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Remediation: Understanding New Media, by Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin | The MIT Press
"Summary

A new framework for considering how all media constantly borrow from and refashion other media.

Media critics remain captivated by the modernist myth of the new: they assume that digital technologies such as the World Wide Web, virtual reality, and computer graphics must divorce themselves from earlier media for a new set of aesthetic and cultural principles. In this richly illustrated study, Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin offer a theory of mediation for our digital age that challenges this assumption. They argue that new visual media achieve their cultural significance precisely by paying homage to, rivaling, and refashioning such earlier media as perspective painting, photography, film, and television. They call this process of refashioning "remediation," and they note that earlier media have also refashioned one another: photography remediated painting, film remediated stage production and photography, and television remediated film, vaudeville, and radio."

Review:

"The authors do a splendid job of showing precisely how technologies like computer games, digital photography, film television, the Web, and virtual reality all turn on the mutually constructive strategies of generating immediacy and making users hyperaware of the media themselves...The authors lay out a provocative theory of contemporary selfhood, one that draws on and modifies current notions of the 'virtual' and 'networked' human subject. Clearly written and not overly technical, this book will interest general readers, students, and scholars engaged with current trends in technology."]

[via:
https://twitter.com/thezhanly/status/1135170311941492736

in this exchange:

Venkatesh Rao (@vgr): "I think several new genres of fiction are being born right now that will break the Industrial Age ones (SFF, mystery, romance, horror, thriller).

One I think is alt-realism. Or adjacent-realism. Not counterfactuals, more like fictional conspiracy theories."

Me (@rogre): "Have you done the same for *form* of fiction? (Think length, type of prose, formatting, use of multimedia, etc.) I think there is something similar going on there too. I also think that these genres and forms are not necessarily as new as they seem, just finally gaining traction?"

Venkatesh Rao (@vgr): I think that’s probably overtheorized already by all the hypermedia studies people. I’m more interested in content. I suspect @thezhanly has good knowledge on state of art there. But overall I think media form evolves much less quickly than people want it too.

Zhan Li (@thezhanly): Bolter & Grusin’s remediation concept is a crucial perspective for this https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/remediation ]
books  media  jaydavidbolter  richardgrusin  1998  photography  film  painting  art  writing  howwrite  publishing  theater  filmmaking  radio  television  tv  refashioning  culture 
june 2019 by robertogreco
The Triumph of the Quiet Style - The Awl
"The clearest demonstration of the quiet style—the dominant, most provocative, most interesting aesthetic of our time—is in theater, where Annie Baker created a revolution by slowing everything down, inserting long pauses, setting plays at room temperature. Baker is, in America and for straight plays, the unquestioned superstar playwright of her generation. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 2014 and a MacArthur Grant in 2017. Her success is so sweeping that it’s almost hard to remember how weird her style seemed five or ten years ago, and how much it ran against all the prevailing headwinds of playwriting, which, for decades, had been all about making plays faster, more shocking, edgier.

American plays were already fast-paced (quick cuts, overlapping dialogue) and then, in the 1970s, David Mamet figured out a syncopated style that made them even faster. (“Arrive late, leave early,” is his prescription for writing scenes). Neil LaBute, Mamet’s heir, starts his signature play, Reasons to Be Pretty, with the stage direction: “Two people in their bedroom, already in the middle of it. A nice little fight. Wham!” Edward Albee, the reigning granddaddy of American theater, admitted that he wrote The Goat, a play about a man’s love affair with a farm animal, more or less because he couldn’t think of any taboos left to break.

For Baker, studying playwriting at NYU, the contemporary approach to playwriting was a nightmare—a formula to get your turns and reveals as plentiful and as high up in the script as possible, and all of it about as artistic as working in the pit at Daytona. While in graduate school, she had a breakdown (by her accounting, one of many) and, stuck, declared to her mentor that what she really wanted to do was to write a play about her mom and her mom’s “hippie friends sitting around and talking about spirituality for two hours,” which, to Mamet and her NYU professors, would have been like saying that what she wanted most as a playwright was to make sure that her audience had the right atmosphere for a nice, peaceful nap."



"But it’s not as if the quiet style began ten years ago. Chekhov is quiet. Our Town is quiet. Beckett is quiet. French New Wave is quiet. Probably, in every era, ‘serious’ art is quieter and slower than commercial. What I am saying, though, is that something distinctive is happening, and it’s clearly resonating with audiences since the same tendencies are dominant in all these different mediums, producing what for years has been the the most unsettling, most challenging, most talked-about work.

The key figure for the quiet style, the one who lays its sociopolitical foundations, is J.M. Coetzee. In Coetzee, the ruling class relinquishes—reluctantly but voluntarily—all its entitlements and, in humility and debasement, acquires a kind of beneficence. “The alternatives [to the power structure] are not,” he writes in the Diary Of A Bad Year, “placid servitude on the one hand and revolt against servitude on the other. There is a third way, chosen by thousands and millions of people every day. It is the way of quietism, of willed obscurity, of inner emigration.”

For the protagonists of the quiet style, most of whom descend from generations of easy living (their privilege is so patent and so internalized that they rarely deign even to speak of it), institutions no longer have anything to offer them and need nothing from them. They tend to be very willing to relinquish whatever societal power they have to those who want it more than they do. It’s characteristic to be an ex-pat (as in Lerner and Greenwell) or to be in some sort of internal exile (Vermont in Baker’s plays) or to be adrift in the ghettos of the unpublished, unproduced artistic underclass (as in Jarmusch, Baumbach, Heti, Dunham, etc). In other words, to have opted out.

What’s crucial—and, ultimately, what defines the quiet style—is the gesture of abnegation, a recognition by its heroes that success either is not for them or doesn’t matter to them. In spite of its heavy use of naturalism, the quiet style is not realism. Fundamentally, the quiet style is a mode of religious expression and it leans heavily on its confessional aspect, its blind faith that the moments of most abject, most senseless humiliation are also the moments when we are at our funniest and truest and (ultimately) most divine. For me, the great attraction of the quiet style is that it takes the attributes of my much-maligned generation—our restlessness, fecklessness, envy, solipsism—and turns them into something like a prayer."
quiet  quietness  slow  pause  pauses  art  film  theater  samuelbeckett  frenchnewwave  jmcoetzee  2017  style  playwriting  writing  davidmamet  anniebaker  abnegation  restlessness  fecklessness  envy  solipsism  naturalism  realism  antonchekhov  jimjarmusch  sheilaheti  lenadunham  noahbaumbach  filmmaking  taolin  benlerner  mumblecore 
may 2019 by robertogreco
Resolved: Debate is stupid | The Outline
"People — yes, even you — do not make decisions on an entirely rational basis. An audience is more easily won over with a one-liner that inspires applause or laughter than a five-minute explanation of a complicated phenomenon. A false statistic repeated confidently will be more convincing than a truth stated haltingly by some guy you’ve never heard of, and who you’ve already decided you don’t like because he’s arguing against the guy you came to see. Massively complex ideologies with hundreds of years of scholarship behind them are reduced to a couple of fast-talking egos in Dockers thinking about the best way to make their opponent look like a dumbass. Debate is not politics. It’s theater.

Real learning is hard. It’s a slow, confusing process where you sometimes have to read long books with dreadful covers, and look at footnotes and shit. It requires us to recognize and then overcome our biases as best we can. It can take years to learn what we really think and why, and then if we get a lingering feeling we might be wrong, it can take years to un-learn and start all over.

