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The Creative Independent: Jonas Mekas on documenting your life
"Were you ever interested in writing a straightforward memoir about your life?

I don’t have time for that. There are fragments of that in this book, but I think my films are my biography. There are bits and fragments of my personal life in all of my films, so maybe someday I’ll put them together and that will be my autobiography."



"People talk a lot about your films, but you have a poetry practice as well.

Occasionally I still write poems. It comes from a different part of me. When you write, of course it comes from your mind, into your fingers, and finally reaches the paper. With a camera, of course there is also the mind but it’s in front of the lens, what the lens can catch. It’s got nothing to do with the past, but only the image itself. It’s there right now. When you write, you could write about what you thought 30 years ago, where you went yesterday, or what you want for the future. Not so with the film. Film is now.

Are most of your decisions intuitive? Is it a question of just feeling when something is right or when it isn’t?

I don’t feel it necessarily, but it’s like I am forced—like I have to take my camera and film, though I don’t know why. It’s not me who decides. I feel that I have to take the camera and film. That is what’s happening. It’s not a calculated kind of thing. The same when I write. It’s not calculated. Not planned at all. It just happens. My filmmaking doesn’t cost money and doesn’t take time. Because one can always afford to film 10 seconds in one day or shoot one roll of film in a month. It’s not that complicated. I always had a job of one kind of other to support myself because I had to live, I had to eat, and I had to film.

How do you feel about art schools? Is being an artist something that can be taught?

I never wanted to make art. I would not listen to anybody telling me how to do it. No, nobody can teach you to do it your way. You have to discover by doing it. That’s the only way. It’s only by doing that you discover what you still need, what you don’t know, and what you still have to learn. Maybe some technical things you have to learn for what you really want to do, but you don’t know when you begin. You don’t know what you want to do. Only when you begin doing do you discover which direction you’re going and what you may need on the journey that you’re traveling. But you don’t know at the beginning.

That’s why I omitted film schools. Why learn everything? You may not need any of it. Or while you begin the travel of the filmmaker’s journey, maybe you discover that you need to know more about lighting, for instance. Maybe what you are doing needs lighting. You want to do something more artificial, kind of made up, so then you study lights, you study lenses, you study whatever you feel you don’t know and you need. When you make a narrative film, a big movie with actors and scripts, you need all that, but when you just try to sing, you don’t need anything. You just sing by yourself with your camera or with your voice or you dance. On one side it is being a part of the Balanchine, on the other side it is someone dancing in the street for money. I’m the one who dances in the street for money and nobody throws me pennies. Actually, I get a few pennies… but that’s about it.

You’ve made lots of different kinds of films over many years. Did you always feel like you were still learning, still figuring it out as your went along?

Not necessarily. I would act stupid sometimes when people used to see me with my Bolex recording some random moment. They’d say, “What is this?” I’d say, “Oh nothing, it’s not serious.” I would hide from Maya Deren. I never wanted her to see me filming because she would say, “But this is not serious. You need a script!” Then I’d say, “Oh, I’m just fooling. I’m just starting to learn,” but it was just an excuse that I was giving, that I’m trying to learn. I always knew that this was more or less the materials I’d always be using. I was actually filming. There is not much to learn in this kind of cinema, other than how to turn on a camera. What you learn, you discover as you go. What you are really learning is how to open yourself to all the possibilities. How to be very, very, very open to the moment and permitting the muse to come in and dictate. In other words, the real work you are doing is on yourself."



"You are a kind of master archivist. I’m looking around this space—which is packed with stuff, but it all appears to be pretty meticulously organized. How important is it to not only document your work, but to also be a steward of your own archives.

You have to. For me there is constantly somebody who wants to see something in the archives, so I have to deal with it. I cannot neglect them. These are my babies. I have to take care of them. I learned very early that it’s very important to keep careful indexes of everything so that it helps you to find things easily when it’s needed. For example, I have thousands of audio cassettes, in addition to all the visual materials. I have a very careful index of every cassette. I know what’s on it. You tell me the name of the person or the period and I will immediately, within two or three minutes, be able to retrieve it. People come here and look around and say, “Oh, how can you find anything in this place?” No, I find it very easily.

I always carry a camera with me in order to capture or record a couple images and sometimes conversations. Evenings, parties, dinners, meetings, friends. Now, it’s all on video, but back when I was using the Bolex camera, I always had a Sony tape recorder in my pocket—a tiny Sony and that picked up sounds. I have a lot of those from the ’60s, ’70s, ’80s. Hundreds and hundreds. I have books which are numbered, each page has written down what’s on each numbered cassette. I don’t index everything, that would be impossible, but approximation is enough. I advise everyone to do this. Record things. Keep an index. It’s very important."



"Aside from all of those projects, do you still have a sort of day-to-day creative practice?

I never needed a creative practice. I don’t believe in creativity. I just do things. I grew up on a farm where we made things, grew things. They just grow and you plant the seeds and then they grow. I just keep making things, doing things. Has nothing to do with creativity. I don’t need creativity."



"And the last remaining company that still made VCRs recently went out of business.

