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Listen Up, Look Sharp, Graphic Designers—Bauhaus Moving Image Proves Good Design Isn't Just About Communication | | Eye on Design
“As evidenced by a long-lost short film by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy”



“His sentiments around type and print are echoed across his vast output—painting, drawing, photography, collage, sculpture, film, theater, and writing—but one of its most fascinating distillations is in a recently rediscovered film, Tönendes ABC (ABC in Sound), from 1933. What the piece also conveys is a cheekier side to Moholy-Nagy’s practice, and a brazen approach to “appropriating” other people’s work.

ABC in Sound, a minutes-long experimental optical sound film was missing for more than 80 years, before being found at the BFI National Archive in London and identified as Moholy-Nagy’s for the first time by BFI curators. Its screening coincides with a wider László Moholy-Nagy London exhibition at Hauser & Wirth gallery, which is showing his 1930 film Ein Lichtspiel: Schwarz Weiss Grau (A Lightplay: Black White Grey); alongside works on paper, photographic pieces, and the mesmeric kinetic sculpture Light Prop for an Electric Stage (also 1930), which the aforementioned Lightplay documents in deliciously abstract modes.

The reason ABC in Sound remained undiscovered for so long is partially because, as it turns out, it’s not as original in concept as much of Moholy-Nagy’s other works. ABC in Sound existed, but not in isolated form, or credited to the artist: In 1936, the original nitrate for ABC in Sound was accidentally spliced to a copy of Oskar Fischinger’s Early Experiments in Hand Drawn Sound from 1931 by an archivist for a screening program at the London Film Society.”

[See also: https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-abc-in-sound-1933-online

"Inspired by advances in sound recording and fascinated by the production of synthetic sound, Hungarian artist and Bauhaus professor László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) explored the idea of reverse-engineering an alphabet of sounds from the visual representation they produced by the grooves on gramophone discs. Taking this a step further, after the release of Rudolph Pfenninger’s Tönende Handschrift (Sounding Handwriting), he produced this film of ‘visual sounds’ which showed the image of the track that was passing through the sound head of the projector - so that the audience could directly compare the image with the sound that it made.

In later years Moholy-Nagy recalled that the soundtrack for Tönendes ABC “used all types of signs, symbols, even the letters of the alphabet, and my own finger prints. Each visual pattern on the sound track produced a sound which had the character of whistling and other noises. I had especially good results with the profiles of persons”. In this it differed from its companion piece, Oskar Fischinger’s Early Experiments in Hand Drawn Sound, which used purely abstract shapes in the same way; Moholy-Nagy even wittily uses the word ‘Handschfift’ printed onto his soundtrack. The films were shown together at the London Film Society on 10 December 1933 and the combined print donated to the newly formed BFI, where it was recently rediscovered.

Moholy-Nagy would have undoubtedly seen Fischinger’s film before he made his own. Fischinger’s many experiments with “ornamental animation in sound,” predated ABC in Sound. The films made by the pair are remarkably similar in concept, realization, and form (see screenshots from some of Fischinger’s experiments below): in each we hear synthetic sound, created by white patterns that appear visually along one side of the screen. The variations in the shapes of the lines generate the changes in the sounds—some of which seem quite beautiful, in a strange, non-human way; others more like bone-shaking blasts of a pneumatic drill; all—as was imperative for their creators—impossible to create using the conventional instruments of the time, or the human voice."]

[On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ui_FU-KAZMM

"Missing for over 80 years, this experimental film by Bauhaus teacher and artist László Moholy-Nagy was found by BFI curators embedded in a reel of film that also contained Oskar Fischinger’s Early Experiments in Hand Drawn Sound.

László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) was a tenacious, restless creative who associated with various early twentieth century vanguard art movements. Teaching at the legendary Bauhaus school, which this year sees its centenary, his early optical sound films experimented with the formal properties of film and blurred the lines between sound and image and the act of hearing and seeing sound. Newly scanned at 4K, the restoration of ABC in Sound / Tönendes ABC will receive its world premiere at BFI Southbank on 18 June."]
film  sound  design  graphics  graphicdesign  play  tinkering  filmmaking  video  materials  type  typography  print  appropriation  audio  oskarfischinger  rudolphpfenninger  bauhaus  lászlómoholy-nagy  communication  classideas 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
ISTE | Learning happens in a zigzag – and that’s OK
"Jad Abumrad is quick to say he doesn’t feel comfortable giving educators advice, and yet his career in radio touches on many topics educators are familiar with.

Tinkering. Curiosity. Messy experiences. Failing forward. Transformation.

Abumrad, host and creator of public radio’s “Radiolab,” will be the opening keynote speaker at ISTE 2017.

“I firmly believe that if the act of teaching could be closer to the act of living, that would be a good thing,” Abumrad said.

“Teaching and learning shouldn’t be things that happen in an artificial space," he said. "They should happen in as messy and chaotic a way as the rest of our life happens.”

Sounds like he speaks ISTE.

On tinkering.

Abumrad has said that “Radiolab” was a product of his tinkering with an idea for a show that would include dialogue, sound effects, music and interviews. Educators might call it inductive learning, and the idea of tinkering certainly connects with today’s makerspaces.

But what Abumrad knows for sure is that tinkering can help learners externalize their thinking “by fumbling around to find the other piece of your idea.”

He recalls tinkering around to solve the problem of defining a radio show without using a theme song, but instead by using sound. He spent hours creating 25 versions of layered voices and glitchy edits that would play at the top of “Radiolab.” It became a signature of the show.

“I feel a lot of my own development has been like that. The material somehow teaches you something and you keep tinkering until it feels good,” Abumrad explained.

On curiosity.

It’s an education industry debate. Can curiosity and creativity be taught? Abumrad says, based on his experience, the answer is “yes.”

He says “Radiolab” co-host Robert Krulwich turned him on to the idea that nothing propels you like a really well-asked question. “If you have a good question, you have tension and suspense. It’s like having booster rockets on,” Abumrad said. “I’ve learned that if you surround yourself with people who are relentlessly curious, you begin to get that practice and get that muscle.”

He describes it as having a sense of unease about the information that’s being provided and then pressing to know the question behind the question.

“I didn’t start by being someone who woke up and had a relentless curiosity about the world. I worked with people who do, and I just sort of stole their moves,” Abumrad said. “We need to allow kids to understand what it feels like to have a question and then give them permission to ask it.”

On messy experiences.

As a self-proclaimed late bloomer, Abumrad acknowledges that he didn’t learn in a straight line, but rather stumbled his way through things, wishing along the way that others were familiar with the way he learned.

“Learning happens in a strange zigzag that’s not neat. We try to clean it up and make it a set of facts, but it’s not that way.”

In his experience, if there was room for learning to be messy, it might be more interesting for students.

On failing.

“Radiolab” listeners have become accustomed to the show’s cadence. The interviews are not always clean. Speakers stumble. There are pauses. Flubs are part of the vibe.
Abumrad says those mistakes make the show more authentic and acknowledge the unnatural artifice that exists when people are placed in a studio in front of mics and separated by panes of glass.

Mistakes happen and they don’t have to be edited out. Imagine if that thinking were applied to learners.

“If you start in a prosaic place and think, ‘what’s going on here,’ and you fumble and you ask the dumb questions that get you to the next questions, and you don’t pretend you know more than you know and you flail through the dark until you hit on something ... the spirit of the show is more of a stumble than a podium-style presentation,” Abumrad described.

And he thinks that willingness to make mistakes is beneficial, even scientific.
“Nothing we do is definitive. We do our best and we try to get everything right, but at the end of the day, every sentence that comes out of our mouths is provisional. And that’s how science is.”

On transformation.

The New York Times asked Abumrad why anyone would create a new aesthetic for the retrograde form that is radio. A similar question could be asked of the education system. Why attempt to change the factory model?

Abumrad said his contribution to transforming radio was inadvertent, based in trying to do something others hadn’t and rooted in his experience as a musician.

But he pondered the question, why try and change the way things are taught?

“I actually think the way things are taught is a little like how I feel about any meeting I go to. You can have a plan for a meeting, but every third meeting, you have to throw the plan away. You have to blow it up.

“Teaching is one of those things that inherently has to be blown up every few years. By its essential nature, it should be continually rethought because in some sense, the act of learning should embody the spirit of learning. And the people doing the teaching should be constantly learning how to recalibrate. I feel like the idea of blowing up your preconceived forms should just be something that has to happen – like every quarter.”"
2017  jadabumrad  sfsh  learning  howwelearn  tinkering  failure  transformation  messiness  radiolab  nonlinear  non-linear  alinear  linearity 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Learning Ecologies: Can the City Be Our Classroom? - Urban Planning and Design - architecture and design
"Over the past few months, Gensler San Francisco’s EDU 2.0 group, a cohort of emerging designers, strategists and leaders in the Education practice area, hosted a series of three roundtable discussions around the experiential learning trend and what it means for educational institutions and cities.

Project-based approaches to teaching have been disrupting the educational landscape for several years and many institutions have fully embraced experience-based curriculum; however, the built-environment has not kept up. This approach requires environments that encourage both self-guided and group learning, provide maker spaces and allow students to personalize their educational experience. Participants in the roundtable discussions included thought leaders and innovators from elementary education, high school, university and cultural institutions, as well as organizations involved in education for all ages. While our conversations varied due to the diverse participants, our question for all of the discussions was the same:

In a world where resources for learners are pervasive and abundant, where institutions may no longer play the role of primary purveyors of information, and abilities may be represented in ways different from the traditional diploma, what role will the institution of education play?

Commentary from some of our roundtable participants included:

• “We’re striving to build a university as it should be, not how it may have accidentally evolved over a hundred years.” –Mike Wang, Minerva Schools

• “I’m going out and using a series of experiences and apprenticeships to create a new form of higher education.” –Dane Johnson, Experience Institute

• “What could it look like if you designed a school rooted in equity and innovation and its goal was to bring disparate groups together?” –David Clifford, Design School X, Stanford d.School

• “At CCA we remake our physical environment…and our curriculum constantly in a way that is incredibly agile and it benefits the students.” –Mara Hancock, CCA

Through these conversations we identified the following trends on the horizon that not only apply to educational projects, but also retail, cultural and civic work:

• Curators of Experience: Learner-Centric Education
The goal of this kind of education is not to impart information nor to create experts, but to allow the students to learn how to identify questions, themes and problems.

• Community
For campus-less institutions and legacy institutions alike, place, identity and community remain important.

• Irresistible Places
Our most impactful memories of school often surround these special, irresistible places; a corner of a library or the place where you ate lunch with your friends. These places encourage and enable memorable learning experiences.

• Technology is a Tool, Not a Solution
Information delivered online in a vacuum, unrelated to real-world experience, is difficult to internalize and doesn’t feel relevant to the student.

• In Defense of the University
When we demand that learning be unencumbered by reaching a specific goal, a learner has the opportunity for free intellectual exploration.

• Tinkering
This educational practice includes the importance of play and prototyping within a context of experiential learning.

• Beyond the Report Card
Badging, sharing a digital portfolio, a deep network of collaborators and one’s ability to tell one’s story are more important to many employers than the conventional GPA.

• Intergenerational Learning
Age and experience level are not always the indicator of the role of educator.

• Scale It Up
Traditional educational systems can learn from innovative charter schools, cultural institutions and private schools to provide the best opportunities for all students.

