recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : topography   16

Natural Atlas · Topo Map
"Map and guide to the outdoors built by the people out in it. Explore 1,000,000+ waterfalls, campsites, trails, and more."



"About Us

Natural Atlas is a platform for outdoor knowledge. We want to build great maps and tools for navigating and learning about the outdoor world.

Community Matters

A local who goes out hiking on their free time is going to know vastly more about the land than a single source ever could. It’s their experiences and their intricate details that are most accurate and interesting.

Small Details Count

Knowing where a tiny spring is, or a bush of wild raspberries, can sometimes make the greatest difference in a trip. You’ll see future updates to Natural Atlas that specifically cater to this.

Landscapes Change

Outdoor maps and information gets stale fast. Mother nature puts in and takes out log crossings every season. Fire pits come and go. From user-powered content to building our own map – we want to minimize friction for updated beta.

Rich Experience

We’ve spent hours scouring maps and guide books – and it’s always been painful going between the two. Natural Atlas is the fix: a great map combined with content on everything on the map that can be searched and easily browsed.

Who We Are

We grew up in Cody, Wyoming where we – like most locals – got into the habit of hiking without trails. We’d find a place to park and then meander off in a direction that seemed interesting. Other days we’d scour maps trying to find two track roads that ventured to the most obscure places. Natural Atlas is the service we’ve always wanted: a place that catalogs all the small details that make nature and outdoor travel what it is, open to everyone."
camping  hiking  mapping  maps  travel  outdoors  topography  nature 
december 2016 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Procedural Forestry
"We looked at procedural Brutalism the other week—and, deep in the BLDGBLOG archives, we explored the moors of a procedurally generated British countryside—so why not procedural forestry?

Designer Florian Veltman tweeted two screen grabs the other week, along with the quick comment that he was "working on a procedural forest." The first image, which you can see in his tweet, is just a path or small clearing—almost a holloway—cutting forward through a forest of algorithmic leaves and branches.

But it's the picturesque errorscape seen in the opening image of this post, and in Veltman's second tweet, that really caught my eye. Captioned by Veltman as a "procedural forest gone wrong... or right?," it resembles a kind of upended tectonic plate overgrown with vegetation, pierced by the alien presence of a miscalculated substrate erupting from below.

Procedural forestry, procedural geology, procedural oceanography—the very idea of a procedural natural history is just incredible. Unstoppable worlds endlessly flowering from roots of code. Imagine landscape information modeling becoming weirdly sentient, self-generating, and aesthetically sublime, laced with errors, topographies gone wild—stuttering and mutated—in the infinite seams between digital worlds.

We watch in unearthly awe as coded terrains crack open or glitch apart just enough to reveal their mathematical interiors, buried operating systems indistinguishable from nature whirring away within the roots and leaves."
bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  procedural  forestry  geology  oceanography  naturalhistory  code  landscape  topography  math  mathematics  2014 
september 2014 by robertogreco
'Grid Meets the Hills' shows terrain shaping S.F. - SFGate
"To the extent that the phrase rings any sort of bell, "urban events" may bring to mind visions of a flash mob, a street fair or a parade with corporate sponsors.

In San Francisco, it also can mean those spots where topography and real estate collide - the seductive disruptions that in turn embody what this city has come to be.

Contentious friction absorbed by the whole, again and again and again.

This is a roundabout introduction to the best book on San Francisco I've read in years, Florence Lipsky's "San Francisco: The Grid Meets the Hills." A French architect, Lipsky uses historical maps and her own eye-popping cartography images to show how surveyors and planners tackled the steep-hilled reality of our peninsula terrain. Beyond that, she explores how the lay of the land alters not just what we see, but how we see.

"Nature and Architecture blend to compose a city that is alternately triumphant, modest and familiar," Lipsky writes. "San Francisco's identity resides more in the ebb and flow of its streets than in the Transamerica Tower. ... More in its spaces than the volumes that define them.""
books  history  sanfrancisco  hills  geography  topography  planning  urban  urbanism  design  architecture  maps  mapping  florencelipsky  1999  terrain  terraforming  terrainshaping  via:alexismadrigal 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Introducing Mapbox Outdoors | Mapbox
[See also: https://www.mapbox.com/blog/outdoors-design/ ]

"A beautiful new map designed for outdoor adventures.

Mapbox Outdoors is ready for anything: it includes thousands of biking, hiking, and skiing trails on top of detailed terrain with elevation data. Off the beaten path, find marked creeks, mountain peaks, and other geological features. What would your activity tracker or travel website look like if it cared about more than just highways?

