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robertogreco : universe   29

MIA en Instagram: “Jesus SA D ! I'm called Mathangi. I studied the deity made an L.p. and came close to understanding Hinduism as much as it's in my DNA my…”
"Jesus SA D !
I'm called Mathangi. I studied the deity made an L.p. and came close to understanding Hinduism as much as it's in my DNA my signature for MIA is a Hindu ohm🕉 and to speak truth Jesus is real.

Sri Lanka has banned social media.
Social media is a tool.
Everything stems from how we use our tool. If u do the devil's work you will spread darkness, if you do gods work you will spread light. The religion u believe doesn't matter. Both sides exist

Some people say God can't be proven so They exist on worldly plain and deal with life and times within those parameters and live a social exsistance and put belief in modernization and science .This exsistance is always changing so we have to be more fluid in adapting.

This changing society is getting faster and faster because of technology. Our human minds are trying to keep up because
we 've never had change at this rate. We as society experience growing pains. Simultaneously the tools of change can be used by those in religious exsistance good or bad. The people in the middle will be caught in the middle. Hense confusion.

Thoughts on religions.

I always say religion is like a car on a road.
It doesn't matter the car or the road it's about the fact you are heading to the same place. On this road you can start pointing fingers and laugh at other people's car or complain someone is using too much fule or emmision or someone is on a bike even . Some drive cars they chose for safety some drive ones they choose for speed , but really it's about your car and what gets you there. Path to God is a road that comes from any direction depending on where the person is coming from. The closer you get , when your about 100 miles to God you realise everyone's car is the same in that epicentre. No matter what religion , no matter if you are a monk ,a yogi, a priest ,you all are led by the same energy. This is God. God is in everyone. If you are enlightened which just means you've learnt to cut out lots of carp, you will see Jesus meet Buddha and see Shiva energy they know each other . All of these people at some point came at different times to bring you the message and passage . But it's to the same place."

[Previously:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BwhM5Q-BGXW/

"Trying to stay in the light today. "Inner peace inner peace inner peace .... " quote from kungfupanda ●○ .

I wanted to put a picture of Sri Lanka up but I don't wanna give them what they want.
I wanted to say pary for Sri Lankan but I didn't want to normalise us responding like that.
Events like this just makes me want independent journalism to be more effective in our society and not just an ecco chamber of establishment voices with Google cutting traffic to certain sites.

Jesus is a prophet in Islam too let's not jump to conclusions . May the souls who left today go somewhere greater."

and

https://www.instagram.com/p/BwkZ4kHBNKq/

"#earthday🌍. We are our biggest threat. Stayin connected to the source in solitude.

If u destroy places of worship then know everywhere is a place of worship to worship . What are u gonna do send in your warships to destroy the whole planet? Fuck off.
Keeping an eye on the bigger picture staying humble in the days of the rumble.
Living in the days of the prophercy I don't wanna be no body's property.

Staying naturally #natural #sustainably grateful to God for this amazing universe."]
mia  srilanka  2019  society  religion  christianity  islam  god  buddha  buddhism  christ  shiva  hinduism  change  confusion  socialmedia  earthday  sustainability  universe 
april 2019 by robertogreco
Ursula K. Le Guin, Keynote 5/8/14 on Vimeo
[Starting at 7:00]

“My little talk is called “Deep in Admiration.” This conference is going to be thinking about how to think outside the mindset that sees the techno fix as the answer to all problems. Just this week, I heard a poet say that the essence of modern high technology is to consider the world as disposable: use it and throw it away. Well, we know that we don't need more infantile new technologies that demand throwing away all the old ones every Tuesday. We need adult rational technologies, old and new: pottery making, bricklaying, sewing, carpentry, solar power, sustainable farming. But after our long orgy of being lords of creation and texting as we drive, it's hard to stop looking for the next technofix. We have got to change our minds. To use the world well, we need to relearn our being in it, renew our awareness of belonging to the world. How do we go about it? That awareness seems always to have involved knowing our kinship as animals with animals. Darwin gave that knowledge a scientific basis and now both poets and scientists are extending our awareness of our relationship to creatures without nervous systems and to non-living beings, our fellowship as things with other things. Relationship among all things seems to be complex and reciprocal. It's always at least two way, back-and-forth. It seems as if nothing is single in this universe and nothing goes one way. In this view, humans appear as particularly lively, intense, aware nodes of relation in an infinite network of connections, simple or complicated, direct or hidden, strong or delicate, temporary or very long lasting, a web of connections infinite, but locally fragile, with and among everything, all beings, including what we generally class as things, objects.