The full list of trends explained in more details can be found here. [http://www.gensler.com/uploads/document/515/file/Learning-Ecologies_Gensler.pdf ]"
lindseyfeola  schooldesign  sfsh  cityasclassroom  schools  age  experience  education  tinkering  technology  community  learning  howwelearn  mikewang  danejohnson  davidclifford  marahancock  curriculum  lcproject  openstudioproject  apprenticeships  mentoring  cca  experientiallearning  experientialeducationcities  urban  urbanism 
january 2017 by robertogreco
The Tinkering Studio
"a studio workshop for playful invention, investigation, and collaboration

The Tinkering Studio is an immersive, active, creative place at the Exploratorium where museum visitors can slow down, become deeply engaged in an investigation of scientific phenomena, and make something—a piece of a collaborative chain reaction—that fully represents their ideas and aesthetic.

In the Tinkering Studio, visitors are invited to explore a curiosity-driven exhibit, chat with a featured artist, or investigate a range of phenomena with staff artists, scientists, educators, and others by participating in a collaborative activity. A large, eclectic assortment of materials, tools, and technologies are provided for people to use as they explore and create."
exploratorium  sfsh  science  art  tinkering  making  sanfrancisco  classideas 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Edith Ackermann’s Pedagogical Perspective on Tinkering & Making on Vimeo
"We interviewed Edith about her take on the idea of making and tinkering, her perspective is one we value quite a bit."
edithackermann  play  tinkering  exploratorium  making  learning  howwelearn  teaching  howweteach  education  schools  children  2015 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Digital Manifesto Archive: Design Fiction's Odd Present vs. Science Fiction's Near Future
"Julian Bleecker's "Design Fiction's Odd Present vs. Science Fiction's Near Future" proposes that Design Fiction supplant typical Science-Fiction narratives with diegetic prototypes--actual objects that test an idea."



"If there is anything to be gained from these Design Fiction practice it is the playful optimism that comes from "making things up." Making things up is playful and serious at the same time. It's playful in that one can speculate and imagine without the "yeah, but," constraints that often come from the dour sensitivities of the way-too-grown-up pragmatists. It's serious because the ideas that are "made up" as little design fictions - formed into props or little films or speculative objects - are materialized things that hold within them the story of the world they inhabit. There is the kernel of a near future, or a different now, or an un-history that begins the mind reeling at the possibilities of what could be. When an idea is struck into form we have learned to accent that as proof - a demonstration that this could be possible. The translation from an idea into its material form begins the proof of possibility. Props help. Things to think with and things to help us imagine what could be.

This is how the world around us is made, by people who imagine what could be and then go forth and make it material. Wheels did not suddenly appear on luggage, but they are and its hard to imagine that it didn't happen sooner.

Playfully, seriously making things up is how the world around us comes to be. Don't sit around and wait. Make up the world you want. Believe it. Tell its story. Inhabit it and it will become.

Design Fiction strides alongside of Science Fiction, obligating itself to fashion representation of what could be - whether that's a different present, a reassessment of the recent past, or a future likely to be obtained, it may be a reaction to a sense that Science Fiction has given up on the future, or ceded its remit to imagine the future. Perhaps Science Fiction has shifted to envisioning the differently present or the recently past. Ridley Scott recently said, "We have done all we can for Science-Fiction. After 2001 A Space Odyssey, Science-Fiction is dead."

Design Fiction mucks around in this odd present in which we live. Every year the future is held aloft in the hand at widely publicized consumer electronics trade shows. The press eats it up. It's the new science fiction. This is how we imagine the future. Through 100 million dollar trade shows. Through the trade's hand-held technologies and their odd mash-ups of telephone fitness devices brain wave TV remote controls. (No wonder the science-fiction literary has thrown in the towel. They'd do better as consulting engineers. What a great idea.) Our future is shown to use as made things - prototypes, or evocative objects that suggest, MacGuffin like, what they do. Objects that take batteries and have screens that goad us to massage them. Objects that cycle every 12-18 months and thence end up in a discard drawer or in a closet under last year's crap. Or on the Internet's close, Craigslist.

Design Fiction's commitment is to create a legible, tangible, material representation of alternatives. it uses designed objects - props, prototypes, fakes, punks, speculative consumer electronic objects, evocative ingots of color, material and precision manufacturing, prompts, provocations, little films, atmospheres and visual moments - to start conversations about the future. Design Fiction embraces the cycles of obsolescence, that banal next-new-thing - but it does so in order to find chinks in the iron-clad cycle and find innovative alternatives to the mediocre experiences they inevitable deliver.

The emphasis of Design Fiction is on alternative world as represented through the things. These props are called diegetic prototypes." They are objects that test an idea. The fact that they exist as material objects imply their existence in the same way an objects existence in a movie or play makes the object come to life. In some cases, those props spread ideas more effectively than could a laboratory prototype. Diegetic prototypes serve to tell a story about an object and start conversations, sometimes even before technical possibility has been considered. Diegetic prototypes implicate themselves as things that people would live with, rather than operating solely as technological, scientific or engineering possibility. They are designed, evocative, desirable, ineffable and imbued with a sense of imminent possibility, even necessity. They come across as things that actually make sense.

Design Fiction creates these things because they can help tell the stories about the worlds they occupy, without the stories being told in a typical narrative - and because telling good stories is hard. Making suggestive, evocative, compelling, curious objects is a designer's way of telling stories about worlds that could or should become."
manifestos  designfiction  speculativefiction  speculativedesign  design  sciencefiction  scifi  julianbleecker  optimism  making  play  playfulness  prototyping  tinkering  criticalmaking 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Search results | Farm Hack
"We are a worldwide community of farmers that build and modify our own tools. We share our hacks online and at meet ups because we become better farmers when we work together.

Watch our movie. Get started here."

"FarmHack is a community for those who embrace the long-standing farm traditions of tinkering, inventing, fabricating, tweaking, and improving things that break. We are farmers of all ages, but the project has special relevance to young and beginning farmers as a place to learn from their peers' and their elders' successes, mistakes and new ideas. We also seek to bring our non-farmer allies on board: engineers, architects, designers, and the like. Together, with an open-source ethic, we can retool our farms for a sustainable future."

[via: http://engineeringathome.org/ ]
farms  farming  making  adaptations  hacking  agriculture  tools  engineering  architecture  design  tinkering  invention  inventing  fabrication  tweaking  improvisation 
february 2016 by robertogreco
whitney trettien on Twitter: "It continues to upset me how often I come across a digital humanities syllabus with all-but-0 women writers/thinkers/makers/educators."
“It continues to upset me how often I come across a digital humanities syllabus with all-but-0 women writers/thinkers/makers/educators.”

“@whitneytrettien Thank you Whitney. I finally understand why this word "maker" is so important to people.”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567768889506934784

“@whitneytrettien By using "Maker" instead of builder, mechanic, tinkerer, fabricator, etc...”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567770540010512384

“@whitneytrettien One implies the sort of meta-awareness of the activity (and accompanying prestige) that we associate with...”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567770713278402560

“@whitneytrettien that we associate with writers, artist, educators.”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567770804697440256

“@whitneytrettien I've always known that "Maker" was a fantastically class-conscious term, but could never put my finger on why exactly.”
https://twitter.com/CaptDavidRyan/status/567771011358023681

“@KellyPDillon @whitneytrettien @evalantsoght I wonder lately how to best combine these stories with courses on methods, too, you know?”
https://twitter.com/djp2025/status/567771031763693568

“@KellyPDillon @whitneytrettien @evalantsoght I mean, is the answer a separate course on Women in Comp? Or a module on comp hist in DH class?”
https://twitter.com/djp2025/status/567771246801469440

“@KellyPDillon @whitneytrettien @evalantsoght I mean, is the answer a separate course on Women in Comp? Or a module on comp hist in DH class?”

“@djp2025 @KellyPDillon @evalantsoght Historicize the methods and the making within/against other practices? "my mother was a computer," etc.”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567772121632632832

“@whitneytrettien @KellyPDillon @evalantsoght Indeed, and exactly.”
https://twitter.com/djp2025/status/567773158800101379

“@whitneytrettien Guilty, apart from the literary texts I teach.”
https://twitter.com/briancroxall/status/567768467655651328

“@briancroxall Which may be more problematic, no? Reinscription of the male gaze to dissect women writers. Not accusing, just musing.”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567768920455913472

“@whitneytrettien It could be. My application of “theory” to our texts is pretty loose. +”
https://twitter.com/briancroxall/status/567769131811086337

“@whitneytrettien It makes me wonder as well whether the idea of distant reading is a gendered gaze.”
https://twitter.com/briancroxall/status/567769298207535104

“@briancroxall Me too -- definitely something I've been thinking about recently.”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567769736176758784

“@briancroxall @whitneytrettien Can I interest you in an article on precisely that subject...”
https://twitter.com/ncecire/status/567769693927522304

“@briancroxall @whitneytrettien (forthcoming...) pic.twitter.com/wTVpR8L7AP ”
https://twitter.com/ncecire/status/567771149954973699

“@ncecire Excellent -- when/where is it out? I look forward to reading it. @briancroxall”
https://twitter.com/whitneytrettien/status/567771469862961153

“@whitneytrettien Oh, ha, would you look at that! Institutional repository at work. http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/52909/1/11_82.1cecire.pdf … @briancroxall”
https://twitter.com/ncecire/status/567772313060671488

“looks fantastic @ncecire's "Ways of Not Reading Gertrude Stein." ELH 82 (forthcoming 2015) http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/52909/1/11_82.1cecire.pdf ”**
https://twitter.com/pfyfe/status/567807396900315136

**Article now at:
http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/52909/
http://muse.jhu.edu/login?auth=0&type=summary&url=/journals/elh/v082/82.1.cecire.html
gender  makers  making  class  whitneytrettien  davidryan  2015  digitalhumanities  briancroxall  danielpowell  feminism  scholarship  academia  malegaze  genderedgaze  craft  thinking  education  tinkering  fabrication  mechanics  building  meta-awareness  art  writing  method  computation  computing  practice  nataliacecire 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Oscillator | On Democratization
"In the early 1970’s, several Dutch universities created “science shops” (wetenschapswinkels) with the aim of democratizing science. The science shops connected public interest groups who had scientific questions with university students and researchers who could provide answers. Opening access to university research would help activist groups achieve their goals, and would also have an impact on the universities themselves. In an essay for the journal Science, Technology & Human Values, Joseph Wachelder writes about the more radical goals of the science shops early on:
The democratization of science in fact implied a general and even radical transformation of society. The aim was to reorient science toward the social needs of workers and disadvantaged groups and to fight the vested interest of the establishment and the so-called military-industrial complex. In those early days, the political Left pushed science shops as one means of transforming both science and society in radical ways. Unions, targeting issues such as occupational health, social security, and working conditions; environmentalists; patients’ groups; third-world activists; and, slightly later, women’s liberation groups considered themselves as partners in pursuit of a new and better society.
I read about the science shops for the first time over the holidays in Making Genes, Making Waves, Jon Beckwith’s autobiography about his research in molecular biology and his political activism. Given the current fad for “democratizing science” I was surprised that I’d never heard them mentioned before.


