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robertogreco : unproduct   50

Buying to Last: Back to a Bygone Era - The New York Times
"Take his favorite socks, from Darn Tough, a Vermont company. Made from moisture-wicking, extra-dense merino wool, one pair costs $20. “But they come with a lifetime guarantee,” he marveled. “I normally burn through socks, but I’ve put 200 miles on these.”

The idea of buying goods that last isn’t new, of course. It was what consumers did in earlier generations. But the notion of lasting value appears to be resonating these days with young, value-conscious, environmentally aware buyers who are rebelling against the proliferation of cheap, disposable goods or the planned obsolescence built into many products.

One company that has caught on to this trend is BuyMeOnce (www.buymeonce.com).

The two-year-old website was founded by Tara Button, 36, of London, with a simple mission: helping us buy fewer, better things. Think of her company as a nudging reminder that heirloom was once more than just a flattering description for a tomato.

“We want to change the way the world shops, from short-term to long-term buying,” she explained by phone from her British headquarters. “Long-lasting products save the planet and save money — people seem to have lost sight of that.”

It was a birthday gift that led to the idea for her company: a pan by the French cookware company Le Creuset, which famously offers a lifetime warranty on its products. Ms. Button was smitten, and began searching for other companies with similar guarantees.

“I wanted everything in my life to feel like this: an investment that I knew I would never have to rebuy.” Startled that there was no comprehensive resource to steer such shopping choices, she decided to start one, jettisoning a dead-end job in advertising for this passion project.

From the outset, Ms. Button used simple criteria to assess whether to add a company to the site — including durability, ethical production and exceptional aftercare — as well as checking to see if customers’ online reviews buttressed companies’ claims.

“It’s like panning for gold,” she explained of the process. “Brands start to fizz their way to the top.”

One such standout is Minnesota’s own Duluth Pack, a 135-year-old canvas and leather bag company that still offers a lifetime guarantee and repairs for no or a nominal fee. Compare that with the startup Swedish Stockings, which focuses on sustainable hosiery: If you mail old pantyhose to the startup so it can recycle them, rather than consign them to a landfill, Swedish Stockings will provide a discount code to buy a pair of its own, long-lasting hose.

Durability isn’t the driving appeal of Davek umbrellas, though they’re sturdier than their drugstore counterparts and come with a lifetime warranty.

Rather, Ms. Button selected their products for BuyMeOnce because of the inventive ways Davek responds to the commonest problem: losing that umbrella.

Its Loss Alert technology pairs with a smartphone app, and will send a message if the owner moves more than 30 feet away; if even that fails, Davek extends a 50 percent discount on replacements.

There are alternatives to fast fashion, too, like Marie Hell, a New York City-based women’s wear label. Ms. Button worked with the company to devise a mechanism by which it could encourage customers to fix their clothing rather than throw it away: send a smartphone snap of the damage to the designer, and it will pay $30 toward any repairs undertaken by a tailor near the customer — far easier and more resource-neutral than mailing it back.

Eileen Mandel of Marie Hell says that BuyMeOnce now makes up 30 percent of its international sales. “No one — that’s right, no one — has cashed in a voucher,” she said. “We knew we could offer this unheard-of bonus because we have 100 percent confidence in our product.”

BuyMeOnce began with just 100 fully vetted items; it now lists more than 1,500.

While most of the company’s business is online and through affiliate links, she has also used brick-and-mortar pop-up stores. And she is starting a Good Housekeeping-style certification that brands can use to advertise their sustainable credentials.

For buyers who like to measure the impact of their purchases, she will soon add a price-per-use calculator to the site, which she believes will help people better see how costs amortize over time.

The shift in shopping from investment to convenience occurred in the postwar period, according to Tim Cooper, a professor at Nottingham Trent University in Britain and editor of “Longer Lasting Products.”

The development of cheap new plastics in the 1950s gave birth to a new consumerist mind-set. “It changed from a society where products were purchased on the basis they would last as long as possible, to a world where things are replaced as frequently as possible,” he explained. The invention of market-based pricing in the 1980s had an impact, too: Retail prices were unmoored from production costs for the first time, and instead were decided according to what a customer might reasonably pay — breaking the age-old link between cost and quality.

Planned obsolescence was a natural next step, in which products are designed without possibility of repair or to fail after a certain period — Mr. Cooper cites printers in particular, which he says will often be programmed to produce a limited number of copies and so curtail their life span. No wonder electronics remain one of the toughest categories for Ms. Button and her team.

The best way to drive change, of course, is consumer power — as another BuyMeOnce loyalist, Dominic Latchu, a 34-year-old student in Durham, N.C., knows very well.

He’s glad that products he’s found through the site have sustainable bona fides, but it’s pure economics that have made him an evangelist; one of his favorite purchases was an Elvis & Kresse messenger bag, which is made from upcycled hoses decommissioned by the British fire brigade.

“Rather than buy a cheap product 10 times a year, it makes more sense to buy one that will last much longer — you can’t beat an investment that comes with a lifetime guarantee,” he said.

Every such purchase can contribute to a shift away from that postwar manufacturing mind-set. “If more people start buying durable, long-lasting products,” Mr. Latchu said, “eventually producers will have to shift to making things that last longer.”"
unproduct  durability  2018  quality  sustainability  environment 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Virgil Abloh - YouTube
"Young architects can change the world by not building buildings."

"Irony is a tool for modern creativity."

