board. Watch that space. I’m also exploring various newer models for learning environments, from Strelka and CIID to MIT Media Lab and School of Everything, alongside the centres of excellence like the RCA and others. My father and mother, more of an influence on me than perhaps even they realise, were both educators and learning environments and cultures may well be in my DNA, to some degree."

"…the other idea that I’m incredibly interested in pursuing at Fabrica is that of the trandisciplinary studio."

"With this stew of perspectives at hand, we might find project teams that contain graphic designers, industrial designers, neuroscientists, coders, filmmakers, for instance. Or product design, data viz, sociology, photography, economics, architecture and interaction design, for instance. These small project teams are then extremely well-equipped to tackle the kind of complex, interdependent challenges we face today, and tomorrow. We know that new knowledge and new practice—new ideas and new solutions—emerges through the collision of disciplines, at the edges of things, when we’re out of our comfort zone. Joi Ito, at the MIT Media Lab, calls this approach “anti-disciplinary”."

"And living in Treviso, a medieval walled Middle European city, our new home gives me another urban form to explore, after living in the Modern-era Social Democratic Nordic City of Helsinki, the Post-Colonial proto-Austral-Asian Sprawl of Sydney, the contemporary globalised city-state of London, and the revolutionary industrial, and then post-industrial, cities of the north of England."
1994  australia  uk  finland  venice  helsinki  london  sydney  domus  josephgrima  danielhirschmann  bethanykoby  technologywillsaveus  tadaoando  alessandrobenetton  rca  schoolofeverything  strelkainstitute  joiito  medialab  mitmedialab  ciid  paulthompson  nontechnology  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  marcosteinberg  jocelynebourgon  culturalconsumption  culturalproduction  code  darkmatter  fabricafeatures  livewindows  colors  andycameron  richardbarbrook  californianideology  discourse  sitra  italy  treviso  helsinkidesignlab  benetton  culture  culturaldiversity  socialdiversity  diversity  decisionmaking  sharedvalue  economics  obesity  healthcare  demographics  climatechange  research  art  design  studios  lcproject  learning  education  2012  antidisciplinary  transdisciplinary  cityofsound  danhill 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Traditional Turning on Vimeo
"During the past 20 years Robin Wood has produced and sold over 30,000 wooden plates and bowls from his small workshop nestled into a Peak District hillside. Creating items for everyday use and making a living from his work as a craftsman is a fundamental principle underpinning Robin's working lifestyle. He seems very happy with the path he has chosen but his activities are not restricted to wood turning.

Robin is also Chairman of the Heritage Craft Association heritagecrafts.org.uk, is featured in many television craft programmes, and shares his skills and knowledge with others by running classes in bowl turning and spoon carving. He also writes a very interesting and informative craft blog. greenwood-carving.blogspot.co.uk
Dave and Lynwen went along to see him turn a bowl. artisanco.com "

[via: http://kottke.org/12/11/stay-small-or-go-big ]
bowlturning  weather  studios  workshops  tradition  2012  robinwood  bowls  plates  turning  small  slow  simple  making  eating  food  wood  craft 
november 2012 by robertogreco
NoFavorite
"We are a New York-based design firm, offering web development and interactive solutions to a wide range of clients in a variety of fields; from art and design to fashion and entertainment.We pride ourselves on our unique approach to design and our aesthetic sensibilities, while taking advantage of the latest innovations in web technologies.We work very closely with our clients in order to express their individual vision in a fresh, innovative, and compelling way."

[via: Sponsors of http://mmuseumm.com/information ]
tomsachs  web  layout  design  webdesign  nofavorite  studios  nyc  webdev 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Partners & Spade
"Partners & Spade, established in 2008 by Andy Spade and Anthony Sperduti, is a storefront and studio on Great Jones Street in the NoHo neighborhood of lower Manhattan. The studio produces films, books, apparel and conceptual products as well as marketing and branding projects for select corporate clients. The storefront, open on weekends to the public, presents a constantly re-imagined group show of artwork, objects, collections and ideas generated by an ever changing cast of collaborators.

