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robertogreco : tinosehgal   6

On Performativity — Walker Art Center
"Located at the intersection of performance and visual art, On Performativity examines the questions that emerge when our art experiences are framed around the presence of the human body—and its absence. This volume of the Living Collections Catalogue includes newly commissioned essays by art historians Philip Auslander, Dorothea von Hantelmann, and Shannon Jackson as well as in-depth scholarship on works by Trisha Brown, Eiko & Koma, Yves Klein, Hélio Oiticica, and Tino Sehgal from the Walker Art Center’s collections."



"Curator Elizabeth Carpenter surveys the notion of performativity in the context of the Walker Art Center’s own history of interdisciplinary programs and collecting landmarks. “How do institutions reconcile the challenges facing the art world today,” Carpenter asks, “regarding the historicization, canonization, institutionalization, documentation, preservation, and presentation of performance and, by extension, of the objects that it often leaves behind?”"
walkerartcenter  performativity  elizabethcarpenter  interdisciplinary  philipauslander  dorotheavonhantelmann  shannonjackson  trishabrown  eikokoma  yvesklein  héliooiticica  tinosehgal  art  body  bodies 
july 2015 by robertogreco
On Performance « SB129
"Performance has always played an important role in design… The communication of a project – be it in front of a client, a peer group, conference audience or general public, requires a level of performance. How the story behind a project is constructed and told makes an enormous difference to its reception. I’ve always encouraged my students to embrace the performative nature of project crits and presentations. If you design, direct, practice and perform your presentations you’ll go far…

If we abstract the ‘script’ from the object and focus purely on the social interaction, we have something close to the work of Tino Sehgal…

This is where performance comes into it’s own, it acts like a mirror to the actions, relationships and events that make up our daily lives. It gives us the necessary distance to examine, reflect and understand what we do and why… surely a useful activity for design and designers."
relationships  infa-ordinary  georgesperec  tommarriot  larissaseilern  socialchange  performing  movement  martinturner  matthouse  practice  teaching  education  art  theseassociations  objects  madelineakrich  performingtoknow  reflection  crits  sharing  performativeturns  constructedsituations  context  storytelling  communication  presentations  tinosehgal  design  performance  2012  mattward 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Tino Sehgal: The fine art of human interaction | The Economist
"A studio visit with Mr Sehgal consists of meeting the artist on a park bench…"

"As it happens, the artist is not keen on the term “performance” because it suggests a formal separation between artwork and audience. “Situations are much more inclusive. We are in it together,” he explains. His titles often start with the word “this”—which implies a shared moment."

““Photographs are two-dimensional…I work in four dimensions.”

"Mr Sehgal’s rigorous avoidance of documentation extends to a prohibition on written instructions and receipts. When one of his “situations” is sold, the work is described verbally in the presence of lawyers and certain stipulations are made orally…"

"Clearly, Mr Sehgal is not anti-market. Given his resolute refusal to make inanimate objects, however, he does appear to be anti-materialist. Mr Sehgal believes that “it is not so rewarding or efficient or sustainable” to clutter the world with more and more material goods."
situatedart  constructedsituations  improvisation  anti-materialist  materialism  anti-market  2012  docmentation  glvo  performance  happenings  tinosehgal  art 
august 2012 by robertogreco
SFMOMA | OPEN SPACE » A Meditation on Space (in Four Parts)
"…architecture school didn’t teach me…much about behavior, and how that behavior can activate and transform the spaces we design. Natalia Ilyin makes the following comment in her wonderful meditation on Modernism, Chasing the Perfect:

"As designers, we have been taught to love the object, love the completedness of the finished masterpiece. But because we have paid so much attention to the outsides of things, we have forgotten the insides.""

"We worked hard and did some decent studio work, but what really mattered is that we knew when to blow it all off. To fuck around and experience life, because life is where all the good ideas come from anyway."
We create devices that distract people from thinking, from working through the fear that accompanies real thinking, from coming out the other side. We help to make people believe they can’t live without movement, communication, distraction. We teach them the exact opposite of truth.
—Natalia Ilyin, Chasing the Perfect

Currently, digital technology is too often the tail that wags the design (and often art) dog, and I worry that it’s distracting us from, rather than connecting us to, what is meaningful. Ilyin is talking about design more generally, but her words are absolutely applicable to today’s digitally saturated context. Not everything needs to be mediated by technology or be “social” (in the contemporary sense of the word). Instead of the iPad, why can’t the new paradigm for a magazine be a live show that is specifically intended not to be documented (like the popular Pop Up Magazine events)? Instead of a Kindle, why can’t the new paradigm for reading a book be a live performance by actors on a stage (as in the play, Gatz!)? Instead of Facebook, why not create a restaurant to connect, engage, and educate a struggling rural community (as the Pie Lab project in Greensboro, Alabama did)?

"Instead of listening to a museum audio tour, why not discover art unencumbered by commentary? Instead of viewing art online, why not live with it in your own house? Or within the—gasp—four white walls of a gallery? Sounds downright radical, no? If it seems as if I am reneging on my earlier anti-white wall gallery stance, I am. New technology has dramatically changed the context of the white cube, and as designers we need to be aware of the increasingly distraction-filled environments people are coming from when they enter the art spaces we help articulate."
I have nothing to say and I am saying it and that is poetry. We need not fear these silences. We may love them.
—John Cage, Silence, 1961
digital  johncage  pielab  marinaabramoviç  tinosehgal  markhansen  benrubin  johnbaldessari  experience  communication  socialmedia  2012  sfmoma  participatory  paticipation  jochengerz  esthergerz  shimonattie  tiborkalman  rigo23  society  jasonbrenner  jaquestati  morphosis  johndewey  nataliailyin  galleries  museums  graphicdesign  design  art  glvo  life  architecture  ericheiman  ncm  participatoryart 
july 2012 by robertogreco

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