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Thirteen Ways to Raise a Nonreader [.pdf]
"1. Never read where your children can see you.
2. Put TV or computer in every room. Don’t neglect bedrooms & kitchen.
3. Correct your child every time she mispronounces a word.
4. Schedule activities every day after school so your child will never be bored.
5. Once your child can read independently, throw out picture books. They’re for babies…
7. Give little rewards for reading. Stickers & plastic toys are nice. Money is even better.
8. Don’t expect your children to enjoy reading. Kids’ books are for teaching vocabulary, proper study habits & good morals.
9. Buy only 40-watt bulbs.
10. Under no circumstances read your child the same book over & over. She heard it once & should remember it.
11. Never allow your child to listen to books on tape; that’s cheating.
12. Make sure your kids only read books that are “challenging.” Easy books are a complete waste of time. That goes double for comics & Mad mag.
13. Absolutely, positively no reading in bed."
reading  books  literacy  children  parenting  teaching  humor  sarcasm  via:thelibrarianedge  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  boredom  cheating  audiobooks  rewards  filetype:pdf  media:document 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Shigeru Miyamoto, Nintendo’s man behind Mario : The New Yorker
"Miyamoto has told variations on the cave story a few times over the years, in order to emphasize the extent to which he was surrounded by nature, as a child, and also to claim his youthful explorations as a source of his aptitude and enthusiasm for inventing and designing video games."

"The Dutch cultural historian Johan Huizinga, in his classic 1938 study “Homo Ludens” (“Man the Player”), argued that play was one of the essential components of culture—that it in fact predates culture, because even animals play. His definition of play is instructive. One, play is free—it must be voluntary. Prisoners of war forced to play Russian roulette are not at play. Two, it is separate; it takes place outside the realm of ordinary life and is unserious, in terms of its consequences. A game of chess has no bearing on your survival (unless the opponent is Death). Three, it is unproductive; nothing comes of it—nothing of material value, anyway. Plastic trophies, plush stuffed animals, and bragging rights cannot be monetized. Four, it follows an established set of parameters and rules, and requires some artificial boundary of time and space. Tennis requires lines and a net and the agreement of its participants to abide by the conceit that those boundaries matter. Five, it is uncertain; the outcome is unknown, and uncertainty can create opportunities for discretion and improvisation. In Hyrule, you may or may not get past the Deku Babas, and you can slay them with your own particular panache.

The French intellectual Roger Caillois, in a 1958 response to Huizinga entitled “Man, Play and Games,” called play “an occasion of pure waste: waste of time, energy, ingenuity, skill, and often of money.” Therein lies its utility, as a simulation that exists outside regular life. Caillois divides play into four categories: agon (competition), alea (chance), mimicry (simulation), and ilinx (vertigo). Super Mario has all four. You are competing against the game, trying to predict the seemingly random flurry of impediments it sets in your way, and pretending to be a bouncy Italian plumber in a realm of mushrooms and bricks. As for vertigo, what Caillois has in mind is the surrender of stability and the embrace of panic, such as you might experience while skiing. Mario’s dizzying rate of passage through whatever world he’s in—the onslaught of enemies and options—confers a kind of vertigo on the gaming experience. Like skiing, it requires a certain degree of mastery, a countervailing ability to contend with the panic and reassert a measure of stability. In short, the game requires participation, and so you can call it play.

Caillois also introduces the idea that games range along a continuum between two modes: ludus, “the taste for gratuitous difficulty,” and paidia, “the power of improvisation and joy.” A crossword puzzle is ludus. Kill the Carrier is paidia (unless you’re the carrier). Super Mario and Zelda seem to be perched right between the two."
games  nintendo  miyamoto  shigerumiyamoto  design  art  inspiration  videogames  childhood  exploration  nature  naturedeficitdisorder  wonder  children  play  unstructuredtime  gaming  mario  japan  history  edg  srg  glvo  unschooling  deschooling  topost  toshare  classideas  narratology  ludology  adventure  rogercaillois  johanhuizinga  work  gamification  asobi  funware  music  guitar  self-improvement  kyokan  empathy  collaboration  japanese  jesperjuul  janemcgonigal  animals  focusgroups  gamedesign  experience 
december 2010 by robertogreco
What We Can Do - New Teachers - Practical Theory
"Don't just take any job. Work in places that you agree with. And ask a ton of questions when you interview. Include some of these:

* What is the pedagogy of this school?
* How do you nurture, support and develop that pedagogy?
* (To a principal) - What is your theory of action? How does innovation happen here?
* (To a teacher) - How does what you do in your classroom relate to the whole of learning in the school?
* What is the common language of teaching and learning here?
* How do you create systems and structures to support and enhance that language?
* How do teachers learn and grow here here?
* What is the role of the student here? (And don't settle for "To learn.")

And only work in the places where the answers are in line with what you believe. And never work in the places that cannot answer those questions."
chrislehmann  education  teaching  advice  values  educationalphilosophy  cv  learning  lcproject  pedagogy  change  reform  schools  interviews  hiring  toshare  topost 
november 2010 by robertogreco
"Bullying" Has Little Resonance with Teenagers | DMLcentral
"Combating bullying is not going to be easy, but it's definitely not going to happen if we don't dive deep in mess that underpins & surrounds it. Lectures by uncool old people like me aren't going to make teens who are engaged in dramas think twice about what they're doing…using the term "bullying" is also not going to help at all. We need interventions that focus on building empathy, identifying escalation, & techniques for stopping the cycles of abuse. We need to create environments where young people don't get validated for negative attention & where they don't see relationship drama as part of normal adult life. The issues here are systemic. & it's great that the Internet is forcing us to think about them, but the Internet is not the problem here. It's just one tool in an ongoing battle for attention, validation, & status. & unless we find effective ways of getting to the root of the problem, the Internet will just continue to be used to reinforce what is pervasive."
bullying  danahboyd  identity  teens  topost  toshare  empathy  socialcurriculum  culture  tcsnmy 
november 2010 by robertogreco
for the love of learning: A newsletter I send home to parents
"Because I do teach in a rather unconventional manner, I need to keep parents informed with what we are doing. This is important because most of the things parents might look for to gauge their children's learning in school are the very things I don't do.

They won't see grades, worksheets, homework, tests or even quizzes. Because these things are noticeably absent, it is my responsibility to be proactive and inform parents of what we are doing in class, and to suggest other more authentic indicators of their children's learning.

Here the newsletter I sent home in early November. It illustrates to parents some of what we've been doing and where we are going."
classroomnewsletters  homework  parenteducation  teaching  pedagogy  joebower  education  learning  schools  tcsnmy  topost  toshare 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Community. Community. Community. « Re-educate Seattle
"Community. Community. Community.

In school, we operate under the conceit that if we focus on content delivery—that is, if our lesson plans and unit plans are elegantly prepared—then human relationships won’t matter.

And after-school programs are left to pick up the pieces.

Of course, classroom teachers know that relationships matter. But school is not set up in a way to enable true community to develop. Six classes a day, five minutes between classes and 30 minutes for lunch. Get ‘em in, get ‘em out. One teacher typically sees 150 kids every day, for 55 minutes at a time. In that structure, there’s a limit to what classroom teachers can do to build the authentic, caring human relationships that provide the foundation for academic and social growth.

The failings of our schools are not a result of the failings of individuals. It’s a failing of the institution.