Debate, in contrast, offers an easy way out. Some dudes spouting their favorite buzzwords in each other’s vicinity makes us feel smart and engaged, like we’re in that fresco of the Greek men they put on all the philosophy textbooks. (Small aside — have you ever noticed how in this image, all the female figures look thoroughly sick of these guys?) However, the format of debate, which is supposed to represent the height of intellectual tradition, encourages us instead to applaud the candidate who is best at using simple rhetoric, looking suave, and machine-gunning irrelevant lines at their browbeaten interlocutor. These are all things that real intellectual inquiry is supposed to look beyond.

Do not be tempted by the promise of easy satisfaction. Watching a debate can make you actively worse at understanding the nuances of a topic. If you want to really know about a subject, here’s my advice: read widely and extensively (and not just the books your favorite YouTuber recommends). Talk to people, patiently and fairly, rejecting your instinctual desire to win. And perhaps most importantly — take this from a veteran — do not reward former debate team kids with your attention. They are the worst type of nerds and they never share their snacks."
debate  learning  thinking  2018  aislingmccrea  politics  howwelearn  truth  theater  performance  slow  schooliness  deschooling  unschooling 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Frankétienne, Father of Haitian Letters, Is Busier Than Ever - The New York Times
"Frankétienne has had prophecies of death (his own) and destruction (Haiti’s).

The earthquake that wrecked this country in January 2010? It was foreseen, said Frankétienne, the man known as the father of Haitian letters, in his play “The Trap.” It was written two months before the disaster and depicts two men in a postapocalyptic landscape, now a familiar sight in his Delmas neighborhood here.

“The voice of God spoke to me,” said Frankétienne, 75, later noting he had also long dwelt on the ecological ruin he believes the planet is hurtling toward. As for his death, that will come in nine years, in 2020, he says, at age 84. He is not sick, he says, but he has learned to “listen to the divine music in all of us.”

And so the prolific novelist, poet and painter — often all three in a single work — hears his coda. He is vowing to complete a multivolume memoir “before I leave, physically,” while keeping up an increasingly busy schedule of exhibitions and conferences.

“I am going to talk about everything I have seen from age 5 or 6,” he said recently at his house-cum-museum and gallery. “And stuff that hasn’t happened yet because I am a prophet.”

Eccentric. Abstract. A “spiralist,” who rejects realism and embraces disorder. Frankétienne — he combined his first and last names years ago — embraces chaos as a style he believes befits a country with a long, tumultuous history birthed in a slave revolt more than 200 years ago and scarred by a cascade of natural and man-made disasters.

In chaos he finds order.

“I am not afraid of chaos because chaos is the womb of light and life,” he said, his baritone voice rising as it does when he gets worked up over a point. “What I don’t like is nonmanagement of chaos. The reason why Haiti looks more chaotic is because of nonmanagement. In other countries it is managed better. Haiti, they should take as reference for what could happen in the rest of world.”

Scholars widely view Frankétienne as Haiti’s most important writer. He wrote what many consider the first modern novel entirely in Haitian Creole, “Dezafi,” in 1975, and a play well known here that challenged political oppression, “Pelin Tet.” It is a biting work from 1978 that is aimed, not so subtly, at Jean-Claude Duvalier, the son of the dictator François Duvalier and himself a former dictator known as Baby Doc, who returned here from exile in January.

Although not well known in the English-speaking world, Frankétienne has star status in French- and Creole-speaking countries and was rumored to be on the short list for a Nobel Prize in Literature in 2009.

After the quake, his works gained more international attention, particularly in Canada and France. “The Trap” debuted in March 2010 at a Unesco forum in Paris that named him an artist for peace; galleries in New York have organized shows featuring his artwork. Still, he also holds informal Sunday workshops with young artists in Haiti to talk about and critique their work.

“He is not only a major Haitian writer, he is probably the major Haitian writer, forever,” said Jean Jonassaint, a Haitian literature scholar at Syracuse University.

Frankétienne’s output, about 40 written works and, by his count, 2,000 paintings and sketches, comprises dense, baroque affairs. He invents new words, blending French and Haitian Creole. Long digressions are de rigueur. His paintings, which he says are selling particularly well these days, blur swirling blacks, blues and reds, often covered with poems.

He admires James Joyce, and it shows. “ ‘Finnegan’s Wake’ was like a crazy book, just like I write crazy books,” he said.

Still, the Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat said Frankétienne remained popular among Haitians, in part because some of his plays had been videotaped and passed around in Haiti and in immigrant communities in the United States.

“Pelin Tet,” in which the grim life of two Haitian immigrants in New York deliberately echoes the oppression of the Duvalier era on the island, is a touchstone for many Haitians, said Ms. Danticat, who grew up in the same neighborhood as Frankétienne and was, in part, inspired to write by his rise to the top.

“His work can speak to the most intellectual person in the society as well as the most humble,” she said. “It’s a very generous kind of genius he has, one I can’t imagine Haitian literature ever existing without.”

Frankétienne was born as Franck Étienne on April 12, 1936, and raised in the Bel-Air neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, the son of a Haitian farmworker and an American businessman, who later abandoned her.

Frankétienne’s mother worked as a street vendor — selling cigarettes, charcoal, candies, moonshine — while raising eight children.

“Since I was 5 or 6 I was smoking or drinking, but my mother never knew,” he recalled. He was the oldest, and she strove to send him to school (he, in turn, tutored his younger siblings, leading him to establish his own school).

The school he attended was French-speaking. Frankétienne initially did not know a word of French, but angered at being teased by other students, he set about mastering the language and developing an affinity for words and artistic expression.

His best-known works came in the 1960s and ’70s, and he ranks his novel “Dezafi” as one of his most cherished. Set in a rural Haitian village, it weaves cockfighting, zombification, the history of slavery and other themes into an allegory of the country’s pain and suffering.

“It is the challenge of finding the light to liberate everyone,” he said. He wrote it in Creole, he said, because that was the voice of the characters he imagined.

But Frankétienne also felt a need to assert his Haitian identity, as people often look at his fair skin, blue eyes and white hair and doubt he is from this predominantly black country.

“They might think I am white or mulatto or whatever, but I am not,” he said. “I have black features, Negro features. My mother was an illiterate peasant and she had me when she was 16. She was taken in by an American, a very rich American. The American was 63 and my mother was 16 at the time.”

Switching from Creole to English, which he is usually too timid to speak, he added, “You understand who I am now?”

After completing “Dezafi,” he was frustrated that so few of his compatriots could read it, with nearly half the adult population illiterate. He switched to plays, even if that meant irritating the dictatorship.

“Dictators are mean but not necessarily stupid, so they knew I didn’t have any readers,” Frankétienne said. “What really gave them a problem was when I started with plays.”

Other writers and artists left Haiti during the dictatorship, but he stayed as his reputation grew outside the country and human rights groups closely followed him, providing, he believes, some cover from Mr. Duvalier.

Later, he joined other intellectuals in denouncing Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the first democratically elected president after Jean-Claude Duvalier was overthrown. Mr. Aristide, he said, became fixated on power and tolerated corruption and thuggery in his administration.

“He is a ghost, too,” Frankétienne said of Mr. Aristide’s return in March after seven years in exile.

His only regret, he said, is that his work is not widely translated and better known. If he knew Chinese, Japanese, Italian or other languages, he said, he would put them in his works.

“Everything is interconnected,” he said. “We are connected to everything, everyone.”

