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robertogreco : technium   21

The Technium: Pain of the New
"I predict that on each step towards increased realism new media take, there will be those who find the step physically painful. It will hurt their eyes, ears, nose, touch,and peace of mind. It will seem unnecessarily raw, ruining the art behind the work. This disturbance is not entirely in our heads, because we train our bodies to react to media, and when it changes, it FEELS different. There may be moments of uncomfort.

But in the end we tend to crave the realism -- when it has been mastered -- and will make our home in it.

The scratchy sound of vinyl, the soft focus of a Kodak Brownie, and the flickers of a 24 frame per second movie will all be used to time-stamp a work of nostalgia."
kevinkelly  2013  change  technium  technology  film  reality  framerate  history  photography  audio  cds  thehobbit  hfr 
january 2013 by robertogreco
The Technium: The Improbable is the New Normal
"To the uninformed, the increased prevalence of improbable events will make it easier to believe in impossible things. A steady diet of coincidences makes it easy to believe they are more than just coincidences, right? But to the informed, a slew of improbably events make it clear that the unlikely sequence, the outlier, the black swan event, must be part of the story. After all, in 100 flips of the penny you are just as likely to get 100 heads in a row as any other sequence. But in both cases, when improbable events dominate our view -- when we see an internet river streaming nothing but 100 heads in a row -- it makes the improbable more intimate, nearer.

I am unsure of what this intimacy with the improbable does to us. What happens if we spend all day exposed to the extremes of life, to a steady stream of the most improbable events, and try to run ordinary lives in a background hum of superlatives? What happens when the extraordinary becomes ordinary?"
internet  web  exposure  information  coincidence  blackswans  expectations  photography  video  cameras  everyday  believability  improbable  2013  kevinkelly  technium 
january 2013 by robertogreco
The Technium: The Post-Productive Economy
"Civilization is not just about saving labor but also about "wasting" labor to make art, to make beautiful things, to "waste" time playing, like sports. Nobody ever suggested that Picasso should spend fewer hours painting per picture in order to boost his wealth or improve the economy. The value he added to the economy could not be optimized for productivity. It's hard to shoehorn some of the most important things we do in life into the category of "being productive." Generally any task that can be measured by the metrics of productivity -- output per hour -- is a task we want automation to do. In short, productivity is for robots. Humans excel at wasting time, experimenting, playing, creating, and exploring. None of these fare well under the scrutiny of productivity. That is why science and art are so hard to fund. But they are also the foundation of long-term growth. Yet our notions of jobs, of work, of the economy don't include a lot of space for wasting time, experimenting, playing, creating, and exploring."

"The are two senses of growth: scale, that is, more, bigger, faster; and evolution. The linear progression of steam power, railways, electrification, and now computers and the internet is a type of the former; just more of the same, but only better. Therefore the productivity growth curve should continue up in a continuous linear fashion.

I suggest the growth of this 3rd regime is more like evolutionary growth, rather than developmental growth. The apparent stagnation we see in productivity, in real wages, in debt relief, is because we don't reckon, and don't perceive, the new directions of growth. It is not more of the same, but different."
growth  robertgordon  industrialization  generativity  leisurearts  evolution  internet  networks  plumbing  china  future  technology  productivity  economics  kevinkelly  2013  technium  post-productiveeconomy  artleisure 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Such a Long Journey - An Interview with Kevin Kelly - Boing Boing
"…we should be open to assignments and changing our mind. I think that's what I had, a change of mind. I'm a huge believer in science and scientific method…every time that we get an answer in science it also provokes two new questions…in a certain curious way science is expanding our ignorance - our ignorance is expanding faster than what we know…what we know is just a small, small fraction of what is going on in the world…