The magic of Mapbox Outdoors is refined, curated data from dozens of sources --- combined into a seamless layer. Then with Mapbox's customization technology, the visual possibilities are endless.

Outdoors is the result of incredible improvements to our raw data sources and rendering technology. To make the map globally accurate, we improved elevation data in 9 countries. Even at the highest zoom levels, elevation lines and labels show every summit and crag. Landcover data colors every part of the surface to show the shape of the woods or a marsh in the valley.

Unlike most other maps, we store and render terrain as vector data, so it's highly customizable: you can change colors, fonts, and labels to match brands, apps, and experiences. For instance, you can render contour lines transparently to show elevation on top of satellite imagery.

As of today, Mapbox Outdoors is available for Enterprise. This summer we will roll it out for all Mapbox plans."
maps  mapbox  via:steelemaley  mapping  outdoors  topographicalmaps  topography  terrain 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Zarch
"Just been reminded of my frankly awesome “Zarch/Virus” experiment [desktop, not mobile] http://revdancatt.github.io/CAT808-zarch/ :) which I must write about."
https://twitter.com/revdancatt/status/421649541394604032
revdancatt  topography  coding  webdev  webdesign 
january 2014 by robertogreco
How Los Angeles Erased Hills From Its Urban Core
"In 1912, Los Angeles considered an audacious plan to reshape its topography. A group calling itself the Bunker Hill Razing and Regrading Association proposed to pump water from the Pacific Ocean, pipe it 20 miles to the city center, and spray the seawater through high-pressure jets against a ridge of hills to the immediate northwest of downtown Los Angeles. In all, the project would sluice away some 20 million cubic yards of shale and sandstone that residents knew as Bunker and Fort Moore hills.

Ultimately dismissed as impractical, the association's plan was only the first of several schemes to erase the hills from the city's landscape. In the late 1920s, before the Great Depression intervened, the city came close to adopting another plan by C.C. Bigelow, a mining baron well-versed in the art of hydraulicking.

Among American cities, the proposals were not without precedent. Seattle had washed away 27 blocks of Denny Hill between 1908 and 1911. In 1912, Portland used some of the same machinery to flatten Goldsmith Hill.

In Los Angeles, the proposals targeted what business interests and civic leaders saw as an obstacle to the city's growth. Suburbs like Hollywood and Colegrove boomed on the plains to the city's northwest, but the hills made these new towns difficult to reach from downtown by streetcar. Because they could not scale the hills' steep eastern faces, the trolleys circled around the hills, creating bottlenecks on the few routes out of downtown.

At first, the city carved deep road cuts and bored tunnels into the hills to relieve congestion, but regrading offered a more comprehensive solution.

Traffic relief was not the only justification. Regrading offered the prospect of new, vacant real estate to a dense central business district that found itself cornered-in by the hills. Though the city's most fashionable neighborhood had once perched itself atop Bunker Hill, the fashionable people had moved on, and the structures they left behind took on an increasingly shabbier appearance. Regrading proposals promised to wipe the architectural slate clean. And in later years, as Bunker Hill's population became older, poorer, and more multi-ethnic, the proposals also promised to remove communities deemed undesirable by developers.

A more modest plan eventually accomplished those goals without razing the hill entirely. In the 1960s, L.A.'s Community Redevelopment Agency oversaw an urban renewal program that scraped some 30 feet of soil from the top of Bunker Hill and replaced the existing built environment with 27 virgin superblocks cleared for high-rise development.

But other hills—landmarks for more than a century—did recede from downtown L.A.'s landscape."
losangeles  history  terraforming  geography  topography 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The Lay of the Land | edgeca.se
[Now at: http://fjord.style/the-lay-of-the-land ]

"I have a lot of questions. I blame the fact that I grew up in a fjord.

Our town was squeezed onto a small strip of land on the edge of a deep bay, in an oblong bowl of mountains. To get anywhere, you had to leave by either “the narrows” on one end, or “the pass” on the other. Once outside, the closest approximation of civilization was eight hours away.

Inside this pre-Internet Shangri-La, raised with old comics instead of television, I developed a concept of the outside world which required a lot of recalibrating later. My education at the hands of my cartoon masters was supplemented by months-long summer family road trips, most of which was spent creeping through interminable mountain ranges, as I studied our road atlas, and my comics.

Eventually I escaped my fjord, but a few lessons of my youth have been repeatedly confirmed: topography is important, and there’s no faster way to make an impression than with a cartoon. And by “cartoon” I mean a simplification which exaggerates some details and omits others. You could also say “model,” but I like the connotations of “cartoon”; it retains a transgressive frisson that the word “model” doesn’t have, unless you’re in fashion. But anyway.

