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robertogreco : tactile   25

Jacob Sam-La Rose en Instagram: “Decluttering. These are the keepers. I harbour a fantasy of my future kids being fascinated with these in the same way I raided my mother’s…”
"Decluttering. These are the keepers. I harbour a fantasy of my future kids being fascinated with these in the same way I raided my mother’s record collection. Not just for the music itself, but the cover design, the appeal of the tangible object... In a digital world, it’s good to have analog anchors..."

[Commented: "Oh, those spacial, ambient, tactile, smell, taste, and sound memories that come from the places where we are raised. Swoon. I just tracked down a book about whales that was in our house as a child. I’d been referencing it for years without remembering the name (The Whale), but recalling so many details of its contents and the situations I was in while pouring over the book. The confines of small-ish collections encourage repeated reencounters that just don’t come as easily in the near infinite expanse of YouTube, Spotify, etc. Maybe this is why I have been so keen to create my on digital collections, something that I can move around in over and over again?"]

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/p/BmL5xv5HcOo/]
jacobsam-larose  2018  decluttering  memory  space  sound  music  collections  senses  mariekondo  taste  smell  sounds  place  finite  curation  tangible  tactile  analog  digital  books  childhood  memories 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Zarina Bhimji: Yellow Patch
"A film installation entitled "Yellow Patch". This film was shot in India.

I am interested in the spaces, micro details and the light of these distant interiors. The location of light is an element of my composition and becomes just as intricate and important as having a figure in my work. The stillness has a suspension of everyday life and yet narrative is deferred by mood and mystery and incompleteness. So that atmosphere is tactile, moist light. But as I worked further I kept coming back to disconnection and belatedness."

[See also: "Zarina Bhimji's world without people"
http://www.phaidon.com/agenda/art/picture-galleries/2012/january/18/zarina-bhimjis-world-without-people/ ]

[via: "Hapticality in the Undercommons, or From Operations Management to Black Ops," by Stefano Harney https://www.academia.edu/6934195/Hapticality_in_the_Undercommons_or_From_Operations_Management_to_Black_Ops

"I want to take just two examples, very different. The first is the performance artist Athi-Patra Ruga. The second is photographer and filmmaker Zarina Bhimji. I don’t intend to read these artists nor to place them in a school or tradition. I want to say instead that they inspire me to think about the line today and its killing rhythm, and to think about the ways this line runs through us, and how it bypasses subject formation at work. But most of all I want to look at their work to think about what Fred calls Black Ops, and the undercommons their work invites us to feel around us.



Empty but not unoccupied, rooms, buildings, and fields, the access in Zarina Bhimji’s aesthetically gorgeous film Yellow Patch at first might seem to be about memory. But memory for the line is a matter of metrics, of not making the same mistake twice. It is useful for improvement. And Bhimji’s camera resists the application of memory to the present for purposes of improvement. Her sound rumbles with labour and logistics, above the empty buildings, echoing in the rooms. But with her we enter a militant preservation, not keeping up, not improving, not looking for productive variance. I would say that old administrative papers stacked on the aging wooden office bookcases, or the yellow shutters cut by blocks of light from outside are aestheticised not to make memory useful through nostalgia, where it can be preserved and sold, or judgement where it can be used for improvement. Instead her film displays a calmness, peace, rest, in history, in contemporary history. Not the de-historicised rest of the meditation industry nor the preservation of the history industry, but a militant rest for history, in history, in struggle, right now. Her rooms, ships, fields, and bays do not leave history to give us preservation or provide us with rest in the struggle. Other lines are right here, the film suggests to me, the undercommons is never elsewhere, its touch is also a reach. Its touch is a rest, a caress. Hapticality occupies these rooms with a tap, tap, stroke rhythm of love."]
zarinabhimji  film  towatch  belatedness  disconnection  2011  haptic  hapticality  tactile  everyday  undercommons  stefanoharney  art  artists  uganda  india 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Please Touch the Art on Vimeo
"cantorfineart.com/story/please-touch-the-art/

One day a blind man discovered a screw painting by Andrew Myers with his hands. The blind man found as much enjoyment out of the tactile elements of the work as any sighted person ever has by just looking at them. Andrew considers this moment as one of the most inspiring of his career. Which led us to a question: Why is touching artwork so taboo?