Frankétienne added, “The only thing not chaotic is death.”"
frankétienne  haiti  2011  literature  chaos  death  writing  form  theater  poetry  creole  language  identity  education  zombies  voodoo  vodou  voudoun  slavery  history  jeanjonassaint  edwidgedanticat  babdydoc  papadoc  jean-claudeduvalier  françoisduvalier  disorder  order  nonmanagement 
november 2018 by robertogreco
SYNONYMS FOR CHURLISH by Megan Vaughan - Whether you whine or twine He shake it up, right...
"Whether you whine or twine
He shake it up, right on time

I’ve had a go at reviewing The Privileged by Jamal Harewood in Twine because, frankly, I’ve no idea how else to even begin talking about a show so totally rattling.

Apols that it’s just got the default formatting on it. CSS coding is like ?????? to me. (That Facebook blue gets fucking everywhere these days innit.)

Have a go here [https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/41115788/The%20Privileged.html ], and please shout if anything doesn’t work, or there are typos. My campaign to bring spellcheck to Twine starts now."
twine  via:tealtan  meganvaughan  jamalharewood  reviews  if  interactivefiction  theater  performance  gaming  theprivileged 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Christine Jones on the notion of the gift, reciprocity, and how being a parent influences her work — Odyssey Works
"OW: WHY CREATE EXPERIENCES?

CJ: As a parent I am aware of creating a world where Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy exist for my kids. When they die it's our job to make other kinds of magic. I love what Charlie Todd of Improv Everywhere says. He said he wanted to live in a world where anything can happen at any moment. His work makes our world just such a world...I think everyone has a desire to be surprised, delighted, moved, and transported. If we don't do this for each other, no one else will. Our parents will make magic for us when we are young, when we are older, we have to make it for ourselves and each other."

OW: WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO DO WITH YOUR WORK?

CJ: This probably sounds horribly pretentious, but lately I have been thinking of myself as an artist who uses Intimacy the way a painter uses paint. My intention with all of my work is to enhance a feeling of connection and presence that makes people feel seen, and sometimes, especially with Theatre for One, loved. It is always amazing to me how simple acts of kindness and generosity are so deeply appreciated. We very rarely slow down enough to feel truly with other people. I am trying to create fruitful circumstances for a gift exchange between audience and performer. Whether it be a big Broadway show, or an immersive dinner theatre experience, or Theatre for One, I am hoping to create a space and relationships within the space that allow the audience to feel that they are receiving a beautiful experience and in return they are giving the performers or creators the gift of their full presence and attention."
audiencesofone  2015  christinejones  art  performance  theater  reciprocity  presence  care  parenting  interactivity  immersivity  immersive  experiencedesign  magic  intimacy  audience  setdesign  wonder  discovery  visibility  gifts  interviews  odysseyworks  wanderlust  sextantworks  relationships  davidwheeler  generosity  theatreforone 
september 2015 by robertogreco
28. You Will Attend a Theater for One — Why 2015 Won’t Suck — Medium
"You Me Bum Bum Train has a very silly title that sounds like a Portuguese man propositioning you for anal sex. I don’t know why I say Portuguese — could be Dutch or Pashto. It sounds like a broken English bumsex proposition is what I’m saying.

I suspect that they keep the silly title because if they called it anything that communicated how utterly amazing it is, they’d be even more deluged with requests for tickets than they are already. I feel bad for bigging it up: Their entire run sold out in eight minutes last time.

London’s YMBBT is what they call “theater for an audience of one,” which sounds a bit frightening. Or “immersive theater,” which these days seems to mean standing in the dark being shouted at by someone wearing a weird hat.

Imagine this instead: You climb through a cupboard and find yourself in a boardroom, about to chair a shareholder meeting. You do brilliantly. After a few minutes, an aide leads you up some stairs and suddenly you’re the lead detective examining a crime scene. Somehow, you know just what to say. One of the police officers leads you through a wine cellar and then you’re on a live TV chat show being asked about your latest book. You make the host and audience laugh and laugh.

Everyone else in each of these scenes is in on it. You cannot fail. You feel that maybe you could fly if you really tried. It’s like the best crazy dream you’ve ever had, that one you wake up from thinking, “Yes, I am okay, yes, I can do more than I thought.” It’s self-help in art form. It should be available by prescription."
2015  naomialderman  art  youmebumbumtrain  ymbbt  audiencesofone  theater  performance  immersivetheater  self-help 
january 2015 by robertogreco
12 ideas for making Boston more inclusive - Magazine - The Boston Globe
"1) CREATE SPACES WHERE PEOPLE FROM ALL WALKS CONVERGE … — Francie Latour

2) HELP SKILLED IMMIGRANTS GET RE-LICENSED … — Omar Sacirbey

3) BRING HIGH-TECH OPPORTUNITIES TO THE INNER CITY … — Michael Fitzgerald

4) GET HIGH SCHOOLERS TO CROSS CLIQUE LINES … — James H. Burnett III

5) ENSURE ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION … — Sarah Shemkus

6) NURTURE URBAN BUSINESSES … — Michael Fitzgerald

7) SPREAD THE HEALTH … — Priyanka Dayal McCluskey

8) BUILD MORE MIXED-INCOME HOUSING … — Jeremy C. Fox

9) PROTECT THE RIGHTS OF TRANSGENDER PEOPLE … — Jeremy C. Fox

10) CULTIVATE INCLUSION EXPERTS … — Nadia Colburn

11) CELEBRATE DIVERSITY THROUGH THEATER … — Cindy Atoji Keene

12) TEACH TOLERANCE TO CHILDREN — Sarah Shemkus"

[See also: "What are Boston’s biggest barriers to inclusion? Community and nonprofit leaders, academics, activists, and others discuss problems and priorities."
http://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/2014/12/03/what-are-boston-biggest-barriers-inclusion/0PnxFPYOYlqbAyQRGS4TRK/story.html

[via: https://twitter.com/anamarialeon/status/543045803393433600 ]
boston  cities  urban  urbanism  inequality  2014  francielatour  omarsacirbey  michaelfitzgerald  jamesburnett  sarahshemkus  priyankadayalmccluskey  jeremyfox  nadiacolbum  cindyatojikeene  inclusion  housing  education  health  healthcare  business  highschool  relationships  community  diversity  tolerance  theater  children  youth  technology  immigrants  urbanplanning  inlcusivity  inclusivity 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Sarah Churchwell: why the humanities matter | Opinion | Times Higher Education
"The renowned scientist E. O. Wilson recently described the humanities as “the natural history of culture, and our most private and precious heritage”. The humanities are the study of what makes us human, of what it means to be human. As they penetrate every aspect of existence, they can, and should, intersect with the natural and social sciences, but literature, history, art, music, languages, theatre, film – and yes, television and computer games – are the stories and ideas through which we express our humanity.

We understand ourselves and our world through the telling of stories. Visual dramas teach us sympathy, empathy, pity, encouraging us to break out of our solipsistic shells. They explore ethical issues, ask challenging questions, inform the way we view each other. Today we live in a culture more defined by images and stories than ever before. Given this, it is vital that we approach the media, advertising and marketing discourses that influence and often manipulate us with critical thinking. We need improved communication skills; no one is born with them, and just chatting with your family and friends does not teach the precision of language needed to negotiate and reframe our complicated world. In a global age, we need to understand other societies. Anyone who has ever studied a foreign language knows that different phrases can prompt new perspectives and open our eyes to cultural values; studying foreign languages also improves mastery of our own. This rule holds by analogy more generally: when we learn about other people, we also learn about ourselves.

