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Designing better file organization around tags, not hierarchies
"Computer users organize their files into folders because that is the primary tool offered by operating systems. But applying this standard hierarchical model to my own files, I began to notice shortcomings of this paradigm over the years. At the same time, I used some other information systems not based on hierarchical path names, and they turned out to solve a number of problems. I propose a new way of organizing files based on tagging, and describe the features and consequences of this method in detail.

Speaking personally, I’m fed up with HFSes, on Windows, Linux, and online storage alike. I struggled with file organization for just over a decade before finally writing this article to describe problems and solutions. Life would be easier if I could tolerate the limitations of hierarchical organization, or at least if the new proposal can fit on top of existing HFSes. But fundamentally, there is a mismatch between the narrowness of hierarchies and the rich structure of human knowledge, and the proposed system will not presuppose the features of HFSes. I wish to solicit public feedback on these ideas, and end up with a design plan that I can implement to solve the problems I already have today.

This article is more of a brainstorm than a prescriptive formula. I begin by illustrating how hierarchies fall short on real-life problems, and how existing alternative systems like Git and Danbooru bypass HFS problems to deliver a better user experience. Then I describe a step-by-step model, starting from basic primitives, of a proposed file organization system that includes a number of desirable features by design. Finally, I present some open questions on aspects of the proposal where I’m unsure of the right answer.

I welcome any feedback about anything written here, especially regarding errors, omissions, and alternatives. For example, I might have missed helpful features of traditional HFSes. I know I haven’t read about or tested every alternative file system out there. I know that my proposed file organization scheme might have issues with conceptual and computational complexity, be too general or not expressive enough, or fail to offer a useful feature. And certainly, I don’t know all the ramifications of the proposed system if it gets implemented, on aspects ranging from security to sharing to networks. But I try my best to present tangible ideas as a start toward designing a better system. And ultimately, I want to implement such a proposed file system so that I can store and find my data sanely.

In the arguments presented below, I care most about the data model and less about implementation details. For example in HFSes, I focus on the fact that the file system consists of a tree of labeled edges with file content at the leaves; I ignore details about inodes, journaling, defragmentation, permissions, etc. For example in my proposal, I care about what data each file should store and what each field means; I assert that querying over all files in the file system is possible but don’t go into detail about how to do it efficiently. Also, the term “file system” can mean many things – it could be just a model of what data is stored (e.g. directories and files), or an abstract API of possible commands (e.g. mkdir(), walk(), open(), etc.), or it could refer to a full-blown implementation like NTFS with all its idiosyncratic features and characteristics. When I critique hierarchical file systems, I am mostly commenting at the data model level – regardless of the implementation flavor (ext4, HFS+, etc.). When I propose a new way of organizing files, I am mainly designing the data model, and leaving the implementation details for later work."
tags  tagging  design  folksonomy  files  filing  computing  organization  via:jslr  hierarchy  hypertext  complexity  multiverse  search 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Taxonomy and Recirculation — Responsive Web Design
"We identified five distinct ways that posts could be sorted, each with its own purpose and rules:

categories and tags have no overlap. A term can exist in one list or the other, but not both. Categories are the primary grouping of the post, and the terms are quite broad: “Food”, “Race”, “Art”. If taxonomy is branding, then these top-level categories convey the major themes that make up The Toast. The category is relatively prominent in the homepage and article page metadata.

tags are much more topical. Topical tags are displayed on the front-end, but their real purpose is to drive the “recirc” modules that help users explore the site. (More on that in a second.) Keeping these tags functional means that we can automagically show more posts about “Buddhism” or “Shakespeare” as long as everything is tagged consistently.

fake tags are actually fake. The funny tags (like truckin’ and the continuation thereof) are a vital and hilarious part of The Toast experience, but the little information architect in our hearts wept whenever a user clicked through to the archive page for one of the 6,152 tags that only had a single post in them. On the new site, those “tags” are still presented on the front-end, but on the back-end they’re just a plain text field. (The fake tags link out to a Google Search, which we think is hilarious. We’re fun at parties.) We kept the funny and the functional, but gave them each their own field so they could be used differently. Deep breaths, taxonomists. It’s all going to be OK.

series have their own taxonomy list. The series are a major draw, and a huge source of multiple page views – it’s hard to read something like Mallory’s Two Monks Inventing Bestiaries and not immediately want more in the same vein. The next thing a user wants to see is probably not another article related to “animals”, but more inventions from the monks: perhaps maps, or dinner parties. By separating the series into their own taxonomy–rather than grouping them under Tags or Categories—we were able to build recirc modules that give preference to series-siblings over topic-siblings.

authors are managed only as people, not tags. Wordpress has a built-in way to create authors, with a byline and a gravatar. But the old taxonomy included many author names as tags, too—this was unnecessary, and we are all about avoiding unnecessary work. In the new system it’ll be easy to see more articles by a given author, so you can catch up on the back catalog written by your favorites.

