recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : trading   25

dandan the transient on Twitter: "I see these two found each other, bleh. For the record decolonization is about a return to traditional values and ways of thinking, adaptation to and of tech is a cornerstone of most Native traditions." / Twitter
[via and see also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:1fb6a90208e0 ]

“I see these two found each other, bleh.

For the record decolonization is about a return to traditional values and ways of thinking, adaptation to and of tech is a cornerstone of most Native traditions. [quoting @kendrick_mccabe:]
@loisdum I’m convinced it’s a buzz word now with roots in something honorable but has lost its way. Wanting “decolonization” but utilizing the wheel, western technology, doesn’t make sense to me…

My ancestors didn’t see steel and think, “how nice but that’s not traditional.”

No they traded for and adapted it to their needs. The took the improved material and formed it into their traditional (and better) shape (the ulu).

I have any old ulu made out of a food lid that an ancestor made when Russians gave them canned foods.

Natives were often better armed then the US Army, with plains NAtives going from bows to repeater rifles while the cavalry still often used black powder.

(Note in most situations a good bow is better then black powder).

From methodology to material when most tribes found something useful they traded for it and found a way to impRove it for their use.

Adaption, ingenuity, and cleverness are traditional values.

That is why the majority of modern foods (like 87% from one article) originated from precontact Native food science.

Medicine, architecture, leadership, governmental systems, pragmatism, the list goes on, all because we experimented, discovered, and improved.

All that said, the wheel was known by most tribes before contact, and it was surely seen and understood not soon after.

It was deemed for the most part not very useful when we had canoes that could go farther, faster, and with less work.

The wheel requires roads to not only be built, but maintained. Don’t believe me, ask why the military has been trying to develop mechanical legged gear haulers since WW2. Or why hikers aren’t taking trailers on thru hikes.

And tracked vehicles are extremely damaging.

The wheel is great if you want to build and maintain an infrastructure, something pre industrial societies needed cheap or free labor to do the building and maintaining.

Laborers weren’t considered disposable to most Native cultures.

And why even go to that work when a river gets you there twice as fast and a fraction of the work?

Why struggle with a wagon up a mountain pass when a travois will glide along? I know which I’d rather have to repair on the fly.

A better question than “why didn’t Natives build wheels?” is “why did Europeans spend decades blocking, damming, and covering their natural roadways instead of just discovering kayaks and canoes?”

But now we have roads so not taking advantage of that with the wheel would be silly and untraditional.

The environment has been changed and we adapt as we always have.

A lot of folks bringing up “no domesticated beasts of burden” so let me remind you llama, dogs, and horses.

Just cause colonial history taught y’all an entire continent was filled with horses in 30 years from 8 escaped Spanish mounts don’t make it true.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/y815zgfbox6wknk/Collin.Horse.Dissertation.pdf?dl=0&fbclid=IwAR1lLBDf6SD9hl9ivIpGnuN_z7G-mlhtx54wKMpD3QJVqKq1yEptAGDuNI8

Add to your knowledge even European history (though untrustworthy compared to Indigenous history) records that at least 3 Inuit at different times crossed over to England, one of them kayaking into London on a rainy day, all preColombus

We discovered you [quoting @DanDanTransient:]
And Inuit in kayaks crossed into England and back as is recorded in history and story so I mean, there ya go

I guess I should connect these two as one does [quoting @DanDanTransient:]
Ok so I love the positive and informative comments on my wheel thread, but I want to address my favorite flavor of statement that I just couldn’t believe anyone like believed.

Summing them all up “Natives didn’t use the wheel because we didn’t have agricultural societies.”

Ok once I got done laughing at this wrong statement I doubled down on any of them in that I believe pre industrial societies require a system of forced labor to build and maintain roads. Few tribes had that here, laborers weren’t widely accepted as disposable.

I mean like Europeans may have tried for an agricultural society but I think it’s pretty verifiable that the rest of the world was doing it better.
dandan the transient

Like 87% of the world’s food today comes from pre contact American food science, and the majority of the rest came from outside europe.

Now that’s based on articles cause the closest I’ve came to being a scientist is wearing a lab coat and waving a microscope at climate change deniers.

So my numbers may be off, but we still gave the world most of its modern food.

But what I’m not off about is many tribes had flourishing agriculture both in the generally accepted method and in what I would consider non standard.

First in the generally accepted category those dudes in central America like created corn from grass, they weren’t just kinda playing around, they like made something.

Tomatoes are another example of “hey look at this little berry I’m gonna create something the size of an apple.”