Indeed, today’s democratization looks a lot different from the democratization pushed by science shops and radical science movements of the 70s. Science for the People, an activist group of scientists and engineers founded in the early 1970s, organized against the misuse of science by military and corporate interests and advocated that science work for marginalized people rather than maintaining the status quo. A powerful symbol for the group was a fist raised in solidarity next to a hand holding a flask. Alice Bell notes in a recent article on activist science that, “The fist of solidarity stood in front of the chemist’s flask here, not simply used to hold science up high.”

[image]

Compare that with Science for the People, a Canadian radio program about science, which rebranded in 2013 from “Skeptically Speaking.” Their logo echoes the Science for the People cover image from 1970, but here the fist holds up a test tube—literally holding science up high. In a blog post about their rebrand, the producers discuss what “science for the people” means to them:
We’re about getting the word of something we love to people who might not hear about it anywhere else, in the hopes that maybe, just maybe, they’ll love it a little too. We’re about taking tough scientific concepts and teasing out what matters. We’re about taking the latest in scientific progress and relate it to people like our friends and our families, and our communities, and our society.


[image]

Telling people about your love for science is great, but as Bell notes (referring to the flask-toting fist on the cover of the Geek Manifesto), “Looking back at these earlier radicals, [it] seems to pale to a Che Guevara T-shirt in comparison.”

Other efforts seem similarly pale when you begin to examine their claims about democratization in light of what democratization meant to more political generations of scientists. Like the Science for the People radio program, many of these efforts are focused on the one-way transmission of science from the academy to the public, rather than a radical transformation of science itself to address public interests.

Open access publishing has made it easier to publish and read scientific articles, and is gradually (hopefully) chipping away at the tyranny of the impact factor in academic career advancement. These are worthy goals which I support whole-heartedly—I’ve published most of my papers in open access journals—but making papers open to download doesn’t necessarily make science democratic and open to everyone.

Likewise, recent efforts to get more people involved in scientific research have been branded “citizen science,” but unlike the science shops where the citizens dictated research directions, citizen science projects simply allow non-scientists to volunteer their time collecting or analyzing data for professional researchers. These projects can be great learning experiences, allowing non-scientists to get a better picture of the scientific process, as well as great research experiences, allowing scientists to explore topics that they couldn’t have done without the expanded team. But letting people do free work for you isn’t the same as doing work for people.

In synthetic biology, “democratization” has recently been used as a marketing ploy for companies that are selling DNA or DNA editing software. Cambrian Genomics and Genome Compiler both claim to “democratize creation,” an empty statement that helps drive press coverage and TED invitations in the crowded genetic engineering market. Both companies are selling slightly different, cheaper, or easier to use versions of things that have been sold to molecular biologists for decades, but claiming that their versions will suddenly make it possible for “anyone” to do genetic engineering. Making cheaper and more accessible laboratory tools is great, but it’s worth asking what else is necessary to truly make “creation” accessible (I’m not going to get into the differences between synthesizing DNA and “creating life” here, but suffice it to say that I don’t agree with that part of their phrasing either). There are many other tools, training, and above all a reason to do it that are all necessary in order to make a “creature.” It’s no surprise then that, according to SF Gate, Cambrian currently sells DNA primarily to biotech giants like Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, and Thermo Fisher. If you don’t work to really democratize science, you’re just making cheaper tools for the people who already had access to them. (Also hype, lots of hype.)

[image]

The contemporary projects that seems most like the 70s Dutch science shops are today’s hackerspaces and community labs, where non-expert scientists can explore techno-scientific questions on their own time (and usually on their own dime). While there are a huge variety of projects and educational goals in these spaces, a particular kind of “hacker” has gone mainstream (and even received DARPA funding). Tinkering in a garage is now seen as the first step towards starting the next multibillion dollar Silicon Valley company. Hackerspaces can be the site of anti-establishment thinking, but they are also becoming part of the military-industrial complex.

None of these projects are necessarily bad. By and large, they all point towards a broader positive shift happening in the scientific community towards more transparency, accountability, diversity, and public involvement. But we shouldn’t let something as important as democratization become an empty label. We need to be critical of self-proclaimed democratizers—who is benefitting and who remains left out? Who is calling the shots and who is working for whom? Where does the money come from? How can we do science better?"
christinaagapakis  democratization  science  history  politics  1920s  netherlands  wetenschapswinkels  scienceshops  canada  scientificallyspeaking  transmission  citizenscience  scientificprocess  learning  education  accessibility  hackerspaces  communitylabs  labs  laboratories  darpa  tinkering  makerspaces 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The Makery
"The future needs people who can creatively Make.

At The Makery youth and adults are encouraged to be curious, to tinker, to experiment, and to make with technology. We are a place where communities can gather to play with the creative power of digital design and fabrication, electronics, physical computing, engineering, art and coding.

POP UP INSTALLATIONS & EXHIBITS
We transform storefronts, art galleries, atriums, and street spaces into playful and inspiring makerspaces with curated talks, hands-on events, interactive installations and exhibits for the public to explore.

WORKSHOPS & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
We teach hands-on workshops in 3D printing, digital fabrication, electronics, robotics, physical computing, soft circuits, game design, programming, and the craft of making.

We also offer customized private group creativity experiences to ignite teamwork, playful invention, prototyping and exploration of the art and fun in emerging creative technologies.

MAKER LAB & STORE
Coming next year

We will have a variety of fabrication equipment for members and residents and be a shareable workshop for budding makers and inventors.

We know what it's like to need a last minute part for a project. We will also have a fun, informed and stocked store.

For now, browse our Limited Edition Kits."
nyc  makerspaces  via:blubirding  openstudioproject  lcproject  fablabs  tinkering  making  themakery 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Oculus Rift’s $2 Billion Purchase - TIME
"Palmer Luckey—the name suits him—grew up in Long Beach, Calif., the son of a housewife and a car salesman. He was a natural-born tinkerer. “Self-taught!” is how he describes himself. “Explore the world around you, take things apart, put ’em back together. You can learn a lot if you do nothing but spend your entire life in your garage working on projects or in your room reading on the Internet.” As a teenager one of Luckey’s hobbies was taking apart old video-game consoles and reassembling them inside portable cases. Another one was virtual reality.

It was an odd hobby for a person Luckey’s age because the received wisdom at the time was that VR was a failed technology. Everybody has an idea of what VR is, or what it’s supposed to be: a simulated, three-dimensional, interactive world that surrounds you completely. It’s been a staple of science-fiction classics—-Neuromancer, Snow Crash, Tron, Star Trek, The Matrix—and a core component of our collective pop-cultural vision of the future for decades.

But apart from niche applications like designing cars and surveying oil fields, VR never made it to market. As Luckey puts it, “the idea existed, the will existed, the people existed, the demand existed—and the technology did not.” It baffled engineers, frustrated consumers and ate up billions of dollars of R&D money. Like flying cars and robot butlers, VR is one of those revolutions that went from wow to lame without ever actually materializing in between. Nintendo tried its hand at it in 1995 with the Virtual Boy game console and lost millions. The list of virtual-reality products that launched and then died of neglect is long."
oculusrift  facebook  2014  palmerluckey  autodidacts  unschooling  learning  tinkering  lcproject  openstudioproject  johncarmack  gaming  videogames  vr  virtualreality 
march 2014 by robertogreco
The Craftsman, the Trickster, and the Poet, by Edith Ackermann [.pdf]
"I suggest that art as a way of knowing is about “re-souling” the rational mind. This, in turn,occurs as a consequence of being mindfully engaged, playful in spirit, and disposed to usection—or the powers of myth—as windows into our inner and outer realities. Here, I of-fer a few thoughts on how people make sense of their experience, envision alternatives intheir minds, and most importantly, how they bring forth what they envision in ways thatcan move and inspire others (those at the receiving end of a creator’s oerings)."

[quoting: http://linkedith.kaywa.com/p138.html ]

"The craftsman, the trickster, and the poet are emblematic of the creative side in all of us: a deeply-felt reluctance to freeze the nuances of human experience into set categories, or representations, that rid themselves of the imaginal for the sake of proof or "reason". The artist sticks to the image. And that is why s/he captures our imagination. When art is "true", we know how to read between the lines! What the poet especially warns us against is to look at words as signs (instead of symbols, or indices),: “As we manipulate everyday words, we [shouldn’t] forget that they are fragments of ancient stories, that we are building our houses with broken pieces of sculptures and ruined statues of goad as the barbarians did” (Schultz, 1993. p. 88). The scientist instead is more of a Saussurian. He wants words to be signs, and he cringes when their meanings are “sticky” (fused to their contexts), “thick” (polysemic), or ambiguous (could be seen in more than one way). As for he rationalist in us: s/he wont seek to delight, amuse, or move us (spark insights). Instead, s/he’s here to reason, argue, and prove (provide evidence)!"

[video: http://www.exploratorium.edu/knowing/video.php?videoID=1241851064001 ]

[Edith Ackermann: http://web.media.mit.edu/~edith/ ]
poetry  poets  crafts  craftmanship  trickster  editchackermann  mindfulness  2011  art  artists  creativity  science  stickiness  reason  imagination  beginnersmind  neoteny  play  playfulness  richardsennett  ellenlanger  georgsimmel  jesters  clowns  bricolage  gastonbachelard  making  piaget  ernstcassirer  mending  tinkering  jeanpiaget 
march 2014 by robertogreco
“Education in Disguise”: Culture of a Hacker and Maker Space [eScholarship]
"Hacker and maker spaces (HMSs) are open-access workshops devoted to creative and technical work. Their growing numbers (over 500 worldwide) make them a significant grassroots movement supporting informal learning. Scholars have found pedagogical benefits of tinkering and hacking, but the cultural contexts from which these practices arise remain under-studied. How do members of hacker and maker spaces bring about personalized and collaborative learning? In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2011 and March 2012 with members of GeekSpace, a North American HMS. Findings suggest that the pragmatic attitude present in other hacker cultures served a similar uniting function in this space. Specifically, members encouraged learning and collaboration predominantly through a belief in materialities, particularly as GeekSpace's collective identity shifted from hacker to maker. Members altered the space to serve individual and collective goals rather than employing deliberation or strong organizational methods. Initially the group approached learning through lectures and solo problem-solving, which gave way to learning through hands-on work and peripheral participation on projects. Future avenues of research on HMSs include patterning across different sites, organizational practices and factors that inhibit participation. This article draws on interviews with HMS members to discuss how the spread of hacking and making has led to members forming loose organizations focused on informal learning and peer production."
hackerspaces  makerspaces  lcproject  openstudioproject  research  2014  andrewschrock  learning  education  howwelearn  tinkering  grassroots  constructivism  informallearning  collaboration  criticalmaking  mattratto  seymourpapert 
march 2014 by robertogreco
1900s rural farmers: The original hackers? | Marketplace.org
"Most of us think of hackers as people who tinker with computers and make tech do things it wasn't originally supposed to do. Some people trace hacking back to the 1950s and 1960s. That's when the technologically curious started tricking telephone signal systems into unlocking free long-distance calling. But as far back as the early 1900s, rural farmers -- or you could call them hackers -- got to tinkering as well.