We need to redesign the institution."
stevemiranda  pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  education  tcsnmy  learning  community  communities  lcproject  curriculum  socialcurriculum  toshare  topost  change  relationships  responsiveclassroom  responsivedesign 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Gary Stager: Wanna be a School Reformer? You Better do Your Homework!
"Reading is important for children and adults alike. Therefore, I challenged myself to assemble an essential (admittedly subjective) reading list on school reform. The following books are appropriate for parents, teachers, administrators, politicians and plain old citizens committed to the ideal of sustaining a joyful, excellent and democratic public education for every child."
education  reform  garystager  books  toshare  topost  teaching  readinglist  alfiekohn  angelopatri  seymourpapert  seymoursarason  dennislittky  samanthagrabelle  deborahmeier  tedsizer  jonathankozol  herbertkohl  susanohanian  geraldbracey  juanitadoyon  progressive  unschooling  deschooling  learning  schools  policy  tcsnmy  lcproject 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - How to Have an Idea [The sequence quoted here is like the difference between standardized testing and formative assessment.]
A computer's brain: "You bough socks on Amazon! You'll *love* these sock monkey dolls! (erm, no, I won't …)" [You scored in the top ten percent of kids in the nth grade nationally. You must be smart!]<br />
<br />
Human brain: "You bought socks! This reminds me of this one time that my friend Mitch and I… (illogical, but hopefully meaningful)" [You helped out a classmate. And you mentioned how their predicament reminded you of something you struggled with over the summer, something that was completely unrelated except for the emotional reaction that it got out of you. Watching and helping your classmate gave you a better understanding of yourself and motivated you to share how you have changed. You are a thoughtful and caring person.]<br />
<br />
"Our brains are not computers. Effectiveness is measured by the quality of the illogical connections, not logical ones."
creativity  howto  invention  mindmapping  frankchimero  brain  human  computing  ideas  thinking  tcslj  topost  to  share 
october 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - All Creative Work Is Derivative
"Our second "Minute Meme," illustrating how all creative work builds on what came before. Photographed and animated by Nina Paley. Music by Todd Michaelsen ("Sita's String Theory," a Bonus Track on the soon-to-be-released Sita Sings the Blues soundtrack CD!). Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. More information at http://questioncopyright.org/minute_memes/all_creative_work_is_derivative High res version at: http://www.archive.org/details/AllCreativeWorkIsDerivative [Via: http://blog.frankchimero.com/post/1310613784/all-creative-work-is-derivative-via ]
copyright  art  creative  education  philosophy  meta  video  copyleft  toshare  topost 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » You Know This is True
"I know lots of parents who aren’t all that thrilled w/ the system but who are assuaged by idea that schools their kids are in will at least push them along to success on traditional path. Opting for something else is just too hard, & to be honest, too “untested.”…

But this all takes on more relevance in the context of the “What to do About Schools?” conversations that we’ve been enduring the past couple of months. The “problems” we face w/ schools are right now are less about schools themselves & more about lack of vision & fear of change. Put simply, age-grouped, subject-delineated, 8am-2pm, September-June, one-size-fits-all system that we have makes process of education easy. The realities of personal, self-directed, real problem-solving learning in a connected world are anything but.

Still, the hardest reality right now is that there is no groundswell to do school differently, not just “better.” Seems it’s easy to see a path to “better.” “Different” is just too scary."
willrichardson  schools  education  unschooling  deschooling  homeschool  tcsnmy  change  gamechanging  fear  vision  topost  toshare  schooling  schooliness  stagnation  racetonowhere  parenting  lcproject 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Portrait of a child's wonder years - The Irish Times - Tue, Oct 05, 2010
"He doesn’t point to his controversial claim that watching films as a child can be as beneficial a part of early childcare as being read books. He doesn’t bring up his championing of creches because they ape the way ancient tribal societies rear children.

What surprised him most, he says on the phone from his home in England, was just how full of ability children aged two to five really are. “They are capable of so much and have such a capacity for learning that it is quite simply astonishing,” says the 81 year old.

His latest book is full of equally not-so-shocking revelations. He warns that adults should not speak to children in baby language as it could slow down language acquisition, for example – advice which can be found in even the most elementary childcare books…"It’s not up to me to tell people how to raise their children but I wrote this book because if they have all the facts, a parent will be better informed about the decisions they make.""
desmondmorris  children  parenting  books  film  learning  potential  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  schools  teaching 
october 2010 by robertogreco
There's No Such Thing as "Cyberbullying" - Anil Dash
"By creating language like "cyberbullying", they abdicate their own role in the hateful actions, and blame the (presumably mysterious and unknowable) new technologies that their kids use for these awful situations.…

The truth of it is, calling the cruelty that kids show to one another, based on race or gender identity or class or any other imaginary difference, by a name like "cyberbullying" is a cop-out. It's a group of parents, school administrators and lazy reporters working together to shirk their own responsibility for the meanspirited, hateful, incomprehensible things their own kids do.

And it's a myth. There's no such thing as cyberbullying. There's only the cruelty in all of us, and the cowardice of making words to hide from it."

[via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/1225365840 ]
bullying  anildash  cyberbullying  media  myths  cruelty  parenting  schools  danahboyd  cowardice  racism  race  genderidentity  gender  class  differences  difference  journalism  socialmedia  technology  homophobia  children  teens  youth  toshare  topost 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Apt. 11D: Governor Christie Pushes For Merit Pay and Tenure Reform
[via: http://ayjay.tumblr.com/post/1216615980/quantification-in-most-professions-is-being-used ]

A comment: "Quantification in most professions is being used to keep us from having to shoulder the messy burden of making human, intimate judgments, or explaining why we value what we value. They usually end up being the architectural equivalent of trying to build a cathedral without arches, stained glass, multiple sizes of stone, gargoyles or any other idiosyncratic part that deviates from the standard stone block used in a standard stone wall. …

A school that’s all about rewarding people who teach to the tests or who look good even on a robust, multivariable scale, is almost certainly going to overlook good teaching that misses the metric, teaching which a humane, sensitive supervisor might notice and reward.

Because we know that humane, sensitive supervisors are relatively rare, we look to the numbers as insurance against that rarity. I’d rather figure out how to make humane sensitivity the first requirement of institutional leadership."
education  quanitifcation  measurement  tcsnmy  learning  schools  teaching  human  humanity  sensitivity  leadership  deschooling  unschooling  administration  management  judgement  accountability  values  rewards  testing  standards  standardization  standardizedtesting  metrics  toshare  topost  shrequest1 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Does the Digital Classroom Enfeeble the Mind? - NYTimes.com [Some great stuff in here, including his definition of education.]
"The deeper concern, for me, is the philosophy conveyed by a technological design. Some of the top digital designs of the moment, both in school and in the rest of life, embed the underlying message that we understand the brain and its workings. That is false. We don’t know how information is represented in the brain. We don’t know how reason is accomplished by neurons. There are some vaguely cool ideas floating around, and we might know a lot more about these things any moment now, but at this moment, we don’t.

You could spend all day reading literature about educational technology without being reminded that this frontier of ignorance lies before us. We are tempted by the demons of commercial and professional ambition to pretend we know more than we do. This hypnotic idea of omniscience could kill the magic of teaching, because of the intimacy with which we let computers guide our brains."
jaronlanier  toshare  topost  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  education  schools  teaching  learning  self-directedlearning  policy  technology  computers  computing  information  informationliteracy  lcproject  knowledge  culture 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Museum of Science and Industry | Month at the Museum | The Details
"The Museum of Science & Industry, Chicago is looking for "you." & by "you," we mean an adventurous, outgoing person with a strong interest in learning about science & the world around her or him, plus the ability to write engagingly about your experiences. Ideally, you're also the web-savvy sort who can keep your thumb out of frame when taking photographs. If that "you" sounds like you, or if you are simply curious about this intriguing endeavor, then you should read on.