Decartes and the behaviorists willfully saw dogs as machines without feeling. Is seeing plants without feeling a similar arrogance? We don't know. But one way to stop seeing trees or rivers or hills only as natural resources is to class them as fellow beings, kinfolk. I guess what I'm trying to do is subjectify the universe because look where objectifying it has got us. To subjectify is not to co-opt and colonize and exploit. Rather, if it's done honestly, it involves a great reach outward of the mind and the imagination. What tools do we have to help us make such a reach? Mary Jacobus, in a book called Romantic Things, wrote, “The regulated speech of poetry may be as close as we can get to such things, to the stilled voice of the inanimate object or the insentient standing of trees.” Poetry is the human language that can try to say what a tree or a rock or a river is, that is to speak humanly for it in both senses of the word for. A poem can do so by relating the quality of an individual relationship to a thing, a rock, a river, a tree, the relationship to or simply by describing the thing as truthfully as possible. Science describes accurately from outside and poetry describes accurately from inside, you could say. Science explicates, poetry implicates. Both celebrate what they describe. We need the language of both science and poetry to save us from ignorant irresponsibility.”

[via: https://twitter.com/steelemaley/status/560283083430445057
"“To use the world well we need to relearn our being in it” -Le Guin http://vimeo.com/97364872 "]

[See also: “ARTS OF LIVING ON A DAMAGED PLANET”
http://anthropocene.au.dk/arts-of-living-on-a-damaged-planet/
https://vimeo.com/artsofliving

“Ursula K. Le Guin: Panel Discussion with Donna Haraway and James Clifford, 5/8/14”
https://vimeo.com/98270808

“Donna Haraway, "Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene: Staying with the Trouble", 5/9/14”
https://vimeo.com/97663518

“Inhabiting Multispecies Bodies: Panel Discussion with Donna Haraway, Margaret McFall-Ngai, and Jenny Reardon, 5/9/14”
https://vimeo.com/97663316

“On Damaged Landscapes: Panel Discussion with Kate Brown, Deborah Bird Rose, Eric Porter and William Cronon, 5/9/14”
https://vimeo.com/97852132

“Jens-Christian Svenning, "Future Megafaunas: A Historical Perspective on the Scope for a Wilder Anthropocene," 5/9/14”
https://vimeo.com/98751434 ]
ursulaleguin  plants  animals  art  2014  technosolutionism  via:steelemaley  things  objects  interconnectedness  interdependence  networks  systemsthinking  technology  jens-christiansvenning  donnaharaway  anthropocene  margaretmcfall-ngai  jennyreardon  katebrown  deborabirdrose  ericporter  williamcronon  jamesclifford  multispecies  objectification  subjectification  fellowahip  kinship  poetry  science  religion  morality  compassion  henryvaughn  maryjacobus  nature  humans  humanism  responsibility  environment  universe  interconnected  interconnectivity 
january 2015 by robertogreco
New Parallel Universe Theory - Business Insider
"Although the model is crude, and does not incorporate either quantum mechanics or general relativity, its potential implications are vast. If it holds true for our actual universe, then the big bang could no longer be considered a cosmic beginning but rather only a phase in an effectively timeless and eternal universe. More prosaically, a two-branched arrow of time would lead to curious incongruities for observers on opposite sides. “This two-futures situation would exhibit a single, chaotic past in both directions, meaning that there would be essentially two universes, one on either side of this central state,” Barbour says. “If they were complicated enough, both sides could sustain observers who would perceive time going in opposite directions. Any intelligent beings there would define their arrow of time as moving away from this central state. They would think we now live in their deepest past.”"