[via: https://twitter.com/bobbyjgeorge/status/1024691065843081218 ]
virgilabloh  via:bobbygeorge  unproduct  nonproduct  2017  creativity  opportunity  irony 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Taeyoon Choi on Twitter: "I'm wary of an explicative model of entrepreneurship in education (class project as a pitch & classroom as a mock business meeting). Instead… https://t.co/fI5I6OAZVh"
"I'm wary of an explicative model of entrepreneurship in education (class project as a pitch & classroom as a mock business meeting). Instead, I want my students to engage in a generative practice of systemic exchange. They create value, idea, trust, and care – not products."

[replied: "👇👉 the “unproduct” https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:unproduct "https://twitter.com/rogre/status/950556361540100096 ]
taeyoonchoi  2018  education  entrepreneurship  business  capitalism  care  trust  value  repair  unproduct  meaning  purpose  exchange  design  pitching  teaching  values  howweteach  learning 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Metafoundry 15: Scribbled Leatherjackets
[Update 23 Jan 2015: a new version of this is now at The Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/01/why-i-am-not-a-maker/384767/ ]

"HOMO FABBER: Every once in a while, I am asked what I ‘make’. When I attended the Brighton Maker Faire in September, a box for the answer was under my name on my ID badge. It was part of the XOXO Festival application for 2013; when I saw the question, I closed the browser tab, and only applied later (and eventually attended) because of the enthusiastic encouragement of friends. I’m always uncomfortable identifying myself as a maker. I'm uncomfortable with any culture that encourages you take on an entire identity, rather than to express a facet of your own identity (‘maker’, rather than ‘someone who makes things’). But I have much deeper concerns.

Walk through a museum. Look around a city. Almost all the artifacts that we value as a society were made by or at the the order of men. But behind every one is an invisible infrastructure of labour—primarily caregiving, in its various aspects—that is mostly performed by women. As a teenager, I read Ayn Rand on how any work that needed to be done day after day was meaningless, and that only creating new things was a worthwhile endeavour. My response to this was to stop making my bed every day, to the distress of my mother. (While I admit the possibility of a misinterpretation, as I haven’t read Rand’s writing since I was so young my mother oversaw my housekeeping, I have no plans to revisit it anytime soon.) The cultural primacy of making, especially in tech culture—that it is intrinsically superior to not-making, to repair, analysis, and especially caregiving—is informed by the gendered history of who made things, and in particular, who made things that were shared with the world, not merely for hearth and home.

Making is not a rebel movement, scrappy individuals going up against the system. While the shift might be from the corporate to the individual (supported, mind, by a different set of companies selling things), and from what Ursula Franklin describes as prescriptive technologies to ones that are more holistic, it mostly reinscribes familiar values, in slightly different form: that artifacts are important, and people are not.

In light of this history, it’s unsurprising that coding has been folded into ‘making’. Consider the instant gratification of seeing ‘hello, world’ on the screen; it’s nearly the easiest possible way to ‘make’ things, and certainly one where failure has a very low cost. Code is 'making' because we've figured out how to package it up into discrete units and sell it, and because it is widely perceived to be done by men. But you can also think about coding as eliciting a specific, desired set of behaviours from computing devices. It’s the Searle’s 'Chinese room' take on the deeper, richer, messier, less reproducible, immeasurably more difficult version of this that we do with people—change their cognition, abilities, and behaviours. We call the latter 'education', and it’s mostly done by underpaid, undervalued women.

When new products are made, we hear about exciting technological innovation, which are widely seen as worth paying (more) for. In contrast, policy and public discourse around caregiving—besides education, healthcare comes immediately to mind—are rarely about paying more to do better, and are instead mostly about figuring out ways to lower the cost. Consider the economics term ‘Baumol's cost disease’: it suggests that it is somehow pathological that the time and energy taken by a string quartet to prepare for a performance--and therefore the cost--has not fallen in the same way as goods, as if somehow people and what they do should get less valuable with time (to be fair, given the trajectory of wages in the US over the last few years in real terms, that seems to be exactly what is happening).

It's not, of course, that there's anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). It's that the alternative to making is usually not doing nothing—it's nearly always doing things for and with other people, from the barista to the Facebook community moderator to the social worker to the surgeon. Describing oneself as a maker—regardless of what one actually or mostly does—is a way of accruing to oneself the gendered, capitalist benefits of being a person who makes products.

I am not a maker. In a framing and value system that is about creating artifacts, specifically ones you can sell, I am a less valuable human. As an educator, the work I do is, at least superficially, the same year after year. That's because all of the actual change is at the interface between me, my students, and the learning experiences I design for them. People have happily informed me that I am a maker because I use phrases like 'design learning experiences', which is mistaking what I do for what I’m actually trying to elicit and support. The appropriate metaphor for education, as Ursula Franklin has pointed out, is a garden, not the production line.

My graduate work in materials engineering was all about analysing and characterizing biological tissues, mostly looking at disease states and interventions and how they altered the mechanical properties of bone, including addressing a public health question for my doctoral research. My current education research is mostly about understanding the experiences of undergraduate engineering students so we can do a better job of helping them learn. I think of my brilliant and skilled colleagues in the social sciences, like Nancy Baym at Microsoft Research, who does interview after interview followed by months of qualitative analysis to understand groups of people better. None of these activities are about ‘making’.

I educate. I analyse. I characterize. I critique. Almost everything I do these days is about communicating with others. To characterize what I do as 'making' is either to mistake the methods—the editorials, the workshops, the courses, even the materials science zine I made—for the purpose. Or, worse, to describe what I do as 'making' other people, diminishing their own agency and role in sensemaking, as if their learning is something I impose on them.