The politicians and corporations telling us that the humanities do not matter are, by no coincidence, the same people who think of us only as workers and consumers, not as citizens or individuals, and who strip away our human rights, one by one. It is the wealthy who insist that we should seek only to work: we don’t need the humanities, they tell us, all we need is to labour in a marketplace that will enrich them, not us.

If we agree that the humanities do not matter, or fail to challenge this assessment, we are colluding in the very practices that reduce our humanity, that impinge upon all the other ways in which we can enrich our lives, our abilities to express our creative individuality. Until we reconsider what it means to lead a truly satisfying life, what the ancient Greeks considered the “good life” – who are by no coincidence the people who invented the study of the humanities – we should not be surprised if we have the politicians and plutocrats we deserve. Why should any politician seek to challenge the source of his (rarely her) power?

The humanities conserve and safeguard those aspects of our being that intersect with the meanings of human existence beyond industry. A certain playwright was said to love humanity as a concept but to have less time for human beings. The same can be said of our so-called leaders, whose lofty rhetoric in support of humanity is belied by their contempt for the study of the humanities. That said, as the historian James Truslow Adams wrote some years ago, it is absurd to think that the powerful will abandon their power “to become spiritual leaders of a democracy that despises spiritual things”.

There is a story that may be apocryphal but is illustrative. Supposedly, Richard Dawkins was once visiting an art gallery in Florence, and as he left was heard to ask, “But what’s all this art for?” Regardless of whether Dawkins actually said it, this question articulates a widely held view among the instrumentalists and technocrats who decide our society’s priorities. Last year it was revealed that scientific studies had “proven” that reading made people more empathetic. At last, some book lovers cried, what we always knew has been proven: book lovers are better people! Anyone who has spent time in a literature department might challenge this jolly notion, but I agree with the critic Lee Siegel, who responded by defending his right to love books regardless of whether they “improved” him. Let me answer the question: what’s all this art for? It’s for us.

When we stopped being citizens and began to think of ourselves – or rather, each other – only as consumers, we relinquished thousands of years of human development. How can we sustain our civilisation if we don’t understand how it works? How can we interpret Magna Carta and defend our rights if no one reads Latin? How will we protect our own laws? How can we hope for transcendence in a secular age if we give up on beauty? Even in instrumentalist terms, the humanities represent 5,000 years of free research and development in what it means to be human. I think we should make use of that.

The humanities are where we locate our own lives, our own meanings; they embrace thinking, curiosity, creation, psychology, emotion. The humanities teach us not only what art is for, but what life might be for, what this strange existence might mean. What kind of humans would think that the humanities don’t matter? We need the advanced study of humanities so that we might, some day, become advanced humans."
humanities  2014  sarahchurchwell  eowilson  humanity  culture  literature  art  history  language  languages  stories  storytelling  theater  film  music  socialsciences  videogames  tv  television  humans  capitalism  policy  politics  markets  richarddawkins  technocracy  technocrats  instrumentalists  leesiegel  secularism  thinking  criticalthinking  thewhy  why  existence  existentialism  purpose 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Burn the Seats: Audience Immersion in Interactive Theater on Vimeo
"“It’s about a heightened state of awareness,” says Felix Barrett about groundbreaking productions like Sleep No More and The Drowned Man. Punchdrunk productions transform existing architectural spaces into interactive theater pieces in order to disrupt the traditional, formulaic, and passive theater model. They demand the attention of all five senses."
theater  storytelling  2013  sleepnomore  felixbarrett  thedrownedman  architecture  immersive  senses  punchdrunk  interactive 
september 2014 by robertogreco
MO`OLELO [mo-oh-Leh-low] Hawaiian story/legend/tale/narrative
"MO`OLELO [mo-oh-Leh-low] Hawaiian story/legend/tale/narrative
a community-focused, socially-conscious, equity theater company"

"Mo`olelo was recognized by The American Theatre Wing with their 2011 National Theatre Company grant.

Create
Mo`olelo exists to uncover and research stories within different communities and bring them to life on stage, using all the artistic and technical elements of the performing arts.

Produce
Mo`olelo exists to produce original stories by contemporary playwrights and lesser-known stories by master playwrights.

Educate
Mo`olelo exists to educate youth in technical theater and design, exposing them to potential careers, and grooming this new generation of theater artists so they can tell stories on stage with integrity.

Mo`olelo Performing Arts Company’s mission is to create, produce, and educate. Through all three aspects, we seek to broaden the scope of San Diego’s cultural environment by offering professional, socially-conscious theater that provides a voice for diverse and underrepresented populations, aesthetics, and issues on stage; generates participation and dialogue between local communities; and creates paid employment for local theater artists. Our commitment to paying artists union-level wages reflects our strong belief that professional, resident artists will make San Diego a nationally-competitive destination arts scene, thus improving the quality of life for all people of San Diego County. Mo`olelo serves the diverse general public, from youth to seniors, with particular focus toward providing a forum for those who are typically underserved in mainstream American theater. Mo`olelo means story in Hawaiian, and is a reflection of our vision to present powerful stories that are as diverse as the Islands of Hawaii."
sandiego  theater  hawaii 
april 2014 by robertogreco
A Friend Visits my Slotin Notes - Just Wrought
"And just like that, Thia Stephan Hyde was making plans to  pay my notes a visit.  All that day she updated me with emails and pictures  from her time with my darlings. At the end of it she sent me the following lovely email, which she has graciously allowed me post. Reading it felt like an injection of light straight into my worn-out artist’s heart."



"There is a sub-genre of theatre people who are absolute full-on theatre geeks. We are the ones who revel not only in the delight and the accolades of the performances themselves, but who glory in the research that leads up to the live show. Theatre geeks don’t think of it as “homework”, theatre geeks actually get off on endless hours of dramaturgy, historical research and literary cross-referencing, and GO off on intellectual tangents that may not have any direct correlation with any actual decision put into the work of rehearsal or performance. . . though I insist that you never, ever know what tiny tidbit of historical backstory or arcane research may lead to a tiny choice that lifts a performance from serviceable to inspired.

Anyway, when playwright Paul Mullin mentioned on Face Book that he wondered if someone in New York might have a chance to go visit some materials he had loaned to the Library for the Performing Arts here in town, I was an instantly enthusiastic volunteer! (and I am already registered as a researcher at said library, because – why? I am a theatre geek. You got it.)"



"About 25 minutes later, the boxes arrived, very officially delivered on a cart, signed out from the page who brought them to the librarian, and then signed out again from him to me. I was told to turn in my pen, as only pencils are allowed at the desks, and was told that yes, I could take photos of the material. But I could only have one box at a time, and could only remove one folder at a time from each box. Where to start, where to start? I guessed that “Box 1” was the earliest of the papers (Ding Ding Ding Ding Ding!!), and I started with the “generative notes” folder, which was fascinating. Truly, from just a few scribbled words on a few pages (the very first said: “The relationship of horror and happiness”) through longer philosophical paragraphs and charts of dramatis personae and timelines through feedback from early draft read-throughs, I got to see the “birth” of a play."



"And SO much more. Honestly, I found almost every scribble compelling.

Moving on to other folders, I found out:

That Paul’s own father had been a physicist. (I never knew this.)

