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robertogreco : tunnelvision   12

Majoring in Idiocy | Front Porch Republic
"colleges and universities are essentially diploma retailers obsequiously bent on making the shopping experience of their customers enjoyable and painless.

…For education presently conceived and presently practiced has but one goal: the mass production of idiots.

I’m speaking—I hope—in fairly precise terms here.

An “idiot,” from the Greek idios (“private,” “own,” “peculiar”), is someone who is peculiar because he is closed in on himself or separated or cut off. In short, he is a specialist. If he knows anything, he knows one thing.

… The idiot may have extensive knowledge of a given thing, but to the extent that he has no sense of where to place that knowledge in the larger context of what is known and knowable, and to the extent that he doesn’t know that the context for the known and the knowable is the unknown and the unknowable—to that extent his knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes a collection of mere facts, which, as Cervantes said, are the enemy of truth."

[via: http://randallszott.org/2012/06/13/specialization-idiocy-jason-peters-education/ ]
cv  criticalthinking  thinking  universities  colleges  curriculum  skepticism  science  tunnelvision  knowledge  2010  generalists  certification  diplomas  wisdom  specialization  idiots  highereducation  deschooling  unschooling  education  jasonpeters  specialists 
july 2012 by robertogreco
LILEKS (James) :: The Bleat
"I’m 53. I feel the same way about it. I don't claim it as mine, even though I was here first, watched it grow up…I may not inhabit it in the sense that I feel required to check in on Foursquare or share every damned atom of information, but this mindset is not limited to people who grew up think they have the wisdom of the ages because they had a hotmail account when they were ten…

Perhaps “uncomfortably” worked better in the original Polish; maybe there’s an idiomatic implication to the word that would help me understand him better. Oh, right: global culture is more important than language, so nevermind. But while every system can be replaced, it is wishful thinking to believe this means it’s replaced by something better. Unless he equates efficiency and better suited to his needs as “better.” Isn’t there a moral component to consider? Whether or not something is good? Or are “more opportunities” sufficient? You can Godwin that construct with ease."
webculture  tunnelvision  cyberspace  youth  democracy  piotrczerski  online  web  generations  2012  webgen  digitalnatives  jameslileks 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Eating Your Cultural Vegetables - NYTimes.com
"For Lyra, just turned 6, this rapid-fire show is bewitching in its complexity — the epitome, she thinks, of sophisticated viewing. She watches “Phineas and Ferb” aspirationally, as a sort of challenge to herself. She’s trying as hard as she can to adopt the knowing, self-aware manner of story-watching that older children already have…<br />
My aspirational viewing is different in its particulars from Lyra’s, but we both embrace unfamiliar viewing experiences even though — or because — we struggle to understand them. We both yearn: Lyra to be 8 years old; me to experience culture at an ever more elevated level."
via:lukeneff  phineasandferb  aspirationalmedia  aspirationalselves  media  culture  sophistication  culturalomnivores  diversity  diversification  culturefatigue  taste  2011  tunnelvision 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Noreena Hertz: How to use experts -- and when not to | Video on TED.com
"We make important decisions every day -- and we often rely on experts to help us decide. But, says economist Noreena Hertz, relying too much on experts can be limiting and even dangerous. She calls for us to start democratizing expertise -- to listen not only to "surgeons and CEOs, but also to shop staff.""
experts  specialization  specialists  tunnelvision  generalists  listening  patternrecognition  decisionmaking  ted  noreenahertz  economics  infooverload  confusion  certainty  uncertainty  democratization  blackswans  influence  blindlyfollowing  confidence  unschooling  deschooling  trust  openminded  echochambers  complexity  nuance  truth  persuasion  carelessness  paradigmshifts  change  gamechanging  criticalthinking  learning  problemsolving  independence  risktaking  persistence  self-advocacy  education  progress  manageddissent  divergentthinking  dissent  democracy  disagreement  discord  difference  espertise 
february 2011 by robertogreco
What’s wrong with bean counting? - Steve Denning - RETHINK - Forbes
"It’s important to note what’s wrong with bean counting. It’s not that counting is wrong. Counting is good. We desperately need to know what’s working and what isn’t.

The problem with the bean counters is what’s being counted. It’s a focus on solely counting things, rather than dimensions of life related to people. It’s perfectly possible to measure dimensions like client delight and employee satisfaction, but the bean counters–and 20th Century business–focused on counting the beans.

Bean counting is the consequence of a view of the world as consisting of “things” to be manipulated, rather than people to be interacted with and conversed with and responded to.

