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robertogreco : treadmilleducation   3

Myths Related to Learning in Schools
"This chapter focuses on the intellectual stultification of learners, the first of three fundamental problems that limit the quality of thinking and efficacy of the educational experience. Students in increasingly lower grades and educators at increasingly earlier points in their careers lose their joy for their work. They become jaded by the limitations on their imaginations, frustrated by the questions they are not allowed to pursue, and depressed by the more experienced peers around them who seem uninterested in their ideas. Somewhere along the way, we—educators, parents, and students alike—decided that schooling was supposed to feel this way, that the drudgery of school was necessary in order for learning to happen. We are all culpable for perpetuating this reality."
unschooling  deschooling  schooliness  learning  schools  education  via:hrheingold  drudgery  pedagogy  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  criticalthinking  curiosity  engagement  boredom  coping  wastedtime  attention  homework  superficiality  myths  grades  grading  motivation  speed  slowlearning  slowness  slowpedagogy  slow  intelligence  pace  risk  riskaversion  treadmill  treadmilleducation  racetonowhere  sageonthestage  hierarchy  freedom  autonomy  burnout  creativity  curriculum 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Gwyeth T. Smith Jr. - Gwyeth T. Smith Jr.: Delaying college for a year benefits students - washingtonpost.com
"During nearly 4 decades as a high school guidance counselor, I had generally recommended a "gap year" only to students who needed to mature. But in this wheezing economy, when jobs are precious and even state colleges are increasingly expensive, I have become a believer in the educational & financial benefits of taking a breather.

I've watched too many students get caught up in the admissions arms race and spend their high school years preening for colleges. They rocket through advanced-placement classes; they push their SAT/ACT scores to 98th percentile. Yet they don't slow down to reflect on who they are & who they want to become. Soon after plunging into their dream engineering or pre-med program, many realize that they aren't cut out to be engineers, doctors & the like.

Others have been hurtling from activity to activity since preschool and can't deal with unstructured hours. They waste their first year of college watching Jon Stewart online when they should be reading..."
colleges  universities  yearoff  education  learning  treadmilleducation  tcsnmy  glvo  schools  schooling  gapyears 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: You Don't Have to Wonder
"If you start by defining the product/output of the system as either someone prepared for more education, or ready to be trained as an electrician or nurse, then art and literature are pretty much irrelevant, except for training people to produce the expected written academic analyses, and it isn't clear you should even require that, since not only does the electrician not need to do it, I'd argue that people need it less in college than you think (e.g., I studied English at three of the top universities in the world, and I can't recall needing "...knowledge of 18th and 19th century foundational works of American literature," I still lack that, and I don't seem to need it yet)."
education  standards  benchmarks  english  literature  nextstep  academics  tcsnmy  arts  art  writing  us  policy  arneduncan  treadmilleducation  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  foundations  backwards 
june 2009 by robertogreco

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