Begun as a means for its founders to pursue varied creative interests, Partners & Spade draws on Spade and Sperduti’s collective experience in advertising, filmmaking and fashion to create compelling brand strategies, products and one-of-a-kind artifacts, as well as a unique space for art happenings and special gatherings."

[via: Sponsors of http://mmuseumm.com/information ]
partners&spade;  anthonysperduti  andyspade  conceptualart  branding  apparel  clothing  books  studios  film  glvo  art  design  nyc 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Sternberg Press - Alex Coles [The Transdisciplinary Studio]
"We have entered a post-post-studio age, and find ourselves with a new studio model: the transdisciplinary. Artists and designers are now defined not by their discipline but by the fluidity with which their practices move between the fields of architecture, art, and design. This volume delves into four pioneering transdisciplinary studios—Jorge Pardo Sculpture, Konstantin Grcic Industrial Design, Studio Olafur Eliasson, and Åbäke—by observing and interviewing the practitioners and their assistants. A further series of interviews with curators, critics, anthropologists, designers, and artists serves to contextualize the transdisciplinary model now at the fore of creative practice."

[See also: http://www.amazon.com/Alex-Coles-the-Transdisciplinary-Studio/dp/1934105961 ]
dextersinister  andreazittel  rickpoynor  alessandromendini  marialind  ronaldjones  carolinejones  ryangander  martinogamper  jamesclifford  guibonsiepe  vitoacconci  architecture  anthropology  generalists  fluidity  interdisciplinarity  interdisciplinary  post-post-studio  2012  jorgepardo  Åbäke  konstantingrcic  olafureliasson  alexcoles  design  art  studios  transdisciplinary 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Invisible Dog Art Center
"The Invisible Dog Art Center opened in October, 2009, a raw space in a vast converted factory building with a charmed history and an open-ended mission: to create, from the ground up, a new kind of interdisciplinary arts center. Over the last two years, over 50,000 people have attended our events: visual art exhibits; dance, theater, and music performances; film screenings; literary arts and poetry readings; lectures; community events; and more.

Long-term collaborations with artists are integral to The Invisible Dog’s mission, which is to create not only a new kind of art center, but also a new kind of artistic community.

The Invisible Dog brings together artists of all career stages, offering them unique opportunities for involvement. Over the last two years, the art center has evolved organically, developing with and alongside its diverse roster of collaborators… "
interdisciplinary  art  invisibledog  glvo  nyc  studios  coworking  arts  brooklyn 
october 2012 by robertogreco
The God of Small Things - NOWNESS
"Lucian Freud’s Holland Park studio is an otherworldly space normally barred to all but the notoriously reclusive painter’s select group of sitters. It was a coup when filmmaker Tim Meara was granted access to shoot what would become his short film, Small Gestures in Bare Rooms. Freud himself no longer uses this studio—approaching his tenth decade, he finds it increasingly difficult to get up the stairs—but the paint-soiled sanctum is a testimony to the countless hours the artist has spent re-working his canvases, wiping his brush after every stroke and endlessly refining his obsessive depictions of the human body. Tim Meara created the film over six months, interviewing members of Freud’s inner circle and re-staging moments from their stories as “silent portraits,” with a voiceover by the novelist Francis Wyndham. During filming the unthinkable happened—Freud agreed to appear on camera, prompted by the memory of the birds of prey he used to keep in his Delamere Terrace studio in the 40s. For half an hour, the painter allowed himself to be filmed walking along the canal in London’s Little Venice, a kestrel perched on his arm. The full version of Meara’s short—destined to be a feature in time for Freud’s 90th birthday—can be seen beginning March 10 at the Pompidou Center, as part of the museum’s Freud retrospective."

"I assure you that I do not paint the world in desolate colours for my own pleasure. After all, I cannot change my eyes. As for my lack of convictions, alas I’m only too full of convictions. I burn with suppressed anger and indignation. But my ideal of art demands that the artist shows none of this, and that he appears in his work no more than God in nature. The man is nothing; the work is everything."

["The man is nothing, the work is everything." comes from a letter from Flaubert to novelist George Sand.]