That a fellow named Thomas Keenan who was associated with Los Alamos after the fact thought the play contained a “disturbing amount of non-pertinent philosophy and mental meandering”. (Paul pointed out that of course THAT is of what a play consists. . . Hamlet, for example)

That a CD was being rushed to “Anzide’s”, which tickled me because I adore Jim Anzide, and got to work with him in a Circle X production of a play written by another favorite of mine, Tom Jacobson.

That Louis Slotin was not covered by insurance and that the US Government haggled and dragged its heels over compensating his family and returning his belongings to them. And that though they didn’t want to do so at first, eventually the government decided that it would be good to give sick leave pay to the other scientists for the days they had been hospitalized, as it had “been determined advisable in order to ensure confidence on the part of employees . . . who may perform similar operations or experiments in the future.” Sigh.

That I had forgotten how we all used to live by the FAX machine! The faxes, the faxes, the piles of FAXES!"
via:vruba  libraries  research  names  naming  references  paulmullin  thiastephenhyde  2013  writing  science  theater  metadata  meta  geeks  theatergeeks  intertextuality  howwework  howwelearn  facebook  fandom  losalamos  notes  notetaking  time  memory 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Why Common Core Standards Will Succeed | Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice
"Reform-minded policy elites–top federal and state officials, business leaders, and their entourages with unlimited access to media (e.g., television, websites, print journalism)–use these talking points to engage the emotions and, of course, spotlight public schools as the reasons why the U.S. is not as globally competitive as it should be. By focusing on the Common Core, charter schools, and evaluating teachers on the basis of student test scores, these decision-makers have shifted public attention away from fiscal and tax policies and economic structures that not only deepen and sustain poverty in society but also reinforce privilege of the top two percent of wealthy Americans. Policy elites have banged away unrelentingly at public schools as the source of national woes for decades.

National, state, and local opinion-makers in the business of school reform know that what matters is not evidence, not research studies, not past experiences with similar reforms–what matters is the appearance of success. Success is 45 states adopting standards, national tests taken by millions of students, and public acceptance of Common Core. Projecting positive images (e.g., the film Waiting for Superman, “everyone goes to college”) and pushing myths (e.g., U.S schools are broken, schools are an arm of the economy) that is what counts in the theater of school reform.

Within a few years–say, by 2016, a presidential election year–policy elites will declare the new standards a “success” and, hold onto your hats, introduce more and better and standards and tests.

This happened before with minimum competency tests in the 1970s. By 1980, thirty-seven states had mandated these tests for grade-to-grade promotion and high school graduation. The Nation at Risk report (1983) judged these tests too easy since most students passed them. So goodbye to competency tests. That happened again in the 1990s with the launching of upgraded state curriculum standards (e.g., Massachusetts) and then NCLB and later Common Core came along. It is happening now and will happen again.

Policy elites see school reform as a form of theater. Blaming schools for serious national problems, saying the right emotionally-loaded words, and giving the appearance of doing mighty things to solve the “school” problem matter far more than hard evidence or past experiences with similar reforms."
larrycuban  policy  edreform  commoncore  politics  businessasusual  standards  2013  success  theater  blame  schools  publicschools  poverty  inequality  economics  distraction 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Why English Majors are the Hot New Hires | The New OPEN Forum
"Years ago while interviewing an English major, I mentioned that—for many reasons—I liked hiring individuals who have a degree in the humanities. When I finished speaking, I noticed that the applicant was slightly choked up. He said, "You are the only person who has made me feel good about my degree." It's not uncommon for English majors—or anyone majoring in the humanities for that matter—to get a bad rap. Even Marc Andreessen, founder of Netscape, not too long ago said that people should get math-oriented degrees; otherwise, they will end up working in shoe stores.

We place a great value on a STEM education (degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics). But are the tables turning? Are hiring managers beginning to see the value that a liberal arts education—and an English major in particular—brings to the workplace? Recently, some high-profile businesspeople came out in favor of hiring English majors. Bestselling author and small-business expert Steve Strauss, for example, has admitted that "English majors are my employee of choice." And Bracken Darrell, CEO of Logitech, had this to say: "When I look at where our business is going, I think, boy, you do need to have a good technical understanding somewhere in there, to be relevant. But you’re really differentiated if you understand humanities.""

[Related: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/07/30/tech-job-unemployment/2595669/ ]
englishmajors  humanities  education  hiring  work  employment  trends  careers  2013  brunamartinuzzi  stem  stevestrauss  brackendarrell  communication  writing  research  empathy  janerobbins  davidboyes  ideo  jobs  highereducation  highered  arts  art  theater 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Spirits Melted Into Air
"Spirits Melted Into Air takes individual scenes or speeches - in this case, from the 2012 Royal Shakespeare Company productions of Richard III and The Comedy of Errors - and produces data-visualisations of actors' motion during them.

Produced by Tom Armitage for the Royal Shakespeare Company, the work is in parts a technology prototype, data visualisation, and artwork.

It explores stripping the text away from dramatic performance: removing the playwright, and leaving only the production elements - the actor, the director, and everyone else who influences a performance. The project seeks to highlight the work that the Royal Shakespeare Company does in bringing the written texts of Shakespeare's plays to life."
royalshakespearecompany  movement  visualization  tomarmitage  shakespeare  theater 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Insomniac's Guide to Sleep No More - Readlists
"The crunchiest writing about SNM and its development, extensions, and effects. Please sign your additions. (@kissane)"
2012  readlists  macbeth  nyc  theater  sleepnomore 
july 2012 by robertogreco
On Sleep No More, magic and immersive storytelling | Fresh & New(er)
"Towards the close of their talk Pete Higgin had a nice line – “explanation is the killer of wonderment”.

It reminded me of a recent article from Salon on the effect of YouTube on the traditions & social practices of magicians.

“The biggest problem with DVD and YouTube exposure is that it has damaged the skill of learning through asking…

What if we designed exhibitions to have the same ‘dense, cinematic detail’ that Punch Drunk’s productions have? (And trusted visitors to respect and engage with them appropriately through scaffolding the entry experience?)

What if we designed our exhibitions to hold things back from some visitors? And to purposefully make some elements of an exhibition ‘in-accessible’ to all? (The Studio Ghibli Museum in Tokyo is wonderfully designed with some spaces and passages that are only accessible by small children that lead to experiences that only children can have separate from their parents.)

What if we made ‘wonderment’ our Key Performance Indicator?"
theatricality  magic  explanation  parallelism  mitmedialab  colinnightingale  petehiggin  transmedia  storytelling  punchdrunk  via:tealtan  storycode  immersive  exploration  museums  themeparks  theater  exhibitions  inaccessibility  accessibility  nyc  lcproject  experiencedesign  experience  studioghiblimuseum  studioghibli  details  wonder  wonderment  sebchan  2012  sleepnomore  design  medialab 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Playmakers on Vimeo
"playmakers, a 35 minute documentary, is the culmination of a six month project following the progress of Hide&Seek; game designers Alex Fleetwood and Holly Gramazio through the development of a new game. The documentary was filmed over the first 6 months of 2009 and premiered at the Sheffield Documentary festival. Playmakers will be available to download and view on the 5th of May 2010.

Over the last 50 years play has become an increasingly private activity. Now it is bursting back onto our streets. playmakers explores the emerging area of pervasive games it examines the implications of reclaiming play into the public domain and shows the possibilities offered by new technologies.