"“If we assume there is no maximum possible entropy for the universe, then any state can be a state of low entropy,” Guth says. “That may sound dumb, but I think it really works, and I also think it’s the secret of the Barbour et al construction. If there’s no limit to how big the entropy can get, then you can start anywhere, and from that starting point you’d expect entropy to rise as the system moves to explore larger and larger regions of phase space. Eternal inflation is a natural context in which to invoke this idea, since it looks like the maximum possible entropy is unlimited in an eternally inflating universe.”

The controversy over time’s arrow has come far since the 19th-century ideas of Boltzmann and the 20th-century notions of Eddington, but in many ways, Barbour says, the debate at its core remains appropriately timeless. “This is opening up a completely new way to think about a fundamental problem, the nature of the arrow of time and the origin of the second law of thermodynamics,” Barbour says. “But really we’re just investigating a new aspect of Newton’s gravitation, which hadn’t been noticed before. Who knows what might flow from this with further work and elaboration?”

“Arthur Eddington coined the term ‘arrow of time,’ and famously said the shuffling of material and energy is the only thing which nature cannot undo,” Barbour adds. “And here we are, showing beyond any doubt really that this is in fact exactly what gravity does. It takes systems that look extraordinarily disordered and makes them wonderfully ordered. And this is what has happened in our universe. We are realizing the ancient Greek dream of order out of chaos.”"
physics  space  time  2015  chaos  arrooftime  universe  arthureddington  quantummechanics  davidalbert  ludwigboltzmann  julianbarbour  timkoslowski  flaviomercati  paralleluniverse 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Eric Metaxas: Science Increasingly Makes the Case for God - WSJ
"The fine-tuning necessary for life to exist on a planet is nothing compared with the fine-tuning required for the universe to exist at all. For example, astrophysicists now know that the values of the four fundamental forces—gravity, the electromagnetic force, and the “strong” and “weak” nuclear forces—were determined less than one millionth of a second after the big bang. Alter any one value and the universe could not exist. For instance, if the ratio between the nuclear strong force and the electromagnetic force had been off by the tiniest fraction of the tiniest fraction—by even one part in 100,000,000,000,000,000—then no stars could have ever formed at all. Feel free to gulp. Multiply that single parameter by all the other necessary conditions, and the odds against the universe existing are so heart-stoppingly astronomical that the notion that it all “just happened” defies common sense. It would be like tossing a coin and having it come up heads 10 quintillion times in a row."
science  religion  god  physics  ericmetaxas  universe  via:ayjay 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Marvel Developer Portal
"The Marvel Comics API allows developers everywhere to access information about Marvel's vast library of comics—from what's coming up, to 70 years ago."
api  comics  fiction  marvel  universe  via:robinsloan 
december 2014 by robertogreco
From Fernando Pessoa, “The Book of Disquiet”
"What happens to all those people who, simply because I saw them and saw them again, became part of my life? Tomorrow I too will disappear from the Rua da Prata, the Rua dos Douradores, the Rua dos Fanqueiros. Tomorrow I—the soul that feels and thinks, the universe I am for myself—I myself, yes, tomorrow I will also be the man who stopped walking on these streets, the man others will vaguely evoke, saying, “Whatever became of him?” And everything I do, everything I feel, everything I live, will be nothing more than one pedestrian less in the daily routine of any city anywhere."

— Fernando Pessoa, “The Book of Disquiet”
fernandopessoa  death  life  mortality  insignificance  sonder  universe 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Imaginary Foundation Stardust Art Print - Art - Store
"This art print is inspired by the most powerful sentence of Carl Sagan's scientific series, Cosmos:
"The cosmos is also within us, We're made of star stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself."

Sagan continues, "We are star stuff contemplating the stars, organized collections of ten billion billion billion atoms, contemplating the evolution of nature, tracing that long path by which it arrived at consciousness here on the planet earth, and perhaps throughout the cosmos.""
via:bopuc  consciousness  universe  cosmos  carlsagan 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Quote by John Green: I believe the universe wants to be noticed. I t...
“I believe the universe wants to be noticed. I think the universe is inprobably biased toward the consciousness, that it rewards intelligence in part because the universe enjoys its elegance being observed. And who am I, living in the middle of history, to tell the universe that it-or my observation of it-is temporary?”
quotes  2012  intelligence  consciousness  elegance  ephemerality  observation  noticing  universe  thefaultinourstars  johngreen  ephemeral 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Aporeticus - by Mills Baker · I have often thought that the nature of science...
"I have often thought that the nature of science would be better understood if we called theories “misconceptions” from the outset, instead of only after we have discovered their successors. Thus we could say that Einstein’s Misconception of Gravity was an improvement on Newton’s Misconception, which was an improvement on Kepler’s. The neo-Darwinian Misconception of Evolution is an improvement on Darwin’s Misconception, and his on Lamarck’s… Science claims neither infallibility nor finality."