"I think that the greatest characteristic of genius is, above all, energy. Hence, what I detest most of all in the arts, what sets me on edge, is the ingenious, the clever. This is not at all the same as bad taste, which is a good quality gone wrong. In order to have what is called bad taste, you must have a sense for poetry; whereas cleverness, on the contrary, is incompatible with genuine poetry.”

[The above quote appears to come from The Journals of Grace Hartigan, 1951-1955: http://isola-di-rifiuti.blogspot.com/2011/08/reading-notes-journals-of-grace.html ]

"What seems to me the highest and most difficult achievement of Art is not to make us laugh or cry, nor to arouse our lust or rage, but to do what nature does — that is, to fill us with wonderment [to set us dreaming]. The most beautiful works have this quality. They are serene in aspect, incomprehensible [inscrutable]."

[Bracketed parts within are the differences between the translation Lucian Freud reads and another translation of a letter from Flaubert to Louise Colet: http://www.comesaunter.com/2011/02/gustave-flaubert-on-the-highest-achievement-of-art.html ]

[Related "Centre Pompidou and Lucian Freud exhibit, L’Atelier": http://thomasapolis.com/2010/06/29/centre-pompidou-and-lucian-freud-exhibit-latelier/ ]
paint  studios  documentary  creativity  timmeara  lucianfreud  2010  artists  art 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Tellart | Experience Design & Engineering
"People don’t interact with computers or devices, they interact with each other and the world around them; a world in which the borders between natural, material and virtual have blurred.

Tellart builds where these borders blur.

As we come to understand that the network isn’t in computers but inside everything we touch, we learn that “form” isn’t what we see, it’s what we use. Every day there’s a new surface to interact with. But, underneath these surfaces lie familiar human needs, desires, habits and hopes.

Emerging technologies aren’t built with the same tools or the same talents we know from the past. We are Tellart: we’re inventors and explorers. We believe the best way to explore an idea is to make it real. We don’t just dream and sketch, we prototype and manufacture. We are in the business of making things real.

For twelve years, Tellart has been building interactive objects and environments that connect to the web.

Twelve years of marketing stunts, building control systems, museum exhibitions, games for health, consumer electronics, and medical simulations. Technologies emerge, and we’ve set out to give them culturally and economically relevant form.

In a small factory in New England, we’ve been housing the brains, hands, and hearts of industrial designers, electrical engineers, graphic designers and software architects. We’ve built our own tools and we use them every day.

We are proud of our clients and partners and the work we’ve done together. Sometimes our work starts with workshops to reveal needs and goals, or to identify potential strategies and tactics. Sometimes we create long-term agreements over years to build out innovative lines of business. But we always share the same goals as our partners: to actually make things that change the way the world thinks and acts.

Tellart starts where you start: with a hunch, an idea, a stray piece of technology, a carefully articulated demand, a broad sense that something is possible if addressed with courage, care, attention, and commitment."

[via: http://twitter.com/moleitau/statuses/225703421397831680 ]
manufacturing  sketching  internetofthings  form  toolmaking  tools  uk  studios  interactive  design  interaction  webdesign  agency  technology  usability  prototyping  making  tellart  iot  webdev 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Setup / Julian Bleecker
[Julian reads my mind.]

"The dream setup is a studio that's a short bike's ride from home. In front would be a cafe that the studio would run in a haphazard way — sometimes someone from the studio might pop around and decide to make coffee for patrons. Sometimes you'd just have to turn people away. But the cafe would also be a bit of a literati cafe, so people would come by and read and write and talk and use as a meeting place and to teach little "Public School" style classes on anything and everything. There'd be books and a bit of a lending library. The only thing between the cafe and the studio behind it would be a bit of glass wall and a door. The studio would have a proper cooking kitchen (no microwave and robot coffee — real cooking) and a long family style table to accommodate 15 or so — that's what experience tells me is the maximum compliment for a well-oiled, creative, functioning team of designers/makers/builders.