Not too mention quinoa, rices, grains, and orchids that covered the land. Just cause Europeans burned a lot of it doesn’t mean it didn’t exist.

But let’s go beyond the standard accepted forms because innovation is traditional in both method and thought.

The spread of bear poop filled with huckleberry seeds to increase the amount of plants, clearing one style of tree to make room for more useful trees, clearing brush to prevent damaging fires, or carrying seeds to easier each locations for medicines and craftable plants.

When settlers arrived here they were shocked at the “wild” paradise filled with useful things, it was like forests were engineered to suit the tribes’ needs.

Spoiler it was like that because we engineered it that way.

We did the work.

Their inability to see terraforming for what is was doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. They benefited and continue to benefit from thousands of years of planning and labor.

The fact that we didn’t clear cut trees or make long straight rows to labor over doesn’t mean we weren’t planning out and caring for our lands, it means we were working smarter not harder.

Clearing wide spaces opens the door for erosion and a lack of diversity ruins the soil, increasing salt content and sapping nutrients.

Sure you can rotate crops or haul fertilizer to combat this, but why add that labor when animals and other plants will do it for you?

And let’s remember when thinking about both our ancestors and our place in modern society that: [quoting @DanDanTransient:
Adaption, ingenuity, and cleverness are traditional values.

And I think the environment will agree with me, if your definition of agriculture is limited to back breaking labor that destroys the land than agriculture needs 🚮.

But if your definition can expand to land stewardship that improves the land for human and nonhuman people 👍

And link to the next stage I guess [quoting @DanDanTransient:]
Before someone comes at this with the same energy they did the wheel thread talking about population let’s hit that myth.
indigenous  technology  wheels  steel  decolonization  tradition  culture  trading  horses  natives  blackpowder  guns  adaptation  food  science  medicine  architecture  leadership  governance  government  pragmatism  canoes  kayaks  transportation  roads  vehicles  terrain  mobility  infrastructure  society  industrialization  labor  maintenance  repair  environment  waterways  nature  land  history  inuit  2019  agriculture  ingenuity  cleverness  work  terraforming  clearcuts  trees  crops  croprotation  fertilizer  animals  plants  horticulture 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
OurGoods
"OurGoods runs on mutual respect. OurGoods exists so that creative people can help each other produce independent projects. More work gets done in networks of shared respect and shared resources than in competitive isolation. By honoring agreements and working hard, members of OurGoods will build lasting ties in a community of enormous potential."

[See also: http://tradeschool.ourgoods.org/ (previously bookmarked) and http://carolinewoolard.com/ ]
the2837university  lcproject  learning  teaching  trading  economics  creatives  sharing  deschooling  unschooling  education  alternative  tradeschool  carolinewoolard  bartering  community  ourgoods 
october 2012 by robertogreco
A conversation between Rob Walker and co-founder of Area/Code, Kevin Slavin : Observatory: Design Observer
"I know some of the people involved in Museum of the Phantom City, and they’re good people. But, in order to see the things that they want to point out, I have to go that place — well, okay. But then, once I’m there, the best way to display that information is the juxtaposition of it in front of what I’ve just traveled there to see? I don’t think so. Bottom line, maybe, is that visualizing the invisible is difficult, and might not be best expressed through the metaphor of the camera."

"What's important to me about the kinds of things we were doing with Area/Code — and all the designers around us — is that we were building systems in the middle of the data, some systems that gave us a way to read, and reasons to read it. The stories we were telling with locative games were fiction, but as always, good fiction describes the real world rather precisely."
trading  algorithmictrading  gps  geocaching  design  urban  softwareforcities  software  algorithms  cities  finance  paolaantonelli  reality  phantomcity  augmentedreality  storytelling  fiction  photography  area/code  robwalker  2011  kevinslavin  ar 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Object memory on Vimeo
“‘This trade’, he said, ‘was not the trade as you Europeans know it. Not the business of buying and selling for profit! Our people’s trade was always symmetrical.’

Aboriginals, in general, had the idea that all ‘goods’ were potentially malign and would work against their possessors unless they were forever in motion. The ‘goods’ did not have to be edible, or useful. People liked nothing better than to barter useless things - or things they could supply for themselves: feathers, sacred objects, belts of human hair.

‘Trade goods’, he continued, should be seen rather as the bargining counters of a gigantic game, in which the whole continent was the gaming board and all its inhabitants players. ‘Goods’ were tokens of intent: to trade again, meet again, fix frontiers, intermarry, sing, dance, share resources and share ideas.”