Migration: Like cleaning out your closet, but with more robots
Migrating from the old taxonomy to our new and shiny five-part taxonomy required some human effort—with a lot of help from automated scripts. It wasn’t feasible to manually re-tag every single post and launch a new site during this century. But the new taxonomy wouldn’t work unless the existing posts were converted to the new system.

We started by exporting the full list of all tags on the site to a spreadsheet. We sorted and grouped by the number of posts in each entry, so tags with more than five posts could be handled first, leaving tags with only one post for later. We tasked Nicole and Mallory with recategorizing the list, which was the best client trolling we’ve ever done. They sorted each entry into:

• topic for tags that were topical and should stay as true tags.
• series for tags that should be converted to the new Series taxonomy.
• author for tags that are people. Tags are people!
• joke for the funny tags that should be converted to entries in each post’s plain text field.
• delete for tags that were no longer relevant or had no entries in them.

This sorting of tags into their new buckets could only be done by real people who were familiar with all the content in question, then the work after that could be automated. We also hope that this process will prophylactically prevent their tags from getting out of control in the future."
via:tealtan  tags  tagging  taxonomy  2015  cms  thetoast  webdev  webdesign  archives 
october 2015 by robertogreco
pinboard private tags //5880.me (–⅃-)
"Holy smokes!

I ... just learned about private tags on Pinboard.

If you start a tag with a dot, only you will see it

As someone who works on client projects, I am so thrilled to learn there's a way to tag what I learn on a project with that project name without making the link itself private. Stoked."
pinboard  tags  tagging  privacy  maxfenton  2015 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Tags | Collection of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
"We have 2,227 tags and this is page 1 of 62. The tags are sorted in ascending order by tag name."
tags  tagging  cooper-hewitt  collections  taxonomy 
june 2015 by robertogreco
We're sharing more photos but getting less in return
"Theoretically, we could have an up-to-the-minute photo database of any popular location. We'd just need Instagram to include more metadata by default and allow users to sort by location (or let a third-party app do the same).

If we were properly organizing the photos we're already putting online, I could see how a festival was going, and Google Maps could show me all the photos taken from the Eiffel Tower in the last five minutes. I could even see if a popular bar is crowded without any official system. We'd be able to see the world right now, as clearly as we see its past on Google Street View, as quickly as news spreads on Twitter.

We have the data and the technological infrastructure, but we're stuck because no developer can access all the data.

If anyone was going to deliver these capabilities, it would be Flickr. In 2006, it was the canonical destination for photos. If you wanted to see photos of a certain place or subject, that’s where you went. But Facebook replaced Flickr as a social network, killing it on the desktop, and Instagram released a simpler mobile app, killing it there too. That would have been fine if Facebook and Instagram kept their photos data-rich and fully exportable. But both services give fewer tagging, grouping, and other sorting options, and they built their photos into incompatible databases. Facebook won't organize photos any way but by human subject or uploader. Instagram has just a few view options and focuses solely on the friend-feed.

We're photographing everything now, building this amazing body of work, but we're getting less and less out of it.

We do get some benefits from not having one monopoly in charge of photo sharing: Instagram did mobile better than Flickr, Facebook can link a photo of someone to their whole social profile, and Foursquare efficiently arranges photos by location. These advantages, however, have replaced Creative Commons licensing, advanced search, and any other tool that relies on treating the world's photo pool as a mass data set rather than a series of individualized feeds.

Twitter, Tumblr, and Imgur siphon off bits of the photo market without giving them back into the mass set. Meanwhile, any photo service that dies off (RIP Picasa, Zooomr, Photobucket) becomes a graveyard for photos that will probably never get moved to a new service.

Why are we giving up this magical ability to basically explore our world in real-time? The bandwidth is lower than streaming video; the new-data-point frequency is lower than Twitter; the location sorting is less complicated than Google Maps or Foursquare. But no one service has an incentive to build this tool, or to open up its database for a third party. Instead they only innovate ways to steal market share from each other. Flickr recently downgraded its mobile app, removing discovery options and cropping photos into squares. The new app is an obvious Instagram imitation, but it won't help Flickr recapture the market. If any photo service beats Instagram, it won't be by making data more open.

Our collective photo pool suffers from a tragedy of the commons, where each service snaps up our photos with as few features as it can, or by removing features. (Snapchat, for example, actively prevents photos from joining the pool by replacing the subscription model with a one-to-one model, efficiently delivering photos straight from my camera to your feed.) We are giving our photos to these inferior services, they are making billions of dollars from them, and what we're getting back is pathetic.