We're looking for someone to take on a once-in-a-lifetime assignment: spend a Month at the Museum, to live & breathe science 24/7 for 30 days. From October 20 to November 18, 2010, this person's mission will be to experience all the fun & education that fits in this historic 14-acre building, living here & reporting your experience to the outside world. There will be plenty of time to explore the Museum & its exhibits after hours, with access to rarely seen nooks and crannies of this 77-year-old institution."

[video submission: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twPrFLkvsnM
via: http://blog.beplayfuldesign.com/post/1128967692/ ]
museums  chicago  residencies  oddjobs  science  tcsnmy  classideas  topost  toshare  msichicago 
september 2010 by robertogreco
New Designs for Learning: A Conversation with IDEO Founder David Kelley | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights
"Analytical thinking is great. It’s the way you learned to be step-by-step—to collect data, analyze it & come up w/ a conclusion, like you did in science class. It is really useful, & I hope people keep doing it. It's very important. Design thinking is more experimental & less step-by-step. It's fuzzier. It's intuitive. It's empathic. We often say that it’s integrative thinking, where you put together ideas from different sources—it’s synthesis. This is a way of thinking that is not quite so linear, but you can build confidence in it if you do it over & over again…the basic premise of design thinking revolves around empathy, being understanding of what other people want, & how the world is put together from a social & emotional point of view…wouldn’t you have multiple faculty members with different points of view in the same classroom, so that the kids are not biased"

[via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/david-kelley-on-design-thinking-from-the-archives/ ]
analysis  synthesis  d.school  creativity  design  education  learningspaces  emergent  tcsnmy  schools  lcproject  designthinking  empathy  intuition  criticalthinking  21stcenturyskills  socialemotionallearning  bias  k12lab  prototyping  toshare  topost  nclb  making  doing  realworld  storytelling  generalists  scaling  davidkelley  socialemotional 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - The Back Side of Your Gullet Is Decadent and Depraved, Part 4 [The beatiful ending to a great series, so well worth the wait. This is a must read.]
"Half of balance is just believing you have it…A man needs a playground, otherwise he’ll wither away…The good classes feel like they teach you the opposite of what they promised…You forget what it’s like to be light, nimble, & open, & those qualities are important for someone on a quest, even if they leave you vulnerable…Every kind of work must disfigure you in some way…Does criticism come from the opposite place that teaches you how to enjoy life?…both of them were stretching the truth a little bit, just so they could tell the truth about how they felt to one another. There was a beauty to that: lying to be wholly honest…Isn’t it good to be a little dissatisfied? Who would ever do anything if they believed everything was already good enough?…if you shine a light bright enough, maybe the world wouldn’t stop being a mess, but at least maybe you could be lucky enough see a small, glittering, beautiful little piece of it."
frankchimero  nourishment  meaning  balance  life  wisdom  design  criticism  desire  relationships  happines  memories  truth  tcsnmy  dissection  belief  play  well-being  friendship  hope  beauty  youth  age  work  topost  toshare 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - There is a Horse in the Apple Store
"When does the magic of a situation fade? When do we get acclimated to the exceptional? Is this how we get by? Would anything get done if we were constantly gobsmacked? Is this how we survive, how we stay sane? We define a pattern, no matter how exceptional, and acclimate ourselves to it?"
zombieculture  spoiledbywonders  apple  ponies  frankchimero  awareness  noticing  2010  aponyintheapplestore  tinypony  tinyponies  lookup  lookaround  humor  applestore  learning  curiosity  children  toshare  topost 
september 2010 by robertogreco
How to Create Nonreaders
"The best teachers, I find, spend at least some of their evenings smacking themselves on the forehead – figuratively, at least – as they reflect on something that happened during the day. “Why did I decide that, when I could have asked the kids?” &, thinking about some feature of the course yet to come: “Is this a choice I should be making for the students rather than w/ them?” One Washington, DC creative writing teacher was pleased w/ himself for announcing to students that it was up to them to decide how to create a literary magazine – until he realized later that he had incrementally reasserted control. “I had taken a potentially empowering project & turned it into a showcase of what [I] could do.” It takes insight & guts to catch oneself at what amounts to an exercise in pseudodemocracy. Keeping hold of power – overtly for traditionalists, perhaps more subtly for those of us who think of ourselves as enlightened progressives – is a hell of a lot easier than giving it away."
pseudodemocracy  alfiekohn  democracy  education  learning  motivation  reading  research  teaching  topost  toshare  tcsnmy  progressive  schools  writing  coercion  democratic  student-centered  studentdirected  student-led  unschooling  deschooling  2010  majoritarianism  compromise  consensus  decisionmaking  rewards  punishment  assessment  autonomy 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Education Week: All of My Favorite Students Cheat
"One recurrent theme in these students’ comments is a sense that the deck is stacked against them. They see a prestigious college as the only gateway to a good life, and they believe they need stellar transcripts and mile-long lists of extracurricular activities to get accepted. Students taking three to six advanced-placement classes, playing sports, competing on robotics teams and at music recitals, and signing up for SAT-prep classes almost always turn to cheating as a survival tactic."

"The kids themselves, however, are showing a way out. It seems significant that they want to talk about cheating with adults like me, a teacher and authority figure. And even the most strident defenders of the status quo among them admit what they are doing is bad. They would not do it, they say, “if the school worked better.”"

What we adults need to come to terms with, I think, is our own insecurity…"
cheating  teaching  dishonesty  schools  tcsnmy  competitiveness  competition  admissions  colleges  universities  assessment  learning  motivation  insecurity  parenting  toshare  topost  honesty  trust 
september 2010 by robertogreco
TeachPaperless: Why Teachers Should Blog
"…to blog is to teach yourself what you think.

And sometimes what we think embarrasses us and we must then confront our thoughts and consider whether there are alternatives.

This is real maturity. Because real maturity is not about having the right answers, it's about having the audacity to have the wrong answers and re-address them in light of contemplation, self-argument, and experience.

This is made perhaps even more evident by the public nature of the blog, and that is one of the foremost reasons all teachers should in fact blog. Because to face one's ill conclusions, self-congratulations, petty foibles, and impolite rhetoric among peers in the public square of the blogosphere is to begin to learn to grow.

And to begin to understand that it's not all about 'getting it right', but rather is a matter of 'getting it'…