…the most active theologians today are science fiction authors…asking the important questions of "What if?"… [Examples of questions]…Those are the kinds of questions that not theologians are asking in any religion that I am aware of, but science fiction authors constantly are exploring that. And they're the ones who are going to have the answers for us that the theologians will have to look to. But at the same time these are fundamentally religious questions that are not being asked in that vocabulary."
darkmatter  whatwedon'tknow  ignorance  curiosity  thinking  scientificmethod  technology  jaronlanier  technium  philosophy  avisolomon  interviews  2012  openminded  mindchanges  experience  religion  scifi  sciencefiction  science  kevinkelly  via:litherland  mindchanging 
may 2012 by robertogreco
The Technium: Techno Life Skills
"Anything you buy, you must maintain. Each tool you use requires time to learn how to use, to install, to upgrade, or to fix. A purchase is just the beginning…

You will be newbie forever…

Often learning a new tool requires unlearning the old one…

Take sabbaticals [from the tools]…

Tools are metaphors that shape how you think. What embedded assumptions does the new tool make?…

What do you give up? This one has taken me a long time to learn. The only way to take up a new technology is to reduce an old one in my life already…

Every new technology will bite back. The more powerful its gifts, the more powerfully it can be abused. Look for its costs…

Nobody has any idea of what a new invention will really be good for. To evaluate don't think, try…

The older the technology, the more likely it will continue to be useful.

Find the minimum amount of technology that will maximize your options."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2011/6833 ]
education  learning  technology  future  2011  kevinkelly  tcsnmy  unschooling  unlearning  maintenance  tools  philosophy  technium  assumptions  upgrades  change  perpetualchange  life  lifeskills  lcproject  edg  srg  impermanence 
may 2011 by robertogreco
What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly, Book - Barnes & Noble
"A refreshing view of technology as a living force in the world.

This provocative book introduces a brand-new view of technology. It suggests that technology as a whole is not a jumble of wires and metal but a living, evolving organism that has its own unconscious needs and tendencies. Kevin Kelly looks out through the eyes of this global technological system to discover "what it wants." He uses vivid examples from the past to trace technology's long course and then follows a dozen trajectories of technology into the near future to project where technology is headed.

This new theory of technology offers three practical lessons: By listening to what technology wants we can better prepare ourselves and our children for the inevitable technologies to come. By adopting the principles of pro-action and engagement, we can steer technologies into their best roles. And by aligning ourselves with the long-term imperatives of this near-living system, we can capture its full gifts."
books  toread  kevinkelly  technium  technology  society  civilization  engagement  pro-action  singularity  future 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The School of Life : On Mutuality
"Mutuality rather than independence is the chief characteristic of human life, whatever we'd like to believe. Many prefer to see human life as one long competitive struggle for dominance. Philosopher Edmund Burke, Darwin's champion Herbert Spencer (who coined the phrase "survival of the fittest") and Ayn Rand (high priestess of the American idea of rugged individualism) are among those who characterise human life in terms of the struggle between individuals for the spoils of humanity. Science is increasingly contradicting this view: rather than being a species of arch individualists, we are the social ape. We live in larger, more complex groups than our closest cousins, collaborating with friends and strangers thanks to our nuanced social brain. Indeed, we use other people's brains to navigate the world: to acquire skills and practices, and to access knowledge systems of long-dead strangers. We call this "culture"."

[via: http://twitter.com/cervus/statuses/17735266663 ]
human  relationships  sociology  social  culture  tcsnmy  conversation  connectivism  connectedness  interdependency  knowledgesystems  systems  humanity  mutuality  brain  collaboration  lcproject  strangers  internet  web  online  technium  darwin  edmundburke  herbertspencer  aynrand  individualism  toshare  competition  cooperation  independence  theschooloflife  charlesdarwin 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Technium: Predicting the Present, First Five Years of Wired
"I was digging through some files the other day and found this document from 1997. It gathers a set of quotes from issues of Wired magazine in its first five years. I don't recall why I created this (or even if I did compile all of them), but I suspect it was for our fifth anniversary issue. I don't think we ever ran any of it. Reading it now it is clear that all predictions of the future are really just predictions of the present. Here it is in full:"
kevinkelly  technium  future  futurism  guidance  history  quotes  trends  value  90s  web  wired  death  dannyhillis  paulsaffo  nicholasnegroponte  peterdrucker  jaychiat  alankay  vernorvinge  nathanmyhrvold  sherryturkle  stevejobs  nealstephenson  marcandreessen  newtgingrich  brianeno  scottsassa  billgates  garywolf  johnnaisbitt  mikeperry  marktilden  hughgallagher  billatkinson  michaelschrage  jimmetzner  brendalaurel  jaronlanier  douglashofstaster  frandallfarmer  rayjones  jonkatz  davidcronenberg  johnhagel  joemaceda  tompeters  meaning  ritual  technology  rituals 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The Technium: Two Kinds of Generativity
"There is a natural arc by which each invention moves from generative openness in a new-born to refined generativity of a well defined idea. Some folks mistakenly believe that modern regime of manufacturing & consumerism inevitably closes off all cool inventions to first kind of generativity, but this maturity has always happened, long before industrial age. Technology's natural cycle is merely being accelerated now.