The best agnostic tool we have is the archaic Google Image Search, which doesn't effectively sort results, doesn't distinguish between image sources, and doesn't even touch location search. The lack of agnostic metadata is keeping us in the past. As Anil Dash pointed out in 2012, the photo pool (like blogs and status updates) is becoming fragmented and de-standardized. Everything we're putting online is chopped up by services that don't play well together, and that's bad for the user.

Dash wrote, "We'll fix these things; I don't worry about that." I do. I don't think technology has to work out right. We can build expressways where we should have built bullet trains. We can let an ISP monopoly keep us at laughable broadband speeds. We can all dump our memories into the wrong sites and watch them disappear in 10 years. We can share postage-stamp-sized photos on machines capable of streaming 1080p video.

Even if we do fix this, it will not be retroactive. There are stories about whole TV series lost to time because the network stupidly trashed the original reels. Now that we take more photos than we know what to deal with, we won't lose our originals—we'll just lose the organization. When Facebook and Instagram are inevitably replaced, we'll be left without the context, without the comments, without anything but a privately stored pile of raw images named DCIM_2518.JPG.

Just a heap of bullshit, really."
nickdouglas  flickr  metadata  photography  2014  instagram  tags  tagging  search  storage  facebook  tumblr  imgur  twitter  picasa  zooomr  photobucket  archives  archiving  creativecommons  realtime  foursquare  googlemaps  snapchat  anildash  googleimagesearch  technology  regression  socialmedia  fragmentation  interoperability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Little Mystical - Notes on “The Structure of Collaborative Tagging System”
"I stumbled across a 2005 research paper on Delicious tagging, which studied tag usage across users and time. Here are some highlights:"

[Allen's commentary between highlighted screenshots:]

"This is perhaps the single greatest challenge with archival (personal or institutional) and systems for returning – your sensibilities in how to divide and categorize things change and throws off all your previous taxonomic efforts. These two articles on channel drift and decay theory may be worth revisiting."

"I wrote an overview of my Pinboard tagging structure [http://tanmade.com/writing/2012/05/05/tagging-structures.html ] back in 2012, which hasn’t changed very much – and is remarkably similar to this."
allentan  2013  pinboard  tagging  folgsonomy  tags  taxonomy  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  retrieval  social  socialbookmarks 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Tagging Structures – Allen Tan is…writing
"Tags have cascading levels of specificity: publishing > journalism > reading > narrative, for example, letting me jump in at whatever scale that I can remember. A useful rule-of-thumb is to name these tags what I’m likely to search for later, which sometimes feels like future sight."



"As fallback, I have 10 tags at the top level: technology, education, life, publishing, political, society, design, history, art, and food. Some of these things overlap, and that’s ok: they reflect the way I mentally sort what I find and read. Everything should be tagged at least one of these lead tags, and they are the starting points when I remember almost nothing about what I’m looking for.

This gives me a naming framework at the moment of tagging, too: I start with the lead tag and then describe the bookmark with broad categories, gradually getting more specific (the same way one would carve at sculpture), and then I skim through the article and my highlights again to add any individual triggers: names and highly specific concepts tend to be dropped in here. Specific uses (say, shopping) or projects also come at the end.



"This is a continuously evolving system: my bookmarks from even half a year ago looks different from my bookmarks now. This sometimes gives me trouble when I get confused by things tagged out of order, or by outdated naming conventions (I try to tag all people names as firstname-lastname now). So, careful and diligent pruning is necessary to keep this system coherent."

[See also: http://tealtan.tumblr.com/post/54105931916/notes-on-the-structure-of-collaborative-tagging that references http://www.citeulike.org/user/zelig/article/305755 + http://arxiv.org/pdf/cs.DL/0508082.pdf ]
allentan  2012  tagging  folksonomy  pinboard  del.icio.us  granularity  tags  bookmarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialbookmarks  taxonomy 
june 2013 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
i miss delicious.com
" Delicious is the Rome, Jerusalem, and Paris of my existence as an academic these days. It's where I make my friends, how I get the news, and where I go to trade. All this from a little server that does nothing but share bookmarks in public.
...For two years I've been using Delicious as an information organizer. It's produced an impressive encyclopedia of the most interesting information, images, articles, citations, books, and subjects on the internet to which I might want to refer. Consider my dissertation tag, under which are a wide variety of online images and Google books that I'll be using for my research. Not only can I come back to them, but I can also find related subjects—dissertation material related to walking—and navigate seamlessly from one to another. As an improvement on the index card system—or on my own terrifying piles of articles, even now ornamenting my bookshelf, or even on the folders within folders within folders of word documents—this represents a definite improvement."

"There is nothing like Delicious out there in terms of an community for finding grass-roots curators and beholding their careful, discerning brilliance over time.  Not twitter, where we all snark meaninglessly; not tumblr, which buries precious information beneath a flood; not Zotero, where it's nearly impossible to browse strangers or follow them from afar.  

