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robertogreco : stuff   13

Living With Less. A Lot Less. - NYTimes.com
"Our fondness for stuff affects almost every aspect of our lives. Housing size, for example, has ballooned in the last 60 years. The average size of a new American home in 1950 was 983 square feet; by 2011, the average new home was 2,480 square feet. And those figures don’t provide a full picture. In 1950, an average of 3.37 people lived in each American home; in 2011, that number had shrunk to 2.6 people. This means that we take up more than three times the amount of space per capita than we did 60 years ago.



Intuitively, we know that the best stuff in life isn’t stuff at all, and that relationships, experiences and meaningful work are the staples of a happy life.


I like material things as much as anyone. I studied product design in school. I’m into gadgets, clothing and all kinds of things. But my experiences show that after a certain point, material objects have a tendency to crowd out the emotional needs they are meant to support.



My space is small. My life is big."
homes  housing  stuff  possessions  materialism  2013  grahamhill  sustainability  small  slow  relationships  experiences  happiness  consumerism 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Mark Pilgrim’s philosophy …Preserved | aashiks'in
"1. Stop buying stuff you don’t need
2. Pay off all your credit cards
3. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in your house/apartment (storage lockers, etc.)
4. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit on the first floor of your house (attic, garage, etc.)
5. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in one room of your house
6. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in a suitcase
7. Get rid of all the stuff that doesn’t fit in a backpack
8. Get rid of the backpack"

[I'd say that as a family, we're on step four (although all of our possessions would probably fit in one room tightly packed). And we make physical things, so that demands a palette of physical materials and tools, not necessarily a whole lot as Lizette describes here: http://lizettegreco.tumblr.com/post/19398592549/there-was-a-time-when-my-mother-used-to-remove-the ]
possessions  ownership  glvo  stuff  simplicity  materialism  postconsumerism  postmaterialism  travellight  via:litherland 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Living with 100 items. No, 50. No, only 15. Screw it, just get beautiful, useful things – marks.dk
"Bruce Sterling’s “Last Viridian Note”…puts things into the following categories:

1. Beautiful things.
2. Emotionally important things.
3. Tools, devices, and appliances that efficiently perform a useful function.
4. Everything else.

There are no numbers, no set rules for how much stuff you “must” own. I like the idea some have of only owning 100 things, or even just 50 things. But it’s only an idea. I couldn’t do it myself but I can, however, cut down on the stuff that I already own and don’t use.

DVDs go category 4…espresso machine in 3…couch, bed & chair in 3 as well…Half my clothes go in 4…& I need to buy after a pattern of 1 & 3 from now on.

…don’t think you can even buy after category 2 most of the time. That’s the kind of stuff that evolves over time…

Question yourself with everything you are about to buy; if there is a reasonable chance it will be placed in category 4 anytime soon, don’t buy it."
brucesterling  markjensen  possessions  consumption  minimalism  2011  lastviridiannote  things  simplicity  sustainability  consumerism  stuff  qualityoverquantity  viridianism  nomads  neo-nomads  materialism 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Douglas Rushkoff - Blog - CNN.com: Are Jobs Obsolete? ["We're living in an economy where productivity is no longer the goal, employment is."]
"We start by accepting that food and shelter are basic human rights. The work we do -- the value we create -- is for the rest of what we want: the stuff that makes life fun, meaningful, and purposeful.

This sort of work isn't so much employment as it is creative activity. Unlike Industrial Age employment, digital production can be done from the home, independently, and even in a peer-to-peer fashion without going through big corporations. We can make games for each other, write books, solve problems, educate and inspire one another -- all through bits instead of stuff. And we can pay one another using the same money we use to buy real stuff.

For the time being, as we contend with what appears to be a global economic slowdown by destroying food and demolishing homes, we might want to stop thinking about jobs as the main aspect of our lives that we want to save. They may be a means, but they are not the ends."
douglasrushkoff  jaronlanier  economics  2011  jobs  work  leisurearts  labor  meaning  basics  gamechanging  paradigmshifts  society  greatrecession  history  making  doing  creativity  stuff  purpose  technology  productivity  food  employment  unemployment  obsolescence  healthcare  post-productiveeconomy  artleisure 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Stephanie Zacharek - Salon.com
"Objects can be designed to low price, but cannot be crafted to low price." But if we stop valuing—& buying—craftsmanship, very idea of making something w/ care & expertise is destined to die & something of us as human beings will die along w/ it: "A bricklayer, carpenter, teacher, musician, salesperson, writer of computer code—any & all can be craftsmen. Craftsmanship cements relationship btwn buyer & seller, worker & employer, & expects something of both...is about caring about work & its application...what distinguishes work of humans from work of machines & it is everything that IKEA & other discounters are not."...
books  walmart  ikea  globalization  consumerism  environment  economy  economics  china  cheap  design  consumption  politics  labor  bargains  sustainability  stuff  society  relationships  craft  time  slow  human  humans  humanity  craftsmanship 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Viridian Design Movement
"The items that you use incessantly, the items you employ every day, the normal, boring goods that don't seem luxurious or romantic: these are the critical ones. They are truly central. The everyday object is the monarch of all objects. It's in your time most, it's in your space most. It is "where it is at," & it is "what is going on."