Prior to the mid-1800s, tactile interaction was commonplace for visitors experiencing collections of art, but as museums of art evolved, rules forbidding touch became the norm. In some cases, these were to protect artwork that truly was not meant to be touched, but in large part these norms had nothing do with preservation and everything to do with nineteenth century politics of gender, race and class control.

In light of all this, we decided to create a documentary that elevates the level of tactile arts, and gives back to the visually impaired community. It was at that point that we met George Wurtzel.

George is a blind artisan and teacher working at Enchanted Hills Camp in Napa Ca. This is a 300 acre camp nestled in the red wood forest above Napa Valley. Enchanted Hills is a summer camp for the visually impaired. Here George teaches blind folks, through example, how to use all the equipment necessary to become blind artisans.

Currently, George is converting an old grape crushing barn into a Tactile Art Center. The top floor of the building is his 1900 sq. ft. wood working shop. The bottom floor will be his Tactile Art gallery space where blind people can feel and sell their artwork.

We fell in love with George and his mission and wanted to support his new tactile art gallery. So we worked with Andrew Myers to surprise George with a tactile portrait of himself. The first portrait he will be able to feel and recognize.

Learn more about Enchanted hills here: lighthouse-sf.org/programs/enchanted-hills/

The Academy of Music for the Blind (AMB) were kind enough to create a song for our soundtrack. AMB specifically addresses the educational, social, and physical needs of talented blind music students so that they can fully develop their unique talents and be prepared for integration into the workplace or other educational settings.

To learn more about the AMB visit:ouramb.org/

To learn more about this project, visit cantorfineart.com/story/please-touch-the-art/

Music Credits:

Artist: Tycho, Song: A Walk
Buy it in iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/album/a-walk/id679251532?i=679251628

Artist: Aphex Twin, Song: 14th Avril
Buy it in iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/album/avril-14th/id50235099?i=50235117 "
video  art  tactile  blind  blindness  music  tactileinteraction  touch  senses  andrewmyers  georgewurtzel  enchantedhillscamp  napa  lagunabeach  tactileartcenter  2016 
june 2016 by robertogreco
The Tactile Workshops · Lomography
"Keep your hands off! Don’t touch! Isn’t it interesting how we hardly ever say ’don’t listen’ or ‘avert thine eyes!’ Well, perhaps, but not to the extent of the first two exclamatory remarks, when speaking to children. Bruno Munari’s educational book ‘The Tactile Workshops’ contain highly sensory visuals that show his design savvy nature as well as call into question the role of the sense of ‘touch’.

These lovely prints are from the book The Tactile Workshops by Bruno Munari, cover seen below.

Tactile (adj.): Of or connected with the sense of touch.

Munari was an Italian artist and designer and, based on this book, a Pedagogue! An upholder of the didactic method of education, the book showcases his workshops, with children participants, in which ‘the sense of touch’ was the focus. Targeted at educators and parents, Munari’s book aims to pose the question, “what occurs in the mind when one comes in physical contact with an object without the use of their vision?

The black and white photos show kids engaging in simple activities, such as running their fingers over tactile/touch boards while their other senses, namely visual, aren’t in play. Interestingly, these black and whites are dashed with bright, highly saturated, colors, in order to engage one’s visual stimuli and highlight objects, such as the tactile boards, being played with by the children. From viewing these photos, it may come as no surprise that Munari worked as a graphic designer for many years, contributing immensely to the entire visual arts field.

It only makes sense that we tracked down images from this designer’s book on a design blog, from which we drew the inspiration for this article."

[See also:
http://www.kerismith.com/blog/what-texture-is-the-chair-you-are-sitting-on/
http://stircenter.com/2009/02/21/bruno-munaris-tactile-workshops/ ]
brunomunari  tactile  texture  children  photography 
april 2016 by robertogreco
The Humane Representation of Thought on Vimeo
"Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014.
Preface: http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness):
- The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii's "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/
- but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com
- and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo
- and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

Dynamic conversations and presentations:
- Ken Perlin's "Chalktalk" changes daily; here's a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

Context-sensitive reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

"Explore-the-model" reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/
- http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/
- http://ncase.me/polygons/
- http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html
- http://earthprimer.com/

Evidence-backed models:
- http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring:
- http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/
- http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/
- http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/

Modes of understanding:
- Jerome Bruner: http://amazon.com/dp/0674897013
- Howard Gardner: http://amazon.com/dp/0465024335
- Kieran Egan: http://amazon.com/dp/0226190390