In the end, I don't care that the people were more reliable than Yahoo, or that corporate America destroyed my intellectual commons.  I miss you, Delicious.  Give me my library back."

[More: https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308703279855058944 and https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308679134744293376 and others]
joguldi  research  del.icio.us  socialbookmarking  community  twitter  zotero  intellectualcommons  2013  libraries  yahoo  data  privacy  connectivism  collectivism  folksonomy  tags  tagging  learning 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Tagging is broken - Kippt Blog
[This makes no sense to me. The argument sounds like: tagging is broken because tags don't have a purpose, but if you use hashtags instead they all of a sudden have a purpose.]
via:caseygollan  tags  tagging  del.icio.us  pinboard  hashtags  kippt  2012  socialboomarks  socialboomarking  bookmarks  bookmarking 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Flickr: Discussing Tagography ~ case studies in FlickrCentral
"Tagography is a bit of a riff on tags, for which an ad-hoc standard can be found here. Please feel free to post your comments and your own examples of tag use in this thread."
folksonomy  tips  tagography  photography  tags  tagging  flickr  2004 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Flickr: Discussing Tagging it up ~ some suggestions for tagging your images. in FlickrCentral
"You can find some specifics examples of how people are using tags in the tagography thread.

a bunch of flickr users have made some suggestions for tags in this thread, and i've tried to compile a thorough a list as possible here, from those suggestions ~ feel free to pick and choose from this list as you see fit: …"
names  naming  subjects  genre  medium  folksonomy  tagography  2004  tags  tips  tagging  flickr 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Shirky: Ontology is Overrated -- Categories, Links, and Tags
"This piece is based on two talks I gave in the spring of 2005 -- one at the O'Reilly ETech conference in March, entitled "Ontology Is Overrated", and one at the IMCExpo in April entitled "Folksonomies & Tags: The rise of user-developed classification." The written version is a heavily edited concatenation of those two talks.

PART I: Classification and Its Discontents

Q: What is Ontology? A: It Depends on What the Meaning of "Is" Is.

Cleaving Nature at the Joints

Of Cards and Catalogs

The Parable of the Ontologist, or, "There Is No Shelf"

File Systems and Hierarchy

When Does Ontological Classification Work Well?

Domain to be Organized

Participants

Mind Reading

Fortune Telling

Part II: The Only Group That Can Categorize Everything Is Everybody

"My God. It's full of links!"

Great Minds Don't Think Alike

Tag Distributions on del.icio.us

Organization Goes Organic"
2005  flickr  del.icio.us  web  metadata  classification  categorization  taxonomy  via:caseygollan  tagging  tags  folksonomy  clayshirky  ontology 
may 2012 by robertogreco
The Fans Are All Right (Pinboard Blog)
"I learned a lot about fandom couple of years ago in conversations with my friend Britta, who was working at the time as community manager for Delicious. She taught me that fans were among the heaviest users of the bookmarking site, and had constructed an edifice of incredibly elaborate tagging conventions, plugins, and scripts to organize their output along a bewildering number of dimensions. If you wanted to read a 3000 word fic where Picard forces Gandalf into sexual bondage, and it seems unconsensual but secretly both want it, and it's R-explicit but not NC-17 explicit, all you had to do was search along the appropriate combination of tags (and if you couldn't find it, someone would probably write it for you). By 2008 a whole suite of theoretical ideas about folksonomy, crowdsourcing, faceted infomation retrieval, collaborative editing and emergent ontology had been implemented by a bunch of friendly people so that they could read about Kirk drilling Spock."
pinboard  2011  fanfiction  taxonomy  folksonomy  brittagustafson  del.icio.us  avos  bookmarking  bookmarks  tags  tagging  collaboration  collaborative  crowdsourcing  fans 
october 2011 by robertogreco
collision detection: "The tag is the soul of the Internet"
"Okay, enough of these stoner epiphanies! The point is that Instagram’s tags, primed by de Kerckhove’s provocation, made me think anew about the cognitive power of tags — their sense-making ability. But I also realized I haven’t seen designers do anything particularly interesting with tags in a while. I haven’t seen anything that helps me spy patterns in data/documents/pictures in similarly weird and fresh ways. Maybe tagging, as a discipline, hasn’t been pushed in very interesting ways. Or maybe I haven’t been looking in the right place?

(Irony of ironies, I realize I’ve never bothered to tag my blog posts.)"
clivethompson  tags  tagging  folksonomy  perspective  instagram  flickr  blogs  blogging  sensemaking  2011  photography  discovery 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Tweeters: I want a witness tag « BuzzMachine
"A proposal:

It would be terribly useful if there were a separate convention for tweets from witnesses to major events so their reports can be separated from the discussion that follows. How about !jpquake for witnesses vs. #jpquake for discussion?