In a recent newsletter, Dan Hon wrote, "But even when there's this shift to Makers (and with all due deference to Getting Excited and Making Things), even when "making things" includes intangibles now like shipped-code, there's still this stigma that feels like it attaches to those-who-don't-make. Well, bullshit. I make stuff." I understand this response, but I'm not going to call myself a maker. Instead, I call bullshit on the stigma, and the culture and values behind it that reward making above everything else. Instead of calling myself a maker, I'm proud to stand with the caregivers, the educators, those that analyse and characterize and critique, everyone who fixes things and all the other people who do valuable work with and for others, that doesn't result in something you can put in a box and sell."

[My response on Twitter:

Storified version: https://storify.com/rogre/on-the-invisible-infrastructure-of-often-intangibl

and as a backup to that (but that doesn't fit the container of what Pinboard will show you)…

“Great way to start my day: @debcha on invisible infrastructure of (often intangible) labor, *not* making, & teaching.”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536601349756956672

“[pause to let you read and to give you a chance to sign up for @debcha’s Metafoundry newsletter http://tinyletter.com/metafoundry ]”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536601733791633408

““behind every…[maker] is an invisible infrastructure of labour—primarily caregiving, in…various aspects—…mostly performed by women” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536602125107605505

“See also Maciej Cegłowski on Thoreau. https://static.pinboard.in/xoxo_talk_thoreau.htm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eky5uKILXtM”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536602602431995904

““Thoreau had all these people, mostly women, who silently enabled the life he thought he was heroically living for himself.” —M. Cegłowski”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536602794786963458

“And this reminder from @anotherny [Frank Chimero] that we should acknowledge and provide that support: “Make donuts too.”” http://frankchimero.com/blog/the-inferno-of-independence/
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536603172244967424

“small collection of readings (best bottom up) on emotional labor, almost always underpaid, mostly performed by women https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:emotionallabor”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536603895087128576

““The appropriate metaphor for education, as Ursula Franklin has pointed out, is a garden, not the production line.” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536604452065513472

““to describe what I do as 'making' other people, diminish[es] their own agency & role in sensemaking” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536604828705648640

“That @debcha line gets at why Taylor Mali’s every-popular “What Teachers Make” has never sat well with me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxsOVK4syxU”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536605134185177088

““I call bullshit on the stigma, and the culture and values behind it that reward making above everything else.” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536605502805798912

“This all brings me back to Margaret Edson’s 2008 Commencement Address at Smith College. http://www.smith.edu/events/commencement_speech2008.php + https://vimeo.com/1085942”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536606045200588803

“Edson’s talk is about classroom teaching. I am forever grateful to @CaseyG for pointing me there (two years ago on Tuesday).”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536606488144248833

““Bringing nothing, producing nothing, expecting nothing, withholding … [more]
debchachra  2014  making  makers  makermovement  teaching  howweteach  emotionallabor  labor  danhon  scubadiving  support  ursulafranklin  coding  behavior  gender  cv  margaretedson  caseygollan  care  caretaking  smithcollege  sensemaking  agency  learning  howwelearn  notmaking  unproduct  frankchimero  maciejceglowski  metafoundry  independence  interdependence  canon  teachers  stigma  gratitude  thorough  infrastructure  individualism  invisibility  critique  criticism  fixing  mending  analysis  service  intangibles  caregiving  homemaking  maciejcegłowski 
november 2014 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Essay: 'Designing Finnishness', for 'Out Of The Blue: The Essence and Ambition of Finnish Design' (Gestalten)
"Knowing what to do when there is nothing to do
"The press conference is over, and in comes Jari Litmanen, from behind the door. And I looked at his face and I looked at his eyes, and I recognised something in those eyes. And I thought, this is a man with a great willpower. Because he was not shy, not timid, but he was modest. He is not a man who will raise his voice, or bang with his fist on the table and say, ‘We do it this way.’ No, he was more of a diplomat, not wanting to be a leader, but being a leader." [Former AFC Ajax team manager David Endt, on legendary Finnish footballer Jari Litmanen]

Finland has proven that it can take care of itself locally and globally. At home, its sheer existence is a tribute to fortitude, guile and determination, never mind the extent to which it has lately thrived. Globally, through Nokia, Kone, Rovio and others, through its diplomatic and political leadership, and through its design scene in general, it has punched well above its weight. Having been a reluctant leader, like Litmanen, will Finland once again step up to help define a new age, a post-industrial or re-industrial age? Unlike 1917, there are few obvious external drivers to force Finns to define Finnishness. So where will the desire for change come from?

Finland, and Finnishness, is not immune to the problems facing other European countries; the Eurocrisis, domestic xenophobia, industrial strife. Challenging these is difficult for an engineering culture not yet used to working with uncertainty, and in collaboration.

That requires this sense of openness to ambiguity, to non-planning, which is quite unlike the traditional mode of Finnishness. And yet there are also valuable cues in Finnishness, such as in the design—or undesign, as Leonard Koren would have it—of Finnish sauna culture.
"Making nature really means letting nature happen, since nature, the ultimate master of interactive complexity, is organized along principles too inscrutable for us to make from scratch. … Extraordinary baths … are created by natural geologic processes or by composers of sensory stimulation working in an intuitive, poetic, open-minded—undesign—manner." (Koren, ibid.)

Equally, the päiväkoti day-care system demonstrates a learning environment built with an agile structure that can follow where children wish to lead. The role of expertise—and every teacher in Finnish education is a highly-qualified expert—is not to control or enforce a national curriculum, but to react, shape, nurture and inspire. As such it could be a blueprint not only for education generally, but also for developing a culture comfortable with divergent learning, with exploration and experiment, with a broader social and emotional range, and with ambiguity.