So, all of this new technology, it’s okay for now… but it’s very temporary. You could almost look at it from a spiritual angle. All technology is temporary. Everything falls to dust anyway. And yet, you keep making things."
jonasmekas  2017  film  filmmaking  poetry  documentation  archives  collage  books  writing  creativity  howwewrite  biography  autobiography  art  work  labor  technology  video  vcrs  temporary  ephemeral  ephemerality  making  howwework  howwemake  journals  email  everyday 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
Ein ganzer Ort macht Schule <br />Zwischennutzung in Feldkirchen an der Donau – Blog – schulRAUMkultur
[translation from: www.DeepL.com/Translator

"A whole place goes to school
Interim use in Feldkirchen an der Donau
12.02.2017

Feldkirchen an der Donau is cheering and being cheered. A jewel of contemporary school construction and a committed pedagogical practice put this Upper Austrian community in the limelight. There are many reasons why this was successful. One of them was almost overlooked. The temporary use during the construction site period was an impressive feat of courage and cooperation on the part of civil society, preparing the team of female teachers for their practice in the cluster school unintentionally and, after almost 40 years, turning an advanced school concept from the 1970s into reality. The Feldkirchen hiking school is history again - but it has made history in Feldkirchen ...

The details can be read in the download. The text is the slightly revised version of my technical contribution in the magazine schulheft 163, which was published in autumn 2016. The building of fasch&fuchs.architekten, on everyone's lips, can in my opinion be understood more fundamentally, more profoundly, if the prehistory is also taken into account. This would almost be submerged in history. By a lucky coincidence I was able to salvage and secure it. It shows very well how meaningful spatial school development can be for the success of best architecture.

Meeting room of the parish in use as a school © parish Feldkirchen an der Donau

The use of architecture is a dance with habits. Architects understandably tend not to see the real (not imagined) use anymore. Usage is quickly invisible because "unseen", usage takes place after our creative phase. Therefore, both phases - phase 0, project development, and phase 10, settlement accompaniment - are relevant for school conversions that require laymen to act anew. I will report about it soon - in Leoben I was commissioned for phase 10 at the Bildungszentrum Pestalozzi - an experiment!

The reference to the original contribution in the school book 163: Zinner, Michael (2016): A whole place does school. Text contribution in: Rosenberger, Katharina; Lindner, Doris; Hammerer, Franz (2016, editor): SchulRäume. Insights into the reality of new learning worlds. schulheft 163; 41st year; StudienVerlag Innsbruck. 77–88

A whole place goes to school [.pdf]
http://www.schulraumkultur.at/perch/resources/170206-blog-zinner.michael-2016artikel.schulheft163-ueberarb-ein.ganzer.ort.macht.schule-seite77bis88.pdf "]
education  schools  schooldesign  microschools  community  temporary  sfh  lcproject  openstudioproject  communities  neighborhoods  decentralization  via:cervus  architecture  pedagogy  teaching  learning  howweteach  1970  austria  progressive  tcsnmy 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Escola Aberta
"Escola Aberta1,2 is:

a) autonomous b) reflexive c) temporary

1.The Escola Aberta will be a temporary design school based in Rio de Janeiro. Teachers and students of graphic design from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie (Amsterdam) will conduct a week of workshops, lectures and activities, aiming to ignite a discussion on ways of teaching and learning and to establish an exchange of ideas with Brazil.

2. Directed at students, young professionals and artists, masters and apprentices, the Escola Aberta will be free of charge and take place from the 6th till the 11th of August, at the Carioca Design Center, Tiradentes square.

Escola Aberta1,2 will be:

a) free of charge b) in Rio de Janeiro
c) on August 2012 d) from monday to friday

1.Application deadline is 1st of July 2012. A total of 60 participants will be selected.
2. Please note that the Escola Aberta is unable to provide or organize any accommodation, board or transportation. Attendance is expected for the entire duration of the school, i.e. every day from Monday till Friday.

Escola Aberta1,2 seeks:

a) students e) craftsmen i) Brazilians
b) teachers f) artists j) foreigners
c) masters g) designers k) you
d) apprentices h) philosophers

1.The Gerrit Rietveld Academie is a dutch art and design academy, based in Amsterdam. It has grown to be a uniquely international school, open to applicants from all over the world. As a consequence an increased multicultural exchange of ideas, customs, knowledge and skills is cultivated. Particularly in the graphic design department the gap between teachers and students has become eminently narrow. This closeness ultimately opens up an intensified reciprocal exchange of opinions and ideals.

2.The Escola Aberta is looking for people with open minds, will for exchange, a questioning attitude and love for debate. Participants will be challenged to assume different roles during the week, to act as teachers and students, masters and apprentices, designers and artists. They must be able to switch from theory to practice and from protest to action.

T (true) or F (false):
( ) An art school, simply put, is a representative of the institutionalization of art.
( ) When our view of art is limited, so is our view of society.
( ) If questions aren’t asked in art schools, where then?
From Teaching to Learn by Joseph Kosuth, 1991.

Knowledge is something that:
a) You have to repeat and memorize, in order to get a diploma.
b) When in fact you need it, you can get it anywhere.