At the time, phone companies were expanding their networks in U.S. cities, but not rural areas -- too expensive, too few customers. So ranchers and farmers hacked their own lines using the same barbed-wire fencing they used to pen in their livestock."
rural  farming  farmers  ruricomp  hacking  hackers  history  theestreetfindause  davidsicilia  tinkering  making  hackerculture  1950s  1960s  benjohnson  agriculture 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Julian Bleecker on ‘Undisciplinarity’ on Vimeo
"‘Undisciplinarity’ is as much a way of doing work as it is a departure from ways of doing work, even questioning what ‘counts’ as work. It is a way of working and an approach to creating and circulating culture that can go its own way, without worrying about working outside of what histories-of-disciplines say is ‘proper’ work. It is ‘undisciplined’. This is important because we need more playful and habitable worlds that the old forms of knowledge production are ill-equipped to produce. It’s an epistemological shift that offers new ways of fixing the problems the old disciplinary and extra-disciplinary practices created in the first place."
julianbleecker  2010  undisciplinarity  glvo  cv  openstudioproject  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  generalists  design  extradisciplinary  knowledgeproduction  learning  culture  making  doing  innovation  scienceofscience  anthropology  science  sciencestudies  historyofconsciousness  sciencefiction  simulation  play  simulations  tinkering  prototyping  exploration  speculation  experimentation 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Innovation in Education | Fast Company
"Nikhil Goyal, student and author of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student's Assessment of School:

1. Make cities our classrooms. … projects, apprenticeships, working with mentors, and traveling … community should be our curriculum …

2. Swap pedagogy for andragogy. We need to switch from pedagogy (teacher-focused) to andragogy (adult-leading). In this model of education, children have control, they are motivated intrinsically, and the curriculum is problem- rather than content-orientated. We need to have young people become the captains of their learning. …

3. Hike teacher pay and end market-based rewards. …

Gever Tulley, founder, Brightworks and the Tinkering School:

1. Focus on microschools: Schools don't have to be big. The hyper-local micro-school can compete on a financial basis while delivering a more engaging learning experience.

2. Make room for alternative schools. …

3. Treat education as a regular practice like exercise, not as a phase. …"
pbl  projectbasedlearning  projects  making  tinkering  tinkeringschool  brightworks  pedagogy  process  practice  practices  howwelearn  mentorship  mentorships  mentors  mentoring  apprenticeships  urbanism  urban  cities  cityasclassroom  andragogy  alted  alternative  deschooling  unschooling  2012  teaching  georgeparker  michellerhee  gevertulley  cv  schools  education  learning  openstudioproject  lcproject  nikhilgoyal 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Making Friends: On Toys and Toymaking — dConstruct Audio Archive
"Toys are not idle knick-knacks: they allow us to explore otherwise impossible terrain; fire the imagination; provide sparks for structured play. They do not just entertain and delight; they stimulate and inspire. And always, they remind us of the value - and values - to be found in abstract play.

Toymaking is not an idle habit. Toys are a fertile ground for creators to work in. They offer a playful space to experiment and explore. They are a safe ground to experiment with new techniques, skills, or ideas. Though they emerge from no particular purpose, they expose purpose and meaning through their making. Toymaking ranges from making realistic simulations of life to producing highly abstract playthings. And everyone who makes things - out of paper, wood, metal, plastic, or code - has something to gain from making them.

Trying to draw a thread through what, it turns out, has been a lifetime first shaped by toymaking, and then spent making toys in idle moments, Tom will take in…"
playthings  making  simulations  meaning  purpose  delight  inspiration  play  srg  edg  glvo  practice  experimenting  prototyping  tinkering  2012  dconstruct2012  dconstruct  toymaking  toys  tomarmitage 
september 2012 by robertogreco
A Cloud of My Own (Pinboard Blog)
"I have no idea what I'm doing. I do it, I write it up, and then wisdom pours down from the Internet."
tinkering  servers  hardware  twitter  crowdsourcing  web  internet  2012  learningbydoing  experimentation  learning  doing  maciejceglowski  pinboard  maciejcegłowski 
june 2012 by robertogreco
dConstruct2011 videos: The Transformers, Kars Alfrink
"In this talk, Kars Alfrink – founder and principal designer at applied pervasive games studio Hubbub – explores ways we might use games to alleviate some of the problems wilful social self-seperation can lead to. Kars looks at how people sometimes deliberately choose to live apart, even though they share the same living spaces. He discusses the ways new digital tools and the overlapping media landscape have made society more volatile. But rather than to call for a decrease in their use, Kars argues we need more, but different uses of these new tools. More playful uses."

[See also: http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kars-alfrink AND http://speakerdeck.com/u/dconstruct/p/the-transformers-by-kars-alfrink ]

"Kars looks at how game culture and play shape the urban fabric, how we might design systems that improve people’s capacity to do so, and how you yourself, through play, can transform the city you call home."
monocultures  rulespace  self-governance  gamification  filterbubble  scale  tinkering  urbanism  urban  simulationfever  animalcrossing  simulation  ludology  proceduralrhetoric  ianbogost  resilience  societalresilience  division  belonging  rioting  looting  socialconventions  situationist  playfulness  rules  civildisobedience  separation  socialseparation  nationality  fiction  dconstruct2011  dconstruct  identity  cities  chinamieville  design  space  place  play  gaming  games  volatility  hubbub  howbuildingslearn  adaptability  adaptivereuse  architecture  transformation  gentrification  society  2011  riots  janejacobs  karsalfrink  simulations 
december 2011 by robertogreco
MAKE | Zen and the Art of Making
"Some of the most talented and prolific people I know have dozens of interests and hobbies. When I ask them about this, the response is usually something like “I love to learn.” I think the new discoveries and joys of learning are the crux of this beginner thing I’ve been thinking about. Sure, when you’ve mastered something it’s valuable, but then part of your journey is over — you’ve arrived, and the trick is to find something you’ll always have a sense of wonder about. I think this is why scientists and artists, who are usually experts, love what they do: there is always something new ahead. It’s possible to be an expert but still retain the mind of a beginner. It’s hard, but the best experts can do it. In making things, in art, in science, in engineering, you can always be a beginner about something you’re doing — the fields are too vast to know it all."
philliptorrone  making  learning  unschooling  curiosity  education  experts  generalists  creativegeneralists  2011  zen  knowledge  expertise  lewiscarroll  makers  electronics  art  artists  science  scientists  tinkering  tinkerers  lifelonglearning  deschooling  mindset  beginners  invention  arduino  fear  risktaking  riskaversion  teaching  lcproject  failure  stasis  yearoff  openminded  children  interestedness  specialists  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  exploration  internet  web  online  constraints  specialization  interested  beginner'smind 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Hackasaurus
"Building a generation of webmakers… Hackasaurus spreads skills, attitudes and ethics that help youth thrive in a remixable digital world. By making it easy for youth to tinker and mess around with the building blocks that make up the web, Hackasaurus helps tweens move from digital consumers to active producers, seeing the web as something they can actively shape, remix and make better.

Through a set of easy-to-use tools…Hackasaurus tools make it easy for kids to remix, create and share on the web. The X-Ray Goggles allow learners to see what the web is made of, remix and change their favorite web pages, and share their creations with friends. WebPad makes it easy to take the next step, creating your own web pages in a matter of seconds. And the Hackbook provides bits of code for easy copying and pasting, making it easy to play with the web like lego.

…and at "hack jam" events around the world."
onlinetoolkit  hacking  html  hackasaurus  hackdays  classideas  srg  edg  glvo  mozilla  youth  coding  programming  web  webdev  hacks  web2.0  tools  tinkering  remixing  remixculture  hackjams  unconferences  bookmarklets  bookmarklet  webdesign 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Brightworks: A School that Rethinks School | MindShift
"At Brightworks, a K-12 private school set to open in San Francisco this fall, there will be no tests, grades, or transcripts.

Instead, students will participate in activities and interact with professionals in various fields, design a project that they bring to fruition themselves, and produce a multimedia portfolio that they’ll share with the school, the community, and – via the Brightworks website – the world…

…curriculum with three phases: 1) exploration, 2) expression, & 3) exposition.

…year’s theme is “wind” for instance…

Sure, there are only 30 students aged 6 through 12 starting in September (though there are a few slots still open for 12-year-old girls) and the teacher-to-student ratio at Brightworks is a minimum of 1 to 6. The program is resource and labor-intensive. “We don’t scale well at all,” says Welch."
lcproject  scale  gevertulley  2011  brightworks  schools  schooldesign  inquiry-basedlearning  projectbasedlearning  passion-based  exploration  student-centered  unschooling  deschooling  grades  grading  thematicunites  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  constructivism  pedagogy  sanfrancisco  making  doing  tinkering  tinkeringschool  curiosity  curriculum  creativity  pbl 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Practical Magic | Think Quarterly by Google
"The most original innovations spring from mucking about, not from thinking hard. Perhaps that’s really why all this is happening now – components are getting smaller and cheaper, computing is becoming disposable, networking is getting easier – but I don’t think this is driven just by technology. It’s driven by a generation of inventors who’ve learned the power of fast, cheap ‘making’ on the web and want to try it in the world.

This, to me, is as exciting as the day I downloaded a browser. We’re seeing the connectivity and power of the web seeping from our devices and into our objects. Everyday objects, yes, but also new generations of extraordinary objects – flying robot penguin balloons, quadrocopters that can play tennis, Wi-Fi rabbits that tell you the weather."
google  innovation  russelldavies  tinkering  berglondon  berg  wifi  arduino  mikekuniavsky  html  web  internet  making  hacking  internetofthings  spimes  2011  iot 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Polaroid’s SX-70: The Art and Science of the Nearly Impossible
"We could not have known and have only just learned–perhaps mostly from children from two to five–that a new kind of relationship between people in groups is brought into being by SX-70 when the members of a group are photographing and being photographed and sharing the photographs: it turns out that buried within all of us–God knows beneath how many pregenital and Freudian and Calvinistic strata–there is latent interest in each other; there is tenderness, curiosity, excitement, affection, companionability and humor; it turns out that in this cold world where man grows distant from man, and even lovers can reach each other only briefly, that we have a yen for and a primordial competence for a quiet good-humored delight in each other: we have a prehistoric tribal competence for a non-physical, non-emotional, non-sexual satisfaction in being partners in the lonely exploration of a once empty planet."
design  technology  art  history  science  polaroid  harrymccracken  edwinland  steevejobs  apple  photography  gadgets  entrepreneurship  tinkering  invention  sx-70  relationships  people  anseladams  normanlocks  andywarhol  OneStep  kodak  consumerelectronics  electronics  instantphotography  cameras  granthamilton  2011  children  companionship 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Seven Spaces of Technology in School Environments on Vimeo
"Matt Locke originally came up with the concept of the Six Spaces of technology (http://test.org.uk/​2007/​08/​10/​six-spaces-of-social-media/ ​). I added a seventh earlier this year, Data Spaces, and have played around with how education could harness these spaces, and the various transgressions between them, for learning.

This short presentation tackles the potential of adjusting our physical school environments to harness technology even better. What happens when we map technological spaces to physical ones?

You can see more of the detail behind these thoughts over on the blog:

http://edu.blogs.com/​edublogs/​2010/​10/​-cefpi-clicks-bricks-when-digital-learning-and-space-met.html "

[via: http://twitter.com/irasocol/status/86712955856629760 See also: http://www.notosh.com/2011/01/consultancy-new-schools/ via http://twitter.com/ewanmcintosh/status/86721281147404288 ]
ewanmcintosh  2010  classroom  classroomdesign  gevertulley  tinkering  tinkeringschool  teaching  pedagogy  adaptability  digital  physical  learning  unschooling  deschooling  fidgeting  privatespaces  groupspaces  dataspaces  technology  fujikindergarten  mattlocke  blogging  flickr  blogs  watchingspaces  participatory  participationspaces  thirdteacher  performingspaces  space  publishing  twitter  stephenheppell  design  place  lcproject  classideas  tcsnmy  reggioemilia  classrooms 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Week 315 – Blog – BERG
"Your sensitivity & tolerance improve only with practice. I wish I’d been given toy businesses to play w/ at school, just as playing w/ crayons taught my body how to let me draw.