In back would be a 40 foot x 40 foot pitch of back garden with a fire pit, outdoor kitchen and a wall where we could show movies all year round in the California evenings. Attached and visible through a wall of sound muffling glass would be the shop. A big shop with CNC machines, clean room, electronics assembly and fabrication, hand tools, finishing tools, cutters both material and laser and a 3D printer that wouldn't be fetishized but used to compliment proper designing and making."
coffee  thesetup  california  design  making  edg  srg  kitchens  reading  books  publicschool  thirdplaces  cafes  libraries  groupsize  cv  glvo  studios  lcproject  2012  julianbleecker  thirdspaces  openstudioproject  usesthis 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Gowanus Ballroom – An Alternative Art Space in Brooklyn New York
"The Gowanus Ballroom is an alternative exhibition space located along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, NY.

Once operated as a steel mill in the 1800′s, this 12,000-square-foot space sits beneath 50-foot cathedral ceilings with a 4,000-square-foot mezzanine overlooking the lower gallery. In 2010, Josh Young of Serett Metal retooled the space and founded Gowanus Ballroom.

The space now serves both as a metal fabrication shop that frequently opens its doors to artists and assists or teaches them to build, and as a creative exhibition space that showcases the talents of emerging artists and designers in the Brooklyn area."
performances  music  lcproject  openstudios  education  design  fabrication  metal  metalfabrication  venues  galleries  studios  glvo  architecture  engineering  gowanuscanal  gowanus  studiospace  nyc  art  brooklyn  via:maxfenton 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Tom Sachs: Working to Code
"HOW TO SWEEP
Part 1 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kt-VlZpz-8E

"LOVE LETTER TO PLYWOOD
Part 2 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVxldyIa0Bg

"SPACE CAMP
Part 3 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-jSSTGqU5c

"COLOR
THE COMPREHENSIVE COLOR CODE
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2011"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBM_9W_e_D4

"TEN BULLETS
THE STUDIO MANUAL
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2010"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49p1JVLHUos

10 Bullets, INTRO
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28reJVNLk80

10 Bullets, #1: "WORK TO CODE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAIYVmRCX-Q

10 Bullets, #2: "SACRED SPACE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1GL4JT0sa4

10 Bullets, #3: "BE ON TIME"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6pUonbzPLU

10 Bullets, #4: "BE THOROUGH"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-gVtV67Gnc

10 Bullets, #5: "I UNDERSTAND"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGn84iuBdHw

10 Bullets, #6: "SENT DOES NOT MEAN RECEIVED"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n06LcXljbM

10 Bullets, #7: "KEEP A LIST"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRl1WOzo1zg

10 Bullets, #8: "ALWAYS BE KNOLLING"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-CTkbHnpNQ

10 Bullets, #9: "SACRIFICE TO LEATHERFACE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8heORFuGOY

10 Bullets, #10: "PERSISTENCE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDbJQoEjfbo
studios  work  2010  2012  howwework  tenbullets  tomsachs  video  art  color  space  wood  plywood  sweeping  vanneistat  2011  knolling  persistence  lists  listmaking  confirmation  understanding  thoroughness  time  punctuality  code 
june 2012 by robertogreco
A Cabin in a Loft
"A Cabin in a Loft is a one-room bed & breakfast in the vibrant artists’ neighborhood of Bushwick, Brooklyn. It is envisioned as an alternative to hotels and hostels and is available for short-term rental. The Cabin is run out of my workshop and studio, where I also live. Many of the artworks, furniture, and objects in the space were made by me or fellow artists and are for sale. By staying here, you are supporting my work as an artist, architect, and designer. You are also becoming part of a vast community of global travelers who open their homes to guests curious in engaging a local’s experience of the place they are visiting.