New-borns w/ infinite potential but low-productivity become middle-agers generating great productivity & unleashing fantastic creativity; in turn the mature keep frontiers expanding by generating more newborns. I speak here of ideas & devices.

Each new unformed, hackable, potential invention is quickly refined by use & this use makes a technology more specific, conditional, & open to use by know-nothings. Therefore each tech eventually becomes less malleable, less powerful in undefined ways but more powerful in defined ways. It moves from the margins to the center."
hackability  ipad  kevinkelly  maturity  technium  technology  development  innovation  opensource  generativity  progress  gamechanging  closedsystems  opensystems  manufacturing  consumerism  invention  cylces  commoditization 
may 2010 by robertogreco
The Technium: Tending the Garden of Technology
"KELLY: At a deep level, the act of discover and the act of creation are identical. The steps that you would take to find something are exactly the same steps you'd take to make something. So you can say that Edison discovered the lightbulb and Newton invented gravity.

LAWLER: Wendell Berry might say that is all well and good, but technology doesn't change the essential nature of humanity. It doesn't make us better people.

KELLY: I disagree with Wendell. We have created our humanity. And I think our humanity has been created by technology. Our humanity is defined by things we have invented. Like the alphabet. Our culture is one thing we've created. But I also think there has been an evolution of morality. Culture and cultural inventions are part of the Technium -- they are technologies."
kevinkelly  technium  technology  humanity  humans  inventions  creation  discovery  change  2010 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The Technium: Penny Thoughts on the Technium
"For many years the dogma was that evolution was offloaded from the genes into culture. Our bodies stopped evolving because culture took it over. But in fact it turns out that genetically we are actually accellerating in our evolution. That our genes are evolving faster because of technology. Reading & writing changes. Permanently rewires the brain. It’s for sure we’ll see (with enough evidence) that people who use Google and offload their memory to the cloud, it will affect our brains. So we are absolutely changing ourselves.

I‘m interested in how people personally decide to refuse a technology. I’m interested in that process, because I think that will happen more and more as the number of technologies keep increasing. The only way we can sort our identity is by not using technology. We’re used to be that you define yourself by what you use now. You define yourself by what you don’t use. So I’m interested in that process."
kevinkelly  technology  technium  evolution  internet  web  networks  organisms  identity  refusal 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The Technium: Progression of the Inevitable
"The procession of technological discoveries is inevitable. When the conditions are right...the next adjacent technological step will emerge as if on cue...The recurring forms of simultaneous inventions in human history are dots on a long connected line that stretches from the big bang to the deep future. The parallel tracks of independent technological development on different continents trace & re-trace & re-trace again similar trajectory — of a semi-autonomous system headed somewhere...technium is not a random meandering...not an accident of human preferences, foibles & once-in-a-millennial genius...has a direction...leaning towards increasing complexity, sentience, consilience, specialization, possibilities & choices. As it flows in that direction it unfolds its inevitable progression. Yet at the micro scale, volition rules. Our choice is to align ourselves with this direction, to expand choice & possibilities for everyone & everything & to play out the details w/ grace & beauty."
progress  invention  technium  kevinkelly  technology 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Technology, Evolution, and God | Integral Life
"Wired magazine’s own "Senior Maverick" talks with Ken Wilber about some of the ideas behind Kevin's blog The Technium, which explores the various ways humanity defines and redefines itself through the interface of science, technology, culture, and consciousness. Kevin also shares some of his own thoughts about the role of spirituality in the 21st century, going into considerable depth around his own spiritual awakening several decades ago."