we should be instilling in students both a strident determination to take part in the unadulterated public debate and yet have humility."
shellyblake-pock  blogging  teaching  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  socialmedia  thinking  education  humility  learning  edtech  debate  organization  transparency  modeling  embarrassment  maturity  risk  risktaking  mistakes  contemplation  self-arguement  experience  teacherasmasterlearner 
august 2010 by robertogreco
How To Raise A Superstar [If true, this is huge endorsement of small, progressive schools where the emphasis is not on competition, but on exposure, experience, and unstructured time, where all students are given the chance to participate.]
"smaller cities offer more opportunities for unstructured play…to hone general coordination, power, & athletic skills. These longer hours of play also allow kids to experience successes (& failures) in different settings…likely toughens their attitudes in general…important advantage of small towns…actually less competitive…allowing kids to sample & explore many different sports. (I grew up in big city,…sports career basically ended at 13. I could no longer compete w/ other kids my age.) While conventional wisdom assumes it’s best to focus on single sport ASAP, & compete in most rigorous arena…probably a mistake, both for psychological & physical reasons…While deliberate practice remains absolutely crucial, it’s important to remember that most important skills we develop at early age are not domain specific…real importance of early childhood has to do w/ development of general cognitive & non-cognitive traits, such as self-control, patience, grit, & willingness to practice"
jonahlehrer  children  childhood  biology  learning  cognition  education  sports  psychology  practice  tigerwoods  performance  competition  urban  rural  tcsnmy  confidence  persistence  self-control  patience  grit  self-confidence  athletics  athletes  variety  toshare  topost  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  sampling  malcolmgladwell  burnout  specialization  generalists  coordination  success  failure  play  unstructuredtime  specialists 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero — Anonymous asked: What advice would you give to a graphic design student? [This is not just for graphic design students.]
"Look people in the eyes when you are talking or listening to them. The best teachers are the ones who treat their classrooms like a workplace, & the worst are ones who treat their classroom like a classroom as we’ve come to expect it… Libraries are a good place. The books are free there, & it smells great… beat them by being more thoughtful. Thoughtfulness is free & burns on time & empathy… The best communicators are gift-givers… Don’t become dependent on having other people pull it out of you while you’re in school. If you do, you’re hosed once you graduate. Keep two books on your nightstand at all times: one fiction, one non-fiction… Buy lightly used. Patina is a pretty word & beautiful concept… Learn to write, & not school-style writing… Most important things happen at a table. Food, friends, discussion, ideas, work, peace talks & war plans. It is okay to romanticize things a little bit every now & then: it gives you hope… Everyone is just making it up as they go along."

[Book list: http://blog.frankchimero.com/post/993864785/you-put-together-the-remarkable-text-playlist-along ]
advice  design  education  frankchimero  empathy  thoughtfulness  patina  beausage  teaching  learning  interestingness  libraries  books  work  life  careers  glvo  tcsnmy  writing  craft  whatmatters  meaning  mindfulness  hope  truth  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  gifts  self-directed  self-education  relationships  discipline  graphics  graphicdesign  tools  wisdom  toshare  topost 
august 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - 21st Century Education in New Brunswick, Canada
"This video was produced by the New Brunswick Department of Education to stimulate discussion among educators and other stakeholders in public education in the province of New Brunswick. The 21st Century presents unique challenges for education worldwide. In order to keep pace with global change we must focus on 21st Century Skills and public education must adapt to keep students engaged." [I have some mixed feelings about this one, but it's making the rounds and could be useful as a discussion piece.]
newbrunswick  education  future  21stcenturylearning  21stcenturyskills  tcsnmy  toshare  topost 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Build Your Own Blocks (BYOB)
"Welcome to the distribution center for BYOB (Build Your Own Blocks), an advanced offshoot of Scratch, a visual programming language primarily for kids from the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. This version, developed by Jens Mönig with design input and documentation from Brian Harvey, is an attempt to extend the brilliant accessibility of Scratch to somewhat older users—in particular, non-CS-major computer science students—without becoming inaccessible to its original audience. BYOB 3 adds first class lists and procedures to BYOB's original contribution of custom blocks and recursion."
blocks  squeak  scratch  byob  teaching  programming  tutorials  edg  coding  tcsnmy  computing  toshare  topost 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » Unlearning Teaching
"I think that’s one of the hardest shifts in thinking for teachers to make, the idea that they are no longer central to student learning simply because they are in the room. When learning value can be found in a billion different places, the teacher has to see herself as one of many nodes of learning, and she has to be willing to help students find, vet, and interact with those other nodes in ways that place value at the center of the interaction, meaning both ways. It’s not just enough to add those who bring value; we must create value in our networks as well."
willrichardson  change  education  learning  pedagogy  teaching  technology  unlearning  usefulignorance  ignorance  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject  toshare  topost 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Unlearning How to Teach
"Rather than teachers delivering an information product to be ‘consumed’ and fed back by the student, co-creating value would see the teacher and student mutually involved in assembling and dissembling cultural products. As co-creators, both would add value to the capacity building work being done through the invitation to ‘meddle’ and to make errors. The teacher is in there experimenting and learning from the instructive complications of her errors alongside her students, rather than moving from desk to desk or chat room to chat room, watching over her flock."

[via: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/unlearning-teaching/ ]
creativity  education  teaching  unlearning  knowledge  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  schooliness  learning  toshare  topost  belesshelpful  intervention  lifelonglearning  ericamcwilliam  zigmuntbauman  sageonthestage  guideontheside  teacherasmasterlearner 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Jonathan Harris . Clouds and coins [Read the whole thing.]
"[I]t was the best class I ever had anywhere at any age. It was basically a grab bag of things that people should know, but things that people often never end up learning… The class was a crash course in things that are usually picked up slowly and by accident, like lost coins, over the course of your life. This class was so memorable because it was so little like school, and so much like life. School is basically a way of keeping people occupied — a theatrical set piece designed to take up time and spit out consenting consumers.

Any adult knows that what he really knows he did not learn in school. The gradual accumulation of experience is really how we learn. But unlike school, life is unpredictable, so it would be dangerous to leave the teaching of life to life. Just think how much would get left out of the curriculum, and how hard it would be to standardize tests!"
jonathanharris  education  learning  life  wisdom  unschooling  topost  toshare  tcsnmy  videogames  metaphor  standardizedtesting  schools  schooling  teaching  parenting  east  west  westernworld  easternworld  passivity  accepance  understanding  experience  experientiallearning  emptiness  heroes  identity  knowledge  mortality  replacability  children  making  seeing  building  unpredictability  curriculum  lcproject 
august 2010 by robertogreco
WNYC - Radiolab » Secrets of Success
"Malcolm Gladwell doesn’t like Gifted and Talented Education Programs. And he doesn’t believe that innate ability can fully explain superstar hockey players or billionaire software giants. In this podcast, we listen in on a conversation between Robert and Malcolm recorded at the 92nd St Y. Robert asks Malcolm if he’s a “genius denier,” and Malcolm asks Robert if he’s uncomfortable with the power of love, as they duke it out over questions of luck, talent, passion, and success."
genius  luck  talent  passion  success  love  malcolmgladwell  science  radiolab  brain  desire  leadership  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  mattheweffect  circumstance  coincidence  billgates  advantage  generations  timing 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Big Lie (Thoughts on Why School Is Not Only About Workforce Development) - Practical Theory
"A public education that centers first around workforce development will put high premium on following directions & doing what you're told. A public education that centers first around citizenship development will still teach rules, but will teach students to question underlying ideas behind rules. Workforce development will reinforce hierarchies that we see in most corporate culture, while citizenship-focus will teach students that their voice matters, regardless of station…

I want to be honest about why we teach what we teach. I'm tired of schools & politicians implicitly promising that result of successful schooling is high wages…

Teaching kids that hard work in school will mean more money is shortcut & example of shoddy logic that doesn't ring true to many kids. Teaching kids that hard work in school will help them develop skills that will help them be a more fully realized citizen & person is a harder argument to make, but it stands a much better chance of being true."
chrislehmann  education  tcsnmy  civics  citizenship  economics  schools  schooling  lcproject  umairhaque  douglascoupland  josephstiglitz  pubiceducation  publicschools  citiznship  criticalthinking  whatmatters  toshare  topost 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Summer Must-Read for Kids? Any Book - Well Blog - NYTimes.com
"children improved their reading scores even though they typically weren’t selecting curriculum books or classics teachers normally assigned for summer reading. That conclusion confirms other studies suggesting that children learn best when they are allowed to select their own books.

…most popular book during the first year of the study was a biography of Britney Spears.