Playmakers investigates four main themes:

Part 1: Play…

Part 2: Public space…

Part 3: Technology…

Part 4: Theatre/art…"

[See also: http://playmakers.org.uk/ ]
blasttheory  simonevans  quentinstevens  paulinabozek  duncanspeakman  mattadams  simonjohnson  clarereddington  jackcase  thomasbrock  hollygramazio  alexfleetwood  hide&seek  art  theater  urbanplay  urbangames  parkour  social  urbanism  urban  legal  law  publicspace  fun  ubiquitousconnectivity  ubicomp  geolocation  geocaching  socialgames  gaming  via:chrisberthelsen  playmakers  play  games  rules  arg  pervasivegames  pervasive  2010  howardrheingold  michaelwesch  hide&seek; 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Small Wooden Shoe » Perhaps in a Hundred Years
"Perhaps in a Hundred Years is a tender science fiction story about three friends stuck in outer space, waiting for the future to arrive. They tell stories, sing songs, pass notes, and try to answer some questions about communism, candy bars and parties. Dancing, lip syncs and quiet beauty fill the space. Our heroes are surprisingly optimistic, given the conditions outside, armed as they are with cheerful pop songs and over a millennium worth of utopias.  Despite an almost overwhelming pessimism for the long term future, which many of us share, Perhaps in a Hundred Years endeavors to keep it upbeat, or at least tenderly, militantly, hopeful. <br />
<br />
Perhaps in a Hundred Years mixes space-rock show with confessional, talk show with theatre to create performance for the future from the past (or at least from 2005.) "
theater  scifi  sciencefiction  plays  2005  smallwoodenshoe  space  amehenderson  chaddembski  jacobzimmer  hub14  2010 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Punchdrunk
"Since 2000, Punchdrunk has pioneered a game changing form of immersive theatre in which roaming audiences experience epic storytelling inside sensory theatrical worlds. Blending classic texts, physical performance, award-winning design installation and unexpected sites, the company's infectious format rejects the passive obedience usually expected of audiences. Lines between space, performer and spectator are constantly shifting. Audiences are invited to rediscover the childlike excitement and anticipation of exploring the unknown and experience a real sense of adventure. Free to encounter the installed environment in an individual imaginative journey, the choice of what to watch and where to go is theirs alone."
art  culture  alternative  interactive  storytelling  london  theater  immersive  sleepnomore  classideas  sensory  experiencedesign  space  performance  audience 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi • Hecate had just sat down and was about to start...
"…experienced “Sleep No More,” a sprawling interactive theatrical production…in a renovated former warehouse…it was one of the most amazing “designed” experiences I’ve ever had. The entire place is essentially a giant interactive set featuring a cabaret, hotel lobby, a graveyard, a mental hospital, a hedge maze, a detective agency, and numerous other locations you’re allowed to move around freely—following the action (loosely based on “Macbeth”) if you like, or simply exploring. There are secret passages, doors that are locked & unlocked throughout the performance, & dark areas that take a fair amount of courage to explore at first. I found I was exercising parts of my brain I hadn’t used since building a mental map of “Legend of Zelda” dungeons. As the story illustrates, there’s always a possibility you, as an observer, will be pulled into the play’s action, which keeps you constantly a bit on edge. It’s very hard not to get swept up by it all…the immersion is near total"
buzzandersen  sleepnomore  performance  experience  experiencedesign  immersive  theater  nyc  classideas  zelda  legendofzelda  space  place  2011  emursive  punchdrunk 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Sleep No More
"Completed in 1939, the McKittrick Hotel was intended to be New York City's finest and most decadent luxury hotel of its time. Six weeks before opening, and two days after the outbreak of World War II, the legendary hotel was condemned and left locked, permanently sealed from the public. Until now... Seventy-two years later, EMURSIVE has brought the Grande Dame back to life. Collaborating with London's award-winning PUNCHDRUNK, the legendary space is reinvented with SLEEP NO MORE, presenting Shakespeare’s classic Scottish tragedy through the lens of suspenseful film noir. Audiences move freely through a transporting world at their own pace, choosing their own path through the story, immersed in the most unique theatrical experience in the history of New York."

[via: http://log.scifihifi.com/post/7773478290/hecate-had-just-sat-down-and-was-about-to-start ]
experience  nyc  design  art  performance  experiencedesign  theater  classideas  immersive  emursive  sleepnomore  punchdrunk 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Venus Zine: Venus Girl of the Month: Kartina Richardson
[Wayback link: https://web.archive.org/web/20100729201452/http://www.venuszine.com:80/articles/you/7325/Girl_of_the_Month_Kartina_Richardson ]

"I left film school for a number of reasons…frustrated by what seemed to be a fear among my peers—to be serious, thoughtful, or experimental…film department, in my experience, didn't approach making movies in a way that I believed in…

I started writing plays in school because I found that the theater department was more open to the artistic or unusual. It is also a solitary activity, whereas making a film is collaborative…

"The best advice I can give to any young lass who wants to do anything in film is to watch movies nonstop like it's your job. I mean, like, five movies a day if you have the time. In fact, make the time, dammit! Pick a director and watch all their films in chronological order. Keep a notebook and jot down your thoughts. You’ll absorb the rhythm of great filmmaking and though you may not think it’ll make a difference, it absolutely will."
kartinarichardson  film  theater  plays  classideas  learning  autodidacts  toshare 
july 2011 by robertogreco
LITTLE BROTHER LIVE
"I am adapting and directing Cory Doctorow’s novel Little Brother for Custom Made Theatre Company, opening January 2012 in San Francisco. I’ll be blogging about the process here. Blog posts will include insights into the process of adapting the novel for the stage, changes that our production will make (spoilers!), and the process of staging the play. Single tickets aren’t on sale yet, but you can purchase a subscription to Custom Made’s full 2011-12 Season on their website. Want to get involved? Check back soon for information about auditions, design positions, and how you can support the production."
littlebrother  sanfrancisco  theater  custommade  2012  books  adaptation  corydoctorow  blogs 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Anagnorisis - Wikipedia
"Anagnorisis ( /ˌænəɡˈnɒrɨsɨs/; Ancient Greek: ἀναγνώρισις) is a moment in a play or other work when a character makes a critical discovery. Anagnorisis originally meant recognition in its Greek context, not only of a person but also of what that person stood for. It was the hero's sudden awareness of a real situation, the realisation of things as they stood, and finally, the hero's insight into a relationship with an often antagonistic character in Aristotelian tragedy."
culture  writing  language  literature  realization  anagnorisis  aristotle  plays  drama  theater  discovery  insight  definitions  greek  via:rodcorp 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Mo`olelo Performing Arts Company
"CreateMo`olelo exists to uncover and research stories within different communities and bring them to life on stage, using all the artistic and technical elements of the performing arts.

ProduceMo`olelo exists to produce original stories by contemporary playwrights and lesser-known stories by master playwrights.

EducateMo`olelo exists to educate youth in technical theater and design, exposing them to potential careers, and grooming this new generation of theater artists so they can tell stories on stage with integrity."
sandiego  theater  glvo  performingarts 
may 2011 by robertogreco
San Diego Dance Theater
"Founded in 1972 as a 501(c)3 professional company, the San Diego Dance Theater (SDDT) has for 39 years enriched the cultural life of San Diego through countless dance concerts and training for young dancers. Jean Isaacs was appointed Artistic Director in 1997 and under her direction, SDDT has earned its reputation as a company of fully-professional dancers committed to unconventional and deeply courageous programming which expands access to the stage for dancers of many nationalities, races, ages, and physical abilities. We are best known for our cross-border projects, our site-specific Trolley Dances, our summer dance workshops, and for the sheer beauty of our dancers."
music  sandiego  modern  theater  dance  glvo  tcsnmy 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Upper Toronto | Quiet Babylon
"Upper Toronto is a science fiction design proposal to build a new city in the sky. The CN restaurant might be ground level, or imagine a city sitting on top of the Bay Street towers. When Upper Toronto is finished, all residents of will be relocated upwards and Lower Toronto will transformed into some combination of intentional ruin, national park, and farmland.