[part 2 here: http://integrallife.com/node/17277 ]
kevinkelly  philosophy  technology  evolution  religion  spirituality  technium 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium - Everything, Too Cheaply Metered
"In the long run, there is nothing that cannot be made more valuable by metering it. We are rapidly inventing new sensors to cheaply, accurately, and continuously measure all things in all dimensions: geo-graphical location, speed, consumption, health, fitness, repairablity, connection, performance, rest, charge, and a million other vectors. The skills to parse and divine meaningful patterns out of this new environment will become paramount and eagerly sought. Those who control the gateways to this metered information will be kings. Flows of goods and services formed the basis of the first global economy. Flows of data, the second. We are headed toward an economy built on the attention to data's data, or meta data. And there after, we'll build on the attention to attention. In this economy the revolution will be cheaply metered. Afterall, a bit is just a difference waiting to be measured."
kevinkelly  technium  metering  metadata  discovery  flow  statistics  future  economics  information  attention  location  technology 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium: Believing the Impossible
"The Wikipedia has changed my mind, a fairly steady individualist, and lead me toward this new social sphere. I am now much more interested in both the new power of the collective, and the new obligations stemming from individuals toward the collective."
wikipedia  change  kevinkelly  opinion  edge  society  collective  gamechanging  socialsoftware  creation  ethics  evolution  technium  collectiveintelligence  knowledge  learning  social  trends  freedom 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium - Four Stages in the Internet of Things
"apparent smarter nature of the web will be due to fact that web will "know" more. Not in conscious way, but in programatic way. Concepts & items represented on web will point to each other & know about each other -- in fundamental way they do not right n
kevinkelly  technium  semantic  web  online  internet  search  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  networks  information  knowledge  data  future  trends  timberners-lee  semantics 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium - Loving Technology
"I've been looking for examples which describe the love people often show technology. Reader Christopher Quinn submitted a lovely one, and no surprise, it concerns cars."
kevinkelly  technium  relationships  love  technology  objects  literature  sherryturkle 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: Google, Apple and the future of personal computing
advantages that a Google-Apple Cloud Computer offers: cheap ($99-199 for device + free storage and apps), energy efficient (no motors, LED screen), low-maintenance (no moving parts), flexible (mobile, auto-backup, files not tied to machine)
cloudbook  apple  google  computers  computing  future  mac  mobile  phones  technology  trends  networking  networks  cloud  collaboration  collaborative  gamechanging  online  internet  technium  nicholascarr  nearfuture  applications 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium - A Cloudbook for the Cloud
"Eventually we'll have the intercloud, the cloud of clouds. This intercloud will have the dimensions of one machine comprised of all servers and attendant cloudbooks on the planet." Benefits: reliable, auto back-up, infinite storage/apps, seamless sharing
cloudbook  mobile  computers  computing  cloud  networks  networking  collaboration  collaborative  gamechanging  google  online  internet  technium  kevinkelly  future  nearfuture  phones  applications 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium: Technology Wants To Be Free
"Over time the cost per fixed technological function will decrease. If that function persists long enough its costs begin to approach (but never reach) zero. In the goodness of time any particular technological function will exist as if it were free."
kevinkelly  future  technology  economics  resources  money  internet  electronics  business  manufacturing  technium  flying  airlines  culture 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium: Dimensions of the One Machine
"100 billion neurons in human brain..Today the Machine has as 5 X transistors than you have neurons in your head...Somewhere between 2020 & 2040 the Machine should exceed 6 billion HB. That is, it will exceed the processing power of humanity."
ai  brain  computers  technology  networks  singularity  future  internet  gamechanging  web  online  technium  kevinkelly  onemachine  human  processing  hardware  software  storage  mooreslaw 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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