David Deutsch…in The Beginning of Infinity…demonstrates that although we will, barring extinction, continue to refine & improve our knowledge infinitely, we will also never stop being able to improve it. Thus we will always live w/ fallible scientific understanding (& fallible moral theories, fallible aesthetic ideas, fallible philosophical notions, etc.); it is the nature of the relationship between knowledge, mind, & universe.

But it remains odd to say: everything I know is a misconception."
sensemaking  understanding  scientificunderstanding  fallibility  universe  mind  2012  millsbaker  philosophy  karlpopper  darwin  chalresdarwin  alberteinstein  theories  knowledge  whatweknow  misconception  science  daviddeutsch  philosopy  charlesdarwin 
february 2012 by robertogreco
cloudhead - cross
"Science begins with a subject and an object.
Religion begins with a creator and the created.
The illusion is the same.
There is dogma in any.thing that claims to contain every.thing.

God is a verb
not some omnipotent ruler looking down on all of this.
And if there was a big bang,
you and I aren’t something at the end of the process;
You and I are the big bang …
The original force of the universe.
We are the creator and the created
Inseparable from the creating.

-x—x-x—-x-x-x-x-x—x-x—x—x-

Yet the conflict between science and religion drags on … while …
on the streets, the Beatles are still more popular than Jesus Christ,
quantum physics reads like a zen riddle,
and techno teenagers rely on rhythm and rhyme,
- not reason -
to make sense of living at the speed of light."
science  religion  headmine  bigbang  universe  creation  subjects  objects  god  shiftctrlesc 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Ted Chiang on Writing - Boing Boing
"Science fiction and fantasy are very closely related genres, and a lot of people say that the genres are so close that there's actually no meaningful distinction to be made between the two. But I think that there does exist an useful distinction to be made between magic and science. One way to look at it is in terms of whether a given phenomenon can be mass-produced. [...] I think magic is an indication that the universe recognizes certain people as individuals, as having special properties as an individual, whereas a story in which turning lead into gold is an industrial process is describing a completely impersonal universe. That type of impersonal universe is how science views the universe; it's how we currently understand our universe to work. The difference between magic and science is at some level a difference between the universe responding to you in a personal way, and the universe being entirely impersonal."