“What that said to me was that there is a kid culture and a media culture that transcends what we think kids should be reading. I don’t think the majority of these kids ever read during the summer, but given the opportunity to select their own books & discuss what they knew about…in itself, motivating to them.”…

But giving children a choice in the books they read is a message many parents resist…“Teachers & middle-class parents undervalue kids’ preferences, but I think we need to give up being so uptight about children’s choices in books.”
reading  summerreading  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  2010  education  learning  meaning  self-directedlearning 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Your blog sucks. And your work. And probably mine too.
"we “visual” people need to get off of our asses & write. Sounds painful, but I’m not talking about standardized-test/public-school, 5-paragraph-format, “This-leads-me-to-conclude” writing. I’m talking about real writing that communicates. Intended outcomes are labeled, process is documented, & you say why something was made into being. Tell me why.

I want more writing like Liz Danzico’s or Jason Santa Maria’s. I want thoughtful documentation of what it’s like to make stuff. Marco Arment, developer of Tumblr & Instapaper, does that exceedingly well. He lets us into the process, explains decisions & keeps us posted on his thoughts about his work & the things corollary to his development concerns. So, based on that, I ask you this: are we trying to keep design a mysterious black box? Because if that’s what you want, you’re doing a damn good job of it…

To do meaningful curation, it requires knowledge in multiple areas…Great designers are prone to have a wide base of knowledge."
frankchimero  writing  classideas  communication  process  criticism  curation  blogs  blogging  design  glvo  generalists  knowledge  bandwagons  enthusiasm  marcoarment  lizdanzico  jasonsantamaria  realwriting  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  thewhy  thinking  sharing  value  curating 
august 2010 by robertogreco
More Educator Luddites Please | The Compass Point
"The educator luddites I have in mind are people who have always understand school to be more than test prep and who see themselves as far more than the agents of a standardized testing industry. I see them leading the way to create inquiry driven schools where students and teachers are not too busy to think. Schools where the technology serves the learning rather than drives the teaching and where the demand for original work is a collaborate effort to solve compelling problems to which no one present knows the answer. In such a school, the curriculum is not driven by the textbook, the flow of information is not unidirectional, learning is networked and students and teachers work together across the boundaries of age and experience as active seekers, users and creators of knowledge. In this rosy picture, individual schools form a kind of globally aware and networked cottage industry of creative learning."

[via first comment at: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/the-new-storywhos-doing-it/ ]
education  learning  educatorluddites  unschooling  deschooling  apprenticeships  mentorships  autodidacts  progressive  cv  tcsnmy  technology  internet  web  hierarchy  organizations  toshare  topost  gamechanging  whatmatters  michaelwesch  neilpostman  charlesweingartner  maxinegreene  elizabetheinstein  socrates  literacy  citizenship  civilization  society  standardizedtesting  student-led  participatory  crapdetection  mentorship 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The heart of what progressive education means « Re-educate
"“The faculty are interested in providing an environment of collaboration where faculty and learners will identify topics of mutual interest and act as partners in the exploration of those topics.”
education  learning  schools  partnerships  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  collaboration  exploration  progressive  pedagogy  intrinsicmotivation  evergreenstatecollege  teaching  students  stevemiranda  toshare  topost 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » And the time it takes to make them is the time taken to mean it.
"'[Martin Puryear's] sculptures look the way they do because they need to in order to mean what they do. The labor that is compressed into them allows them to work over time, and the time it takes to make them is the time taken to mean it. That they so often employ specialized tradesmen’s skills in their making allows them to work at the edges of utility—vessels that might be dwellings in the shapes of bodies—and in that fertile seam between representation and abstraction.'

A quote from “From Head to Hand: Art and the Manual” by David Levi Strauss.

Why do I blog this? I like the way that time is emphasized here rather than the outcome. The emphasis is on the the practice and process, which have so much to say about the sculpture."
sculrpture  process  toshare  topost  julianbleecker  martinpuryear  davidlevistrauss  creation  time  processoverproduct  productasindicationofprocess  outcomes  labor  craft  representation  abstraction  sculpture  craftsmanship 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The 4 S's of Adolescent Success
“In order to survive & thrive in college, students must have a stake in their own education & know how to walk toward problems. This requires an ability & willingness to approach faculty, navigate bureaucracy, tap into resources, & ask for help. In other words, it requires maturity. If students don’t possess sufficient self-discipline, resilience, impulse-control, & a keen desire to learn, the college experience can have expensive & devastating long-term consequences."

[via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/07/26/the-answer-lies-in-recognizing-that-the-real-goal-of-childhood-is-maturity/ ]
nais  tcsnmy  schools  schooloness  stress  psychology  maturity  edication  unschooling  deschooling  impulse-control  self-discipline  resilience  learning  2008  toshare  topost  integrity  honor  character  responsibility  self-confidence  admissions  collegeadmissions  colleges  universities  readiness  ivyleague  caroldweck  margaretmead  stressmanagement  michellegall  williamstixrud  success  relationships  self-knowledge  sat  well-being  parenting  happiness 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Secret of Successful Entrepreneurs | Wired Science | Wired.com
"Business people with entropic networks were three times more innovative than people with predictable networks. Because they interacted with lots of different folks, they were exposed to a much wider range of ideas and “non-redundant information”. Instead of getting stuck in the rut of conformity—thinking the same tired thoughts as everyone else—they were able to invent startling new concepts... And this returns us to meritocracy. It’s not enough to simply take the smartest kids and make them smarter. What’s just as important is teaching these young people to seek out strangers, to resist the tug of self-similarity and homogenization. Diversity can seem like a such a vague and wishy-washy aspiration, but it comes with measurable benefits. To the extent our meritocratic institutions diminish our social diversity—are your college buddies just like you?—they might actually make us less likely to succeed. Perhaps Bill Gates knew what he was doing when he dropped out of Harvard."
diversity  entrepreneurship  management  success  sociology  startups  psychology  networking  business  creativity  jonahlehrer  interdisciplinary  looseties  homogeneity  crosspollination  networks  scoialnetworks  tcsnmy  toshare  strangers  topost  harvard  meritocracy  martinruef  michaelmorris  paulingram  bias  culture 
july 2010 by robertogreco
America Via Erica: Coxsackie-Athens Valedictorian Speech 2010 [Wow. Wish I was this wise and aware at that age. Go read the whole thing.]
"A worker is someone who is trapped within repetition—a slave of the system set up before him. But now, I have successfully shown that I was the best slave. I did what I was told to the extreme. While others sat in class & doodled to later become great artists, I sat in class to take notes and become a great test-taker. While others would come to class without their homework done because they were reading about an interest of theirs, I never missed an assignment. While others were creating music and writing lyrics, I decided to do extra credit, even though I never needed it. So, I wonder, why did I even want this position? Sure, I earned it, but what will come of it? When I leave educational institutionalism, will I be successful or forever lost? I have no clue about what I want to do with my life; I have no interests because I saw every subject of study as work, and I excelled at every subject just for the purpose of excelling, not learning. And quite frankly, now I'm scared."

[Update 22 Jan 2014: now made into a comic: http://scudmissile.tumblr.com/post/108840471396/pretentioususernametosoundsmart-gooseko ]
valedictorians  ericagoldson  johntaylorgatto  unschooling  deschooling  criticalthinking  passion  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  learning  education  policy  schools  schooliness  schooling  courage  authoritarianism  slavery  busywork  pleasing  democracy  publiceducation  industrial  goals  process  graduation  emptiness  sameness  mediocrity  cv  storyofmylife  innovation  rote  memorization  standardizedtesting  testing  grades  grading  commencementspeeches  rotelearning 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Answer Sheet - Primer for ed reformers (or, it’s the curriculum, stupid!)
"*Learning, real learning—trying to make more sense of what’s happening—is as natural & satisfying as breathing. If your big reform idea requires laws, mandates, penalties, bribes, or other kinds of external pressure to make it work, it won’t. You can lead the horse to water, & you can force it to look like it’s drinking, but you can’t make it drink."