Moments after the tragic earthquake hit Japan, folks are reporting on TV, people turned immediately to Twitter to tell friends and family and perhaps the world what was happening to them and to use it to get information and services.

But, of course, in only moments, people around the world talking about the event and the hashtag gets overrun with folks who are talking *about* the event than *from* it. That’s all good and wonderful as well. But I want a way to separate the two."
twitter  jeffjarvis  tags  hashtags  media  witnesses  events 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Smart Automatic Bookmarks - favbot
"Imagine never having to meticulously bookmark and label your favorite websites. Favbot saves and organizes your browsing history. It figures out the best labels to use for each web page. It understands what websites are important to you. It predicts what other websites you will be interested in. It puts you fully in control. It provides analytics to improve your productivity. Powerful machine-learning algorithms at work. Start using it now."
bookmarking  firefox  onlinetoolkit  favbot  del.icio.us  bookmarks  search  memory  tags  tagging  browsinghistory  automation 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Delicious's Data Policy is Like Setting a Museum on Fire
"Yahoo! is going to shutter its social bookmarking service Delicious, the web learned today, and with it will sink an incredibly valuable source of collectively curated knowledge. You can easily export your own bookmarks (no verdict yet where we should all meet up to import them to) but what if you want to export other peoples'? That's at least half the value of the service, socially curated discovery."
del.icio.us  yahoo  data  history  curation  curating  tags  tagging  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  2010  archives  loc  web2.0 
december 2010 by robertogreco
R.I.P. Delicious: You Were So Beautiful to Me
"It was beautiful. And now it's gone.<br />
<br />
The Library of Congress should have bought it, similar to the way it has now archived every Tweet ever tweeted.<br />
<br />
So much value. So unappreciated. So tragically lost. Where will we all gather next, where our bookmarks can be centralized for maximum network effect? Perhaps this story demonstrates that's not the right question to ask."
del.icio.us  social  yahoo  2010  readwriteweb  tags  tagging  value  cv  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
A stranger comes to town « Snarkmarket
"Step 1: Rob Greco reads Jason Kottke’s blog.

Step 3: I find myself strolling the streets of San Diego with a gang of smart 7th graders.

For the zeit­geisty con­nec­tive tis­sue that is step 2, check out Rob’s reflec­tion here. It includes some very nice words about Snark­mar­ket! (And some nice words about me, too—so of course I was hes­i­tant to link to it too eagerly here—but hon­estly the whole thing is such a cool panoramic tale of a new kind of learn­ing, and Rob’s artic­u­la­tion of it is so good, that I am will­ing to bite the bul­let and incur some neg­a­tive self-aggrandizement points for the sake of sharing.)