Conceived of as houses within houses, the cabin (available for rental) and treehouse (where I live) serve as private sleeping cabins, each with its own semi-private garden set off from the shared living space."
lcproject  openstudioproject  cabins  artists  studios  glvo  b&b  brooklyn  architecture  rentals  nyc 
april 2012 by robertogreco
The Studio-X NY Guide to Liberating New Forms of Conversation - Reading Room - Domus
"Studio-X is a multifunction outpost of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation in lower Manhattan. Alternately a studio space for several of GSAPP's research groups (including C-Lab, Netlab, Living Architecture Lab and Urban Landscape Lab), exhibition space, and events venue, Studio-X's flexible programming makes it a uniquely unpredictable site where architectural and urban thinkers interact with a curious public. Now exporting its model to other cities around the world where GSAPP has a presence, including Rio de Janeiro, Beijing, and Amman, Studio-X marks its first publication with The Studio-X NY Guide to Liberating New Forms of Conversation. José Esparza talked to the book's editor and Studio-X NY's former programming director Gavin Browning, as well as Glen Cummings and Aliza Dzik of New York design firm MTWTF, who designed the book."
process  competition  hierarchy  typologies  transformation  documentation  tabularasa  blankslate  studio-xny  craigbuckley  markwigley  danielperlin  innovation  creativity  rapidresonse  multidisciplinary  mixed-use  classroomdesign  informality  informal  workshops  studios  schooldesign  learningspaces  glvo  openstudio  columbia  nyc  studio-x  glencummings  gavinbrowning  design  adaptability  flexibility  adaptivespaces  lcproject  interdisciplinary  books  domus  architecture 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Outside the mainstream | independent project spaces and artist-run initiatives in Japan | culture360.org
"Japan has major contemporary art museums, but also very interesting smaller independent art initiatives and exhibition spaces, which play an important role in the creation of discourse in the field of contemporary art. It is particularly difficult to start and run such initiatives in Japan, usually reliant on the commitment of dedicated individuals. This article aims to give an insight into some of those non-commercial art spaces. How is it to work in such a space? How are they financed? And why do these people put their energy and money into such projects?"
glvo  japan  art  tokyo  ongoing  youkobo  cas  osaka  itoshima  studios  studiokura  residencies  independent  2011  lcproject 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Fixed gear habitats
"If you don’t have the luxury of a garage, finding adequate bike storage can be a bit of a challenge. Over the years my bikes have been moved from one location to another more often than displaced refugees. Some people give their bikes pride of place in their living rooms, while others tuck them away out of sight. This new project called SPIN by photographer Ben Roberts, showcases some of London’s unique fixed gear bikes in their own habitats."
interiors  bikes  biking  studios  glvo  furniture 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Future Perfect » Caco
"Day 1 in Lagos – setting up our pop-up design studio. 2 weeks on the ground with a strong local crew, so much to learn, to much to do. Highlight? Taking an okada across town to pick up supplies and outrunning the union guys trying to collect their daily levy – somehow managing it despite their optimal vantage point at the edge of a gridlocked round-about. These are the days."

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okada_(commercial_motorcycle) ]
janchipchase  lagos  nigeria  okada  transportation  motorcycles  2011  play  work  howwework  popup  popupstudio  lcproject  learning  pop-updesignstudio  studios  design  pop-ups 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Healing Powers of a Pie Shop - NYTimes.com
"PieLab opened in a makeshift space…Project M team members…at the invitation of the Hale Empowerment & Revitalization Organization (HERO), a housing-advocacy nonprofit, which also sponsored community-minded local initiatives. The Project M team conceived of their pie shop as a pop-up — a temporary cafe — describing it as a “negative-energy inverter, fueled by pie.”…
PieLab = a neutral place + a slice of pie.A neutral place + a slice of pie = conversation.
Conversation = ideas + design.Ideas + design = positive change.

…operated out of temporary quarters for four months…Within a few months of opening…PieLab-inspired efforts popped up in [other] cities…"

[Article also outlines misteps.]

"All the attention buoyed the PieLab collaborators. But it also created problems. When Project M first arrived in Greensboro, some folk bristled at the language it employed."

[Slide show: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/10/10/magazine/pielab.html?ref=magazine ]

[See also http://mmm.pielab.org/ (nice touch on the URL) AND http://vimeo.com/9386150 ]
alabama  greensboro  popuprestaurants  pop-uprestaurants  lcproject  community  humanitariandesign  designimperialism  projectm  amandabuck  food  glvo  srg  pielab  halecounty  conversation  problemsolving  designbasedsolutions  nonprofit  cultureclash  language  blackbelt  us  change  ideageneration  studios  popup  pop-ups  thirdspaces  cafes  openstudioproject  nonprofits 
august 2011 by robertogreco
seesaw
"We're a one-of-a-kind studio + café inspiring curiosity, creativity, and connection.