Some of my favorite things combine topography and cartoons. One in particular holds a special place in my heart: the raised relief map.

I love these maps because they feel like a very simple way of approaching some very complex questions which I don’t think anyone has answered to my satisfaction:
Where are we? What is this place like? What does it mean to be here?
Lately I’ve been focusing on a small part of this question set, something I’ve never felt I thoroughly understood: How big are mountains?"



"Whether due to limits of the material, the analytic or artistic judgements of the creator, or other artifacts of the process, most relief maps involve this kind of explicitly interpretive reduction. This increases their usefulness – an exact miniature of the landscape would not necessarily be more informative.

I’d love to explore a map of the world in such a style. But these things are incredibly time-consuming, requiring a lot of labor and decision-making, and eventually you run out of space. I’ve spent a lot of time working with 3D graphics, so here my thoughts naturally turn to a sub-question: Could these kinds of decisions be made programmatically in any way? And can our experience of mountains be incorporated at all into the process?

Which raises one further question: What is our experience of mountains?"
cartography  mapping  maps  dataviz  reality  perception  2013  peterrichardson  topography  mountains  elevation  comics  information  reliefmaps  canon 
august 2013 by robertogreco
GoogleFaces « this is onformative a studio for generative design.
"An independent searching agent hovering the world to spot all the faces that are hidden on earth.

The way we perceive our environment is a complex procedure. By the help of our vision we are able to recognize friends within a huge crowd, approximate the speed of an oncoming car or simply admire a painting. One of human’s most characteristic features is our desire to detect patterns. We use this ability to penetrate into the detailed secrets of nature. However we also tend to use this ability to enrich our imagination. Hence we recognize meaningful shapes in clouds or detect a great bear upon astrological observations.

Objective investigations and subjective imagination collide to one inseparable process. The tendency to detect meaning in vague visual stimuli is a psychological phenomenon called Pareidolia, and captures the core interest of this project. We were driven by the idea, to explore how the psychological phenomenon of Pareidolia, could be generated by a machine. We wrote an algorithm simulating this tendency, as it continuously searches for face-like shapes while iterating above the landscapes of the earth. As a major inspiration we took a look at the “Face on Mars” taken by Viking 1 on July 25, 1976."
faces  google  maps  mapping  pareidolia  googlefaces  2013  facerecognition  earth  topography 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Deep map - Wikipedia
"Deep map refers to an emerging practical method of intensive topographical exploration, popularised by author William Least Heat-Moon with his book PrairyErth: A Deep Map. (1991).

A deep map work most often takes the form of engaged documentary writing of literary quality; although it can equally well be done in long-form on radio. It does not preclude the combination of writing with photography and illustration. Its subject is a particular place, usually quite small and limited, and usually rural.

Some[who?] call the approach 'vertical travel writing', while archeologist Michael Shanks compares it to the eclectic approaches of 18th and early 19th century antiquarian topographers or to the psychogeographic excursions of the early Situationist International[1] http://www.mshanks.com/2012/07/10/chorography-then-and-now/ [2] http://documents.stanford.edu/michaelshanks/51.

A deep map goes beyond simple landscape/history-based topographical writing – to include and interweave autobiography, archeology, stories, memories, folklore, traces, reportage, weather, interviews, natural history, science, and intuition. In its best form, the resulting work arrives at a subtle, multi-layered and 'deep' map of a small area of the earth.

In North America it is a method claimed by those interested in bioregionalism. The best known U.S. examples are Wallace Stegner's Wolf Willow (1962) and Heat-Moon's PrairyErth (1991).

In Great Britain, the method is used by those who use the terms 'spirit of place' and 'local distinctiveness'. BBC Radio 4 has recently undertaken several series of radio documentaries that are deep maps. These are inspired by the 'sense of place' work of the Common Ground organisation."
via:selinjessa  writing  williamleastheat-moon  verticaltravelwriting  documentary  documentation  radio  photography  illustration  place  rural  michaelshanks  topography  psychogeography  situationist  autobiography  archaeology  stories  storytelling  memory  memories  weather  interviews  naturalhistory  bioregionalism  parairyerth  wolfwillow  wallacestegner  localdistinctiveness  bbcradio  bbs  radio4  deepmaps  maps  mapping  commonground  folklore  science  intuition 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The London Perambulator (full length documentary) - YouTube
"Featuring: Russell Brand, Will Self, Iain Sinclair and Nick PapadimitriouDirected by John Rogers

John Rogers' film looks at the city we deny and the future city that awaits us. Leading London writers and cultural commentators Will Self, Iain Sinclair and Russell Brand explore the importance of the liminal spaces at the city's fringe, its Edgelands, through the work of enigmatic and downright eccentric writer and researcher Nick Papadimitriou - a man whose life is dedicated to exploring and archiving areas beyond the permitted territories of the high street, the retail park, the suburban walkways.