This is, of course, a terrible idea. But it is a terrible idea that lets us imagine and perform about the kind of city we’d want if we could start fresh."
toronto  timmaly  design  cities  designfiction  sciencefiction  architecture  theater  engineering  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  planning  policy  publicpolicy  development 
february 2011 by robertogreco
kobberling and kaltwasser: jellyfish theatre
"berlin-based architects köbberling and kaltwasser have worked alongside volunteers to create 'the jellyfish theatre'. located in southwark, it is london’s first fully-functioning theatre made entirely from recycled and reclaimed materials. the project focuses on energy-efficiency, co-operation and human-scale construction. opening to the public at the end of august, this temporary structure is made of materials from all sources: junked theatre sets, reclaimed timber from building sites, market pallets, old kitchen units that the public brought along."
architecture  art  theater  pallets  design  recycling  temporary  energy-efficiency  reclamation 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Theater - ‘You Me Bum Bum Train’ in London Is a Wild Ride for One - NYTimes.com
"How elastic can a single ego be? Mine was stretched in all directions during the ~40 minutes I spent being pushed through halls &, it seemed, of an office building in East London this month. I was exalted & excoriated, hailed as a genius, reviled as a charlatan and mistaken for both a rock star & a bag of garbage.
theater  experimental  interaction  participatory  2010  audience 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Why Old Spice matters « Snarkmarket
"blogs are actu­ally more related to live the­ater than they are to, say, news­pa­pers. The things that make a blog good are almost exactly the things that make a live per­for­mance good...most impor­tant...is inter­play w/ the audience...

...this cam­paign [also] made me think of 48 Hour Mag­a­zine...same sense of you-gotta-see-this...can-they-really-do-it. It was an event..."But [an event’s] urgency—its live­ness, human vital­ity, &, frankly, its risk & unpredictability—is what makes it more than just another link in the stream"...

one final rea­son to take this for­mat seriously:

...It’s tons of fun. Any­body who’s writ­ten a blog, got­ten deep into Twit­ter, run a Kick­starter project, pulled strings on an ARG will tell you...There’s a spe­cial sat­is­fac­tion to see­ing its impact on the world immediately—and adjust­ing based on what you see. It’s alive, it’s elec­tric, it’s addic­tive. It’s con­nected and communal."
robinsloan  socialmedia  storytelling  advertising  oldspice  2010  theater  analysis  marketing  media  digital  creative  casestudy  video  events  ted  realtime  twitter  blogs  blogging  feedback  interactive  interactivity 
july 2010 by robertogreco
How social media is shaping the arts in Australia
"From backstage status updates to an opera libretto, the arts are learning to be creative with social media, writes Elissa Blake."
arts  culture  twitter  socialmedia  socialnetworking  performance  drama  theater  ballet  future  tcsnmy  classideas 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Maude-Lynne Sells Out! - EYE WEEKLY
"Morgan Norwich is both magnetic and gut-busting as Maude-Lynne, a reclusive retro-fetishist who sells bootleg movies & Victorian literature from her mom’s basement to make ends meet. An enigma, she speaks with a 19th century parlance but has her Tweets relayed to her on a futuristic headset, and pines for a Wuthering Heights-style romance yet dates a keyboard-playing comic book dork (Peter Cavell). A quirky, wit-laden script provides a solid backbone for this show, while Norwich brings it to uproarious life with her geeky grandiosity, sharp ad-libbing, & eventual character unraveling, which rivals Robert Downey Jr.’s in Tropic Thunder."

[via: http://twitter.com/doingitwrong/status/17815931145 ]
theater  atemporality  atemporaldernity  victorian  tcsnmy  classideas 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Builders Association
"Founded in 1994 and directed by Marianne Weems, The Builders Association is a New York-based performance and media company that creates original productions based on stories drawn from contemporary life. The company uses the richness of new and old tools to extend the boundaries of theater. Based on innovative collaborations, Builders' productions blend stage performance, text, video, sound, and architecture to tell stories about human experience in the 21st century. From BAM to Bogata, Singapore to Melbourne, Minneapolis and Los Angeles to Budapest, The Builders Association's OBIE award-winning shows have toured to major venues the world over."

[see also: http://www.continuouscity.org/ ]
artists  art  business  borders  culture  newmedia  multimedia  technology  interactive  media  theater  nyc  performance  globalization  installation  sound  film  design 
june 2010 by robertogreco
In A 'Continuous City,' A Meditation On Connection : NPR
"Continuous City, the latest play from the Builders Association — an experimental theater company that's made a name using technology in innovative ways — centers on a corporation that's trying to sell a new brand of video phones.
2008  theater  online  relationships  lajollaplayhouse  connection  media  npr  mobil  phones  internet  community  socialmedia 
june 2010 by robertogreco
La Jolla Playhouse Receives Major Grant from The James Irvine Foundation 2010/06/29
"La Jolla Playhouse is pleased to announce that it was recently named the recipient of a $900,000 grant from The James Irvine Foundation. The grant will fund the Playhouse's new Theatre Without Walls program over the next four years.

Underscoring the theatre's mission of providing "unfettered creative opportunities for the leading artists of today and tomorrow," coupled with the idea that the Playhouse is defined by the work it creates - not the space in which it is performed - the institution will use the grant to offer theatrical experiences that venture beyond the physical confines of its facilities. The Playhouse will also explore alternative methods of conveying content to audiences through new platforms, such as the use of social media, cell phones, video and other current technologies."
sandiego  lajolla  lajollaplayhouse  theater  grants  tcsnmy  socialmedia  mobile  phone  video  arts 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Joel Kyack (MFA '08) launches Superclogger, large-scale public project presented by LA><ART - Roski School of Fine Arts
"Joel Kyack's (MFA '08) first large-scale public project, Superclogger, will present various puppet shows to L.A. drivers caught in afternoon traffic jams from a mobile theater housed in the back of a nondescript white pickup truck. Broadcasting soundtracks discretely to the viewer's car stereo, Superclogger, curated by Cesar Garcia (MPAS '09), aims to briefly halt the progression of chaos by temporarily drawing the audience out of the commute experience and placing them within an intimate space of engagement and performance that highlights their own individual presence within the broader structure of the traffic jam."

[via: http://www.clusterflock.org/2010/06/superclogger.html ]
art  california  cars  traffic  losangeles  puppets  theater  cesargarcia  commuting  joelkyack 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Such Tweet Sorrow
"Two families in the same town have loathed one another for years. But a boy from one and a girl from the other fall in love - deep, sweet and destructive. You know the tale of Romeo and Juliet but now you can see it happening live and in real time - in modern Britain and on Twitter. Six characters live the story over the five weeks of Such Tweet Sorrow and you can experience it with them."

