recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : thirdworld   8

We Don’t Play Golf Here and Other Stories of Globalization. on Vimeo
"Using Mexico as an example of what much of the Third World has experienced, the filmmakers show how foreign investment in export factories distort both the culture and environment."
mexico  thirdworld  capitalism  globalization  footbal  futbol  golf  film  documentary  culture  environment  2014  inequality 
august 2018 by robertogreco
The Gates Foundation, Ebola, and Global Health Imperialism | Jacob Levich - Academia.edu
"Powerful institutions of Western capital, notably the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation, viewed the African Ebola outbreak of 2014–2015 as an opportunity to advance an ambitious global agenda.Building on recent public health literature proposing “global health governance” (GHG) as the preferred model for international healthcare, Bill Gates publicly called for the creation of a worldwide,militarized, supranational authority capable of responding decisively to outbreaks of infectious disease—an authority governed by Western powers and targeting the underdeveloped world. This article examines the media-generated panic surrounding Ebola alongside the response and underlying motives of foundations, governments, and other institutions. It describes the evolution and goals of GHG, in particular its opposition to traditional notions of Westphalian sovereignty. It proposes a different concept—“global health imperialism”—as a more useful framework for understanding the current conditions and likely future of international healthcare."

[via the thread that starts with (and contains highlighted screenshots)

"The Gates Foundation, Ebola and Global Health Imperialism. https://www.academia.edu/16242454/The_Gates_Foundation_Ebola_and_Global_Health_Imperialism … #ResistCapitalism

Really great & insightful read."
https://twitter.com/JordanLM__/status/791260406518079488

Amidst the Ebola outbreak, Gates said there needs to be a 'powerful global warning and response system' alike to NATO rather than WHO etc.



I did not know about this.
International health charity has its roots in colonial 'tropical medicine schools' est in Britain 19th cent.

Post-war philanthropy 'development' schemes specifically set out to pacify the third world & counter communism.

Agricultural CDPs [Community Development Programmes] in post-ind India, were specifically to counter revolutionary communist threats of.....

wait for it....'basic social reforms'.
Basic social reforms in India fought for by revolutionary communists were a threat to the US empire

See how subtle academia frames things like this. It's not by accident. #Imperialism #ResistCapitalism #GHG ['Global Health Governance']" ]

[that thread via "Bill Gates publicly called for the creation of a worldwide, militarized, supranational authority..."
https://twitter.com/shailjapatel/status/815457312013856768
gatesfoundation  imperialism  global  health  capitalism  charity  philanthropicindustrialcomplex  philanthropy  communism  history  development  agriculture  us  policy  thirdworld  colonialism  healthcare  medicine  healthimperialism  charitableindustrialcomplex  power  control 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Failures of Our Global Imagination | Civicist
"The problem with first world problems, and why we need to shift the way we talk about global tech"



"It’s time to abandon the First World/Third World dichotomy. Whether or not this dichotomy was a helpful one at some point in the past, it’s no longer helpful now. The “Third World” has glittering skyscrapers and glowing smartphones, and the “First World” has decaying neighborhoods and entire swaths of the country without broadband. There are very real and important differences between rich and poor countries, and these dynamics play out at the level of international relations, all the way down to the mundane and often humiliating work of applying for visas. But this framing creates a divide that limits our capacity to understand the vast spectra of the way human beings live in the 21st century. I don’t yet have a better vocabulary for this, but I hope someone smarter than me can figure that out. For now, I do use the phrases “developing world,” “global south,” and “poor countries,” but I’d like to have a better framework. Any suggestions?

Remember the diversity of ways we use communications technology: that includes connecting with people we care about and depend on. In contrast to narratives about vanity, slacktivism, and luxury when it comes to tech in the middle-class West, so much of the conversation about technology in the global south focuses on information and practical communications, like around agricultural trends and educational material. This is good and important work. But highly pragmatic use cases are just part of the reason anyone has used communications technology. Informal markets from Asia to Africa are filled with music and movies, like a Bluetooth-powered Napster, and people are just as likely to send text messages and Facebook posts to check in with friends and loved ones as they are to access important healthcare information and market reports. These things can coexist.

Like a city, the internet and mobile phones provide for a vast diversity of human needs, which include the basic human need for companionship, support, and access to joy in the face of suffering. Fortunately, this part of the global imagination doesn’t require too much effort: Just think of how everyone you know uses technology, the number of apps, the different ways they laugh, smile, cry, and scowl at what they see behind those plates of glass.

Shifting the narrative is such a critical part of the motivation behind my work with global internet cultures, and the above are just a few ideas for how I think we can do that. But more important than trying to know everything about the world is establishing a culture of knowing that we don’t know. The assumption that we can parachute into a foreign culture with formal expertise and knowledge and make things better has never been acceptable, and it has led to a lot of unnecessary suffering, especially in colonized countries. The fact that people in marginalized parts of the world can now call out misguided attitudes and perceptions about them will go a long way, and those of us with access to media and policy can do well to amplify and extend these voices.