P.S. I feel like I have not rec­om­mended a Deli­cious account in years, but Rob’s links are basi­cally what keep me com­ing back to my net­work page. They are thought­ful, thor­oughly anno­tated (his notes are almost lit­tle blog entries), and fright­en­ingly well-tagged."
robinsloan  tcsnmy  tcsnmy7  ego  cv  kottke  taxonomy  zeitgeist  tagging  tags  sandiego  del.icio.us 
april 2010 by robertogreco
people clouds (tecznotes)
"I've only been conscientiously tagging my links for a few months, but already I'm starting to get a clear picture of the kinds of material I get from my friends. I love the idea that a nice stick-and-rock diagram can be made to sum up the specific expertise of people I know, and the topics I look for from each of them. ... Do you tag your links like this? Does it help you develop a sense for those in your circle who are go-to people for certain topics? Does it help you get through your daily reading to know what certain people are best at? Don't you wish that Delicious would let you check your own name for the hive-mind consensus about what you're good for? "
michalmigurski  tagging  tags  del.icio.us  diagrams  clustering  hivemind 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Ethan Hein’s metablog » Social bookmarking is delicious
"The most practically useful thing on the whole entire social web is Delicious. Its original point was to store your web browser bookmarks online. That’s reason enough to use it. But the real value of Delicious is how it connects the thoughts in your head to the thoughts in the heads of innumerable internet strangers. Even more useful is the way it stores, reorganizes and reflects your own thoughts back to you. Delicious feels less like a web site I look at and more like a new module of my brain. It’s also like a slow-paced but highly absorbing text-based computer game, a loosely organized internet scavenger hunt." ... "Flickr is the second most useful site on the social web. It shares many of Delicious’ best qualities, like tagging and the rich inspiration of other users. Here are my Flickr items tagged with Delicious. After looking at my Turing tag on Delicious, my next move would be to take a look at my Turing tag on Flickr."
del.icio.us  flickr  folksonomy  tagging  tags  socialbookmarking  blogging  memes  learning  recursion  via:preoccupations 
november 2008 by robertogreco
LibraryThing | Catalog your books online
"Enter what you're reading or your whole library—it's an easy, library-quality catalog. LibraryThing also connects you with people who read the same things."
books  onlinetoolkit  learning  discussion  cataloging  librarything  socialsoftware  collaboration  socialnetworking  libraries  catalog  folksonomy  organization  tagging  tags  database  reading  community  social  online  literature  web 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Peripheral vision and ambient knowledge :: Blog :: Headshift
"We need to let people organise their inputs by exposing all relevant information in granular feed form and then provide smart aggregation and tagging tools to create a personal eco-system of content, cues and links."
via:preoccupations  filtering  infooverload  flow  feeds  rss  tagging  tags  content  information  management  knowledge  ambient 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds
"toy for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts, and color schemes. The images you create
visualization  tagclouds  tags  tagging  visual  del.icio.us  text  language  mapping  maps  words 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Bush-U-Like « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"doctrine of computational ubiquity some forty years downstream...and frank description of the memex as outboard memory augmentation...Vannevar Bush as belonging properly to the history of ubicomp."
ubicomp  memex  vannevarbush  hypertext  del.icio.us  ubiquitous  memory  information  infooverload  specialization  search  taxonomy  tagging  tags  internet  web  specialists 
february 2008 by robertogreco
How YOU Can Make the Web More Structured - ReadWriteWeb
"Putting meta information into page headers is easy and should be a must-do thing for everyone. Beyond that, providing information such as author, date, and location makes data that much more valuable."
advice  blogging  code  content  metadata  microformats  semanticweb  internet  markup  standards  folksonomy  findability  semantic  webdesign  webdev  users  usability  tagging  tags  howto  format  meta 
january 2008 by robertogreco
geobloggers » The overdue Places post II - Prototyping Iconicness
"something that we decided was fairly important early on, the photos couldn’t just be the most ‘interesting’ photos, as defined by our interestingness score. When we did that, we didn’t get stuff that we though was iconic enough."
algorithms  api  design  development  flickr  geocoding  geotagging  maps  prototyping  places  interestingness  tagging  tags 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Pasta: text pasting service for del.icio.us
"Paste text below and hit preview until you are happy. Submit auto-generates a web page and posts it to del.icio.us"
del.icio.us  text  tools  tagging  tags  bookmarklets  bookmarking  applications  socialsoftware  onlinetoolkit  maciejceglowski  maciejcegłowski 
january 2008 by robertogreco
About the “Learn More” series « LibraryStream
"a series of self-paced discovery entries for library staff interested in venturing out on the social web. Each post is meant as a short introduction to a different social website, tool, or concept. It might not be ground-breaking information to veteran r
socialnetworking  socialsoftware  libraries  howto  tutorials  training  web2.0  networkedlearning  applications  del.icio.us  e-learning  online  flickr  twitter  youtube  tags  tagging  wikis  blogs  blogging  technology  learning  information  library  secondlife 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Many hands make light work « Flickr Blog
"What if you could contribute your own description of a certain photo in, say, the Library of Congress’ vast photographic archive, knowing that it might make the photo you’ve touched a little easier to find for the next person?