In 1971, conceptual artist John Baldessari was asked to exhibit his work at an art school in Nova Scotia. Since the school had no funds to fly him out for the installation, Baldessari sent a piece of paper printed with the words, ‟I will not make any more boring art,” and instructed the school to recruit students to write the sentence repeatedly all over the gallery walls, ‟like punishment.”

Art cannot be taught. However, one can teach _______________. The School is the servant of the _____________. One day the two will merge into one. Therefore, there are no teachers and pupils, but ________________ and ________________.
From the ‟Bauhaus Manifesto”, Walter Gropius, 1919.

“We do not need to consciously learn anything in order to learn something”. Do you agree? Explain. ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________
From Robert Fillou’s interview with John Cage in ‟Teaching and Learning as performing arts”.

Schools are:
a) on demand d) museums
b) commodities e) all of them
c) social events
School (from Greek “scholè”) means “free time”, being the time when people don’t have to act economically or politically. Within the domain of the school, neither accumulation and profit-seeking nor power games take center stage, but only the subject matter."

[via: https://walkerart.org/magazine/never-not-learning-summer-specific-part-1-intro-and-identities ]
brasil  brazil  lcproject  openstudioproject  altgdp  design  art  artschools  riodejaneiro  2012  ephemerality  ephemeral  autonomy  reflection  temporary  escolaaberta  bauhaus  bmc  blackmountaincollege  robertfillou  johncage  johnbaldessari  franklloydright  hermannvonbaravalle 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Impakt Festival 2017 - Performance: ANAB JAIN. HQ - YouTube
[Embedded here: http://impakt.nl/festival/reports/impakt-festival-2017/impakt-festival-2017-anab-jain/ ]

"'Everything is Beautiful and Nothing Hurts': @anab_jain's expansive keynote @impaktfestival weaves threads through death, transcience, uncertainty, growthism, technological determinism, precarity, imagination and truths. Thanks to @jonardern for masterful advise on 'modelling reality', and @tobias_revell and @ndkane for the invitation."
https://www.instagram.com/p/BbctTcRFlFI/ ]
anabjain  2017  superflux  death  aging  transience  time  temporary  abundance  scarcity  future  futurism  prototyping  speculativedesign  predictions  life  living  uncertainty  film  filmmaking  design  speculativefiction  experimentation  counternarratives  designfiction  futuremaking  climatechange  food  homegrowing  smarthomes  iot  internetofthings  capitalism  hope  futures  hopefulness  data  dataviz  datavisualization  visualization  williamplayfair  society  economics  wonder  williamstanleyjevons  explanation  statistics  wiiliambernstein  prosperity  growth  latecapitalism  propertyrights  jamescscott  objectivity  technocrats  democracy  probability  scale  measurement  observation  policy  ai  artificialintelligence  deeplearning  algorithms  technology  control  agency  bias  biases  neoliberalism  communism  present  past  worldview  change  ideas  reality  lucagatti  alextaylor  unknown  possibility  stability  annalowenhaupttsing  imagination  ursulaleguin  truth  storytelling  paradigmshifts  optimism  annegalloway  miyamotomusashi  annatsing 
november 2017 by robertogreco
A Bizarre, Colorful California Rite of Passage, in Photos - The New York Times
"In the 1960s, Ed Ruscha, the poet laureate of the weird contours of Los Angeles, began taking pictures of the city’s gas stations, apartment complexes and parking lots — the mostly banal things one would encounter while going for a drive — and compiling them into inexpensively produced booklets. He eventually formed not only a taxonomy of Southern California’s architectural vernacular — but its languorous temperament, too, and the ways of living people (who rarely figured in the pictures) choose for themselves.

For the photographer Randi Malkin Steinberger, who moved to Southern California in the 1990s, this temperament located itself in the ubiquitous, incongruously cheerful fumigation tents that cover unlucky houses fostering dry-wood termite infestations. Now, her images of these homes are collected in “No Circus,” a Ruschaean portrait of the particular strangeness of Los Angeles and its suburbs, out this month from Damiani.

Resembling lumpen carnival tents or sinister birthday gifts, the tented houses are bright and menacing all at once — a neon lure to a fanciful haunted house, pumped full of poison and poised to be unwrapped. Steinberger’s images present these buildings as enigmatic sculptures, each one a disquieting presence more or less ignored by locals. The images fit snugly in the tradition of looking at the sun-stroked Southern California landscape as an alien terrain, the same surreal sweep that Bruce Davidson encountered when he shot palm trees growing in airport parking lots. They’re peaceful, nearly airless, showing something that could be naturally occurring if not for the corrosive atmosphere swelling inside. In any case, no one seems to be panicking. They have another analog in Ruscha’s “Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Fire,” a painting that imagines that museum’s tidy modernist parcel, everything normal enough — besides the flames licking one side.

“No Circus,” and, for that matter, the West Coast, represent a shift in focus for Steinberger. Before she moved to California, she lived in Italy for 10 years, where she photographed the inner workings of the artist Alighiero Boetti’s studio. “Getting here, just the architecture itself always made me giggle, the juxtaposition of two houses and the styles people choose,” Steinberger told me. “I did find it really humorous.”