Chess grandmaster Savielly Tartakower once said “Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do, strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do.” Indeed, Finland's early development was driven by tactics—survival, consolidation and then growth in the face of a clear set of "things to do"; defeat the conditions, resist the neighbours, rebuild after war.

With that, came success, comfort and then perhaps the inevitable lack of drive. The country is relatively well off and stable, and perhaps a little complacent given the recent accolades.

Design in recent years has seen a shift towards the ephemeral and social—interaction design, service design, user experience design, strategic design and so on. Conversely, there has been a return to the physical, albeit altered and transformed by that new modernity, with that possibility of newly hybrid “things”: digital/physical hybrids possessing a familiar materiality yet allied with responsiveness, awareness, and character by virtue of having the internet embedded within. With its strong technical research sector, and expertise in both materials and software, Finland is well-placed. Connect the power of its nascent nanotech research sector—interestingly, derived from its expertise with wood—to a richer Finnish design culture capable of sketching social objects, social services and social spaces and its potential becomes tangible, just as with the 1930s modernism that fused the science and engineering of the day with design in order to produce Artek.

Finnish design could be stretched to encompass these new directions, the aforementioned reversals towards openness, ambiguity, sociality, flexibility and softness. Given that unique DNA of Finnishness — both designed and undesigned, both old and young—Finland is at an interesting juncture.

The next phase, then, is knowing what to do, despite the appearance of not having anything to do.

Buckminster Fuller, a guest at Sitra's first design-led event at Helsinki’s Suomenlinna island fortress in 1968, once said “the best way to predict the future is to design it.” Finland has done this once before; it may be that now is exactly the right time to do it again."
finland  2014  design  danhill  cityofsound  sitra  buckminsterfuller  education  strategy  culture  exploration  experimentation  ambiguity  emergentcurriculumeurope  undesign  leonardkoren  nature  complexity  simplicity  davidendt  jarilitmanen  unproduct  efficiency  inefficiency  clarity  purity  small  slow  sisu  solitude  silence  barnraising  helsinki 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Eye Magazine | Opinion | Are you sure you need that new logo?
"Item: Last year, in the remote town of Sylhet, in the north-east corner of Bangladesh, I hailed a cycle-ricksha and asked to be taken to the house of my friend Abdul Khaled Kayed in the district of Ambar Khana. I didn’t even know the street he lived in, let alone the number of the house. ‘No problem,’ said the ricksha driver, though he had never heard of my friend and was not familiar with the district. We proceeded by means of a series of encounters with shopkeepers, cafe waiters and fellow ricksha drivers, each one taking us a little closer to our destination. It was a leisurely, somewhat erratic journey. Each conversation was interesting and enjoyable, including invitations to take tea, to describe my house in Camden Town and to discuss the meaning of life; I was almost sorry when we finally arrived at my friend’s house. If there were any street signs to be seen during the journey I didn’t notice them, nor did my driver consult them.

Item: In her book New Lives, New Landscapes (1970), the late Nan Fairbrother showed two photographs of the main street of Suffolk village of Lavenham. The first is of the street festooned with telephone wires and power cables. The second shows exactly the same viewpoint, taken after a successful campaign to remove the overhead wires. The improvement is startling. The Civic Trust Award, so often given to commemorate the application of lettering to shopfronts and offices, or the addition of suitably designed concrete tubs with suitable plants to enhance the village square, was here given to a scheme whose sole purpose was subtraction."



"Item: When I set up my Graphic Design business 30 years ago, one of our first clients was a prestigious furniture maker who wanted a complete graphic styling job: stationery range, information sheets, showroom graphics, vehicle livery and promotional pieces. When we presented our proposals, the managing director was duly impressed and gave us an immediate go-ahead. Then he said, ‘I particularly like the name style for the company, but perhaps we’ll hold on to that until you come up with your proposal for the symbol to go with it.’ When I told him we considered the name style to be quite adequate as an identity device and had no plans for including a symbol, he was much taken aback. ‘But we’ve always had a symbol,’ he said, ‘and anyway, I thought you would insist on us having one.’ After some to-ing and fro-ing we agreed he would think about it. At the end of a nail-biting week, he phoned back to say he was entirely reconciled to not having a symbol. ‘A much more elegant solution,’ he said. ‘And it kills two birds with one stone. We won’t have to bother about all the problems of symbols – when to use them and when not, how small can they be without becoming mere blobs, how big without looking bloated. And we save the sizeable fee you’d be charging us if you did design it.’

There’s the rub. How do we charge for convincing our clients not to have some graphic indulgence they have set their hearts on? And even more difficult, how do we get them to remove something that is unhelpful, or intrusive, or superfluous, or downright misleading? Who is going to pay for something they are not going to get? And who is going to pay for having something they do not need taken from them?"
legibility  design  wayfinding  kengarland  unproduct  notbuilding  bigidea  1993  branding  logos  simplicity  navigation  cities  graphicdesign 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Is Cuteness Bad for Craft? | The Etsy BlogThe Etsy Blog
"We’ve come a long way since the days of William Morris, the designer and leader who fostered the Arts and Crafts movement of the late 1800s. For Morris, craft was a serious endeavor that focused on putting handmade, functional objects in homes. “Rather than three sets of elaborately decorated transferware china, you would have one set of handmade and glazed plates,” explains Lange. The movement was consciously putting its foot down against the introduction of impersonal mass production.