I’ve written in these weeknotes before how I manage three budgets: cash, attention, risk. This is my attempt to explain how I feel about risk, and to trace the pathways between risk and cash. Attention, & how it connects, can wait until another day…

I said I wouldn’t speak about attention, but here’s a sneak peak of what I would say. Attention is the time of people in the studio, & how effectively it is applied. It is affected by the arts of project & studio management; it can be tracked by time-sheets & capacity plans; it can be leveraged with infrastructure, internal tools, and carefully grown tacit knowledge; and it magically grows when there’s time to play, when there is flow in the work, and when a team aligns into a “sophisticated work group.”
Attention is connected to cash through work."
design  business  management  berg  berglondon  mattwebb  attention  flow  groups  groupculture  sophisticatedworkgroups  money  risk  riskmanagement  riskassessment  confidence  happiness  anxiety  worry  leadership  tinkering  designthinking  thinking  physical  work  instinct  frustration  lcproject  studio  decisionmaking  systems  systemsthinking  manufacturing  making  doing  newspaperclub  svk  distribution  integratedsystems  infrastructure  supplychain  deleuze  guattari  cyoa  failure  learning  invention  ineptitude  ignorance  deleuze&guattari  gillesdeleuze  interactive  fiction  if  interactivefiction  félixguattari 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Dark Matter: Activist Art and the Counter-Public Sphere
"Like its astronomical cousin, creative dark matter also makes up the bulk of the artistic activity produced in our post-industrial society. However, this type of dark matter is invisible primarily to those who lay claim to the management and interpretation of culture - the critics, art historians, collectors, dealers, museums, curators and arts administrators. It includes makeshift, amateur, informal, unofficial, autonomous, activist, non-institutional, self-organized practices - all work made and circulated in the shadows of the formal art world. Yet, just as the astrophysical universe is dependent on its dark matter, so too is the art world dependent on its dark energy."

[Concept mentioned by Randall Szott here: http://intheconversation.blogs.com/art/2008/03/interview-with.html ]

[See also other articles here: http://gregorysholette.com/writings/writing_index.html ]

[Update 2 June 2014: Link is dead. Here's the Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20110911222745/http://www.journalofaestheticsandprotest.org/3/sholette.htm ]
art  culture  politics  media  activism  activistart  vernacular  counter-publicsphere  josephbeuys  proletarian  oskarnegt  alexanderkluge  resistance  subversion  outsiders  artcriticism  tinkering  amateur  glvo  bourgeois  darkmatter  gregorysholette  collectives  culturalresistance  hierarchy  gatekeepers  cultureindustry  artworld  invisibility  economics  temporaryservices  lasagencias  publicspace  tacticalmedia  deschooling  unschooling  zines  diy  outsider  shrequest1 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Draft of a manifesto written in defense of a group of people that did not ask for my defense, using words they would not use and engaging people they ignore. « Lebenskünstler
"While you wring hands over what it all means, we are trying to change the world, build relationships and communities. Are we naive? Possibly. We prefer a world of naive dreamers to cynical observers. Keep your beloved “criticality.” Hold it close to your heart and tell us what you feel. We are friends, not “colleagues” and we choose to embrace humane values and each other. We offer a different vision. Against the professional hegemony of academic intellectualism we offer – trust, love, sentiment, passion, egalitarianism and sincerity…

We are gamblers, believing in the value of risking everything for the sake of our “foolish” dreams and schemes."
randallszott  doing  livign  acting  cynicism  2010  manifestos  art  theory  practice  glvo  lcproject  tcsnmy  intellectualism  humanity  passion  egalitarianism  sincerity  trust  love  sentiment  worldchanging  dreamers  academia  risk  risktaking  amateurism  unschooling  deschooling  understanding  cv  leisure  tinkering  wittgenstein  johndewey  philosophy  isolation  shopclassassoulcraft  authenticity  rigor  Rancière  agamben  brucewilshire  richardshusterman  robertsolomon  booklist  nicolasbourriaud  radicalphilosophy  antonionegri  naïvité  everyday  amateurs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
LeisureArts: MacGyver - Bricoleur - LeisureArts
"…pushing for re-thinking the field, finding other ways to critically negotiate, & promote work of cultural MacGyvers. Robyn Stewart, in Text [Oct 2001], writes in…"Practice vs. Praxis: Constructing Models for Practitioner Based Research:"

"It is not easy being a bricoleur. A bricoleur works w/in & btwn competing & overlapping perspectives & paradigms (& is familiar w/ these). To do so they must read widely, to become knowledgeable about variety of interpretive paradigms that can be brought to a problem, drawing on Feminism, Marxism, Cultural Studies, Constructivism, & including processes of phenomenography, grounded theory, visual analysis, narratology, ethnography, case & field study, structuralism & poststructuralism, triangulation, survey, etc."

It's not easy to write about them either…requires challenging available orthodoxies, an equally at-ease disposition w/ regard to switching conceptual domains & categories, & flexibility to leave one's critical assumptions behind…"
bricolage  bricoleur  leisurearts  generalists  arts  art  culture  reading  cv  marxism  feminism  constructivism  narratology  ethnography  casestudies  fieldstudies  aesthetics  poststructuralism  structuralism  survey  triangulation  phenomenography  groundedtheory  theory  praxis  robynstewart  macgyver  criticalthinking  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  research  claudelevi-strauss  culturehacking  hacking  tinkering  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  jacks-of-all-trades  making  doing  glvo  dilettante  bernardherman  randallszott  2006  jacquesderrida  artleisure 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Bricolage - Wikipedia
"Bricolage (pronounced /ˌbriːkɵˈlɑːʒ/ or /ˌbrɪkɵˈlɑːʒ/) is a term used in several disciplines, among them the visual arts, to refer to the construction or creation of a work from a diverse range of things that happen to be available, or a work created by such a process. The term is borrowed from the French word bricolage, from the verb bricoler, the core meaning in French being, "fiddle, tinker" and, by extension, "to make creative and resourceful use of whatever materials are at hand (regardless of their original purpose)". In contemporary French the word is the equivalent of the English do it yourself, and is seen on large shed retail outlets throughout France. A person who engages in bricolage is a bricoleur."

[Bricoleur!]
bricolage  bricoleur  creativity  language  postmodernism  art  tinkering  diy  glvo  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  multimedia  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  learning  education  borrowing  french  fiddling  culture  punk  edupunk  claudelevi-strauss  guattari  constructionism  seymourpapert  sherryturkle  ianbogost  kludge  deleuze  thesavagemind  polystylism  jacquesderrida  gillesdeleuze  félixguattari 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Hackbus
"This site is a community tool for the evergrowing armada of hackbusses.<br />
<br />
We need a root movement of doing strange things with hardware which was not intended (aka "hacking") because only when we use things in ways other than they were planned can something new arise.<br />
<br />
Hackbusses (or mobile hacklabs or hack vehicles) are a low-threshold way of bringing the culture of hacking to the people. They are migratory learning and teaching units, taking the talented hackers and their ideas out of middle-class urban centers and bringing them to people who might not otherwise be aware of the possibilities available to them! Let's have a good time n tha hood! And let's drive to the villages!<br />
<br />
We follow a long tradition of this nomadic approach to bring self-empowerment to the people. These units can be everywhere. And they should be everywhere. Start one yourself!"<br />
<br />
[See also: http://www.hackbus.at/ ]
hacking  diy  community  wiki  howto  hackbus  via:cervus  sidestreetprojects  hacklabs  mobile  mobilelaboratory  tinkering 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Brightworks: An Extraordinary School
"Brightworks is a school that reimagines the idea of school. In September 2011, we will offer a one-of-a-kind K-12 curriculum: students explore an idea from multiple perspectives with the help of real-world experts, tools, and experiences, collaborate on projects driven by their curiosity, and share their findings with the world. Brightworks does away with tests, grades and homework, instead supporting each student as they create a rich and detailed portfolio of their work. Brightworks offers a sliding-scale tuition option to all applicants.

At Brightworks, we believe that a school should serve as a learning commons and a community workshop, an intellectual and creative heart of the neighborhood it resides in. Brightworks will also offer after-school, evening and weekend workshops for children and adults."
education  sanfrancisco  curriculum  pedagogy  learning  teaching  experiential  science  schools  schooldesign  lcproject  testing  grading  homework  sharing  collaboration  tcsnmy  community  agitpropproject  the2837university  children  unschooling  deschooling  bryanwelch  alternative  progressive  make  making  doing  thinkering  tinkering  openstudio  gevertulley  brightworks 
february 2011 by robertogreco
If you truly want to engage pupils, relinquish the reins and give them the chance to learn by doing - News - TES Connect
"Innovations in education that engage young people and have the most profound impact will not occur because someone told teachers what to do and how they should do it. They won't come by tinkering with the curriculum or seeking the perfect balance of assessment. The most important changes in learning this decade will come around because someone, a teacher, maybe you, thought that things weren't what they could be and that something new was worth a try. They will get together with colleagues and make time to talk through the possible and seemingly impossible. And then they will go and try it out.

Don't think (too hard). Try."
education  ewanmcintosh  via:cervus  teaching  tcsnmy  innovation  student-centered  studentdirected  student-led  learning  unschooling  deschooling  make  making  doing  gevertulley  hightechhigh  larryrosenstock  tinkeringschool  tinkering  rogerschank  experience  experimentation  experientiallearning 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net » Tinkering as Learning
"John Seely Brown…has a new book coming out soon, The New Culture of Learning…download first 3 chapters from the site.

He talks a lot about one of my pet subjects, Community Mentoring, the apprenticeship model of education:

"Where traditionally mentoring was a means of enculturating members into a community, mentoring in the collective relies more on the sense of learning and developing temporary, peer-to-peer relationships that are fluid and impermanent. Expertise is shared openly and willingly, without regard to an institutional mission. Instead, expertise is shared conditionally and situationally, as a way to enable the agency of other members of the collective."

as well as a dozen other favorite topics of mine: play as a means of learning, constraints as a stimulus for, rather than an inhibition of, creativity, and so on. I wish I could figure out how to get my hands on the whole book. There is a great page of resources on the site as well, for further exploration."
johnseelybrown  caterinafake  tinkering  learning  mentoring  mentorship  creativity  inhibition  education  books  toread  collective  collectivism  sharing  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  community  apprenticeships  newcultureoflearning  online  web  internet  change  peer-to-peer  peers  relationships  informallearning 
january 2011 by robertogreco
The Play Ethic: Playing well: ten years of The Play Ethic
"wanted a new generation of "soulitarians" to exult in flexibility of new kinds of employment, be excited about transformative power of digitality & networks, recover child-like sense of optimism & creativity…very energies of play - not exclusively our own as a species, but something we uniquely retain right to end of our lives - shows we are a radical animal. Play gives us capacity to flexibly respond to almost any situation our environment throws at us. My aim now is still to explore what an "ethic" for play might be - but one which picks through its wide range of potentiating options, & tries to develop best ones for sustainable society.