Studio: education and support for children & adults.
• friendship skills
• structured play groups
• language immersion
• workshops

Café: eat. drink. play.
• Four Barrel coffee
• tasty Danish and Korean snacks
• family-friendly vibe
• art shows and private events

Private Events: Seesaw is a great place to have your next birthday party, baby shower or private event. We offer a variety of packages. Call or e-mail us and we'll give you the low down."

[via: http://twitter.com/dcinc66/status/88450490043613184 ]
sanfrancisco  lcproject  education  learning  parenting  children  glvo  cafes  studios  curiosity  creativity  social  food  tovisit  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject 
july 2011 by robertogreco
not an alternative
"Not An Alternative is a hybrid arts collective and non-profit organization with a mission to affect popular understandings of events, symbols, and history. We curate and produce work that questions and leverages the tools of advertising, architecture, exhibit design, branding, and public relations. Programs are hosted at a variety of venues, including our Brooklyn-based gallery No-Space (formerly known as The Change You Want to See Gallery).

No-Space is host to free lectures, screenings, panel discussions, workshops and artist presentations. The space also consists of a production workshop, filming studio and video editing suite. During the day it is a collaborative office space (aka coworking) for freelancers and cultural producers."
activism  nyc  research  urbanism  art  architecture  brooklyn  galleries  no-space  notanalternative  coworking  studios  hackerspaces 
april 2011 by robertogreco
HORT
"HORT began its inhabitance back in 1994, under the previous stage name of EIKES GRAFISCHER HORT. Who the hell is Eike? Eike is the creator of HORT. HORT - a direct translation of the studio's mission. A creative playground. A place where 'work and play' can be said in the same sentence. An unconventional working environment. Once a household name in the music industry. Now, a multi-disciplinary creative hub. Not just a studio space, but an institution devoted to making ideas come to life. A place to learn, a place to grow, and a place that is still growing. Not a client execution tool. HORT has been known to draw inspiration from things other than design.

It is encouraged that you don't see the work displayed on this website as a library of ideas and visual styles to pick and choose from, but a showcase of our capabilities and achievements. HORT are willing to give most things a go. I mean how are you supposed to learn if you don't try. Right?"

[See also: http://vimeo.com/20949186 ]
hort  design  lcproject  learning  tcsnmy  studios  studioclassroom  learningenvironments  illustration  germany  berlin  creativity  curiosity  play  eikekönig  cv  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  collaboration  children  safety  work  howwework  sharing  systems  education  unschooling  deschooling  growing  uncertainty  failure  risk  risktaking  schooldesign  freedom  autonomy  revolution 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Dezeen » Outlandia by Malcolm Fraser Architects
"Edinburgh studio Malcol, Fraser Architects have completed a treehouse in Glen Nevis, Scotland,

Outlandia is an off-grid treehouse artist studio and fieldstation in Glen Nevis, Lochaber, Scotland. A flexible meeting space in the forest for creative collaboration and research. Imagined by artists Bruce Gilchrist and Jo Joelson (London Fieldworks) and designed by Malcolm Fraser Architects, Outlandia is inspired by childhood dens, wildlife hides and bothies, by forest outlaws and Japanese poetry platforms."
malcolmfraser  architecture  design  treehouses  homes  research  forests  glvo  scotland  meetingplace  writing  wherewework  studios  small  tinyhomes 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Artist Studio :: Portland, Maine
"The Artist Studio Building is located at 536 Congress Street in Portland, Maine.

Click on the links above to view our artist portfolios and resumes, and learn about our events and shows."
studios  art  portland  maine  glvo 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Institute of Contemporary Arts : Gazetteer : Artist-run spaces (London)
"A selection of spaces currently operating in London, with descriptions written by the people who run them."
art  london  artist-run  artists  glvo  uk  spaces  galleries  studios  agitpropproject  the2837university 
february 2011 by robertogreco
HOME : WHERE THEY CREATE by paul barbera
"My name is Paul Barbera. I am an interior based photographer - As I travel for assignments, I look up artists & creatives. This is a visual document of their creative environments."
photography  creativity  howwework  studios  openstudio  work  via:lizettegreco  design  interiors 
february 2011 by robertogreco
sdspace4art
"Our Mission: To establish permanent, affordable work/live spaces and support facilities for artists in San Diego...