Embodied thinking:
- Edwin Hutchins: http://amazon.com/dp/0262581469
- Andy Clark: http://amazon.com/dp/0262531569
- George Lakoff: http://amazon.com/dp/0465037712
- JJ Gibson: http://amazon.com/dp/0898599598
- among others: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embodied_cognition

I don't know what this is all about:
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/responses.html

---

Abstract:

New representations of thought — written language, mathematical notation, information graphics, etc — have been responsible for some of the most significant leaps in the progress of civilization, by expanding humanity’s collectively-thinkable territory.

But at debilitating cost. These representations, having been invented for static media such as paper, tap into a small subset of human capabilities and neglect the rest. Knowledge work means sitting at a desk, interpreting and manipulating symbols. The human body is reduced to an eye staring at tiny rectangles and fingers on a pen or keyboard.

Like any severely unbalanced way of living, this is crippling to mind and body. But it is also enormously wasteful of the vast human potential. Human beings naturally have many powerful modes of thinking and understanding.

Most are incompatible with static media. In a culture that has contorted itself around the limitations of marks on paper, these modes are undeveloped, unrecognized, or scorned.

We are now seeing the start of a dynamic medium. To a large extent, people today are using this medium merely to emulate and extend static representations from the era of paper, and to further constrain the ways in which the human body can interact with external representations of thought.

But the dynamic medium offers the opportunity to deliberately invent a humane and empowering form of knowledge work. We can design dynamic representations which draw on the entire range of human capabilities — all senses, all forms of movement, all forms of understanding — instead of straining a few and atrophying the rest.

This talk suggests how each of the human activities in which thought is externalized (conversing, presenting, reading, writing, etc) can be redesigned around such representations.

---

Art by David Hellman.
Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "

[Some notes from Boris Anthony:

"Those of you who know my "book hack", Bret talks about exactly what motivates my explorations starting at 20:45 in https://vimeo.com/115154289 "
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574339495274876928

"From a different angle, btwn 20:00-29:00 Bret explains how "IoT" is totally changing everything
https://vimeo.com/115154289
@timoreilly @moia"
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574341875836043265 ]
bretvictor  towatch  interactiondesign  davidhellman  hiroshiishii  softrobotics  robots  robotics  kenperlin  jeromebruner  howardgardner  kieranegan  edwinhutchins  andyclark  jjgibson  embodiedcognition  cognition  writing  math  mathematics  infographic  visualization  communication  graphics  graphicdesign  design  representation  humans  understanding  howwelearn  howwethink  media  digital  dynamism  movement  conversation  presentation  reading  howweread  howwewrite  chalktalk  otherlab  3dprinting  3d  materials  physical  tangibility  depth  learning  canon  ui  informationdesign  infographics  maps  mapping  data  thinking  thoughts  numbers  algebra  arithmetic  notation  williamplayfair  cartography  gestures  placevalue  periodictable  michaelfaraday  jamesclerkmaxell  ideas  print  printing  leibniz  humanism  humanerepresentation  icons  visual  aural  kinesthetic  spatial  tactile  symbols  iot  internetofthings  programming  computers  screens  computation  computing  coding  modeling  exploration  via:robertogreco  reasoning  rhetoric  gerrysussman  environments  scale  virtualization 
march 2015 by robertogreco
'Seeing' Through Touch - an album on Flickr
"“To them, their fingers are eyes”

From 1913, John Alfred Charlton Deas, a former curator at Sunderland Museum, organised several handling sessions for the blind, first offering an invitation to the children from the Sunderland Council Blind School, to handle a few of the collections at Sunderland Museum, which was ‘eagerly accepted’.

They were so successful that Deas went on to develop and arrange a course of regular handling sessions, extending the invitations to blind adults.