…rise of "maker" culture…moved from coding to concrete reality - is an example of a dimension of play that could really help us get beyond a wastefully consumerist society. Makers promote a sociable tinkering, where we use hi-tech to skill ourselves and provide for ourselves more and more, rather than a lazy, brand-directed consumption."

[via: http://magicalnihilism.com/2010/12/31/leg-godt/ ]
play  work  patkane  playethic  makers  doers  hackers  hackerculture  well-being  flexibility  education  unschooling  deschooling  ethics  tcsnmy  learning  sustainability  society  consumerism  consumption  tinkering  glvo  lcproject  teaching  experimentation  joy  janemcgonigal  gamification  hideandseek  happiness  policy  briansutton-smith  competition  gamers  videogames  gaming  games  environment  innovation  invention  narcissism  freedom  openness 
january 2011 by robertogreco
RORY HYDE PROJECTS / BLOG » Blog Archive » ‘Know No Boundaries’: an interview with Matt Webb of BERG London
"we attempt to invent things and create culture. It’s not just enough to invent something and see it once, you have to change the world around you, get underneath it, interfere with it somehow, because otherwise you’re just problem solving. And I wont say that design has an exclusive hold over this – you can invent things and change culture with art, music, business practices, ethnography, market research; all of these are valid too – design just happens to be the way we do it…our things should be hopeful, and not just functional…beautiful, inventive and mainstream…you could see our work as experimental, or science-fiction, or futuristic…our design is essentially a political act. We design ‘normative’ products, normative being that you design for the world as it should be. Invention is always for the world as it should be, and not for the world you are in…Design these products and you’ll move the world just slightly in that direction."
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  design  invention  hope  culture  change  purpose  innovation  scifi  sciencefiction  designfiction  beauty  future  inventingthefuture  speculative  speculativedesign  fractionalai  ai  brucesterling  evolutionarysoup  storytelling  isaacasimov  arthurcclarke  argoscatalog  schooloscope  behavior  evocativeobjects  collaboration  functionalism  technology  architecture  people  structure  groups  experience  interdisciplinary  tinkering  multidisciplinary  play  playfulness  crossdisciplinary  flip  gamechanging 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Community and Context: Thoughts on Closing Comments - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic
"I don't want to rule out ever turning off comments again, but I do know that we'd execute very differently. Oddly, I'm heartened that we've developed enough of a reputation as an open and good place to talk about technology that the inability to interact on the site is perceived as an "epic fail," as one reader told me. We are a community now; certain rules have emerged.

And here's the other lesson I learned, which may be more generalizable. I'm an experimenter and so are many of the staffers here at The Atlantic. We've been tremendously lucky that most of the things we've tried have worked. But you don't always experiment for the good times. You need to have things not work sometimes. There's nothing like a (very) public learning experience to focus the mind on the things that matter for your site."
community  commenting  alexismadrigal  theatlantic  online  blogging  transparency  jaronlanier  wikileaks  tinkering  failure  experimentation  learning  trust  interaction  discussion  jayrosen  patricklaforge  internet  web  2010 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Things We Like: A Veritable Playground Made Out Of Packing Tape. | Public Workshop
"It is a flexible and forgiving, an open system of design, and construction that encourages relentless testing, exploration and collaboration. Very much like our landscape weaving projects (here and here), the material itself is so disassociating to the design-builder that one is likely to drop their conceptions of possibility and the formal notions of space that they have accumulated over their lifetime. We’ve repeatedly seen in our own work how although the final structures may not be permanent, this type of design-build process is incredibly valuable as a piece of a larger learning or design process for getting groups of kids or community members to drop their assumptions and fully, openly explore the possibility of an idea or space."
packingtape  projectideas  architecture  space  structures  play  playgrounds  materials  testing  tinkering  experimentation  exploration  collaboration  design  alexgilliam  publicworkshop 
november 2010 by robertogreco
metacool: More thoughts on the primacy of doing: Shinya Kimura, Jeep, Corvette, and the cultural zeitgeist of life in 2010
"cultural zeitgeist of life in 2010 America is clearly saying "We need to start thinking with our hands again", & that we need at least to have confidence in our decision making as we seek to create things of intrinsic value…It's not difficult to get to a strong, compelling point of view. That's what design thinking can do for you. But in each of these videos I sense our society expressing a strong yearning for something beyond process, the courage to make decisions and to act. Talking and thinking is easy, shipping is tough…<br />
<br />
Tinkering, hacking, experimenting, they're all ways of experiencing the world which are more apt than not to lead to generative, highly creative outcomes. I firmly believe that kids & young adults who are allowed to hack, break, tear apart, & generally probe the world around them develop an innate sense of courage when it comes time to make a decision to actually do something. I see this all the time at Stanford…"
diegorodriguez  make  making  handson  hands  manufacturing  machines  tinkering  shinyakimura  detroit  gm  jeep  bigthree  spacerace  rockets  nostalgia  thinking  learning  experimenting  experience  facebook  google  apple  hacking  creativity  innovation  2010  jacobbronowski  design  engineering  machining  action  tcsnmy  glvo  lcproject  doing  motivation  do  corvette 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Elliot Washor: Making Their Way: Creating a Generation of "Thinkerers"
"Schools can reap the rewards of making if they can resist the "curse of the course;" loosen rigid time structures to promote exploration and smart failures; and, in the evening and on weekends, open their labs, sheds and garages to the community and to makers of all ages and levels of expertise. They will need as well to bring the traditional academic disciplines -- including the increasingly essential arts and design -- into those fab labs and to the making itself. By employing people, objects, places and situations (POPS) to support making, schools will prepare a whole generation of young people to succeed in the challenging careers out there now -- and the ones that will be."
education  tinkering  lcproject  bigpicturelearning  makerfaires  eliotwashor  stem  pedagogy  making  thinking  technology  diy  science  teaching  tcsnmy  make  do  doing  pops  communitycenters  community  sharing  schooldesign  curriculum  projectbasedlearning  engineering  pbl 
august 2010 by robertogreco
A Bookfuturist Manifesto - Science and Tech - The Atlantic
"Bookfuturists refuse to endorse either fantasy of "the end of the book" [bookservativism and technofuturism] -- "the end as destruction" or "the end as telos or achievement" as Jacques Derrida would have it. We are trying to map an alternative position that is both more self-critical and more engaged with how technological change is actively affecting our culture.

We're usually more interested in figuring out a piece of technology than either denouncing or promoting it. And we want to make every piece of tech work better. We're tinkerers. We look to history for analogies and counter-analogies, but we know that analogies aren't destiny. We try to look for the technological sophistication of traditional humanism and the humanist possibilities of new tech."
bookfuturism  timcarmody  future  futures  ebooks  fiction  books  publishing  manifesto  futurism  bookservatives  technofuturism  clayshirky  nicholascarr  reading  technology  tinkering  thinking  humanism  complexity  manifestos 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Playful Inventions and Explorations: What’s to Be Learned from Kids? | Architectradure
[direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3jI19vR5bI ]

"With their boundless curiosity, fertile imagination, and natural mastery of the art of self-directed learning, children have much to teach adults about creativity and innovation. That’s perhaps even more true with today’s “digital natives,” says developmental psychologist Edith Ackermann, whose work explores—and exploits—the intersections of play, learning, design, and technology. An educator and researcher, Ackermann has consulted for LEGO and the LEGO Learning Institute for more than 20 years and worked under the direction of Jean Piaget, the Swiss psychologist renowned for his studies on children at play, at the Centre International d’Epistémologie Génétique. She has taught at Harvard, MIT, and other universities."
play  curiosity  lego  jeanpiaget  imagination  creativity  innovation  invention  tinkering  digitalnatives  self-directedlearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  autodidacts  edithackermann  design  technology  children  piaget 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Constructing Modern Knowledge Reflections - Practical Theory
"luxurious learning enviro=time, resources, permission to play & learn, talk to one another...read, listen, build...we didn't have schedule, we had appointments... ...many ways to learn & lecture can/should be part of good progressive teacher's toolkit...trick is knowing when, what, how long & how you will help students construct meaning from it... we underestimate how complex work we give can be...one pitfall of problem/project-based learning for kids. When there isn't recipe/obvious sequence, roadblocks can feel insurmountable...kids get stuck...not because they don't want to do them, but because they reach stumbling blocks they cannot solve...why teaching "gumption", process & problem solving is so important...as teachers, patience, understanding & flexibility are necessary... utter need for us to honor/assess process. Not every project gets to finish line, teachers can make mistake of not giving a lot of credit for unfinished work"
unconferences  cmk  conferences  chrislehmann  deborahmeier  progressive  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  learning  understanding  gumption  problemsolving  process  projectbasedlearning  projects  tinkering  assessment  acknowledgement  schooldesign  unschooling  deschooling  proceesoverproduct  play  meaning  2010  obstacles  patience  flexibility  complexity  lcproject  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » TEDGlobal: Transforming voting, and education
"Emily Pilloton has big idea for small community. She & her design firm, Project H are focused on transforming education in Bertie County, NC...

firm focuses on 6 principles: Design through action. Design with, not for. Design systems, not stuff. Document, share & measure. Start locally and scale globally. Build.

In the spirit of 5th principle – & because she fell in love w/ community – she & Matt now live there...working on 3 projects designed to transform local education system through design.

[1] rebuilds computer labs from place designed for “kill & drill”, getting students to take tests. Now it’s a creative, open space for exploration & interaction... [2] educational playground system invites students to learn kinetically... [3] project to teach design within public schools...

While this is a small story – 1 course, 13 students, 1 year – it’s a model for how design could lead education in future & how small communities might use education to transform themselves."
emilypilloton  projecthdesign  northcarolina  ethanzuckerman  2010  design  designthinking  tcsnmy  small  rural  problemsolving  ict  education  schools  openstudio  openstudioproject  do  doing  tinkering  exploring  making  creativity  activism  community  lcproject  systems  action  building  change  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  projecth 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Redesigning Education: Designing Schools in a Spiky World | Co.
"We need to build new environments that support experiential, creative & individualized learning. School of One...exemplifies this personalized approach to learning. Via tech-based platforms, students are given personalized lists of learning objectives, which allows all learners to achieve their daily learning objectives at their own pace. Better yet, the school supports students’ multiple intelligences thanks to a diversity of teaching strategies, which include virtual tutoring & video game-based learning."