flickr  library  libraries  folksonomy  copyright  museums  participatory  crowdsourcing  publicdomain  photography  tagging  commons  archive  tags  loc  community  history 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Learning 2.0 - The Things
"Welcome to the original Learning 2.0 Program. This site was created to support PLCMC's Learning 2.0 Program; a discovery learning program designed to encourage staff to explore new technologies and reward them for doing 23 Things."
activities  business  flickr  collaboration  howto  gamechanging  community  learning  lessons  librarians  libraries  management  workshops  web2.0  web  technology  tools  resources  training  reference  networkedlearning  online  pedagogy  professionaldevelopment  courses  progress  tagging  tags  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  wikis  work  education  elearning  folksonomy  free  media  blogs  autodidacts  lcproject  homeschool  unschooling  schools  podcasts  webdesign  myspace  recording  programming  rss  del.icio.us  onlinetoolkit  internet  content  user  webdev 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Jiglu: Tags that think
"Jiglu is a super-smart engine that pieces your site together, intelligently tagging and linking your web content"
tagging  tags  blogging  blogs  bookmarks  collaboration  datamining  sharing  web2.0  semantics  automation  generator  widgets  webdesign  services  networking  webdev 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Scripted Re-Mark: Batch Editing Your Bookmarks - Freshblog
"The service is dubbed Scripted Re-Mark, since you use a script to "re-mark" your bookmarks. It grew out of my earlier experiments with automatic tagging and frustrations with migrating a blog."
del.icio.us  bookmarks  editing  hacks  javascript  rules  share  tagging  tags 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Scripted Re-Mark - Batch Editor for Bookmarks
"This service helps you manage your bookmarks stored on popular social bookmarking site del.icio.us. If you've ever wanted to make edits to all your bookmarks in one hit ("batch mode"), then this is for you. It makes it easy to re-tag bookmarks en masse,
bookmarking  bookmarks  del.icio.us  productivity  folksonomy  hacks  sharing  webapps  tools  tagging  tags  javascript 
october 2007 by robertogreco
MailTags
"The revolutionary enhancement that transforms Apple’s Mail into a powerful email organization system."
tags  taxonomy  tagging  mac  osx  mail  software  applications  addons  extensions  email  productivity  folksonomy 
october 2007 by robertogreco
YouTube - Information R/evolution
"This video explores the changes in the way we find, store, create, critique, and share information. This video was created as a conversation starter, and works especially well when brainstorming with people about the near future and the skills needed in order to harness, evaluate, and create information effectively."
michaelwesch  ux  video  web2.0  information  nearfuture  sharing  internet  online  web  anthropology  taxonomy  tags  tagging  search  content  wikipedia  contribution  usergenerated  user  community 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Loki - You Can Get There From Here
"Combining GPS-like location, local search and one-button access to location-based content, Loki is the first web-based application to make the Internet revolve around you. Literally."
gps  googlemaps  directions  geotagging  location  location-based  locative  mapping  maps  search  firefox  wifi  extensions  browser  spatial  tagging  tags  wireless  networks  navigation  findability  geography  geocoding  interactive  mobile  tracking  browsers 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Creative Generalist - Everything is Miscellaneous
"perhaps the part of this most relevant to the generalist discussion is how the third-order diminishes experts' exclusivity over defining relevant knowledge"
davidweinberger  generalists  tags  tagging  knowledge  experts  information  specialization  web  internet  taxonomy  classification  folksonomy  socialnetworks  complexity  sorting  libraries  culture  wikipedia  statistics  groups  identity  self  clustering  marketing  specialists 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Pew Research Center: Tagging Play
"Forget Dewey and His Decimals, Internet Users Are Revolutionizing the Way We Classify Information - and Make Sense of It"
del.icio.us  flickr  folksonomy  tags  tagging  statistics  standards  socialsoftware  taxonomy  trends  use  classification  community  analysis  libraries  journalism  media  networking  pew  play  research 
july 2007 by robertogreco
FeedBlendr - blending RSS, Atom and RDF feeds into a single river of news!
"FeedBlendr lets you combine a bunch of feeds into one. Enter the URLs of any RSS, Atom or RDF feeds (news, blog, podcast or any other type) you'd like to blend into a single feed below."
aggregator  applications  blogging  blogs  del.icio.us  feeds  lifehacks  links  mashup  online  internet  services  rss  remix  tools  web  web2.0  website  webdesign  technology  tags  software  webdev 
july 2007 by robertogreco
H2O Playlist: Home
"H2O playlists are more than just a cool, sleek technology -- they represent a new way of thinking about education online. An H2O Playlist is a series of links to books, articles, and other materials that collectively explore an idea or set the stage for
bookmarks  learning  del.icio.us  socialsoftware  social  technology  online  links  reference  search  education  rss  resources  bookmarking  tagging  tags  folksonomy  taxonomy  feeds  academia  aggregator  archives  audio  bibliography  books  citation  collaboration  collaborative  collections  community  curriculum  directory  documentation  documents  information  knowledge  pedagogy 
may 2007 by robertogreco
H2O Playlist: Social Bookmarking - sort of...
"Links to support a presentation given at an OU eLearning Community Workshop. Looks at the evolution of my relationship with social bookmarking, moving from simple link collections and their exploition via embedded RSS feeds, to a more general take on boo
bookmarks  learning  del.icio.us  socialsoftware  social  technology  online  links  reference  search  education  rss  resources  bookmarking  tagging  tags  folksonomy  taxonomy  feeds 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Bokardo » The Del.icio.us Lesson