The work that J. A. Charlton Deas carried out whilst at Sunderland Museum is much to be admired. His interest in the education of the blind and his determination to assist in their development, had a great impact on how they viewed the world."
touch  tactile  blind  1913  via:ablerism  johnalfredcharltondeas  sunderlandmuseum  seeing 
january 2015 by robertogreco
List of Physical Visualizations
"This page is a chronological list of physical visualizations and related artifacts, curated by Pierre Dragicevic and Yvonne Jansen. Thanks to Fanny Chevalier and our other contributors. If you know of another interesting physical visualization, please submit one! Or post a general comment.
This list currently has 169 entries."
dataviz  data  datavisualization  visualization  physical  physicalvisualization  objects  pierredragicevic  yvonnejansen  history  timelines  tactile  blind  textured  textures 
january 2015 by robertogreco
DIRTI for iPad, World's first tapioca interface | USER STUDIO
"a 570cm3 dish that contains about 8.600 seeds of dry tapioca grains

Our research led us to wonder if and how we could change the relationship that humans have with tangible controllers: at the time (2011) we were working on trying to control thousands of particles on the screen in the most natural, intuitive fashion possible. We figured there was no better way than by actually controlling real world particles! So when creating this new "DIRTInterface", we set our minds on making something a little less accurate, while a lot more subtle, constantly adapting, almost alive. Tackling the cold, abrupt interaction that traditional controllers impose on us... It was all about interaction design politics ;)

Ok, so what's DIRTI in the first place?

It's the World's first tapioca interface! No really, it enables you to control your computer or your iPad with tapioca or anything else that's semi-transparent and that you can mold, like vanilla ice cream for example. Any non-opaque material that's either granular or liquid will do just fine. It's kind of a real-world interface. And the acronym stands for Dirty Tangible Interface. Tacky? Yeaaaah, we love tacky!