[part of a series: http://www.fastcodesign.com/users/tle ]
trungle  education  schooldesign  tcsnmy  learning  children  teaching  schools  lcproject  schoolofone  tinkering  tinkeringschool  gevertulley  exploration  handson  experientiallearning  thirdteacher  reggioemilia 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Ping - At TechShops, Do-It-Yourselfers Get to Use Expensive Tools - NYTimes.com
"Then they will direct their disposable income and free time toward making things — stuff like chairs, toys and, say, synthetic diamonds. They will do this because the tools needed to make really cool things have become cheaper and because humans feel good when they make really cool things.
techshop  hackerspaces  markhatch  lcproject  tinkering  make  do  making  invention  us 
april 2010 by robertogreco
An Open Letter to Cory Doctorow in Defence of My Mom - Quiet Babylonian
"When people talk about making a computer that their mom can use it's because for a long time NO ONE HAS. My mom doesn't want to tinker with her computer (neither does my dad), she wants to use that time to send emails and photos and maintain the complex network of relationships that is the focus of her time online. She wants to tinker with family while I want to tinker with web pages. For her, the iPad might be perfect."
timmaly  corydoctorow  ipad  technology  open  hacking  simplicity  tinkering 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Tinkering and the grades question « Generation YES Blog
"Because often when we talk about doing something different in schools, we hear, “but how will that fit into the current classroom?” And that means everything from 42 minute periods to test prep to grades. But tinkering is one of those things that doesn’t fit in neatly. It takes time, doesn’t result in neat projects that work with canned rubrics, and might not have any impact on test scores. But should that matter? Can’t we help kids at least a little by making things more like tinkering and less contrived and pre-planned? ...Maybe we are asking the wrong questions. Maybe implementing “some tinkering” where kids are eventually graded, no matter how authentically, is a contradiction. Maybe even counterproductive if it confuses kids. Is it even worth doing?"
education  research  tinkering  grading  grades  assessment  alfiekohn  sylviamartinez  learning  schools  tcsnmy  innovation  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Summer Institute : Constructing Modern Knowledge
"minds-on institute for educators committed to creativity, collaboration and computing. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in intensive computer-rich project development with peers and a world-class faculty. Inspirational guest speakers and social events round out the fantastic event. Alfie Kohn, Deborah Meier, Dr. James Loewen and Peter Reynolds are guest speakers.

Rather than spend days listening to a series of speakers, Constructing Modern Knowledge is about action. Attendees will work and interact with educational experts concerned with maximizing the potential of every learner. ...

list of potential themes for exploration: Creativity and learning, Constructivism and constructionism, Project-based learning, 1:1 Computing, Problem solving across the curriculum, Student leadership and empowerment, Reinventing mathematics education, Computer science as a basic skill, Storytelling, School reform, Tinkering, Effective professional development, Sustaining innovation"
education  technology  summer  1:1  teaching  laptops  e-learning  conferences  events  2010  constructivism  alfiekohn  deborahmeier  math  compsci  creativity  learning  constuctionism  problemsolving  reform  schoolreform  tcsnmy  tinkering  innovation  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  1to1 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Importance of Right-brain Thinking in Education - GOOD Blog - GOOD
"kids were great...earnest & curious...to say they captured my heart would be an understatement. However, teaching them revealed a stark illustration of situation we’re facing in education, at least from my point of view as a designer. The skills or intuition I assumed they had for drawing, observation & building were alarmingly underdeveloped. In short, any in-born human willingness to experiment, cut, glue, break, build or paint, had atrophied. I had set out to teach design as a problem solving process (which it is!) but along the way I had forgotten that it is also a frame of mind— almost literally. In design, thinking “differently” is paramount. Often, that is achieved through expressions like building, drawing, tinkering. Using your hands to build, draw, & tinker takes the problem out of your head, or as some science might indicate, from 1 side of your head to the other. The education system, for myriad reasons valid & otherwise, has abandoned “right-brained” skills."
education  teaching  design  tcsnmy  learning  designthinking  rightbrain  problemsolving  tinkering  iteration  art  drawing  building  handson 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Pasta&Vinegar » Those Magnificent Men in Their Failing Machines
“It made me think about the beginning of that wonderful film, Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, in which you see a litany of failed aircraft. You laugh, but you also see how seriously involved everybody was in trying to fly. All the failure, all the things that didn’t work, make you realize that the Wright brothers were really something. All the paths taken, all the good intentions, the logistics, the absurdities, all the hopes of people trying to fly testifying to the power we have when we refuse to quit.

There should be a museum dedicated to human invention failure. The only problem it would face would be its overnight success. In almost any scientific field, it would add enormously to the understanding of what does work by showing what doesn’t work. In developing the polio vaccine, Jonas Salk spent 98 percent of his time documenting the things that didn’t work until he found the thing that did.“

[Related: http://liftlab.com/think/nova/2010/02/06/slides-from-interaction2010-talk/]
failure  nicolasnova  flight  jonassalk  iteration  tinkering  museums  success  persistence  tcsnmy 
february 2010 by robertogreco
running to stand still « Higher Edison
"Sylvia’s session was built around the notion of bricolage—playful experimentation, conversation with materials at hand, hands-on improv, fondness for the found, passion, tinkering with intent, what-have-you with what-you-have—as an alternate lens on knowledge construction. It’s remix culture in full flower, and it stands in direct counterpoint to traditional analytical problem-solving. Given generous amounts of space, time, at-hand materials, and low or no evaluation pressure, learners will figure things out and make meaning.

Is “curriculum” a restrictive construct that inhibits natural passion-based learning, a lockstep model demanding rigid adherence?

Or do the constructed boundaries of a curriculum serve as a guide-path for learning, a constraint [2] that, by focusing attention, sparks a creative response?