Sometimes shot long from the side of the road, or through a rain-streaked windshield, or approached warily from down the street, the pictures can be funny: a waylaid big top or flamboyant monument to comic relief. One tented house looms over the Pacific Coast Highway, a candy-colored aberration picked out in the suburban sprawl. Other times, Steinberger lets the vinyl fill the frame, isolating the sculptural form. She catches a fearless shrub or nervy marigold sidling up to the safety-cone-orange tarp, nature finding an opening to reclaim some real estate.

Still, there’s a notion of displacement throughout, of homes made uninhabitable and momentarily abandoned. The frames are eerily devoid of people, lending to the sense of unease. The tents are meant to keep the gas in, but they function as much in the reverse, shrouding the house and abstracting the lives of its inhabitants from public view, a striped nylon veil transforming houses into house-shaped secrets, betrayed by a Sol LeWitt fever dream — one of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s wrapped structures gone a bit wrong.

Like the Santa Ana winds or valet parking, turning your dining room into a gas chamber for a few days is something of a shibboleth of Southern California. “Everyone kinds of accepts it,” Steinberger says, “as ‘This is what we do here.’”"
california  photography  randimalkinsteinberger  2016  pestcontrol  architecture  temporary 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Gestalten: The New Nomads: Temporary Spaces and a Life on the Move
"The life of urban nomads places new demands on cities, residences, and working spaces. This book presents temporary architecture, flexible room and furniture concepts, and tools for a generation that feels at home in every corner of the globe.



Mobility is the ultimate new form of freedom: freedom from routine, traditional values, and geographic restraints. Today's creatives thrive on a lifestyle that enables them to work six months in a shared office in Berlin, spend the summer in a caravan in Chile, and show up in time for their next project at a temporary desk in New York.

This growing trend has generated visionary ways of designing products and spaces that facilitate a nomadic yet high-tech life. From a modular dwelling system on wheels to an inflatable classroom in a repurposed dumpster, this book compiles a wide range of flexible spaces and innovative products that define today's nomads. Through innovative technology, and by (literally) thinking outside the box, the designers behind these concepts give people the freedom to call the entire world their home."
nomads  nomadism  neo-nomads  2015  books  robertklanten  svenehmann  michellegalindo  mobility  temporary  architecture  design  inflatables  portability  inflatable 
april 2015 by robertogreco
What Happened? | The Reykjavik Grapevine
"Q: Why did you decide against running for a second term?

A: Because the Best Party is a surprise party. And surprise parties can only go on for so long. You can’t stand up in the middle of a party and yell: “surprise!” That’s absurd. No one would be surprised. The party is already in full swing. Parties that just keep on going, without any element of surprise, they’re just normal parties. And the Best Party was never meant to be a normal party.

Besides that, there is a certain flaw to the Best Party, in that it isn’t a democratic party. It does not play by those rules, and it’s important that it doesn’t. If I were to run again that would have to change. And then it wouldn’t be the Best Party. And I’m not interested in that.

Q: You’ve said the political system is in need of a massive reformation—“a full scale cultural revolution,” as you called it when we interviewed you before the last election. Was the party’s non-democratic nature an attempt to circumvent that system, to instil changes?

A: Exactly. You can think of the Best Party as an intervention. An intervention is temporary; the counsellor doesn’t stay on the family’s couch while it is in the recovery process."



"Q: What about your own beliefs and expectations? Did you compromise them? Did you ever have to stand for something you didn’t believe in, to go against your principles?

A: No, never. I have never done that. I have never gone against my conscience or acted contrary to my beliefs. I know that in life, you sometimes have to swallow bitter pills, that’s just the way it is. Regardless, I have never lied. I have not been dishonest. Even when that was an easy option. I have rather opted for honesty, to admitting that I do not know the answer to a question, rather than telling a lie or diverting the conversation."



"12 STEPS TO DEMOCRACY

Q: You’ve said that you modelled the party after AA…

A: Yes. I really like the philosophy behind AA. It’s very unique; it’s really a lifestyle of sorts that the members adopt. And it seems to work. You never hear anything about a scandal connected to AA. The organisation receives donations and handles money, but you never hear about a charter somewhere that was misappropriating funds or anything of the sort… that type of thing doesn’t seem to happen in AA. This indicates that the programme and the organisation work, that it’s healthy.

The Best Party is built like a 12-step programme—you could call it a political 12-step programme, or a 12-step programme for democracy. I think this is one of the reasons why the Best Party works better than your average protest party or joke party. Those parties don’t work. They have no ideology to build on, no philosophy to ground them. Their basis is often an emotion, like rage, or plain tomfoolery."



There are lots of great ideas out there. But they get misunderstood. And the cause is more often than not simple human frailty, which the theories don’t account for, because they exist solely on the ideological plane, without taking into account emotions and error. Just look at our best thinkers over the past few centuries. From Schopenhauer and Nietzsche to Marx and Engels. Their ideas led to a lot of misunderstanding, a lot of horror. Schopenhauer was Hitler’s favourite philosopher. Karl Marx created communism because he was outraged by how the underclass was being treated. But then, their theories eventually inspired all sorts of atrocities, events and ideas that in no way reflect their intentions.