With Bruce Chatwins quote as a starting point, a group of friends got together to explore storytelling through the trading of objects…"
stories  things  possessions  brucechatwins  totems  tokens  richardhouguez  2011  objectmemory  memory  storytelling  trade  trading  objects 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Living without money - Times Online
"Former teacher Heidemarie Schwermer has lived without money in Germany for 13 years. Our writer finds out how she does it"

[via: http://www.diygradschool.com/2011/01/can-you-truly-live-without-money.html ]
culture  economics  business  community  work  germany  2009  money  moneyfree  exchange  trading  bartering 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Kevin Slavin on Lift 11: Geneva - live streaming video powered by Livestream
Quotes transcribed by David Smith: "things we write but can no longer read"; "three problems … opacity, inscrutability … The third one is darker and a little bit harder to describe — I don't even know what to call it yet"; flash crash; dark pools; 60% of all movies rented on Netflix are rented because Netflix recommended them; 70% of current Wall St trades are algorithms trying to be invisible or other algorithms trying to find the invisible algorithms"
kevinslavin  technology  algorithms  evolution  wallstreet  cities  darkpools  netflix  trading  finance  invisibilealgorithms  financialservices  realestate  nyc  manhattan  songs  film  television  tv  opacity  inscrutability  elevators  lift11  roomba  robots 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Zach Klein's Blog - Special Request
"I collect hand drawn maps. I’m proposing that you send me a hand drawn map to a place that is special to you. In exchange I will send a map of my own, to a place that I love, back to you.

Please send your map as well as a stamped self-addressed envelope (so I can mail you back) to:

Zach Klein
81 E 2nd Street #2R
New York, NY 10003

Thanks ahead!!"
classideas  handdrawn  maps  mapping  exchanges  sharing  trading  zachklein  collections  plp 
august 2010 by robertogreco
OurGoods: A Future History of Education
"More than anything Trade School for me is an archetype of the plausible alternative to over-structured, hierarchical and standardized learning we now take for granted and use in the developmental transformation of over 1.1 million school children. Trade School is an opportunity to subvert the teacher/student relationship to be reciprocal. For me it’s about valuing our collective knowledge and not the expertise of just one person. It’s about finding ways to eliminate currency and the problematic funding structures that currently drive educational institutions and their “innovation”."

[kickstarter here: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/OurGoods/trade-school-0 ]
education  tcsnmy  learning  collectiveknowledge  tradeschool  nyc  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  schools  schooling  change  reform  lcproject  future  innovation  sharing  standardizedtesting  standardization  unstructured  schoolofthefuture  design  art  diy  school  bartering  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  teaching  popupschools  trading  alternative  learningondemand  coworking  ourgoods 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Trade School – Barter goods, services and knowledge in our pop-up storefront in New York City.
"Take a class every night with a range of specialized teachers in exchange for basic items and services. Secure a spot in a Trade School class by meeting one of the teacher’s barter needs."

[Now at: http://tradeschool.coop/ ]
nyc  education  design  art  diy  school  bartering  tradeschool  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  teaching  learning  lcproject  popupschools  trading  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  learningondemand  coworking  tcsnmy  ourgoods 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Trade School: Will Barter for Skills - GOOD Blog - GOOD
"From now until the first of March, OurGoods, an online barter network, is running a pop-up storefront on the Lower East Side of Manhattan called Trade School, where entry into classes is based not on money or talent, but on meeting the needs of a particular teacher. And while some classes like grant writing and butter making have already filled up, there's still plenty of room to learn more about irrational decision-making and chair-bound pilates, not to mention composting and improvisation."