[via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/07/22/the-most-comprehensive-awesome-189-words-ever-written-about-school/ ]
curriculum  reform  criticalthinking  policy  education  learning  tcsnmy  progressive  standards  standardizedtesting  testing  rttt  nclb  motivation  elibroad  billgates  malcolmgladwell  wealth  influence  money  collaboration  understanding  humans  lcproject  deschooling  unschooling  teaching  commoncore  accountability  autonomy  righthererightnow  hereandnow  sensemaking  bighere  longnow  toshare  topost  interdisciplinary  marionbrady 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Project-based Learning at High Tech High | A 21st Century Education Film Series
"In this film, Larry Rosenstock, describes a vision for educaiton that blends the head, the heart, and the hands. High Tech High embraces learning that flows from personal interests, passion for discovery and a celebration of art, technology and craftsmanship."
education  learning  larryrosenstock  hightechhigh  projectbasedlearning  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  via:cervus  schooldesign  architecture  design  designthinking  designbasedlearning  classideas  presentationsoflearning  art  stem  respect  problemsolving  publicschools  us  charter  craft  make  making  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Fear of Spoiling
"Even if a researcher did show that today’s youth were unusually self-centered, we might be inclined to attribute that to an extraordinary emphasis on achievement and winning in contemporary America, schooling that’s focused on narrowly defined academic skills, excessive standardized testing, copious amounts of homework, and a desperate competition for awards, distinctions, and admission to selective colleges. Indeed, earlier research has shown that competitive individuals -- or people who have been instructed to compete -- tend to be less empathic and less generous. In any case, neither logic nor evidence seems to support the widely accepted charge that we’re too easy on our children. Yet that assumption continues to find favor across the political spectrum. It seems, then, that we’ve finally found something to bring the left and the right together: an unsubstantiated critique of parents, an unflattering view of kids, and a dubious belief that the two are connected."
alfiekohn  education  entitlement  parenting  generations  2010  generationme  narcissism  spoiled  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  behavior  discipline  psychology  motivation 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Constructing Modern Knowledge Reflections - Practical Theory
"luxurious learning enviro=time, resources, permission to play & learn, talk to one another...read, listen, build...we didn't have schedule, we had appointments... ...many ways to learn & lecture can/should be part of good progressive teacher's toolkit...trick is knowing when, what, how long & how you will help students construct meaning from it... we underestimate how complex work we give can be...one pitfall of problem/project-based learning for kids. When there isn't recipe/obvious sequence, roadblocks can feel insurmountable...kids get stuck...not because they don't want to do them, but because they reach stumbling blocks they cannot solve...why teaching "gumption", process & problem solving is so important...as teachers, patience, understanding & flexibility are necessary... utter need for us to honor/assess process. Not every project gets to finish line, teachers can make mistake of not giving a lot of credit for unfinished work"
unconferences  cmk  conferences  chrislehmann  deborahmeier  progressive  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  learning  understanding  gumption  problemsolving  process  projectbasedlearning  projects  tinkering  assessment  acknowledgement  schooldesign  unschooling  deschooling  proceesoverproduct  play  meaning  2010  obstacles  patience  flexibility  complexity  lcproject  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A Difference: That's Really Hard Work [Some great similarities between what Michael Wesch does with his class and what we do in class at TCSNMY.]
"The kids begin by co-creating a schedule on a wiki for the research they'll do to solve the problem they've decided to work on. They begin by digging into the problem and reading everything they can on it. Summaries of all their reading are compiled on the wiki. Typically they'll read over 90 articles, papers, or books in the first week of class as they do this. (In more typical University classes they read about three articles in the first week.) Mike guides them, having a little deeper experience in the field then they do, by suggesting other sources they might wish to explore. They continue this research and co-create a research paper for publication. When that's all done, they create very brief condensed video summaries of their research, submit them to Mike who then weaves them together into a brief (5 min?) video. All this is only possible because of the community building work they do together in the first few weeks of the course."
via:cervus  michaelwesch  tcsnmy  lcproject  howwework  classideas  projectbasedlearning  engagement  learning  toshare  topost  projects  projectideas  research  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Ethan Zuckerman: Listening to global voices | Video on TED.com
"Sure, the web connects the globe, but most of us end up hearing mainly from people just like ourselves. Blogger and technologist Ethan Zuckerman wants to help share the stories of the whole wide world. He talks about clever strategies to open up your Twitter world and read the news in languages you don't even know."

[script here: http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2010/07/14/a-wider-world-a-wider-web-my-tedglobal-2010-talk/ ]
infrastructure  bilingualism  blogging  blogs  globalization  global  ted  world  curation  ethanzuckerman  filterbubble  tcsnmy  classideas  toshare  topost  news  media  language  socialmedia  translation  internet  xenophily  xenophiles  perspective  globalvoices  languages  googlechrome  nicholasnegroponte  imaginarycosmipolitans  education  learning  understanding  flocks  GDPbias  gdp  newscoverage  tedglobal  brazil  technology  globalvillage  listening  globalism  communication  knowledge  twitter  collaboration  brasil 
july 2010 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » A wider world, a wider web: my TEDGlobal 2010 talk
"world is much wider than we generally perceive it....Tools like twitter can trap us in...“filter bubbles”–internet is too big to understand, so we get picture of it that’s similar to what our friends see...wider world is click away, but we’re usually filtering it out...wasn’t how it was supposed to work...in 1970s, 35-40% of average nightly newscast focused on international stories...now 12-15%...same phenomenon in quality US newspapers...pays far closer attention to wealthy nations than poor ones...Most media show this GDP bias...internet isn’t flattening world as Nicholas Negroponte thought it would...making us “imaginary cosmopolitans”

[video here: http://blog.ted.com/2010/07/listening_to_gl.php ]
infrastructure  bilingualism  blogging  blogs  globalization  global  ted  world  curation  ethanzuckerman  filterbubble  tcsnmy  classideas  toshare  topost  news  media  language  socialmedia  translation  internet  xenophily  xenophiles  perspective  globalvoices  languages  googlechrome  nicholasnegroponte  imaginarycosmipolitans  education  learning  understanding  flocks  GDPbias  gdp  newscoverage  tedglobal  brazil  technology  globalvillage  listening  globalism  communication  knowledge  twitter  collaboration  brasil 
july 2010 by robertogreco
How US Public School almost killed an Entreprenuer | The Do Village ["10 things that were constantly reinforced during my 12 years of public school in America that had to be unlearned as an adult desiring to be an entrepreneur."]
"10 things that were constantly reinforced during my 12 years of public school in America that had to be unlearned as an adult desiring to be an entrepreneur.

1. Fit in instead of be original

2. Follow the rules instead of questioning why they exist

3. Helping others is cheating despite the fact that everything you do as a successful adult is a team effort

4. Have good handwriting instead of teaching me to type

5. Do it because the teacher said so, instead of teaching me to understand why doing it is important

6. Don’t challenge authority instead of teaching me that I deserve respect too

7. Get good grades in all my classes, even though I will never do trigonometry ever in life. (Sine these nuts. lol)

8. Don’t fail instead of teaching me to value trial and error

9. Debating and arguing with friends is a bad thing, instead of encouraging independent thought and self confidence

10. Be a generalist and learn things I hate, instead of developing my genius at things that i like.

More Dumbshit that I still dont understand.