You, the user, interact with your machine by moving the material around in a sand-blasted dish. Anything that you're going to produce from within the Dirty Tangible Interface can not be 100% accurate, but it's infinitely refined, expressive and subtle. And you can't cancel any action or go back to a previous, default position, but you can control any graphics or sounds coming out of your machine with amazing expressivity, just like with real world instruments. Say, a violin. Not even kidding. And who wouldn't like plunging their hands in ice cream?!"
dirti  interface  tactile  touch  ncmideas  particles  texture  software  programming  installation  tangiblecontrollers  controllers  input  via:markllobrera  userstudio  glvo  maisondepetits  centquatre  rolandcahen  diemoschwarz  ircam  raspeberrypi  ios  ipad  destronics  topophonie 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Augmented Paper - Matt Gemmell
"For me, software experiences that feel like Augmented Paper are those that second-guess our (developers’) natural tendency to put functionality first, or to think of our apps as software. Apps are only incidentally software; software is an implementation detail. Instead, apps are experiences. Design an experience. Make it as beautiful — and as emotionally resonant — as it can possibly be. Then adorn the core experience and content with only as much functionality as is absolutely necessary. Functionality…is like seasoning. A little is an enhancement; any more destroys the flavour…and may well be bad for you. These new classes of devices, so immediately personal and portable and tactile, aren’t desktop-era shrines demanding incantation and prostration. They’re empowering extensions to our real, actual lives - and that’s a profound thing. They take what was once prosaic or mundane, and give us just a taste of superpowers. They’re augmentations, and they should be beautiful."
instapaper  aesthetics  tactile  clear  invisibleinterfaces  instinctivecode  digital  minimalism  skeuomorph  tablets  augmentation  mobile  ipad  iphone  applications  augmentedpaper  mattgemmell  2012  via:preoccupations  designasexperience  ui  ux  windowsphonemetro  windowsphone7  metro  windows  design  ios  apple  android  wp7 
april 2012 by robertogreco
TACTILE SOUND & THE PURSUIT OF SILENCE IN A NOISY WORLD | The New York Public Library
"Through his book, In Pursuit of Silence : Listening for Meaning in a World of Noise, George Prochnik explores the benefits of decluttering our sonic world. Speaking with doctors, neuroscientists, acoustical engineers, monks, activists, educators, marketers, and citizens, Prochnik examines what gets lost when we can no longer find quiet. Some of the characters he's encountered on the road include:
architecture  biology  deaf  design  ecology  audio  sound  tactile  whales  listening  elephants  ocean  ambient 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Manodo's Screen Is The Big Brother Of Energy Saving : TreeHugger
"it's a screen that tells you everything you want to know about your consumption, plus a few stats you maybe didn't want to see - like how many pounds of CO2 emissions that long, hot bath you just took is worth"
sustainability  tactile  monitor  energy  touchscreen  personalinformatics  conservation 
april 2008 by robertogreco
OhGizmo! » Archive » My Touch Keys Adds Tactile Feedback To Your iPhone
"This piece of plastic clings to your screen, with holes where the letters of the keyboard would be. This way you can feel exactly where your fingers are. The blue tint looks like it might wash out your picture a bit, but for $7.99, it can’t be too bad.
iphone  touch  tactile 
march 2008 by robertogreco
iphone-haptics - Google Code
"Our aim with this web site is to publicly experiment with user interface design prototypes, implemented on the Apple iPhone utilising its built-in variable intensity actuator and multi-touch screen."
iphone  interface  haptics  haptic  feedback  touch  ui  mobile  phones  tactile 
february 2008 by robertogreco
receiver - Light touches – text messaging, intimacy & photography by Matt Locke
"Technology often promises transcendence from real life but is eventually domesticated through interaction with real bodies in real spaces. We find new relationships with technologies by rubbing our corporeal bodies up against them, not by crossing a thre
touch  tactile  haptic  texting  sms  vibration  reality  virtuality  mobile  phones  intimacy  ambientintimacy  body  human  contact  photography  bodies 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Nokia perfects the clicky tactile touchscreen - iPhone gnashes teeth, swears revenge - The Red Ferret Journal
"taken them 10 years but Nokia boffins have finally perfected a ‘touch feedback’ touchscreen...you press a key on the screen, and it clicks under your finger with exactly the same sort of fingertip feedback as if you’d pressed a conventional keyboar
touchscreen  haptic  haptics  hardware  interface  iphone  nokia  tactile  gadgets  technology  usability  ui  mobile  phones  multitouch  keyboard  touch 
november 2007 by robertogreco
[stop]Kontakt
"Its interface consists of several 'electron' and 'proton' shaped cartoon like characters, spread out in the space. These 'contact points' invite you to close several electrical circuits, using your body as a conductor between them."
interaction  interactive  installation  sensory  tactile  art  design  technology 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Wired 15.04: Mixed Feelings
"See with your tongue. Navigate with your skin. Fly by the seat of your pants (literally). How researchers can tap the plasticity of the brain to hack our 5 senses — and build a few new ones."
body  brain  cognitive  senses  synesthesia  tactile  tangible  technology  human  hacks  data  perception  psychology  neuroscience  science  research  input  future  evolution  engineering  sensory  haptics  bodies 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Music textile
"Music textile is a large tactile interface for playing electronic music."
interface  music  tactile  textiles  technology  future  fabric 
april 2007 by robertogreco
Evocative Objects - The MIT Press
Turkle collects writings by scientists, humanists, artists, and designers that trace the power of everyday things. These essays reveal objects as emotional and intellectual companions that anchor memory, sustain relationships, and provoke new ideas.
science  education  learning  objects  tactile  play  future  schools  curriculum  studies  lcproject  homeschool  children  students  math  curiosity  schooldesign  books  sherryturkle 
january 2007 by robertogreco
The Immeasurables - Sherry Turkle (World Question Center 2007)
"one of the things that has always worked in getting young people interested in science has been object passions...Playing with objects in their own way leads children to build a personal scientific style."
science  education  learning  objects  tactile  play  future  schools  curriculum  studies  lcproject  homeschool  children  students  math  curiosity  schooldesign  sherryturkle  intimacy  self  identity 
january 2007 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Reactable
"Fantastic next-gen music-making interface - somewhat similar to Jeff Han's Multi-touch interface, which imploded all the interaction design mailing lists a few months back - and with some genuine possibilities for the kind of tactile, embodied instrument
tactile  music  interface  sound  interaction  interactive  objects  design  touch 
november 2006 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about "Design and Making Things" » Archive » 10 Questions with a Joystick Master
"Roger Ibars‘ project entitled “Hard-wired Devices” uses familiar input devices for unfamiliar purposes. Whether he is making a Nintendo controller program the time on an alarm clock or an old-school retro joystick control a game of Snake on a Nokia
design  games  interface  videogames  input  devices  joystick  electronics  interaction  tactile  pingmag 
september 2006 by robertogreco
we make money not art: The crocodile and the toothbrush
"Tom Bentley 's toothbrush for kids monitors the pressure used when brushing and indicates when the child or parent is brushing too hard. If brushing is too hard the end of the brush will glow red, after 2 minutes of brushing the end will glow blue to ind
gadgets  children  interface  tactile  design 
september 2005 by robertogreco

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