In other words, does curriculum keep us on track, or keep us from the constructive, creative process of getting lost?"
sylviamartinez  curriculum  learning  constructivism  shellyblake-pock  education  unschooling  deschooling  leaning  tcsnmy  tinkering  iteration  curiosity  play  experimentation  make  do  passion  knowledge  remixculture  remix  culture  improvisation  remixing 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Tinkerer’s Sunset [dive into mark]
"Once upon a time, Apple made the machines that made me who I am. I became who I am by tinkering. Now it seems they’re doing everything in their power to stop my kids from finding that sense of wonder. Apple has declared war on the tinkerers of the world. With every software update, the previous generation of “jailbreaks” stop working, and people have to find new ways to break into their own computers. There won’t ever be a MacsBug for the iPad. There won’t be a ResEdit, or a Copy ][+ sector editor, or an iPad Peeks & Pokes Chart. And that’s a real loss. Maybe not to you, but to somebody who doesn’t even know it yet."
ipad  apple  iphone  closed  tinkering  programming  coding  learning  children  computers  development  computer  drm  hacking  hacks  hardware  handheld  freedom  future  software  hackers  appleii  hack  computing  trends  2010  teaching 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — On the iPad
"The iPad is an attractive, thoughtfully designed, deeply cynical thing. It is a digital consumption machine. As Tim Bray and Peter Kirn have pointed out, it’s a device that does little to enable creativity...
ipad  apple  technology  programming  iphone  software  creativity  tinkering  hacking  2010 
january 2010 by robertogreco
National Lab Day
"Students love to explore. They ask questions, they are curious.
They are natural scientists.
They poke and prod and test.
They gain feedback and try new strategies.
We now have an opportunity to bring hands-on, tinkering-based learning to a new level in the United States. The growing body of work supported by foundations coupled with an Administration that is highly supportive of innovation in learning makes for a powerful force."
learning  science  education  tinkering  handson  projectbasedlearning  us  teaching  reference  sharingtechnology  engineering  making  doing  iteration  experimentation  exploration  inquiry  math  nationalabday  labs  pbl 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Working Together to Create a National Learning Community - O'Reilly Radar
"Research shows that hands-on learning is powerful and effective. In the well-meaning efforts to create standards in education, context, creativity, and our natural inclinations to explore and play, have been replaced with mountains of homework and a curriculum that is unlikely to effectively prepare youth for the 21st century. In schools, failure is stigmatized, emotionally disabling, and has become a label and a measure rather than part of a feedback system supporting iteration and exploration. The most productive scientists and inventors will tell you that they fail constantly, all day long. ... With hands-on learning, failure is iteration, in the spirit of how the most accomplished scientists and inventors work. In the somewhat misguided efforts to “teacher proof” the educational system, we have lost what good teachers bring to the system: passion, curiosity, love of learning, and an ability to create a learning ecosystem in a classroom, a school and a community."
tcsnmy  education  unschooling  deschooling  handson  learning  iteration  lcproject  gamechanging  lindastone  nationallabday  science  passion  curiosity  creativity  invention  teaching  play  failure  edtech  loveoflearning  context  via:preoccupations  tinkering  projectbasedlearning  labs  pbl 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Meet Bruce Mau. He wants to redesign the world
"Early in his career, Mau began to consider the idea that everything a business does matters; that every action communicates a message to the world and also has consequences on some level...saw...compartmentalised thinking as standard practice in business, & felt that it allowed industry to wreak havoc on the world...Study. Use the necessity of production as an excuse to study. Mau has always believed that a design studio should be a place of study & that designing should be an exercise in lifelong learning. Mau recommends making your own design studio, wherever it may be, into an environment that encourages learning. Surround yourself with ideas; stock the place with books. Just don't spend too much time arranging the bookshelf...new iterations of Massive Change idea...network of schools, or "centres for massive change"...franchise concept of massive change to universities or companies, enabling them to set up their own design/innovation labs using Mau's methodologies"
brucemau  bmd  iwb  lifelonglearning  tcsnmy  lcproject  learning  bookfuturism  design  gamechanging  manifestos  innovation  optimism  future  schooldesign  growth  massivechange  change  society  glvo  diy  tinkering  making  do  doing  openstudioproject 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Tinkering Makes Comeback Amid Crisis - WSJ.com
"American tradition of tinkering...is making comeback, boosted by renewed interest in hands-on work amid economic crisis & falling prices of high-tech tools & materials...Engineering schools across country report students are showing an enthusiasm for hands-on work that hasn't been seen in years. Workshops for people to share tools & ideas -"hackerspaces"- are popping up all over country...124 in US...up from a handful at the start of last year. SparkFun...expects sales of about $10 million this year, up from $6 million in 2008. "Make" mag...has grown from 22,000 subscribers in 2005 to > 100,000 now...annual "Maker Faire"...attracted 75,000 people this year. "We've had this merging of DIY with technology," says Bre Pettis..."I'm calling it Industrial Revolution 2."...Hands-on is catching on at other schools...27% more undergrads earned mechanical-engineering degrees in 2008 than 2003...[while] # of computer-engineering graduates slipped by 31%."
hacking  tinkering  diy  make  making  doing  tcsnmy  lcproject  hackerspaces  trends  handson  2009  engineering  arduino  makemagazine  sparkfun  education  universities  colleges  learning  manufacturing  fabbing  electronics 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Scratch: Programming for All | November 2009 | Communications of the ACM
""Digital fluency" should mean designing, creating, and remixing, not just browsing, chatting, and interacting." ... "As we develop future versions, our goal is to make Scratch even more tinkerable, meaningful, and social. With our Scratch Sensor Board (http://info.scratch.mit.edu/Sensor_Boards External Link), people can create Scratch projects that sense and react to events in the physical world. We are also developing a version of Scratch that runs on mobile devices and a Web-based version that enables people to access online data and program online activities."
scratch  future  media  programming  tcsnmy  tinkering  srg  edg  mobile  data  ubicomp  diy  education  learning  technology  children  kids  processing  medialab  coding  teaching  mitmedialab 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Relevant History: Fred Kaplan on creative freedom
"Lots of creative moments combine prep & training w/ serendipity or the creativity that emerges out of responding to in-the-moment challenges or opportunities...Other creative acts are grounded in, or push the boundaries of, the nature & limits of the media you're working w/ (applies equally to crayons, Lie groups or reinforced concrete). The tinkering movement recognizes the fundamental materiality of most creative work & puts engagement with stuff at its center...as Matthew Crawford & Richard Sennett argue in their books, the creativity of everyone from machinists to musicians is tested & tempered by the demands that their materials make & the traditions in which they work. In other words, thinking of "creativity" as mainly an expression of a psychological gift– a capacity to be creative– is wrong. Or it's incomplete. People aren't creative when they're free to do whatever they want. They're creative when they're free to experiment, to try out new things, to fail at the boundaries."
alexsoojung-kimpang  creativity  constraints  tinkering  serendipity  materiality  innovation  cultofyouth  risk  jazz  experimentation  milesdavis 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Saul Griffith: The 21st Century's Benjamin Franklin | The Stimulist
"Griffith undoubtedly could have gone to work for a think tank, but as he stated in an interview with CNN, he’d rather work for Squid, which he calls a “do-tank.” ... But above all, Franklin and Griffith share a sense that they do not have to focus in a single area to make a big difference. As Jessie Scanlon wrote in Business Week, "While most scientists go deep but narrow, focusing on one subject or problem, Griffith is ecumenical, following his curiosity and his conscience wherever they take him, and then digging deep into the issues that grab him.""
saulgriffith  tinkering  do  science  problemsolving  breadth  depth  benjaminfranklin  history  makingadifference  making  doing  tcsnmy  lcproject  glvo  via:preoccupations 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Tor.com / Science fiction and fantasy - Cory Doctorow's Makers
via: http://io9.com/5311990/how-to-survive-the-next-depression-with-cory-doctorow "it's a fun, smart thought experiment that basically asks the question: What if the people who read MAKE: magazine became activists who wanted to subvert more than licensing agreements? In a near future of economic collapse, unemployed hardware hackers start setting up guerrilla amusement park rides and making the good kind of trouble that earns people a little more freedom. And of course, sinister representatives from major entertainment corporations are hot on their tails . . ."
makers  corydoctorow  books  sciencefiction  tinkering  engineering  fiction  future  recession  greatdepression  diy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Imaginary Gadgets 0005: The fantastic machines of Leonardo | Beyond The Beyond
"He makes no effort to advance learning in general. If a project fails to find financing, he abandons it. In certain especially hasty sketches, he seems to be ridding himself of nagging ideas in order to free himself to turn his attention to something more mentally refreshing."
leonardodavinci  invention  renaissance  history  design  art  mechanics  tcsnmy  creativity  machines  tinkering  thinking  failure  learning 
july 2009 by robertogreco
TED Blog: TED's Facebook fans asked Gever Tulley absolutely anything -- and he answered
Just a few clips: "In support of both of those ideas, we are working with a homeschooling (both unschooling, and curriculum-based) group in Santa Rosa, California who are allowing us to experiment with their children (cue cartoon-ominous laugh). ... If we are to change public policy around testing, we will have to show that not-testing works better. Tinkering School is an experiment in one aspect of that, but their are some courageous efforts out there like the Sudbury Valley schools that have been creating an unschooling-like experience in a school-like facility for more than 30 years -- and showing that it works. Almost 90 percent of kids from those schools go on to higher education after graduating -- and that's after never haven taken a test in their lives."
gevertulley  tinkering  homeschool  unschooling  make  making  learning  exploration  safety  fear  interviews  children  trust  risk  tools  camps  time  education  deschooling  diy  tcsnmy  handson  projectbasedlearning  criticalthinking  failure  lcproject  sudburyschools  tinkeringschool  pbl 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Gever Tulley teaches life lessons through tinkering | Video on TED.com
"Gever Tulley uses engaging photos and footage to demonstrate the valuable lessons kids learn at his Tinkering School. When given tools, materials and guidance, these young imaginations run wild and creative problem-solving takes over to build unique boats, bridges and even a rollercoaster!"
gevertulley  tinkering  homeschool  unschooling  make  making  learning  exploration  safety  fear  interviews  children  trust  risk  tools  camps  time  education  deschooling  diy  tcsnmy  handson  projectbasedlearning  criticalthinking  failure  lcproject  sudburyschools  tinkeringschool  pbl 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Bridging Differences: Test Results Are Not a Good Stand-In for Achievement
"We forget that American economy lived off ingenuity of “ordinary” people, including many with limited or no formal educations & not just “best & brightest.” They sometimes saw themselves as anti-intellectuals—because we mistakenly created a false divide. Too many so-called intellectuals missed connection between hand & eye & brain—not to mention ear, feet & stomach! Americans turned their “ordinary” fascination w/ world of work into hobbies & finding new ways to do old things & old ways to do new things...They produced actual goods & products—good decently paid work was a source of pride. In less than half a century we have lost it. We produce less & less...I was stunned to read that we put a financier in charge of rethinking the auto industry. We need dreamers & tinkerers to invent a new America, not more fancy financial handlers...connection btwn such schooling & real-life achievement, btwn schools that prepare us for 2lst C rather than schools that expect us to actively invent it."
us  education  schooling  intellectualism  anti-intellectualism  learning  schools  publicschools  arneduncan  barackobama  finance  gm  industry  manual  bluecollar  whitecollar  crisis  gamechanging  reinvention  deschooling  unschooling  tinkering  making  make  tcsnmy  deborahmeier  testing  assessment 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Vodafone | receiver » Blog Archive » Tinkering to the future
"Tinkering offers a way of engaging with today's needs while also keeping an eye on the future consequences of our choices...Today we tinker with things; tomorrow, we will tinker with the world...tinkering might look at first like traditional engineering, but it is very different. Both are about designing & making things; but engineering tends to be top-down, linear, structured, abstract and rules-based...meant [for]...large organizations. Tinkering, in contrast, is bottom-up, iterative, experimental, practical and improvisational: informal and disorganized, accessible to anyone who is willing to learn (and fail) and it doesn't follow any plan too closely...But tinkering also taps into human psychology...is an amazingly powerful way to learn...not about mastering dry, arcane bodies of knowledge...about learning how to use your hands, materials & tools, scrounging stuff & ideas, learning from others & your own mistakes. Educational theorists call this active learning & they love it."
tinkering  diy  alexsoojung-kimpang  learning  future  tcsnmy  make  innovation  hacks  engineering  stewartbrand  wholeearthcatalog  problemsolving  autodidacts  experience 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Dog Eared “Distraction”
"When “DIY” attains to its logical zenith, fake becomes the new real. I actually can’t wait for this to happen. The pinnacle of knowledge circulation in the networked age. How-to, tutorials, maker culture, sharing of knowledge (or maybe just descriptions and step-by-step procedures) all coming together so that people make their own stuff, from new materials that do not have to be tuned for epic scale levels of manufacturing. You need something, make one or two rather than having 100,000 of them made offshore someplace and shipped at great expense and with enormous carbon footprint. Natural experimentation with alternative materials, features, etc."
julianbleecker  brucesterling  future  diy  reputation  making  make  tinkering  materials  experimentation  fabbing  manufacturing  howto  sharing  knowledge  sciencefiction  scifi 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Tinkering as a Mode of Knowledge Production in a Digital Age: John Seely Brown on Vimeo
"The MacArthur Foundation brought together educators, "tinkerers," curators, artists, performers and "makers" to grapple with questions around ensuring that all students benefit from learning in ways that allow them to participate fully and creatively in public, community, and economic life.

These interviews from five of the participants were produced to provide some insights into the thoughtful and passionate conversations from that convening."
johnseelybrown  tinkering  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  knowledge  play  models  change  philosophy  schooldesign  lcproject 
april 2009 by robertogreco
The Civil Heretic - Freeman Dyson - Profile - NYTimes.com
"All 6 Dysons describe eventful child­hoods w/ people like Feynman coming by...father...always preaching virtues of boredom: “Being bored is the only time you are creative”...Around the Institute for Advanced Study, that intellectual Arcadia where the blackboards have signs on them that say Do Not Erase, Dyson is quietly admired for candidly expressing his doubts about string theory’s aspiration to represent all forces and matter in one coherent system. “I think Freeman wishes the string theorists well,” Avishai Margalit, the philosopher, says. “I don’t think he wishes them luck. He’s interested in diversity, and that’s his worldview. To me he is a towering figure although he is tiny — almost a saintly model of how to get old. The main thing he retains is playfulness. Einstein had it. Playfulness & curiosity. He also stands for this unique trait, which is wisdom. Brightness here is common. He is wise. He integrated, not in a theory, but in his life, all his dreams of things.”"
freemandyson  skepticism  science  play  curiosity  diversity  tcsnmy  physics  futurism  future  climate  globalwarming  time  weather  boredom  creativity  sandiego  geneticengineering  tinkering  learning  habitsofmind  howwework  richardfeynman  generalists  attention  nuclearweapons  algore  optimism  intellect  genius  interdisciplinary  problemsolving  ingenuity  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  orthodoxy  heretics  belief  debate 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Mari on Mari
"When a child is growing up, [play] is the activity needed to discover one’s potential and to learn about the world. For this reason, objects used to play with are soon abandoned by children, who go on to other things, once an experience has ended."
enzomari  design  play  children  learning  tinkering  unschooling 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Bre Pettis | I Make Things - Bre Pettis Blog - The Cult of Done Manifesto
"1. There are three states of being. Not knowing, action and completion.
2. Accept that everything is a draft. It helps to get it done.
3. There is no editing stage.
4. Pretending you know what you're doing is almost the same as knowing what you are doing, so just accept that you know what you're doing even if you don't and do it.
5. Banish procrastination. If you wait more than a week to get an idea done, abandon it.
6. The point of being done is not to finish but to get other things done.
7. Once you're done you can throw it away.
8. Laugh at perfection. It's boring and keeps you from being done.
9. People without dirty hands are wrong. Doing something makes you right.
10. Failure counts as done. So do mistakes.
11. Destruction is a variant of done.
12. If you have an idea and publish it on the internet, that counts as a ghost of done.
13. Done is the engine of more."
brepettis  procrastination  make  do  manifestos  gtd  writing  tinkering  tcsnmy  philosophy  motivation  inspiration  design  development  research  work  howto  productivity  efficiency  life  cultofdone 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Spotlight on DML | Anne Balsamo: Videos and Frameworks for “Tinkering” in a Digital Age
"There were several questions I asked the group to consider in their discussions throughout the meeting:
tinkering  education  tcsnmy  learning  making  annebalsamo  research 
february 2009 by robertogreco
TED Blog: Get to know Tinkering School through a webcomic
"Two years ago, software engineer and tinkerer Gever Tulley told us five dangerous things you should let your kids do. He returned in 2009 to give us an update about Tinkering School, his part-lab-part-summer-camp where kids use power tools to create amazing things ... like roller coasters!
gevertulley  tinkering  learning  children  tcsnmy  comics  ted  time  freedom  tinkeringschool 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Do-ism « Magical Nihilism [see also: http://brainfood.howies.co.uk/footprints/instorematic/]
"I’m a designer that mainly works with digital materials, and while the pleasure of tinkering with a machine is something that I get quite a lot in software, to tinker in hardware and software (especially Meccano) is a rarer thing. It seems to activate a way of thinking with the eye, the mind and the hand that is entirely natural, and the playful problem-solving instincts of childhood come rushing back. Kevin Kelly writes in an essay about Artificial Intelligence that problem-solving is not just an abstract process of the mind, but something that happens in the world, and brands those who don’t believe this as indulging in ‘thinkism’. The intelligence of the hand, and the eye, and the body, working with material things in the world, instead of abstract symbols in a computer you might call ‘Do-ism’."
make  do-ism  mattjones  tangible  childhood  making  tinkering  russelldavies  kevinkelly  ai  thinkism  tcsnmy 
february 2009 by robertogreco
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