Since Morris’s time, craft has lost its heady undertones, but we’re now seeing a return to the original tenets of the Arts and Crafts movement. Lange cites blogs like Unconsumption and Make It Do, which echo the founding sentiment of the Arts and Craft movement that Lange summarizes as “make it yourself, buy better quality items, think about each purchase, keep it for a long time.”

“I wonder if we are not in the dawn of another reform era,” says Lange."

[See also: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2012/08/dont-put-a-bird-on-it-saving-craft-from-cuteness.html ]
craftwars  makers  making  possessions  meaning  materialism  consumerculture  consumption  sustainability  qualityoverquantity  madetolast  slow  artsandcraftsmovement  alexandralange  cute  williammorris  unproduct  makeitdo  unconsumption  crafting  craft  etsy  2012 
august 2012 by robertogreco
ICON MAGAZINE ONLINE | Architecture Without Buildings
"A new generation of architects is demonstrating that we should stop and think before trying to solve a problem with a building.

They feel much more effective writing, researching, campaigning, occupying and performing than they do at the drawing board. They don't wait to be approached by clients; they see the potential to make a difference and they seize it. That might take the form of an installation, a book, a fireworks display or squatting for days in a condemned building.

Working in places such as Caracas, Tijuana, Zagreb and even Rome, Berlin and London, they operate at the limits of what we call "architecture". Yet in some way they can be seen as the conscience of their profession."

[via: http://nomadicity.tumblr.com/post/11946787180/ ]
unproduct  architecture  design  2008  practice  criticalpractice  teddycruz  anarkitektur  stalker  urbanthinktank  sandiego  tijuana  caracas  zagreb 
october 2011 by robertogreco
My problem with the “Internet Of Things” « Magical Nihilism
"The network is as important to think about as the things.

The flows & the nodes. The systems & the surface. The means & the ends.

The phrase “Internet Of Things” will probably sound as silly to someone living in a spime-ridden future…

In that sense it is useful – as a provocation, and a stimulus to think new thoughts about the technology around us. It just doesn’t capture my imagination in the same way as the Spime did.

You don’t have to agree. I don’t have to be right. There’s a reason I’ve posted it here on my blog rather than that of my company. This is probably a rambling rant useless to all but myself. It’s a bit of summing-up and setting-aside and starting again for me. This is going to be really hard and it isn’t going to be done by blogging about it, it’s going to be done by doing.

This is just what I what I want to help do. Still.

Better shut-up and get on with it."
spimes  2011  mattjones  berg  berglondon  internetofthings  doing  making  cv  lcproject  glvo  mindchanges  brucesterling  future  iteration  systems  unproduct  russelldavies  physical  digital  seamlessness  beautifulseams  mujicomp  fabbing  seams  iot  mindchanging 
august 2011 by robertogreco
OK Do | Dreaming objects – A meeting with Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby
"AD: The question of art and design is problematic. A lot of people want to see us as artists, but we definitely see ourselves as designers trying to push the discipline forward, asking questions about design and through it. In fact, we launched the term critical design ten years ago in order to describe our work. Sometimes people think it simply means criticism; that we are negative about everything, anti-consumerist and against design. Some people relate it to critical theory; to Frankfurt school and anti-capitalist thinking. We are definitely aware of it, but then again not in that category either. Critical design is about critical thinking – about not taking things at face value. It’s about questioning things, and trying to understand what’s behind them. In essence, our objective is to use design as a means for applying skepticism to society at large."
art  design  dunne&raby  fionaraby  anthonydunne  learning  unschooling  deschooling  criticalthinking  questioning  unproduct  undesign  science  research  parallelworlds  paralleluniverses  social  society  democracy  education  thinking  philosophy  glvo  lcproject  openstudio  anti-consumption  functionalfictions  okdo  interviews  potential  herenow  presentations  narratives  change  sustainability  slow 
may 2011 by robertogreco
pass the baton tokyo vintage shop
"pass the baton - this vintage shop promotes a new idea of recycling : pass on things that you truly love. the idea is that if an object is used and not needed anymore, people can pass it along without making new goods

(and potential waste). so that each new owner can create their own new memories. 'pass the baton' is a new personal culture marketplace in japan, a country where the idea of buying used items is not really appreciated. this could change quickly, the bricks-and-mortar flagship store in the center of tokyo offers buyers and sellers a fashionable forum for exchange. as a member of the 'pass the baton' initiative, people can sell as simply as one would at a flea market, but with the added dimension of optioning proceeds to charity. 50% of the proceedings are distributed to the seller. the seller will then contribute a part or all of proceeds to one of several social action groups through the non-profit organization charity platform (NPO)."
reuse  used  nonproduct  charity  vintage  retail  tokyo  glvo  japan  secondhand  beausage  resa;e  readymade  lcproject  unproduct 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Civil Branding » The MUJI 'Enough' message
"MUJI is not a brand...does not make products of individuality or fashion, nor...reflect popularity of its name in prices. MUJI creates products w/ view toward global consumption of the future. This means that we do not create products that lure customers into believing that “this is best” or “I must have this.” We would like our customers to feel the rational sense of satisfaction that comes not w/ “This is best,” but w/ “this is enough”. “Best” becomes “enough”.