 The ideas of psychogeography and Nick's own deep topography are also explored."
london  cities  psychogeography  willself  russellbrand  iainsinclair  nickpapadimitriou  walking  topography  situationist  2011  via:preoccupations  place  urban  urbanism  history  thelondonperambulator  uk  johnrogers  maps  mapping  space  research  documentation  photography  video  discovery  noticing  classideas 
september 2011 by robertogreco
California Map Society
"Welcome to the website of the California Map Society. We invite you to take a tour, bookmark our site and come back for more. You'll find new and unusual sights with every visit. <br />
Here you’ll encounter stories behind historic maps, ways that modern topographic maps are made, techniques for making maps and even making a geographic information system (GIS)... yourself, how to start your own map collection and much more. We at CMS especially enjoy maps of California and by Californians– which covers a lot of territory—but you’ll find much more than California inside."
california  geography  maps  society  history  mapping  cartography  topography  gis 
january 2011 by robertogreco
BIG architects: vilhelmsro primary school
"copenhagen-based BIG architects have unveiled their design of 'vilhelmsro primary school', an academic facility which focuses their curriculum on nature and sustainability in asminderoed, denmark. taking the undulating hillside of the site as a point of departure, the design features a series of bands which pleat and crisscross to merge with the surrounding topography.

the oscillating roofline is experienced from both the inside and the outside. outdoor green terraces and courtyard spaces are generated in between buildings. though all one-storey, the alternating peaks and ceiling heights allow natural daylight to stream into every class room. the sod makeup facilitates passive energy measures such as mitigating heat island effect, acting as thermal mass and evaporative cooling qualities. rain water runoff is reduced, collected and stored for non-potable usage. cross-ventilation is also encouraged through operable windows and overlapping openings."
architecture  schooldesign  design  education  learning  schools  children  sustainability  nature  topography  landscape  light  green  big  bjarkeingels 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Maker Profile - Kinetic Wave Sculptures on MAKE: television on Vimeo
"Reuben Margolin, a Bay Area visionary and longtime maker, creates totally singular techno-kinetic wave sculptures. Using everything from wood to cardboard to found and salvaged objects, Reuben’s artwork is diverse, with sculptures ranging from tiny to looming, motorized to hand-cranked. Focusing on natural elements like a discrete water droplet or a powerful ocean eddy, his work is elegant and hypnotic. Also, learn how ocean waves can power our future. Learn more about Reuben at reubenmargolin.com/"
reubenmargolin  design  kinetic  sculptures  art  sculpture  installation  math  tcsnmy  visualization  diy  waves  ocean  topography  kineticsculpture 
october 2009 by robertogreco
PingMag - Tokyo Topographies
"When Hajime Ichikawa isn’t working as a landscape architect in Akasaka, he follows his passion for Tokyo’s topography. Sometimes you’ll find him developing concepts for a future city in an altered landscape (think of the rising sea levels) for the Fibre City project, and other times he’ll be depicting Tokyo in all kinds of visualisations: He calls himself a map evangelist and GPS is just one of his tools. Hajime spoke to PingMag about his unique interests."
maps  mapping  topography  japan  tokyo  cities  gps  gpsdrawing  visualization  photography  pingmag 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Seed: Design and the Elastic Mind: In the emerging dialogue between design and science, scale and pace play fundamental roles. By MoMA curator Paola Antonelli.
"Much of this is being done by bona fide designers, but scientists and artists have also turned to design to give method to their productive tinkering, what John Seely Brown has called "thinkering." They all belong to a new culture in which experimentation is guided by engagement in the world and by open, constructive collaboration with colleagues and other specialists." ... "...importance of "critical design," or "design for debate," which he defines as a way of using design as a medium to challenge narrow assumptions, preconceptions, and givens about the role products play in everyday life"
paolaantonelli  seed  design  science  moma  gamechanging  designandtheelasticmind  nanotechnology  biomimicry  topography  brain  art  debate  eames  architecture  society  dialogue  interdisciplinary  crosspollination  johnseelybrown  dialog  biomimetics 
april 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read