*Getting to school late will be punished by making you stay home for 3 days…WTF

*Memorize stuff that now can be looked up on Google.

*Learn to do calculus by hand, despite being required to purchase a $200 calculator.

*Appearing smart is more important than being effective…. REALLY?

These are all that I can think of now. Feel free to add dumbshit you learned in the comments section."
education  tcsnmy  rules  handwriting  typing  cheating  collaboration  helping  respect  authority  schools  schooliness  backwards  confidence  self-confidence  arguing  debate  generalists  specialists  doing  making  do  via:cervus  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  teaching  learning  entrepreneurship  unlearning  rote  math  mathematics  trialanderror  failure  risk  risktaking  toshare  topost  manifesto  specialization  manifestos  rotelearning 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Marco.org - School grades are hopelessly broken
"Grades don’t reflect your aptitude, intelligence, or understanding of subject matter. You don’t need to actually learn much useful material to get good grades. (& many of those who learn exceptionally well don’t get good grades.)...
us  grades  grading  highered  learning  education  gpa  tcsnmy  via:lukeneff  schools  toshare  topost  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  authenticity  writing  classideas  aptitude  intelligence  understanding  memorization  rote  teaching  schooling  schooliness  marcoarment  rotelearning 
july 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Seth Godin on Education
"Best selling author Seth Godin discusses the failure of our educational model that's built around producing factory workers."
leestranahan  education  sethgodin  learning  fear  curriculum  lcproject  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  unschooling  deschooling 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Creativity Crisis - Newsweek
"Like intelligence tests, Torrance’s test—90-minute series of discrete tasks, administered by a psychologist—has been taken by millions worldwide in 50 languages. Yet there is 1 crucial difference between IQ & CQ scores. W/ intelligence, there is a phenomenon called the Flynn effect—each generation, scores go up about 10 points. Enriched environments are making kids smarter. W/ creativity, a reverse trend has just been identified & is being reported for first time here: American creativity scores are falling.
creativity  education  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  science  china  children  schools  lcproject  unschooling  politics  us 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Only for MY Kid
"upper-class, high-achieving parents who feel education is competitive, that there shouldn't be anyone else in same class as my child & we shouldn't spend whole lot of time w/ have-nots."

[Explains a lot of push-back progressive schools get from parents who tend to share political views. Read the whole thing. Via Gary Stager comment at: http://weblogg-ed.com/2010/a-summer-rant-whats-up-with-parents/ ]
toshare  tracking  education  tcsnmy  topost  unexpectedobstacles  alfiekohn  democracy  diversity  economics  parenting  privilege  schoolreform  schools  parents  parentdemands  gifted  policy  social  racism  classism  highered  k-12  teens  reform  elitism  ranking  grading  grades  admissions  collegeadmissions  statusquo  protectingthestatusquo  unschooling  deschooling  competitiveness  competition  giftedprograms  selfishness 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Redesigning Education: Why Can't We Be in Kindergarten for Life? | Co.
"The kindergarten classroom is the design studio. All of the learning activities that take place inside...is freakishly similar to the everyday environment of my design studio in the "real world." In an architectural design studio, we work as an interdisciplinary global team to solve the complex problems of the built environment in a variety of different cultural contexts. We do this most effectively through storytelling--sharing personal experiences--w/ support of digital media & tools. A variety of activities--reflective & collaborative, right-brain & left-brain--happen simultaneously in an open environment. Like the design studio, the kindergarten environment places human interaction above all else."

[from a series: http://www.fastcodesign.com/users/tle ]
kindergarten  lifelongkindergarten  tcsnmy  design  classroomasstudio  schooldesign  learning  lcproject  howwework  howwelearn  cv  teaching  student-centered  learner-centered  toshare  topost  thirdteacher  trungle  reggioemilia 
july 2010 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Method designing
"like many designers, I have to immerse myself in cultural context of my work in order to get results. I’ve come to think of this as ‘method designing’, after method acting; way of ‘getting into character’ that consciously & subconsciously informs design process. ...approach might come from fact that, as a designer, I’ve actually spent a lot of time writing, curating & doing strategic work. All...require ability to process vast amounts of data (often media) fairly rapidly & synthesise into some new form—as does designing, or at least the kind done by designers like me. I find it difficult to have a discussion around form & function w/out trying to get at ineffable, intangible aspects of project’s context, for which I’m yet to discover a good word. Raymond Williams’ ‘structure of feeling’ partly does it, & mise-en-scène does to a limited extent, but ‘context’ isn’t quite enough, & doesn’t get at the lived experience & cultural aspects as well as the socio-economic & form-based."
mise-en-scène  structureoffeeling  danhill  cityofsound  design  methoddesigning  methodacting  immersion  cities  helsinki  literature  understanding  howwework  howwelearn  experience  culture  process  tcsnmy  classideas  writing  curating  media  strategy  data  synthesis  context  toshare  topost 
july 2010 by robertogreco
RSA - No limits
"This does not mean, of course, that every person has the same resources and opportunities or that anyone can be great at anything; biological and circumstantial differences and advantages or disadvantages abound. However, by revealing talent to be a process rather than a thing, we can debunk the simplistic idea of genetic giftedness. It is no longer reasonable to attribute talent or success to a specific gene or to any other mysterious gift. The real gift, it turns out, belongs to virtually all of us: it is the plasticity and the extraordinary responsiveness built into basic human biology."
talent  practice  creativity  psychology  expertise  learning  doing  tcsnmy  potential  davidshenck  adaptability  toshare  topost  plasticity  genius  sports  persistence  hardwork  experience  iteration 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Friendship in an Age of Economics - Opinionator Blog - NYTimes.com
"Friendships worthy of the name are different. Their rhythm lies not in what they bring to us, but rather in what we immerse ourselves in. To be a friend is to step into the stream of another’s life. It is, while not neglecting my own life, to take pleasure in another’s pleasure, and to share their pain as partly my own. The borders of my life, while not entirely erased, become less clear than they might be. Rather than the rhythm of pleasure followed by emptiness, or that of investment and then profit, friendships follow a rhythm that is at once subtler and more persistent. This rhythm is subtler because it often (although not always) lacks the mark of a consumed pleasure or a successful investment. But even so, it remains there, part of the ground of our lives that lies both within us and without."
friendship  relationships  tcsnmy  classideas  lifeskills  toshare  topost  empathy  philosophy  money  economics  gain  virtue  consumerism  consumption  society  culture 
july 2010 by robertogreco
News Desk: The Velluvial Matrix : The New Yorker
"When you are sick, this is what you want from medicine. When you are a taxpayer, this is what you want from medicine. And when you are a doctor or a medical scientist this is the work you want to do. It is work with a different set of values from the ones that medicine traditionally has had: values of teamwork instead of individual autonomy, ambition for the right process rather than the right technology, and, perhaps above all, humility—for we need the humility to recognize that, under conditions of complexity, no technology will be infallible. No individual will be, either. There is always a velluvial matrix to know about."
atulgawande  collaboration  complexity  medicine  healthcare  education  commencement  systems  newyorker  learning  knowledge  tcsnmy  humility  infallibility  autonomy  interdependence  teamwork  toshare  topost  history  health  science 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Cultivated Play: Farmville | MediaCommons
"if Farmville is laborious to play & aesthetically boring, why are so many people playing it?...answer is disarmingly simple: people are playing Farmville because people are playing Farmville..."

