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robertogreco : terrain   5

Teju Cole on Instagram: “Seminyak, October 2015. Let like be the emotion and "like" be the Instagram action, the double tap on the picture or the single tap on the blank heart. For some of you, I like that you post, I like the fact of your posting. Rela
"_tejucole:

Seminyak, October 2015.
Let like be the emotion and "like" be the Instagram action, the double tap on the picture or the single tap on the blank heart. For some of you, I like that you post, I like the fact of your posting. Related but not at all the same, I like everything you post (you know who you are). I don't "like" everything anyone posts in part because I want to be able to find things in the "likes" later. I "like" in order to indicate that I like, or to note, or to encourage, or as a thank you. I don't hate-"like." For some of you, I don't like what you post generally, maybe your style doesn't appeal, but I'll "like" a photo you post that I like. I think of a repost as a kind of "superlike" of certain pairings of word and image. Sometimes if I like something a lot, I can't "like" it, because it's too close to my skin. Sometimes, when something makes my spinal cord throb, I'll 🌟 it as well as "like" it, almost helplessly and inadvertently, like a monkey in a psychological experiment.

If someone should "like" something I post, I don't mentally interrogate their "like"—I simply prefer to assume that they like the picture, the words, the sequence of images I've been presenting, or me, which all comes to the same thing, at least at that moment. I notice how many "likes" a given post of mine receives, up to a certain minimum (which I will not reveal), beyond which a shit I giveth not. A "like" from certain people (you know who you are, except for those of you who don't) I mentally calculate as ten ordinary civilian "likes." I seldom but sometimes post with "likes" in mind, either to garner "likes" or to stymie them. I never shoot with "likes" in mind.
#_thehive

giache_I:

'superlike' your writings on this activity and these relations of Instagram ✨✨✨

jetudier:

(is it a function of this medium & platform, that I came to at the age that I did, or pure whimsy, that I find the need to write rather than double tap.. this I went private for just such reasons. to not care or be distracted but I find that a tension still exists .. thinking aloud bout this essay. thank you :)

simplymoraa:

On this one my "like" was primarily for the writing.

creetilda:

And I love you.

achp__:

I assumed your liking politics were very specific, but I didn't imagine they'd be that specific. For me, I try to like less and observe more. Sometimes I can't be bothered, and don't like nor observe, and it makes me wonder about the use I do of this space.

1001sarahs:

🌟✨🌟✨🌟
_tejucole:

@achp__ My liking poetics, you mean. 😬 What I realize is also that one likes here, the same way an author signs book. It is one understood (and largely friendly) form of exchange. Until I published books, I hated getting books signed, much less contemplating signing them myself. The purity of literature was the thing! Then things changed and I did too."

[Continued: https://www.instagram.com/p/BBsHGZvvVtv/

"_tejucole

Ubud, October 2015. Within the system of likes which cannot be turned off, and which implicitly sets up a rivalry not only among one photographer's photos, but between different photographers, lending a mild but never to be mentioned element of anxiety into the presentation of every photo, certain forms of sequencing are imperiled. Repetition is imperiled, slow shifts of photographic phase are imperiled. No one imposes these rules. It's only that Instagram, like any society, has unspoken notions of good behavior, of behavior worthy of reward (and even how that reward is to be assessed: relative to total follower count: a hundred likes has different meanings depending on who's getting it). At direct odds with our individual interests in exploration is our individual talent for popularity. "This one will get plenty of likes" is a thought many of us have had, and not always happily. Read the terrain. Certain work can happen here. Certain work cannot happen here.
#_thehive"
tejucole  likes  liking  favorites  favoriting  faves  socialmedia  2016  instagram  psychology  gamification  terrain  behavior  popularity  motivation  photography  writing  whywewrite  whyweshare  socialdynamics  anxiety  rivalry 
february 2016 by robertogreco
'Grid Meets the Hills' shows terrain shaping S.F. - SFGate
"To the extent that the phrase rings any sort of bell, "urban events" may bring to mind visions of a flash mob, a street fair or a parade with corporate sponsors.

In San Francisco, it also can mean those spots where topography and real estate collide - the seductive disruptions that in turn embody what this city has come to be.

Contentious friction absorbed by the whole, again and again and again.

This is a roundabout introduction to the best book on San Francisco I've read in years, Florence Lipsky's "San Francisco: The Grid Meets the Hills." A French architect, Lipsky uses historical maps and her own eye-popping cartography images to show how surveyors and planners tackled the steep-hilled reality of our peninsula terrain. Beyond that, she explores how the lay of the land alters not just what we see, but how we see.

"Nature and Architecture blend to compose a city that is alternately triumphant, modest and familiar," Lipsky writes. "San Francisco's identity resides more in the ebb and flow of its streets than in the Transamerica Tower. ... More in its spaces than the volumes that define them.""
books  history  sanfrancisco  hills  geography  topography  planning  urban  urbanism  design  architecture  maps  mapping  florencelipsky  1999  terrain  terraforming  terrainshaping  via:alexismadrigal 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Introducing Mapbox Outdoors | Mapbox
[See also: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/outdoors-design/ ]

"A beautiful new map designed for outdoor adventures.

Mapbox Outdoors is ready for anything: it includes thousands of biking, hiking, and skiing trails on top of detailed terrain with elevation data. Off the beaten path, find marked creeks, mountain peaks, and other geological features. What would your activity tracker or travel website look like if it cared about more than just highways?

The magic of Mapbox Outdoors is refined, curated data from dozens of sources --- combined into a seamless layer. Then with Mapbox's customization technology, the visual possibilities are endless.

Outdoors is the result of incredible improvements to our raw data sources and rendering technology. To make the map globally accurate, we improved elevation data in 9 countries. Even at the highest zoom levels, elevation lines and labels show every summit and crag. Landcover data colors every part of the surface to show the shape of the woods or a marsh in the valley.

Unlike most other maps, we store and render terrain as vector data, so it's highly customizable: you can change colors, fonts, and labels to match brands, apps, and experiences. For instance, you can render contour lines transparently to show elevation on top of satellite imagery.

As of today, Mapbox Outdoors is available for Enterprise. This summer we will roll it out for all Mapbox plans."
maps  mapbox  via:steelemaley  mapping  outdoors  topographicalmaps  topography  terrain 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Google Maps gets terrain maps, updated collaboration features | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
"Google Maps has added a new view layer to its repertoire today. It's called terrain view, and as the name suggests, it lets you get a detailed look at geographical features both natural, and human-built like buildings and landmarks."
googlemaps  mapping  terrain  maps 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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