[See also: http://tradeschool.coop/ ]
nyc  education  design  art  diy  school  bartering  tradeschool  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  teaching  learning  lcproject  popupschools  trading  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  learningondemand  coworking  tcsnmy  ourgoods 
february 2010 by robertogreco
FT.com / Comment / Opinion - Mother of all carry trades faces an inevitable bust
"This unraveling may not occur for a while, as easy money and excessive global liquidity can push asset prices higher for a while. But the longer and bigger the carry trades and the larger the asset bubble, the bigger will be the ensuing asset bubble crash. The Fed and other policymakers seem unaware of the monster bubble they are creating. The longer they remain blind, the harder the markets will fall."
us  policy  economics  bubbles  commodities  finance  2009  nourielroubini  currency  government  trading 
november 2009 by robertogreco
VeggieTrader - Your place to trade, buy or sell local homegrown produce
"Wish you could turn your excess plums into lemons, or maybe even a little cash? Use this site to find neighbors to swap with or sell your excess produce to. Or if you specialize in growing tomatoes, find neighbors who specialize in other produce and form networks to share in the variety. Even if you don't have a garden, Veggie Trader is your place for finding local food near you."
classprojects  tcsnmy  gardening  agriculture  neighborhoods  vegetables  fruits  sustainability  collaboration  community  sharing  markets  food  green  local  produce  trading  fruit 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Blaine Lourd Profile - Executive Articles - Portfolio.com
"The problem was the entire edifice of modern Wall Street, in which some people —- brokers, analysts, mutual fund managers, hedge fund managers -— presented themselves as experts and were paid fantastic sums of money for their expertise. But essentially, Ellis argued, there was no such thing as financial expertise. "I read this book," Blaine says, "and I thought, My whole life is a lie, and everyone around me is facilitating this lie.""
economics  business  money  wallstreet  trading  investing  michaellewis  finance  banking  investment 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Pasta&Vinegar » Blog Archive » Taleb's "fooled by randomness"
Nassim Taleb: "I prefer to read poetry. If an event is important enough, it will find its way to my ear...explains why it is better to read the New yorker on Mondays than the Wall Street Journal every morning..." + Nicolas Nova: "reason why I walk around in cities or take so much trains: to have time to ruminate from different “information-filled” places: the internet, my apartment and newsstands+book-shops."
nassimtaleb  randomness  flow  information  predictions  news  attention  trading  bias  patterns  analysis  nicolasnova  blackswans 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Neigborrow: A social network with a purpose | Trade share DVDs books video games neighbors
"allows members to access items they want to use but don’t need to own...supports local borrowing as way to: strengthen communities, promote trust, eliminate waste & redundancy, reduce transportation & shipping costs"
activism  socialnetworking  sharing  local  green  borrowing  neighborhoods  socialmedia  simplicity  sustainability  networks  recycling  reuse  rent  trading  web2.0  environment  community  books 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Secret Enemy Hideout - Read this if you intend to copy my designs
Zach Klein writes his own creative-commons-esque sharing agreement: "1. Don’t install it w/out improving it at least one way. 2. Email me improvement. 3. Give credit ...potentially new friend in it for me. 4. offer me something you’ve created."
sharing  serendipity  online  internet  designs  web  webdesign  zachklein  friendship  relationships  social  creativecommons  copyright  trading  webdev 
february 2008 by robertogreco
FT.com / Comment & analysis / Comment - The worst market crisis in 60 years
"The 60-year super-boom is a more complicated case."..."The danger is that the resulting political tensions, including US protectionism, may disrupt the global economy and plunge the world into recession or worse."
economics  georgesoros  finance  bubbles  recession  money  markets  investing  global  credit  crisis  trading  future  trade  banking  globalization 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Bloomberg.com: Opinion: What Does Goldman Know That We Don't?: Michael Lewis (Update1) - Michael Lewis
"The only difference between Goldman and everyone else was that Goldman had, in effect, an entirely separate enterprise, sitting on top of the firm, with the power to reverse the judgment of its own supposed experts in various markets."
michaellewis  economics  goldmanSachs  finance  business  management  markets  money  risk  strategy  housing  housingbubble  subprime  organization  trading  investment  intelligence 
january 2008 by robertogreco
.: Zwaggle :.
"Zwaggle provides members with a trusted place to: * give away used goods that are no longer needed by your family * receive value from their used goods via our proprietary points based system, called Zoints * use those Zoints to obtain items you need for
sharing  recycling  parenting  shopping  trading  children  families  money 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Safe Haven | The Robert Rubin and Ben Bernanke Death Embrace
"Bernanke: But you know the dollar is at an all-time low and people are running away from our currency? Rubin: I know, but don't worry. I've sold a lot of my shares in Citi, and I'm well diversified. I appreciate your concern."
robertrubin  benbernake  economics  us  money  policy  politics  investing  trading 
november 2007 by robertogreco
FT.com / Comment & analysis / Comment - The pseudo-science hurting markets
"Academic economists are no more self-serving than other professions. You should blame those in the real world who give them the means to be taken seriously: those awarding that “Nobel” prize."
finance  investment  markets  trading  influence  economics  nobelprizes  nassimtaleb  blackswans 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - Disconnecting the Dark Pools of Liquidity
"Darknets, private channels, unlisted numbers, and dark pools of liquidity are all technologies of disconnection. Someday some of the most important information on earth will be information that is NOT connected to the global internet."
money  finance  advantage  economics  insider  information  data  darkpools  disconnection  trading  investing 
october 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read