"The one major idea behind the Del.icio.us Lesson is that personal value precedes network value. What this means is that if we are to build networks of value, then each person on the network needs to find value for themselves before they can contribute value to the network. In the case of Del.icio.us, people find value saving their personal bookmarks first and foremost. All other usage is secondary."
del.icio.us  folksonomy  tagging  tags  taxonomy  search  bookmarks  community  collaboration  networks  systems  user  blogging  blogs  bookmarking  crowdsourcing  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  classification 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Plum: Welcome to Plum
"Plum is a free service that lets you save anything you care about – web pages, videos, photos, documents, emails, feeds, and more – and organize everything into collections."
annotation  blogs  bookmarks  email  books  collaboration  collaborative  collections  notetaking  online  rss  video  web  information  internet  files  folksonomy  networking  lifehacks  documents  research  social  tags  podcasts  portfolio  presentations  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  website  organization 
march 2007 by robertogreco
Christopher D. Sessums :: Weblog :: We Are the Machine: Web 2.0 (re)explained
"a little video entitled "Web 2.0 ... The Machine is Us/ing us" courtesy of Michael Wesch, an Asst. Prof. of Cultural Anthropology at KSU that explains (albeit rather rapidly) many concepts behind the read/write web."
readwriteweb  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  social  society  internet  web  sharing  tagging  video  tags  del.icio.us  flickr  online  michaelwesch 
february 2007 by robertogreco
veotag :.. home
"Place clickable tags and comments anywhere within a video or audio file; Divide video and audio files into chapters and segments; Let your audience see what's coming up -- and jump to the parts that interest them most"
subtitles  annotation  video  tools  online  presentations  remix  editing  digital  socialsoftware  comments  tags  taxonomy  folksonomy  text  social 
december 2006 by robertogreco
flof - el mundo en etiquetas
"flof es una colección de lugares catalogados por usuarios en forma libre. Así como guardás tus páginas favoritas, con flof vas a poder guardar, compartir y descubrir lugares dentro de una gran comunidad."
folksonomy  google  labels  maps  tags  argentina  buenosaires  mapping  community 
november 2006 by robertogreco
The Kaywa Reader
"The Kaywa Reader is a 2D Barcode Reader to install on your mobile phone. Once installed, you can scan 2D Barcodes and the content of the 2D Barcode is then immediately resolved on the phone."
design  kaywa  locative  phones  nokia  mobile  qrcodes  tags 
november 2006 by robertogreco
blip.tv (beta)
"blip.tv is a video sharing site. We believe that the world is fundamentally changing as it becomes easier and easier for individuals and small groups of people to create their own excellent video shows."
broadcast  collaboration  collaborative  community  tv  tools  television  technology  socialsoftware  tags  sharing  social  services  podcasts  opensource  free  howto  internet  movies  multimedia  music  networking  video 
october 2006 by robertogreco
Mirá!: Platial: El Atlas de todos
"Una mezcla perfecta entre los weblogs y los mapas online, así puede considerarse a Platial. La combinación es tan radical que puede vérselo casi un nuevo medio en sí mismo. Neogeografía, cartografía personal, cartografía comunitaria, son algunas d
maps  socialsoftware  social  software  folksonomy  geography  local  locative  mapping  travel  web  tags  tools  networking  community  create  diy  resources  share  argentina  buenosaires 
june 2006 by robertogreco
Ourmedia Homepage | Ourmedia
"# Publish and store video, audio and other media that you created! # Share and discover independent media. Connect to a global community! # Learn how to create citizens media. Free storage & bandwidth forever! # Do NOT post other artists' copyrighted wor
audio  blogs  bookmarks  directory  collaborative  creativity  culture  digital  community  entertainment  free  folksonomy  learning  media  movies  mp3  music  online  opensource  participatory  photography  podcasts  portal  projects  share  sharing  social  socialsoftware  software  space  storage  tags  video  wiki 
april 2006 by robertogreco
INFOLUST | An emerging consumer trend and related new business ideas
So if that's the setting, let’s look at the most important INFOLUST developments: 1. Even more transparency in the online world 2. Search and answers go mobile 3. Real world objects join the game
information  tags  technology  consumer  collaboration  sociology  social  business  sms  media  research  search  ubicomp  spimes 
april 2006 by robertogreco
Platial
"Platial enables anyone to find, create and use meaningful maps of Places that matter to them. We hope it can connect people, neighborhoods, cities and countries through a citizen-driven common context that goes beyond geopolitical boundaries. We are buil
social  software  tags  geography  maps  place  locative  google  collaborative  mapping  folksonomy  travel  tools  web  internet  online  sharing  community 
march 2006 by robertogreco
The Impact of Emerging Technologies: Beyond Google: Collective Searching - Technology Review
"Social software has blossomed in the last few years, with blogging, social-networking sites like MySpace and LinkedIn, and the rise of user-driven content sites like Flickr. But, for the most part, the field is in an awkward, adolescent stage: self-consc
collective  search  web  internet  community  online  software  tools  tags  collaborative  social 
march 2006 by robertogreco
Meaning - About Merkitys-Meaning
"When you take a photo you are capturing an image of what you can see with your eyes. Merkitys–Meaning enriches this image by automatically adding contextual information and allowing you to instantly share your picture; all with just one click. Simply p
flickr  mobile  photography  software  contextual  ambient  geotagging  geography  annotation  maps  mapping  locative  tags  ubicomp  visualization  location  local  location-based 
march 2006 by robertogreco
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