The new economics counts the people dimensions as well as the beans. And guess what? Even in conventional bean-counting terms, the new economics turns out to be two- to four-times more productive than traditional management…"
economics  society  change  management  administration  numbers  statistics  accounting  accountability  accountants  people  leadership  standardizedtesting  whatmatters  tunnelvision 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Go Forth And Travel - The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
"For many years, I have urged young people to take a year off after high school to work and to take time off while in college to travel abroad, ideally alone for at least some of the time. Nearly everyone grows up insular. The problem is that vast numbers of people never leave the cloistered world of their childhood. This is as true for those who grow up in Manhattan as it is for those who grow up in Fargo. And as for college, there are few places as insular and cloistered as the university."

"The moment you meet people of other faiths whom you consider to be at least as decent, at least as religious, and at least as intelligent as you think you are, you will never be the same."
tunnelvision  travel  yearabroad  cv  learning  perspective  generalizations  insularity  universities  colleges  education  religion  politics  groupthink  echochambers  via:lukeneff  dennisprager  understanding  conversation  listening 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Trouble With Experts : CJR
"By abandoning the assumption that gold-plated credentials equal expertise, the press might even change history. Could journalists have helped to take down, say, Bernie Madoff, before the feds did if they had questioned the sec’s experts more? Shirky wonders.

And then there’s the chance that authentic experts (not necessarily credentialed experts) could become journalists of some kind. It’s happening already. Take the flock of professor-bloggers masticating the news on the Foreign Policy Web site or economist bloggers like Tyler Cowen. There are journalists who have become experts via either peer or crowd review…To cheaply paraphrase Isaiah Berlin, journalists can’t all be clever hedgehogs, but perhaps some generalist foxes can start growing some quills."
society  journalism  generalists  specialization  specialists  credentials  experts  expertise  autism  jennymccarthy  science  blackswans  tunnelvision  via:coldbrain  vaccines  amateur  amateurism  unschooling  deschooling  clayshirky 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Be less productive… | Blogush
"I “change” more after long periods of unproductive time than I do when I am productive. When I am unproductive my mind wanders, I explore, dream, wonder. When I am productive I am accomplishing predetermined goals…leads to stronger beliefs, or simply changes in beliefs I already had...After all of the talk of changing education, & after all of the actions based on the talk, at its core the education system will still remain the same because we will have based the changes & reforms on the existing core ideas...Next time you are in a conversation about “changing” education offer up ideas that don’t exist and prepare for the looks…how about if we removed grades completely…how about if there were no assessments…how about if there was no homework…how about if there were no classrooms, no discipline plans, no administrators, no books, no scheduled school hours, no set classes, no curriculum, no required skills to master. How about…if there were no schools."
change  reform  gamechanging  unschooling  deschooling  learning  stasis  lcproject  tcsnmy  schools  schooling  tunnelvision  productivity  thinking  wondering  homework  grades  grading  curriculum 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Multiple Measures of the Same Data
"I still have trouble believing that I live in a world where decisions to close schools would be made without even bothering to move your finger over one more column on the NECAP report to look at the writing scores. Hey! You already paid for them! They're right there. See?
data  rhodeisland  schools  policy  education  testing  tomhoffman  publicschools  nclb  standardizedtesting  tunnelvision 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Hot Trends « Snarkmarket
"Wow, I agree with Noah Brier: Google Hot Trends is the ulti­mate bubble-popper. Wor­ried your Twit­ter feed is too self-reinforcing? Con­cerned your Google Reader has become a com­fort­able cage of your own design? Here is an anti­dote. Get it via RSS drip.
media  tunnelvision  reading  rss  news  robinsloan  google 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Why Design Thinking Won't Save You - Peter Merholz - HarvardBusiness.org
"Obviously, this is getting absurd, but that's the point. The supposed dichotomy between "business thinking" and "design thinking" is foolish. It's like the line from The Blues Brothers, in response to the question "What kind of music do you usually have here?", the woman responds, "We got both kinds. We got country and western." Instead, what we must understand is that in this savagely complex world, we need to bring as broad a diversity of viewpoints and perspectives to bear on whatever challenges we have in front of us. While it's wise to question the supremacy of "business thinking," shifting the focus only to "design thinking" will mean you're missing out on countless possibilities."
adaptivepath  anthropology  complexity  business  creativity  designthinking  thinking  leadership  innovation  critique  collaboration  2009  design  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  strategy  administration  tunnelvision  falsedichotomies  diversity  diversification 
november 2009 by robertogreco

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