But it is also not possible to know every detail about other people’s lives. Attention is limited, as is time. We can learn everything we can about the day to day of rural Laos, but the conflict in Mali will seem completely opaque. Instead, it’s more important to know that we don’t know, know that we need to listen to those who have greater familiarity, and to know that there are ways to go further. Adopting an attitude of humility and curiosity can take us much farther than an attitude of assuredness and assumption. This seems to me like a good place to start—and if you have other and better ideas, I’d love to hear them."

[Also posted here: https://medium.com/@anxiaostudio/failures-of-our-global-imagination-8648b2336c2c ]
anxiaomina  firstworldproblems  internet  thirdworld  firstworld  diversity  slacktivism  vanity  luxury  technology  globalsouth  communication  asia  africa  latinamerica  mobile  phones  smartphones  selfies  advocacy  refugees  2015  privilege  narrative  empathy  thirdworldproblems 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Design For the First World
"We have been focus­ing our energy and resources on try­ing to solve our Devel­op­ing World prob­lems to become more like the First World. But per­haps it is time that we, the so called Third World minds, focused our energy and cre­ativ­ity on solv­ing some of the First World prob­lems. We will have a brighter future to look for­ward to, and per­haps this can help us rethink and approach our cur­rent prob­lems from a dif­fer­ent perspective."
development  activism  change  art  designthinking  problems  culture  design  innovation  competition  world  social  firstworld  thirdworld 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Do you... - a grammar [This just nails the reason why I support the concept of OLPC. Wish I could write something like this some day...I've butchered the quote to fit in as much as possible. Go now and read the whole thing.]
"signature experience for Westerners visiting less-developed nations...see children who lack basics...entranced by...Material things you have & they don’t...less expected...meet a whole lot of relatively healthy, curious young children who will ask for pens...paper...[accept] a 99-cent breast-pocket notebook...like an American kid...an Xbox...map, picture, book & child may pore over it like a Dead Sea scroll...Money? Pshaw. Can I have your pen. Why? Because for every child who grows up without access to basics...there are a few more who get enough of the basics to grow up, but are starved for information & education...Westerners are struck by...being asked for things like pens & paper...[because we] think of poverty in terms of material comforts. & suddenly...staring at a child with just as much intelligence, curiosity, & potential as they ever had as children...difference isn’t strictly about “material” comforts — it’s about this child lacking intellectual tools we take for granted."
olpc  poverty  development  hunger  curiosity  learning  human  thirdworld  meaning  gamechanging  glvo  xo  travel  experience  cv  wealth  basics 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The Tragedy of One Laptop Per Child - SlashGear
"Like the mythical predecessors that came before it, the new device is said to have an 8.5 x 11 inch touch screen made by Pixel Qi with an indoor/outdoor display, use inductive charging (like the Palm Pre), will be waterproof and cost no more than $100. Of course, you can’t buy or order one as they’re targeting 2012 for the ship date. I’ve been asked by a few folks how the OLPC project could manage this with their current specifications and the answer is simple: they won’t be able to."
olpc  development  poverty  hardware  technology  education  thirdworld  xo 
december 2009 by robertogreco
California's deficit of common sense -- latimes.com
"This is the usual problem of the United States, which is not just the richest and most powerful nation on Earth now, but on Earth ever, and one of the most blessed in terms of natural resources. We just collectively make loopy decisions about how to distribute the money and water, and we could make other decisions. Whether or not those priorities will change, we could at least have a reality-based conversation about them...Turn­ing Cal­i­for­nia into a Third World nation where the envi­ron­ment is neglected, a lot of peo­ple are gen­uinely des­per­ate and a lot of the young have a hard time get­ting an edu­ca­tion or just can’t get one doesn’t ben­e­fit anyone. We're not poor in money or water. We've just chosen to allocate them in ways that benefit tiny minorities at the expense of the rest of us. We should at least have a conversation about how we distribute our abundant resources. Derek is right: California is a place of abundance, except when it comes to political sense."
us  california  money  water  resources  budget  policy  politics  economics  thirdworld  economy  agriculture  latimes  culture  society  2009  priorities  education  colleges  universities  farming 
november 2009 by robertogreco
On The Great Big Third World | varnelis.net
"So if we're seeing 9.4% unemployment this month, you should probably double that to get a real picture of how many people aren't being employed in traditional fashion. What if this continues for a few years? And what if we get the high interest [and inflation] rates that I predicted, eviscerating home values? I think the result is a country that approaches "Third World" status with a cheap labor force that will take on contract work without any guarantee of continuing employment for low wages. ... The Third World didn't vanish in the worldwide economic "boom," it spread everywhere. That's what the last two decades have brought us. I knew that the Bush administration was alternately too stupid and too evil to point this out, but Obama had the opportunity to force Americans to face up to the crisis, as FDR did when he took over in 1933, but he took an easy way out. Now we'll all pay the price. Welcome to the new, improved, much larger Third World."
kazysvarnelis  crisis  thirdworld  us  policy  economics  housingbubble  labor  unemployment  georgewbush  barackobama  inflation  devaluation  dollar  markets  boom  greatrepression  recession 
june 2009 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read