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2011/01/02/ted_chiang_makes_a_neat_distinction ]
writing  scifi  writers  science  sciencefiction  interviews  tedchiang  magic  fantasy  universe  individual  individualism  understanding  philosophy 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Stanley Kubrick - Wikiquote
"The most terrifying fact about the universe is not that it is hostile but that it is indifferent; but if we can come to terms with this indifference and accept the challenges of life within the boundaries of death — however mutable man may be able to make them — our existence as a species can have genuine meaning and fulfillment. However vast the darkness, we must supply our own light."
stanleykubrick  universe  darkeness  meaning  fulfillment  indifference  life  humanity  human  quotes  hostility  existence 
december 2009 by robertogreco
The Walrus » The Glad Scientist
"Galileo affair may be seen as historical relic...evolution...still faces fierce resistance...Vatican has also found itself caught up in the controversy. Pope JP II embraced evolution as “more than a hypothesis,” but current pope has referred to universe as “intelligent project,” leaving some people to wonder if he is less committed to science...Consolmagno has little patience for intelligent design. “Science cannot prove God, or disprove Him. He has to be assumed. If people have no other reason to believe in God than that they can’t imagine how the human eye could have evolved by itself, then their faith is very weak.” Rather than seeking affirmation of his own faith in the heavens, he explains that religion is what gives him the courage & desire to be a scientist. “Seeing the universe as God’s creation means that getting to play in the universe - which is really what a scientist does — is a way of playing with the Creator,” he says. “It’s a religious act. & it’s a very joyous act.”"
catholicism  religion  science  galileo  evolution  universe  belief  tcsnmy 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Erasing Dark Energy § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM
"But perhaps the largest objection voiced is that this model would require Earth to be at the center of the universe. In other words, it would violate the Copernican principle, which states that the Earth does not have a special, favored place and that the universe is essentially homogeneous."
mathematics  cosmology  gravity  copernicus  darkenergy  universe  physics 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Seed: The Statistical Universe
"We cannot see farther into the universe because the big bang happened only 14 billion years ago and light from distant regions has not had enough time to reach Earth. Yet subtle clues are beginning to reveal some of the properties of the regions of space hidden beyond our cosmic horizon. Our world appears to be only a small part of a "multiverse," an expanse vastly larger than the visible universe, and for the most part completely different from it."
astronomy  cosmology  universe  science  time  stringtheory  physics 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - The Origins of the Universe - A Crash Course - Op-Ed - NYTimes.com
"Should any of the particles described above be produced at the Large Hadron Collider, from Higgs particles to black holes, corks will rightly pop in physics departments worldwide. But the most exciting prospect of all is that the experiments will reveal something completely unanticipated, something that forces us to rethink our most cherished explanations."
physics  briangreene  lhc  higgsboson  blackholes  universe  science 
september 2008 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Hints of 'time before Big Bang'
"A team of physicists has claimed that our view of the early Universe may contain the signature of a time before the Big Bang." "If the Caltech team's work is correct, we may already have the first information about what came before our own Universe."
cosmology  science  time  physics  bigbangg  universe  astrophysics 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis » Every Single Day - "Turn this one around in your head tonight: what if a universe is a thing that builds more universes? ...
"...Or a postbiological animal that reproduces more universes in n-dimensional space? We learn stuff like this every single day. Every single goddamned day a new idea just falls out of the sky. Who’d want to live anywhere else?"
warrenellis  time  learning  cosmology  physics  space  universe  reality  science  ideas 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The dread planet: Why finding fossils on Mars would be extremely bad news for humanity - The Boston Globe
"if we discovered the fossils of some very complex life forms, like a vertebrate mammal, we would have to conclude that the probability is overwhelming that the bulk of the Great Filter is ahead of us. Such a discovery would be a crushing blow."
space  science  human  life  civilization  mars  universe  technology  greatfilter 
may 2008 by robertogreco
UNIVERSE {{{ SO WIDE
"Claire L. Evans is an unqualified science writer whose work addresses the synchronies between art, culture, technology, and modern science. Evans has presented her earnestly cosmic Power Point performances at MoMA PS1, The Kitchen in NYC, the Portland In
blogs  science  portland  oregon  space  technology  cosmology  culture  urban  universe  clairelevans  media  art  society  physics  claireevans 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Physicist Neil Turok: Big Bang Wasn't the Beginning
"Physicist Neil Turok discusses his theory that the Big Bang is just one in an endless series of universal expansions and contractions -- a theory that has provoked the ire of many physicists, as well as the Catholic Church."
physics  bigbang  catholicism  theory  astrophysics  universe  stringtheory 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Warren Ellis » The Imprint Of Another Universe
"In Aug, radio astronomers announced...found enormous hole in universe...claim...unmistakable imprint of another universe beyond edge of our own...if right, giant void is first experimental evidence for another universe...would also vindicate string theor
science  universe  cosmology  warrenellis  gamechanging  via:blackbeltjones  space 
november 2007 by robertogreco
How Big is the Library of Babel?
"Though it is obvious that the Library of Babel must be vast, I did not appreciate just how vast it is until reading Daniel Dennett's discussion of it in Darwin's Dangerous Idea. "
borges  literature  books  math  scale  universe  size  thelibraryofbabel 
october 2007 by robertogreco
We are meant to be here | Salon Books
"People are not the result of a cosmic accident, but of laws of the universe that grant our lives meaning and purpose, says physicist Paul Davies."
physics  science  time  life  universe  theology 
july 2007 by robertogreco

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