[See also: http://doblog.tumblr.com/post/167472813/ AND http://doblog.tumblr.com/post/640466040/enough AND
full text: http://craightonberman.tumblr.com/post/444105012/the-future-of-muji ]
muji  enough  sustainability  harmony  disharmony  branding  marketing  purpose  tcsnmy  consumption  future  mission  message  unproduct  postconsumerism  postmaterialism 
may 2010 by robertogreco
the hose drawer (tecznotes)
"The pattern we see here is to keep crises small and frequent, as Ed Catmull of Pixar says in an excellent recent talk. When describing the difficulty Pixar's artists had with reviews ("it's not ready for you to look at"), he realized that the only way to break through resistance to reviews was to increase the frequency until no one could reasonably expect to be finished in time for theirs. The point was to gauge work in motion, not work at rest. "So often that you won't even notice it," said Elwood Blues."
michalmigurski  design  twitter  flow  progress  datamining  measurement  data  iteration  learning  improvement  sharing  glvo  criticism  reviews  stamen  process  work  unproduct 
february 2010 by robertogreco
unconsumption
"Consumption = word used to describe acts of acquisition...of things, in exchange for money. Unconsumption is a word used to describe everything that happens after an act of acquisition...an invisible badge...accomplishment of properly recycling your old cellphone, rather than the guilt of letting it sit in a drawer...thrill of finding a new use for something you were about to throw away...pleasure of using a service like Freecycle to find a new home for the functioning VCR you just replaced, rather than throwing it in garbage...enjoying things you own to the fullest – not just at moment of acquisition...pleasure of using a pair of sneakers until they are truly worn out – as opposed to nagging feeling of defeat when they simply go out of style...feeling good about simple act of turning off lights when you leave room...not about rejection or demonization of things...not a bunch of rules...an idea, set of behaviors, way of thinking about consumption itself from a new perspective...free."

[wiki here: http://unconsumption.pbworks.com/ ]
unconsumption  sustainability  consumption  consumerism  design  culture  trends  green  recycling  simplicity  luxury  value  unproduct  upcycling  beausage  plannedlongevity  thriftiness  thrifting  thrift  glvo  diy  make  dowithout  wabi-sabi 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: The Utility of the Unfinished
"Matt has described this to me as “physical PowerPoint”. You instantly know from looking at this thing that it’s not necessarily finished yet; not quite complete. And rather than letting you down, that incompleteness (in this case, an aesthetic one) opens up a communication. It informs the observer that they can engage in a kind of dialogue with the radio, about what it is and what it does. Its form is not final, and that means that there is still space to explore and examine that form. A more finished project would shut out any such exploration from the user or observer, and simply impose its form on them; the only reactions left are accepting that form, denying it, or ignoring it."
schulzeandwebb  writing  conversation  design  unproduct  unbook  dialogue  patina  wear  glvo  prototyping  unfinished  berg  berglondon  dialog 
march 2009 by robertogreco
More ideas , less stuff | Lets get creative | The Guardian
"We're in the midst of a period where people are questioning business models. It's in these downturned times that new innovative businesses and ideas spring up. Recessions are a good time to "prototype". Decisions get made quicker. New ideas don't get bogged down in process. People take risks. Recessions have happened before, of course, but this time we have a whole generation of people who are used to making new stuff happen fast on the web. Have an idea, go home, bash out the code and launch to the world. We are living in a world where people are used to prototyping quickly and cheaply."
benterrett  mattjones  russelldavies  unproduct  brucesterling  tcsnmy  reallyinterestinggroup  economics  future  innovation  consumerism  thinking  ideas  making  make  activism  creativity  design  business  newspapers  products  prototyping 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Compostmodern 09: Saul Griffith Runs the Numbers - Core77
"we need to start thinking about "heirloom design," one great object that lasts you a lifetime" ... "Griffith says there are enough consumers, bloggers and keen eyeballs out there to call out the all the greenwashing right away. But then someone asks a question about the changing client-designer relationship in light of the fact that you might tell them not to make something. "Your client is not the client anymore," Griffith scolds. "The planet is the client." Which means you might have to change the expectations about your career: You're not going to do 64 blockbuster products." See also: http://www.dwell.com/daily/blog/40065402.html
saulgriffith  energy  consumption  green  sustainability  design  undesign  unproduct  heirloomdesign  future  greenwashing  plannedlongevity  change  gamechanging  compostmodern09 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Dr. Jim's Really Nice
"If you're going to rent, why not design the space first? The guts are in place. You decide the rest. Get $10,000 toward your creative build-out and 3 months free rent to start using it. 16' celiings. Fabulous neighbors. Bike routes. Design it, build it, live in it. Sublease it if you want. Just don't get a giant mortgage."

[via: http://www.dwell.com/daily/blog/39792687.html ]
architecture  design  hackingbyconsent  housing  retail  business  renting  portland  oregon  leasing  space  cascadia  non-project  unproduct  customization  usercreated  userdesigned  flexibility 
february 2009 by robertogreco
theunbook.com
"The unbook is a concept originally developed by Jay Cross. The concept evolved based on discussions between Jay and Dave Gray in the summer of 2008. Jay published the first unbook, Learnscape Architecture, on August 12, 2008. The book is now titled Learnscaping and at the time of this writing (February 2009) was in version 1.32. The second unbook, Marks and Meaning, was published by Dave the following day.

This site intends to chronicle the development of the unbook movement, and provide a comprehensive catalogue of all unbook titles, the uncatalogue. To get an unbook listed in the catalogue, please use our contact form and tell us the title of the book (with link to the “buy” page), its author (with link if possible) and a short description of the book. Lengthy descriptions will be edited. Unbooks will be listed alphabetically by title."

[see also: http://communicationnation.blogspot.com/2009/02/unbook-movement.html ]

[Definition below from here: http://theunbook.com/2009/02/18/what-is-an-unbook/ ]

"A traditional book is released in editions. When a work is revised or updated, a new edition is released. These revised or updated editions usually offer small, incremental changes, such as a new preface or introduction, a new chapter, or small changes to the content.