[via: http://daringfireball.net/linked/2010/06/29/farmville with this addition "Says DF reader James Murray via email, FarmVille is like a “Ponzi scheme of attention.”" ]
facebook  farmville  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  zynga  psychology  gamedesign  games  gaming  howardzinn  economy  education  design  culture  business  socialmedia  social  technology  media  politics  online  play  society  sociology  toshare  topost  classideas  civics  responsibility  citizenship  community  policy  corporations  manipulation  profit 
july 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - JP Rangaswami - 2020 Shaping Ideas
"JP Rangaswami is chairman of the social enterprise School of Everything. In 2020 - Shaping Ideas he talks about how the educational institutions of the past have overlooked our human urge to feel free and to participate. In social networks and the open source movement he sees the potential for a whole new approach to learning."

[Also at: http://www.ericsson.com/campaign/20about2020/jp-rangaswami.html#video-4 ]
jprangaswami  learning  learningbydoing  tcsnmy  change  schools  socialnetworks  opensource  lcproject  mentorship  apprenticeships  2010  relationships  schoolwithoutwalls  toshare  topost  communication  teaching  wikipedia  cheating 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Facebook and the Enterprise: Part 5: Knowledge Management – confused of calcutta
"Knowledge management is not really about content, it is about creating an environment where learning takes place. Maybe we spend too much time trying to create an environment where teaching takes place, rather than focus on learning."

[This + part 6 + http://bit.ly/b04OaH have me thinking about Tumblr and other online tools at TCSNMY, and how we use it to learn, model, and observe.]
knowledgemanagement  2007  jprangaswami  collaboration  learning  lifelonglearning  socialnetworking  facebook  knowledge  social  sharing  bookmarking  socialsoftware  tcsnmy  progressive  mentoring  time-shifted  place-shifted  searchability  archivability  retrievability  retrieval  search  transparency  mentorships  mentors  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  letmeshowyou  modeling  lcproject  online  internet  web  hierarchy  experience  enterprise  business  organizations  leadership  management  administration  toshare  topost  mentorship 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Austin Center for Design | On Education [see also: http://diyubook.com/2010/06/jon-kolko-on-dennis-littky-sir-ken-robinson/]
"Designers use synthesis to quickly learn new things and integrate new perspectives with their existing worldview. They are, to some degree, experts in learning, and the critical ingredients seem to translate to a strong pedagogy of education. These ingredients include primary and generative research, active participation, critique and coaching, and the ability to take risks (and potentially be wrong) without negative consequences.
design  education  designthinking  learning  tcsnmy  cv  schools  progressive  pedagogy  dennislittky  toshare  topost 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Think Thank Thunk » Surprise! My Wife is the Good Teacher, I Just Plagiarize
"He didn’t have the ingrained sense of fear and respect most kids have for teachers. He did not have the false urgency that we create in our students. He wasn’t worried about whether I was going to test him, because in preschool, you don’t have tests, just really sweet experiences."
relationships  teaching  preschool  tcsnmy  emergentcurriculum  emergent  constructivism  topost  shawncornally 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Alfie Kohn Interview 2/1/2010 - Dr. Ross Greene2 | Internet Radio | Blog Talk Radio
"In this program, Dr. Greene had the pleasure of talking with Alfie Kohn, author of Punished by Rewards, Beyond Discipline, and many other critical books. This was a fun and enlightening discussion about a variety of school-related topics, including school discipline, socially healthy classrooms, high-stakes testing...the whole gamut."

[via: http://twitter.com/joe_bower/status/17543978978 quoting "When you put autonomy and community together you get democracy."]
autonomy  topost  democracy  community  alfiekohn  education  progresive  tcsnmy  discipline  schools  teaching  learning  structure  responsiveclassroom  responsibility  trust  democratic  progressive  interviews  hierarchy  management  leadership  administration  coercion  learningcommunities  compliance  compulsory  authority  timeouts  punishment  classroommanagement  classroom  safety  comfort  care  culture  ethics  citizenship  caringcommunities  caring  classrooms 
july 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: A Half-Dozen Things Your Middle School Should be "Teaching"
"My experience in school from the age of, say 11 or 12, to 14 often leads me to the conclusion that the best "middle school" would be almost no school at all. Kids have so much to learn during this period of their lives, but almost none of "that" is academic. They need to learn how to function as independent "adults." They need to learn their bodies. They need to discover the world. They need to pursue passions of all kinds. They need to learn how to hurt and how to recover. And they need to begin to imagine their future.
irasocol  middleschool  education  adolescence  tcsnmy  whatmatters  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  classideas  change  curriculum  self  cv  choice  handson  projectbasedlearning  control  communication  topost  toshare  pbl 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Musing about learning by doing – confused of calcutta
"the Maker Generation could be in for a fantastic time when it comes to learning by doing, and when it comes to being able to augment that experiental learning with observation of example. Why do I think that? Serendipity. A number of things are coming together: Experience-capture tools are getting better, cheaper and more ubiquitous...Communal tools for sharing are getting better...The Maker Generation is more inclined to share..The need for experience-based learning in the marketplace has never been greater...There’s an increasing focus on education worldwide, with more appetite for radical approaches...Trust in historical command-and-control “broadcast mode” institutions has never been lower...A change is gonna come." [This + Parts 5 and 6 of "Facebook and the Enterprise" (http://bit.ly/5ECGKp AND http://bit.ly/ay8IXP ) have me thinking about Tumblr and other online tools at TCSNMY, and how we use it to learn, model, and observe.]
jprangaswami  education  make  making  makers  experience  experientiallearning  learning  participatory  schools  change  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  via:cervus  learningbydoing  toshare  topost  constructivism  doing  resilience 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Experimental School Gets Rid of Classes, Teachers : NPR
"imagine a school where the organizational structure is completely flat. At the New Country School in Henderson, MN, there is no front office. Visitors are immediately embraced by an airy atrium that is the centerpiece of this one-room schoolhouse...all around the room, New Country's 124 students sit at desks — real office desks — working at their own personal computers. The feeling is comfortable...hum of constant conversation, none of the screaming & yelling heard in a traditional school. Kids are free to move about the school, so there's no need for hall passes or for teachers to patrol the hall. & there's no need to send kids to the office...Students spend most of their day in front of their computers, working on interdisciplinary projects. If they're working on a history project, they have to do enough writing to fulfill the state curriculum requirements. If they don't fulfill the requirements, they have to do another project."
education  future  teaching  learning  innovation  schooling  alternative  flat  alternativeeducation  collaborative  community  tcsnmy  schools  lcproject  2007  toshare  topost 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Teen Brain | Harvard Magazine Sep-Oct 2008
"Most teenagers don’t understand their mental hardwiring, so Jensen, whose laboratory research focuses on newborn-brain injury, and David K. Urion, an associate professor of neurology who treats children with cognitive impairments like autism and attention deficit disorder, are giving lectures at secondary schools and other likely places. They hope to inform students, parents, educators, and even fellow scientists about these new data, which have wide-ranging implications for how we teach, punish, and medically treat this age group. As Jensen told some 50 workshop attendees at Boston’s Museum of Science in April, “This is the first generation of teenagers that has access to this information, and they need to understand some of their vulnerabilities.”"
brain  cognitive  psychology  research  neuroscience  teens  teaching  learning  vulnerabilities  development  parenting  tcsnmy  topost  medicine  toshare  children  age  2008  science  education 
august 2008 by robertogreco

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