[via: http://www.paula.cl/blog/tendencias/2010/05/20/twitteleseries/ via Lizette]
shakespeare  romeoandjuliet  play  twitter  storytelling  literature  narrative  theater  performance  english 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Twitteleseries | Blog - Paula
"En Chile acaba de terminar la twitteleserie del momento y en Londres cinco actores twittean una moderna versión de Romeo y Julieta en mensajes de 140 caracteres. Dramaturgos, guionistas y escritores se toman twitter."
twitter  chile  shakespeare  romeoandjuliet  theater 
may 2010 by robertogreco
A Dream About Augmented Reality Fiction - O'Reilly Radar
"augmented reality could be an important component of a new kind of storytelling, making today's 3D entertainments as dated as silent films. Elan Lee's Fourth Wall Studios is already chipping away at barrier between storytelling & daily life. The 1st augmented reality entertainments may be text based rather than video; eventually they will likely be as immersive as my dream.

Many years ago, I saw a play in LA called Tamara, story set in mansion where WWI hero & author Gabrielle D'Annunzio was held under house arrest by Mussolini...fascinating experiment in theater...took place in many different rooms of the house. As audience member, whenever scene ended, you had an opportunity to follow the character of your choice to another room. No audience member could see entire play. My wife & I went w/ her parents (back for 3rd or 4th time, seeing parts of play they'd missed on previous visits), & afterwards, we all compared notes for hours about what we'd seen & what we'd missed."
augmentedreality  fiction  tcsnmy  writing  timoreilly  future  gabrielled'annunzio  tamara  theater  cyoa  perspective  distributed  augmentedrealityfiction  literature  interactive  if  interactivefiction  ar 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Joshua Prince-Ramus: Building a theater that remakes itself | Video on TED.com
"Joshua Prince-Ramus believes that if architects re-engineer their design process, the results can be spectacular. Speaking at TEDxSMU, Dallas, he walks us through his fantastic re-creation of the local Wyly Theater as a giant "theatrical machine" that reconfigures itself at the touch of a button."
architecture  theater  dallas  princeramus 
february 2010 by robertogreco
handa gote
"the research and development of czech performance group, handa gote, is based on
art  diy  handagote  performance  dance  cargocult  glvo  edg  srg  sound  assemblage  theater  post-dramatictheater  craft 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Space SIG 7: Designing Knowledge Spaces that work for Learning: the experiment of the art exhibition and the garden shed - KnowledgeBoard
"early decision was made to create some unspecified type of artefact that could be first used at the evening event & then re-used at the Design & Education exhibit. Until very late, this was to be an oral artefact – a story which would capture the passing listener but have no visible form – the story as vehicle for the elicitation, structuring & dissemination of key insights...by chance, at a late stage in project planning...theatre designer, writer & poet Angela Dove suggested that the artefact should be a garden shed...The garden shed was an exceptional success...ordinary 8x6 Homebase shed, adapted only to make it easier to assemble & reassemble, served as an incredibly powerful metaphor for the organic nature of knowledge management. Apart from the obvious role of the shed in artistic creativity - George Bernard Shaw, Hemingway & Mahler all wrote in sheds or huts - the organic growing metaphor really connected with attendees."
lcproject  knowledgespaces  art  design  schooldesign  learning  experience  knowledgemanagement  museums  theater  environmentaldesign 
july 2009 by robertogreco
SignOnSanDiego.com -- Amid Tijuana's violence, cultural pulse is vibrant
"Even as a surge in violent crime has badly shaken Tijuana residents, the city's artists have pushed forward with concerts, festivals, book readings, art shows, and theater and dance performances. Their achievements reveal the vibrant side of this city of
tijuana  mexico  sandiego  art  culture  dance  music  theater 
july 2008 by robertogreco
FUERZABRUTA
from one of the original De La Guarda creators
argentina  percussion  performance  theater  dance  art 
march 2008 by robertogreco
farnham maltings [has requested one of our sasquatch photos to promote their festival]
"collection of buildings set in heart of Farnham that provides place in which people can imagine, create & discover. We aspire to provide tools, encouragment & opportunities for all types & age of artists to develop their own work both here & across regio
art  arts  entertainment  film  music  photography  theater  comedy  organizations  uk  support  glvo 
february 2008 by robertogreco
THE NEW HYPERDRAMA
"How hypertext scripts are changing the parameters of dramatic storytelling"
chalesdeemer  hyertext  writing  drama  theater  plays 
december 2007 by robertogreco
What is Hypertext by Charles Deemer - Copyright 1994
"How is a non-linear script read within the confining format of textual pages arranged in numerical order? Without knowing it (I had never heard the term before), I was having my first experience with "hypertext.""
hypertext  plays  drama  writing  chalesdeemer  1994  theater 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The Last Song of Violeta Parra: a hyperdrama in one act by Charles Deemer [1996]
"Playwright's Note: This script was written for and in collaboration with Andres Espejo and his company Prisma, in Santiago, Chile. Both the English and Spanish versions (translated by Andres Espejo) of the play are available online (see below)."
drama  plays  theater  scripts  hypertext  chile  violetaparra  chalesdeemer  writing  1996 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The Encyclopedia of New York Video - New York Magazine
"In our highlight reel of more than 100 vintage New York videos, CBGB never closed, James Brown never died, and Madonna is still learning how to vogue."
video  music  film  art  nyc  architecture  literature  history  dance  classical  theater 
november 2007 by robertogreco
NPR : Cult Appeal of 'Darko' Film Spawns Stage Version
"Now, Frank the evil rabbit and his troubled teenage victim hit the boards in a play that tries to capture the film's quick cuts through some 70 stage scenes. It's now playing in Cambridge, Mass."
theater  donniedarko  film 
november 2007 by robertogreco
STREB
"Once called the Evel Knievel of dance, Elizabeth Streb’s choreography, which she calls “PopAction,” intertwines the disciplines of dance, athletics, boxing, rodeo, the circus, and Hollywood stunt-work. The result is a bristling, muscle-and-motion v

[Update 15 March 2012: Changed link to new URL http://streb.org/ See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Streb ]
acrobatics  art  body  circus  dance  performance  physical  modern  theater  nyc  brooklyn  classes  kids  children  elizabethstreb  bodies 
october 2007 by robertogreco
The Bambiest
venue for "the everyone's new clothes" by Yoshikazu Yamagata / writtenafterwards
theater  performance  japan  children  dance  tokyo  art 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Dream Science Circus...
"multi-media spectacle for all-ages set in the “laboratory” of an eccentric scientist who has invented a device called the dream machine...extracts dreams from the audience and materializes them on stage using acrobatics, aerial feats, live music and
theater  performance  bellingham  washingtonstate  circus  music  acrobatics 
september 2007 by robertogreco
:: Escola São Paulo >> Uma iniciativa inovadora!
"sala de aula, biblioteca, videoteca, cdteca, dvdteca, exposições, café, restaurante, loja. pessoas e empresas, brasileiras e estrangeiras, participam do projeto por ser a escola um espaço de estudos e pesquisa. acesso gratuito a atividades. desenvolv
lcproject  schools  schooldesign  brasil  sãopaulo  design  education  alternative  culture  art  place  theater  food  dance  cafes  architecture  events  meetings  classes  space  thirdspaces  thirdplaces  openstudioproject  brazil 
april 2007 by robertogreco
Danny Hoch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Danny Hoch is an actor, writer, director and performance artist born 23 November 1970 in Brooklyn, New York City. He has had some small roles in mainstream Hollywood films as well as larger roles in independent and art house movies. He is best known for
performance  hiphop  theater  español  spanish  art  artists  nyc  dannyhoch 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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