We thus figured that the best ideology would be no ideology, save for the one espoused by the AA: Powerlessness, humility, frailty. To realise that we don’t have all the solutions.

And Taoism. Taoism has definitely been an influence.

ORTHODOX ANARCHISTS

Q: What about anarchism? You’ve proclaimed on many occasions that you were an anarchist…

A: "To me, anarchism and Taoism represent the same idea. The only difference is that anarchism went the way of any other ideology. It was written down and demarcated, what counted as anarchism and what didn’t—and in that instant, it fell dead.

You can’t be an anarchist if you’re this way or the other. And in effect, this is oppressive. Take straight edge, a really cool movement that sprang up right in the heart of consumer culture preaching different values, preaching health. All of the sudden, you could be cool and a punker without always being wasted. But that quickly turned into a kind of elitism, the group instated rules and even turned to violence against outsiders who didn’t share their outlook. This is a clear example of something that started as a positive force, but quickly turned negative. And it’s of course due to human error and selfishness, frailty and all that crap.

Q: It became an orthodoxy?

A: So easily! And this is why when I say I’m an anarchist, it´s not because anarchism is some perfect ideology, but because there is no perfect ideology.

The whole idea—what’s important—boils down to the right to remain an individual within a community, to be able to live your life as you will so long as you’re not stepping on anyone else. That you can live in peace, whether you’re a homosexual or like to smoke cannabis or whatever, so long as you don’t disturb others. And that is the only ideology that matters."
jóngnarr  iceland  politics  2014  punk  anarchism  ephemeral  intervention  temporary  pop-ups  bestparty  humility  reykjavík  taoism  anarchy  ideology  frailty  powerlessness  ephemerality 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Future - Enough Room for Space
"Enough Room for Space (ERforS) is a non-profit organization that stimulates the creation of physical, virtual and mental space for cultural initiatives by initiating and coordinating events and residency / research projects. ERforS tries to act as freely as possible, always putting the context and the idea before the medium, challenging the barriers between different disciplines (artistic, scientific or activist). Every project is initiated and coordinated by different artists and / or curators.

ERforS wants to expose, manipulate and invent different processes being part of this constant changing world. How do we position ourselves, as Homo Sapiens Sapiens, towards emerging social, political and ecological issues, now and in the future? By working in different cultural contexts worldwide, ERforS tries to find its position and generate discussion. Because these aims often depend on unexpected and unpredictable combinations of people, institutions, locations and disciplines, ERforS also supports these processes in becoming productive, more solid and long-term working relationships.

As a continuous support behind the different temporary projects, ERforS Head Quarters in Belgium provides a constant space for production, presentation and research, including two residency spaces and a work / presentation space. (under construction until the spring of 2013)"
erfors  enoughroomforspace  events  residencies  temporary  ephemeral  architecture  art  culture  community  communities  mountainschoolofarts  lcproject  openstudioproject  ephemerality 
march 2013 by robertogreco
London Olympics 2012 | These Knock-Down, Shrinkable Games | By Hugh Pearman - WSJ.com
"Some hankered after a flashier stadium to rival Beijing's, but a firm policy was established once the bid was won in 2005: Mindful of the legacy of neglect common among many earlier Olympic-host cities, no white-elephant buildings were allowed for London. This was to be the knock-down Games: Venues with no obvious long-term future—such as the Olympic Stadium—were designed to be dismantled entirely, while others were to be shrinkable once the huge audiences for the Games dispersed. Beyond that, one objective is the permanent regeneration of the largely postindustrial Olympic Park in Stratford, East London. A lot of money has been plowed into this."
via:caseygollan  design  temporaryspaces  temporary  disappearing  shrinking  pop-uparchitecture  pop-ups  ephemeral  2012  olympics  london  ephemerality 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Interstitial Library
"The Interstitial Library's Circulating Collection is located at no fixed site. Its vast holdings are dispersed throughout private collections, used bookstores, other libraries, thrift stores, garbage dumps, attics, garages, hollow trees, sunken ships, the bottom desk-drawers of writers, the imaginations of non-writers, the pages of other books, the possible future, and the inaccessible past.

In a sense, this library has always existed. However, until now it has had no librarians, no catalog, and no name.

The Interstitial Library does not aspire to completeness. Indeed, we champion the incomplete, temporary, provisional, circulating and, of course, interstitial. Above all, we aim to acquire and catalogue those books that are themselves interstitial: that fall between obvious subject categories; that are notable for qualities seldom recognized by traditional institutions; that no longer exist, do not yet exist, or are entirely imaginary."
temporaryservices  temporary  provisional  unfinished  incomplete  taxonomy  ephemeral  shelleyjackson  christinehill  humor  art  collaboration  library  philosophy  borges  classification  cataloging  2004  libraries  books  interstitiallibrary  ephemerality 
august 2012 by robertogreco
DUS Architects Amsterdam -
"DUS architects was founded by Msc Arch. Hans Vermeulen (1977), Msc Arch. Martine de Wit (1977) and Msc Arch. Hedwig Heinsman (1980) in 2004. The office builds 'Public Architecture': Design that consciously influences our daily life. This social significance shows at all levels of DUS' work, ranging from large urban strategies to outdoor breakfast designs. DUS sees architecture as a craftsmanship and combines research and design with a 'hands on' approach and unique use of materials.