Space 4 Art currently provides 30 affordable work studios and 5 affordable work/live studios for 40 of San Diego’s finest artists, designers, and craftspeople. The centrally located facility has an abundance of natural light, a spacious gallery, multiple shared community spaces, including an outdoor patio, a performance space, and a classroom. Space 4 Art also offers support facilities for artists working in a variety of creative media — from painting and printmaking to welding and woodworking."
sandiego  art  studios  glvo  community  collective  cooperative  space4art 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Made In China - Chinese Artist Studios - Wallpaper
"Inside the ateliers of China’s super-star artists"
china  art  studios  glvo  artists 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Twitter / john seely brown: design charrettes and stud ...
"design charrettes and studios - both from architecture might be some of the best learning environments ever and might apply in many fields!"

[See also: http://chronicle.com/weekly/v54/i26/26b03201.htm ]
tcsnmy  lcproject  teaching  learning  schools  architecture  design  charettes  johnseelybrown  via:preoccupations  studios  education  creativity  innovation  problemsolving 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Archinect : Features : ShowCase: Maison NW
"Maison NW, the home and work studio of architect Nathalie Wolberg, is treated as a laboratory to test out new devices and new environments on a daily basis.
architecture  design  homes  experimental  pathologies  senses  emotions  light  space  nathaliewolberg  studios 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Lodging - Watershed - FLOAT [via: http://www.dwell.com/daily/blog/27917309.html]
"small writing studio 100sf in Willamette Valley...owner is philosophy professor & well-known nature writer...retreat for herself & visiting friends...small piece of land along Marys River ~20 minutes from home in town...sits just uphill from riparian wetlands...part of project to restore hydrological & ecological function to Marys River watershed...designed to reveal ecological complexity of site...Small tunnels under studio bring rare reptiles & amphibians into view through floor-level window...water collection basin doubles as front step draws in birds & deer. At midday, silhouettes of animals project from water onto interior ceiling. Windows on west & north sides frame different bird habitats...roof diaphragm amplifies rain sounds & collection basin is measure of past rainfall...2 major intentions underlie...detailing: 1) constructed w/out road access, electricity on site, major excavation 2) removable & recyclable at end of useful life."
design  oregon  homes  studios  architecture  writing  nature  FLOAT 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Startsida Kulturhuset
"The three rooms are especially designed for children of different ages, with different physical needs and abilities. Here kids will find hideaways, hammocks where they can lie and read peacefully, exciting things to look at."
lcproject  community  learning  art  libraries  studios  workshops  sweden  scandinavia  social  stockholm  music  design  culture  children  activities  travel 
may 2008 by robertogreco
kulturhuset on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
see also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulturhuset "Opened in 1974, (Swedish for The House of Culture) is cultural centre to south of Sergels Torg in central Stockholm; both loved & hated as symbol for Stockholm & growth of modernism in Sweden"
lcproject  education  learning  studios  community  scandinavia  sweden  art  libraries  workshops  social  stockholm  music  design  culture  children  activities  travel  youth  teens 
may 2008 by robertogreco
157 Home Workshop [from A Pattern Language]
[Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20080206191755/http://www.ahartman.com/apl/patterns/apl157.htm ]

"As the decentralization of work becomes more and more effective, the workshop in the home grows and grows in importance."



"Make a place in the home, where substantial work can be done; not just a hobby, but a job. Change the zoning laws to encourage modest, quiet work operations to locate in neighborhoods. Give the workshop perhaps a few hundred square feet; and locate it so it can be seen from the street and the owner can hang out a shingle."
christopheralexander  design  change  homes  housing  work  hobbies  learning  society  urban  lcproject  glvo  apatternlanguage  unschooling  deschooling  studios  studioclassroom  decentralization  schools  education 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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