[I must have this bookmarked in some other way or with some other URL, but doing so again doesn't hurt. Update: Yup. Here it is: http://www.boingboing.net/2008/11/18/viridianisms-last-no.html ]
future  futurism  brucesterling  consumerism  culture  design  environment  simplicity  sustainability  happiness  life  lifestyle  technology  green  advice  2008  slow  stuff  qualityoverquantity  philosophy  things  viridian  viridiannote  viridianmovement 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Joe Bageant: Round Midnight: Tortillas and the Corporate State
"The commodity economy long ago enslaved Americans & other “developed” capitalist societies. But Americans in particular. The most profound slavery must be that in which the slaves can conceive of no other possible or better world than their bondage. Inescapable, global, all permeating, the commodities economy rules so thoroughly most cannot imagine any other possible kind of economy.
consumerism  consumption  stuff  ownership  us  economics  capitalism  commodities  joebageant  society 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Installed infrastructure, latent knowledge and the small-batch aesthetic « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"Consider: over the last several years, San Francisco in particular has become a field of premium and super-premium, small-run craft production: Ice cream. Bicycles. Coffee. Spirits. Clothing. An audience primed to expect, desire and demand the provenance of the “lovingly handcrafted,” and pitch-perfect retail tuned to that demand. Especially for someone like me, whose senses have become inured to the increasingly homogenized material landscape of Manhattan, it’s hard to escape the sense that the last decade’s activity amounts to nothing less than a local renaissance of craft and technique and pride."
culture  diy  local  work  community  scenius  stuff  infrastructure  craft  adamgreenfield  sanfrancisco  glvo  make  tangible  economics  generations  premium 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Joho the Blog » [reboot] Bruce Sterling
"Reboot in power. Gen Xers running things. Cultural sentiment: “Dark euphoria.” Things are falling apart, everything is possible, but you never realized you would have to dread it so much...a) Top end: Gothic high-tech...b) low-end: Favela chic...practical advice on bright green geek environmentalism...“Stop acting dead.” You’ve been trained that way; it’s the default for your generation...How do you know...test: Would your dead great grandfather do a better job of what you’re intending to do...Think of objects in terms of hours of time & volumes of space. It’s a good design approach...possessions are really embodied social relationships: made, designed, sold by people...Relationships that happen to have material form...monarch among objects are everyday objects...you’re eager to tell someone about its beauty or meaning. Tools: Don’t make do with broken stuff. You’re not experimenting with it if you’re not publishing the results in a falsifiable form."

[video: http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2009/07/video-from-reboot-11/ AND http://video.reboot.dk/video/486788/bruce-sterling-reboot-11 AND interview: http://video.reboot.dk/video/485250/bruce-sterling ]

[transcript: http://wired.com/beyond_the_beyond/2011/02/transcript-of-reboot-11-speech-by-bruce-sterling-25-6-2009/ ]

"Now let me explain how you can go about doing this, and it really is a different material way of life than any in the twentieth century. It’s a geek-friendly approach to consumption.…

What you need to do is re-assess the objects in your space and time. And I’m going to explain to you how to do this. 00:32:30-6

The king of objects, the monarch among objects are not fancy objects. They’re not high-tech objects, they’re not organic objects, they’re not biological objects, they’re everyday objects. Things that you’re with every day…

Common everyday objects. You need to have the best possible common everyday objects. 00:33:11-4…

Get rid of it. Get rid of it, if you don’t use it! If you haven’t touched it in a year, get rid of it immediately. Sell it, buy real things you really use. 00:35:08-7

Now, you’re going to have a lot fewer things, but the actual quality of your life will skyrocket!…

I’m going to explain to you how you do this…

First you need to make lists. Hackers love lists. A chart. You can make a flowchart. Flowchart it if it makes you any happier.

Four variety of items: Beautiful things; emotionally important things; tools, devices and appliances that efficiently perform some useful function; and category four, everything else…

It’s not that beautiful? It’s not beautiful! Gotta go!…

And everything else. Category four, everything else. Virtualize it, store the data, get rid of it…

It’s not going to hurt you to lose all these things. You don’t need them. After you go through this particular discipline, you will look different, you will act differently. You will become much more what you already are."
gamechanging  future  genx  generationx  favelachic  brucesterling  design  objects  change  longevity  quality  reboot11  postconsumerism  postmaterialism  stuff  possessions  things  travellight 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: cheer up it's Archigram
"I’ve been particularly taken with the Botteries: The World’s Last Hardware Event by David Greene & Mike Myers ... a vision of returning to the English countryside, with everything you require brought by bots of all sorts: communication, rooms, walls, even pets. ... we’ve actually reached a place very similar ... rapidly seeing a world of use as needed, rather than purchase & storage. Blu-Ray is the world’s last media hardware event, it’s download from now on. Netflix & Lovefilm ... Spotify ... We’re starting to live in a world that would have been unimaginable 5 years ago, where ownership is severely debased as a good quality. We’re even seeing the world’s last physical retailers disappear. ... Russell ... was talking about how everyone has a junk room. What if you could ship that to Amazon or someone & pull bits back as you need them? We don’t want cloud computing, we want Big Yellow Internet Storage. & then you could have a smaller house or flat. It struck me as very Archigram-ish."
archigram  chrisheathcote  storage  postmaterialism  netflix  cloudcomputing  amazon  postownership  ownership  stuff  things  gamechanging  spotify  delivery  architecture  books 
january 2009 by robertogreco
UNREMITTING FAILURE: The Horrors of Childhood
"Proust spent 7 volumes trying to recapture his lost childhood. All we had to do to regain ours was walk into a cold concrete block building sitting just off the Accomac Road outside Hellam, Pennsylvania. The building is home to Toomey's Auction House..."
childhood  memory  consumerism  consumption  society  death  proust  stuff  possessions  simplicity  food  snackbars  smells  marcelproust 
january 2008 by robertogreco

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