DUS currently works on a variety of projects that range from art installation, product- and event design to architecture, planning and long-term urban transformation trajectories. The office is based in Amsterdam and is run by the three partners together with a varying team of employees and freelancers. By practicing their credo 'DESIGN by DOING'…"

[via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthonyalbright/7738447800/ ]
dus  urbanism  temporary  urban  art  architects  social  netherlands  amsterdam  architecture 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Museum of the Near Future 1 - Anni Puolakka, Jenna Sutela, Anna Mikkola (Eds.) - ourpress
"Museum of the Near Future (MNF) is an apparatus for looking sideways at and intervening in urban situations and institutions. It presents itself as social installations—such as literary circles or other temporary communities—which are set up on museum premises. Producing space for imagination and discourse, these parasitic installations attempt to destabilize perceptions of what is possible, and desirable, between the now and the next in a given area.

The first iteration of Museum of the Near Future took place at the Museum of Finnish Architecture’s dormant villa in Helsinki during autumn 2011 and in collaboration with Berlin-based Motto Distribution. MNF I explored micro-political and experimental modes of participation in Helsinki, a city undergoing grand urban transformations, such as its rapid expansion to centrally located former harbour areas or the recent identity-defining missions. Composed of a thematic book society/shop in an underused institutional facility, & involving…"
annamikkola  annipuolakka  jennasutela  pop-upmuseums  pop-upgalleries  situationist  urbanism  urban  lcproject  glvo  social  pop-ups  temporary  participatory  installations  parasiticinstallations  installation  2012  mottodistribution  helsinki  berlin  finland  books  okdo  museumofthenearfuture  museums 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Bidoun Library | Bidoun Magazine
"The Bidoun Library had its first outing at Abu Dhabi Art (November 2009) as a collection of books, catalogs, journals, and ephemera that trace contemporary art practices as well as the evolution of the various art scenes of the Middle East. This peripatetic resource then travelled to Art Dubai (March 2010) and 98 Weeks in Beirut (April – May, 2010) before landing in the New Museum in New York (August – September, 2010).

The project space allowed visitors to explore, research, and create wide-ranging connections through materials that are generally unavailable commercially. The focus was on materials created by and for artists, as well as those published by independent organizations based in the Middle East…"

[See also: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/tehranbureau/2010/09/-arts-book-smart-by.html AND http://www.newmuseum.org/exhibitions/426/museum_as_hub_the_bidoun_library_project AND http://www.e-flux.com/announcements/the-bidoun-library/ ]
nomadicschool  curation  collections  art  glvo  lcproject  education  books  middleeast  museums  itinerantlibraries  temporary  mobile  libraries  pop-ups  museum  museumashub  popup 
january 2012 by robertogreco
INSPIRE / NEWS & ARTICLES | Design Indaba
"Besides gearing up for World Design Capital 2012, Helsinki is undergoing a food revolution enabled by the temporary, experimental nature of pop-up restaurants."
2012  trends  temporary  pop-uprestaurants  pop-upcafes  restaurants  food  international  finland  helsinki  popup  pop-ups 
january 2012 by robertogreco
In Oakland, a pop-up retail neighborhood for urban renewal | Springwise
"Popuphood was launched in December 2011 by Alfonso Dominquez and Sarah Filley to encourage urban renewal in Oakland where — despite a thriving bar and restaurant scene — retail is struggling. The project started in the historic neighborhood of Old Oakland, filling five previously vacant store fronts with five new retail shops, including a jewellers and art gallery. The project’s main focus is to support the local community, providing them with a vibrant shopping area and giving local artists, designers and retailers the opportunity to open their own store for six months, rent free. By building cross-sector partnerships with state and federal governments and economic development professionals, popuphood hope to incubate small businesses and create a dynamic community-centric neighborhood, optimizing empty retail space block by block. The video below explains popuphood in more detail: http://vimeo.com/33187820 "
smallbusiness  incubator  sarahfilley  alfonsodominguez  2011  popuphood  temporaryspaces  temporary  lcproject  business  community  entrepreneurship  art  pop-upretail  pop-upstores  oakland  popup  pop-ups 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Building 20 - Wikipedia
"Building 20 was a temporary wooden structure hastily erected during World War II on the central campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since it was always regarded as "temporary", it never received a formal name throughout its 55-year existence. The three-floor structure housed the Radiation Laboratory (or "Rad Lab"), where fundamental advances in physical electronics, electromagnetic properties of matter, microwave physics, and microwave communication principles were made. After the Rad Lab shut down after the end of World War II, Building 20 served as a "magical incubator" for many small MIT programs, research, and student activities for a half-century before it was demolished in 1998."