An unbook is more like software:

1. An unbook is never finished, but rather continually updated, based on feedback from users and their evolving needs.

2. An unbook is released in versions. As in open source software, version 1.0 of an unbook is a significant milestone, indicating that it is stable and reliable enough for use by the general public. The significance of a new release is indicated by the size of the gap: For example, the difference between 1.1 and 1.1.3 is minor, while the difference between 1.1 and 2.0 is major.

3. An unbook is supported by a community of users who share their experiences and best practices with each other, and help each other troubleshoot problems encountered in their practice areas. An unbook’s community is a very real part of the unbook’s development team.

An unbook is mindware: software for the mind."
unbook  books  publishing  jaycross  opensource  davegray  thinking  unproduct  rapid  via:preoccupations  unfinished 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Tarp Hat - The Real Deal: Made In Brazil
"The Real Deal is made in Brazil of recycled canvas tarpaulins from cargo trucks used for transporting goods. Every hat is truly one of a kind as no two are the same. Each hat has its own unique character. Made from various colors of tarp, these hats may have patches, seams, holes, or even Portuguese writing. These hats are hand sewn by Brazilian villagers and reflect the true craftsmanship of the locals. Because the tarpaulins were designed to protect its contents from the rough elements in Brazil, they make perfect covers to shield your cabeça (that's head in Portuguese) from the hot summer sun. Every characteristic of The Real Deal tells a story of its prior life lived as a lonely truck tarp and reveals its journeys through the harsh elements in equatorial Brazil. Here are some examples of the characteristics you could find in your own Real Deal Brazil."
clothing  green  recycled  travel  brasil  sustainability  unproduct  brazil 
february 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: from product to project
"So I've been thinking about how I can continue to projectise this product. And how this bag can have a 10-year + story. So I'm trying to add spimeiness to it and to use internet stuff as a memory aid for this thing. So, I've created a unique URL for it at thinglink, in the spirit of the skuwiki idea. And I've built a tumblblog for it at HMDbag.tumblr.com. That tumblr extracts things from flickr and delicious that I've tagged appropriately, so it's sort of self-generating. I imagine telling the story of the life of the bag that way, keeping it as a project not a product.

But what would be really nice would be if it could tell its own story more. Generate its own data. I could attach an RFID tag, but I'm not quite sure what would ever read it. I guess ideally it would have it's own GPS logging stick sewn in. Or something. The good thing though, about a 10-year + project is that you don't have to have it all sorted at the begining."
brucesterling  design  sustainability  russelldavies  manufacturing  howies  bags  rfid  spimes  brands  products  stories  gps  physical  things  unproduct  beausage  plannedobsolescence  plannedlongevity  glvo  wabi-sabi 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Marks and Meaning, version zero by Dave Gray (Book) in Business & Economics
"Warning: DON'T BUY THIS BOOK if you are uncomfortable with unfinished work! This is version zero, much of the content is still in a vague and formative stage. Marks and meaning is a work in progress; an evolving exploration of visual language, visual thinking and visual work practices by the founder and Chairman of XPLANE, the visual thinking company. An unfinished work, it's a hybrid: part sketchbook, part textbook, part workbook, and continuously updated by the author, based on feedback and conversations with readers. This is version zero: the first version available to the public."
learning  collaboration  infographics  thinking  process  communication  tcsnmy  connectivism  davegray  visualthinking  xplane  unbook  unproduct  evolvingbook  evolution  language  visualization  sketching  notebooks  sketchbooks  workbooks  textbooks  lulu  unfinished 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Who Stole My Volcano? Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Dematerialisation of Supervillain Architecture. « Magical Nihilism
"But then in an almost throw-away aside to Adam, he reflected that the modern Bond villain (and he might have added, villains in pop culture in general) is placeless, ubiquitous, mobile. His hidden fortress is in the network, represented only by a briefcase, or perhaps even just a mobile phone. Where’s the fun in that for a production designer? Maybe it’s in the objects. It’s not the pictures that got small, but the places our villains draw they powers from." ... "So - for a “4th generation warfare” supervillain there aren’t even objects for the production designer to create and imbue with personality. The effects and the consequences can be illustrated by the storytelling, but the network and the intent can’t be foreshadowed by environments and objects in the impressionist way that Adam employed to support character and storytelling. But - what about materialising, visualising these invisible networks in order to do so?"

[see also: http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2008/11/where_is_my_white_cat_and_my_e.html ]
mattjones  design  culture  infrastructure  nomads  neo-nomads  capitalism  mobility  comics  production  villains  jamesbond  coldwar  movies  architecture  film  network  2008  cityofsound  visualization  storytelling  ubiquitous  ubicomp  mobile  supervillains  dematerialization  unproduct 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: Help > Shipping & Delivery > Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging FAQs
"The Frustration-Free Package (on the left) is recyclable and comes without excess packaging materials such as hard plastic clamshell casings, plastic bindings, and wire ties. It's designed to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging (on the right). Products with Frustration-Free Packaging can frequently be shipped in their own boxes, without an additional shipping box."
amazon  economics  consumption  unproduct  recycling  shipping  packaging  toys  design  environment  green  waste 
november 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Web 2.0, Ubiquity, Sustainability and Consumer Rights
"If we are going to interact with companies in intimate ways -- in ways that impact our deepest life choices -- those interactions ought not only to be held to a higher standard of transparency and public accountability; they ought to be safe-guarded in formal ways as well by having corporate decision-making structures that protect the user rights of the people involved."
sustainability  servicedesign  mattjones  tomcoates  ubicomp  everyware  socialmedia  worldchanging  dopplr  environment  ethics  informatics  privacy  unproduct  innovation  urban  web 
july 2008 by robertogreco
We Don't Want To Make Things panel discussion from 02NYC
"Our focus is on non-product-oriented design processes--on rethinking and reframing our purposes. For example, thinking outside the (very important) box of greening the supply chain, in what ways can/does design enable people as producers of meaning, rather than of waste?"
unproduct  design  process  green  sustainability  events 
may 2008 by robertogreco
russell davies: pre-experience design
"I'm convinced that some sort of Experience Design will become the master discipline for businesses that want to be good at selling stuff. It would be a shame if that didn't happen, if they got stuck in the same corporate process silos as everyone else."