[See also: http://www.eecs.mit.edu/building/20/ ]
building20  mit  history  temporary  extendedtemporary  persistence  incubator  radlab  magicalincubartor  place  lcproject  pop-ups  popup 
november 2011 by robertogreco
FOUNDation
"Foundation, a concept by Rikkert Paauw and Jet van Zwieten is about collecting waste material and old furniture from the neighborhood, moving it to a waste container, reusing it to turn it into a small house (with the container as the foundation), to become a temporary meeting place for neighbors and passers-by. During the project, graphic designer Jet van Zwieten will give shape to a public journal that shows the progress and tells the story of the found material and its contributors. This site-specific and investigative approach to design and public space leaves room for unexpected local input and cooperation."

[Blogged here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/11855798582/foundation-projects-vienna-design-week-2010-see ]
FOUNDation  reuse  architecture  pop-upcafes  pop-uprestaurants  pop-upculture  design  tempworks  rikkertpaauw  jetvanzwieten  milan  vienna  glvo  temporary  temporaryspaces  structures  making  doing  popup  pop-ups  local  hyperlocal  openstudioproject 
october 2011 by robertogreco
OBIA, THE THIRD: GPOYW
"Flux is great as a concept until you actually have to sit down and get stuff done. I’m one of those strange people who enjoys working. I like being in the haven of my studio—busting out ideas and trying out new experiments and explorations within the laboratory of these four white walls. And yet, I cannot help but notice how everything around me feels more and more temporary. Everything is moving about so much more quickly now. The moment I create something it vanishes in my memory. My own work becoming information to be transferred and over layered—over and over until it is only a glimmer of something I once interacted with, something I once knew. This is not limited to the experience of making or working. I don’t know about you, but I see and feel it everywhere I turn."
homes  temporality  temporary  flux  change  permanence  place  meaning  security  2011  sanfrancisco  belonging  searching  work  toyinojihodutola 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Temporary Autonomous Zone - Wikipedia
"T.A.Z.: The Temporary Autonomous Zone, Ontological Anarchy, Poetic Terrorism is a book by anarchist writer Hakim Bey published in 1991 by Autonomedia… composed of 3 sections, "Chaos: The Broadsheets of Ontological Anarchism," "Communiques of the Association for Ontological Anarchy," & "The Temporary Autonomous Zone."

…describes socio-political tactic of creating temporary spaces that elude formal structures of control. The essay uses various examples from history & philosophy, all of which suggest best way to create a non-hierarchical system of social relationships is to concentrate on the present & on releasing one's own mind from the controlling mechanisms that have been imposed on it.

In the formation of a TAZ, Bey argues, information becomes a key tool that sneaks into the cracks of formal procedures. A new territory of the moment is created that is on the boundary line of established regions."
culture  art  politics  history  books  toread  temporary  temporaryspaces  popupschools  temporaryautnomouszones  permanentautonomouszones  anarchism  autonomedia  anarchy  hakimbey  1991  taz  autonomy  deschooling  unschooling  control  hierarchy  authority  pop-ups 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Nonce - Wikipedia
"Nonce may refer to:
*Nonce, time being: the present occasion; "for the nonce"
*Nonce word, a word used to meet a need that is not expected to recur
*Cryptographic nonce, a number or bit string used only once, in security engineering
*The Nonce, American rap duo
*Nonce (slang), a sex offender
*Nonce orders, an architectural term"
words  computers  cryptography  slang  time  language  temporary  temporality  nonce 
june 2011 by robertogreco
JUST CHANGE « LEBBEUS WOODS
"At a certain point, the only attainable goal is to live within the state of change itself, like refugees, gypsies, or nomads. It seems likely that in the future, if the pace of change—social, political, economic, cultural—continues to increase, this condition will become common in all social classes.

In such a world, the design and construction of permanent buildings will become less important than it is today, and architects will turn their attention to the development of concepts and techniques of building temporary living spaces. At their most primitive, these will involve portable structures such as tents. With increasing sophistication they will involve site-specific constructions that are created and, just as importantly, disappear as needed or desired."
temporary  lebbeuswoods  architecture  design  change  future  housing  life  neo-nomads  nomads  flux  culture  society 
november 2010 by robertogreco
kobberling and kaltwasser: jellyfish theatre
"berlin-based architects köbberling and kaltwasser have worked alongside volunteers to create 'the jellyfish theatre'. located in southwark, it is london’s first fully-functioning theatre made entirely from recycled and reclaimed materials. the project focuses on energy-efficiency, co-operation and human-scale construction. opening to the public at the end of august, this temporary structure is made of materials from all sources: junked theatre sets, reclaimed timber from building sites, market pallets, old kitchen units that the public brought along."
architecture  art  theater  pallets  design  recycling  temporary  energy-efficiency  reclamation 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Real Estate Bust: How Creatives Are Carving Up L.A.'s Empty Space - Core77
"I bring this up now because probably every designer, architect or artist I've ever spoken with has expressed the desire to open and operate a space: a gallery, a store, a classroom. And I would say this is the time. There's a reason this is the age of the pop-up shop: space is available, and it's yours for the taking. ... Here in Los Angeles, groups like Phantom Galleries (modeled after another group in San Jose) work with artists and temporarily empty businesses to create installations. The entire city of Glendale, an L.A.-adjacent enclave, is launching its own program to fill its (many) empty superstores. Recently the art show Manifest Equality placed the work of 200 artists in a former Big Lots supermarket in the heart of Hollywood. Groups like these are working in every city, looking for designers, architects and artists to activate their vacant spaces."
art  artists  losangeles  realestate  urban  gentrification  entrepreneurship  core77  phantomgalleries  machineproject  lcproject  glvo  temporary  galleries  exhibits  oogabooga  stores  popup  pop-ups 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Gawande, D-MA « Snarkmarket
"Faiz Shakir at Think Progress has a pretty stunning proposal: appointing Harvard-based surgeon/author/hero Atul Gawande to Ted Kennedy’s vacated senate seat in Massachusetts."
atulgawande  medicine  healthcare  us  reform  policy  government  tedkennedy  2009  senate  expertise  temporary  politics 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Caravan - The Free Sublet and House Swap site for Creative Folk Only
"Caravan is a house swap and short term sublet listing for commercial creatives and those working in the advertising/media/fashion/art and design industries. If you're a photographer, illustrator, art director, film director, practicing artist, stylist, designer, make up artist, DOP, producer (shall I go on?) this listing is for you. If you travel internationally for work, marketing, relocation, or just curiosity, and you're feeling the GFC pinch, read on!"

[via: http://www.good.is/post/look-short-term-shelter-for-artists/ ]
travel  housing  apartments  rent  couchsurfing  houseswap  glvo  temporary 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Neo-nomad.net » transvaal: sleeping in residue
"Hotel Transvaal uses the surplus of empty spaces in the neighborhood. In houses soon to be demolished, not yet sold newly built on derelict land and in unused spaces that have been refurnished by merchants from the neighborhood and artists into 1 to 5 star hotel rooms. The supply of rooms is very diverse in terms of furniture, luxury and price, so that anyyone, businessmen, students, tourists, residents and other guests can rent a place. When homes are sold or the torn down the hotel rooms move on."
design  surplus  reuse  hotels  housing  homes  recycling  temporary  adaptivereuse  adaptive 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Encastrable, guerrilla art residencies inside DIY megastores - we make money not art
"Encastrable is a series of guerrilla art residencies held inside gardening and DIY megastores in the Paris area. The project, which i discovered it while i was visiting the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs (ENSAD) in Paris a few weeks ago, was initiated by Paul Souviron and Antoine Lejolivet. At no cost at all, the young artists have at their disposal a huge array of material that they can grab, move, superimpose, and organize onto temporary installations and sculptures. Authorization of the manager of the establishment is obviously never requested."
art  consumption  walmart  contemporary  bigbox  megastores  wmmna  installation  temporary  glvo  guerillaart 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Fleeting architecture | csmonitor.com
"Driven at one extreme by a cultural thirst for "the new" and at another by rising global needs of displaced populations, this dematerialization will only continue to expand, say architects and cultural analysts. And as money for big-ticket buildings runs scarce and pressures to reduce humanity's environmental impact mount, a symbiosis between experimental and utilitarian elements in the architectural landscape can only grow."
architecture  design  ball-nogues  temporary  trends  sustainability 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Creative Class » Hybrid Housing - Creative Class
"I’ve been thinking and writing a bit about the need for a new type of housing that is flexible and rented rather than owned. This seems to fit the bill, as reported in the New York Times. "AVE complexes differ from extended-stay residences in that they offer both luxury hotel-style service and rental units, furnished and unfurnished, with condo-style amenities. A tenant can sign a lease for any time period 30 days or longer, and move in within 48 hours...""
housing  nomads  neo-nomads  mobility  temporary  homes 
december 2008 by robertogreco
In Construction. Recipes from Scarcity, Ubiquity and Excess - we make money not art
"No proper building. Not even an architecture project that would give a hint of what its future headquarters would be like. That didn't prevent El Bòlit, a brand new Contemp Art Center, from opening its borrowed doors a few weeks ago in Girona...The Bòlit was a game popular among children in Catalonia until the middle of the XXth century. "It's a metaphor for a dynamic center, one that is constantly moving and is pushed forward by people"... opening exhibition...proves that, if the center is still waiting for a proper building, it certainly doesn't lack a strong personality, a dauntless attitude and a very promising exhibition programme...In Construction. Recipes from Scarcity, Ubiquity and Excess...Beyond construction of building, creation of a contemp art centre involves first & foremost construction of a discourse, relationships & dialogue...why first exhibition at new centre focuses on processes that explore new methodologies to articulate narratives w/ context as starting point."
wmmna  girona  spain  elbòlit  art  artcenter  glvo  architecture  space  identity  narrative  exhibitions  temporary  cities  museums  barcelona  españa 
november 2008 by robertogreco
In design, the temporary is so contemporary - Los Angeles Times
"Some architects are playing up the idea of impermanence, perhaps underscoring the changeability of our times and town."
architecture  design  society  change  permanence  shigeruban  time  losangeles  temporary  via:cityofsound 
april 2008 by robertogreco

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