[goes well with: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2008/04/dying-like-coal.html ]
experience  russelldavies  ads  advertising  unproduct  thinking  planning  iphone  business  marketing  vw  design  experiencedesign  gamechanging 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Issue 9/2008: I shop therefore I am - Bulletin - David Report - your pathfinder into the future
"In the future luxury goods will be methods that bring us back the power of our own attention: the power to choose ourselves what we want to notice or not. And there lies the true luxury of the future, to be able to resist shopping and still be happy.”
consciousness  consumer  consumerism  society  consumption  materialism  gamechanging  culture  shopping  sustainability  trends  world  futury  luxury  ethics  downshifting  unproduct  psychology  sociology  experience  happiness  research 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Sruli Recht - nonproduct: a home for products that dont have one - "and thus... what makes a non product?"
"...she falls & flails in categories: a specially-made low-run piece, either hand-tooled or machine-made, that would lose its context as a mass-produced item, and is not viable to produce in large quantities. And/or an item that is in concept stage as a byproduct of the previous""

[See also: http://www.core77.com/blog/object_culture/interview_with_designer_sruli_recht_part_1_macrobiotic_fractal-based_production_methods_and_more_16315.asp ]

[New links:
http://srulirecht.com/category/non-products_2008/
http://srulirecht.com/category/non-products_2009/
http://srulirecht.com/category/non-products_2009/ ]
unproduct  concepts  handmade  glvo  design  iceland  nonproduct  srulirecht 
april 2008 by robertogreco
ENESS - interactive design, public installations, 3D software development from Melbourne, Australia
kevlar handkerchief, 5 1/4 inch floppy disk tiles, pingpong paddle stand, one hour circle-drawing clock, zen robot that creates perfect spirals in the sand
unproduct  nonproduct  design  glvo  products  interaction 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Hugh Graham Creative » The end of consumer culture?
"needs to be new paradigm of consumption, one that will work for business, community & environment. I don’t know what form this new paradigm will take, but it has something to do w/ learning to appreciate real value of things & their place in world."
activism  capitalism  consumer  consumerism  consumption  materialism  unproduct  environment  sustainability  values  culture  society  design  marketing  choice  business  economics 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Design is Dead | varnelis.net
"Just as we seem to have more faith in design than ever, just as design seems to be exploding, we are also faced with a culture for which design (as conventionally practiced) is simply not appropriate anymore."
design  thinking  problemsolving  materialism  philippestarck  unproduct  culture  ethics  sustainability  green  designandtheelasticmind  moma  clayshirky  kazysvarnelis  networks  designer  diy  hacking  making  opensource  usergeneratedcontent  usergenerated  make  hertzianspace 
march 2008 by robertogreco
AFP: Philippe Starck tells magazine design is dead
"was a producer of materiality & am ashamed of this fact. Everything I designed was unnecessary...will definitely give up in 2 years' time...want to do something else...don't know what...want to find new way of expressing myself ...design is dreadful form

[Link rot workarounds: http://www.yankodesign.com/2008/03/28/philippe-starck-design-is-dead/and http://www.nowpublic.com/culture/philippe-starck-tells-magazine-design-dead ]
philippestarck  design  materialism  france  culture  sustainability  consumerism  environment  unproduct  philosophy  life  gamechanging 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Planned obsolescence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"process of a product becoming obsolete and/or non-functional after a certain period or amount of use, approximately, as planned or designed by the manufacturer"
capitalism  unproduct  sociology  via:blackbeltjones  green  media  liberalism  manipulation  psychology  business  politics  culture  design  society  marketing  obsolescence  sustainability  products 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Vance Packard - Wikipedia
"In The Hidden Persuaders, first published in 1957, Packard explores the use of consumer motivational research and other psychological techniques, including depth psychology and subliminal tactics, by advertisers to manipulate expectations and induce desire for products, particularly in the American postwar era. He identified eight "compelling needs" that advertisers promise products will fulfill. According to Packard these needs are so strong that people are compelled to buy products to satisfy them. The book also explores the manipulative techniques of promoting politicians to the electorate. The book questions the morality of using these techniques."
advertising  books  capitalism  plannedobsolescence  unproduct  sociology  via:blackbeltjones  green  media  liberalism  manipulation  psychology  business  politics  culture  design  society  sustainability 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Conscious Capitalism
"Eric Ryan and Nathan Shedroff discuss "why a deeper understanding of human nature needs to be central to a 21st century business strategy and how it can challenge people's attitudes toward consumerism."
consumerism  unproduct  consumption  materialism  design  attitudes  society  change  sustainability  capitalism  human  psychology  sociology  green  replacing  recycling  reuse  services  value  markets  marketing  emotions 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Click opera - My agenda
"reason art world is booming...super-rich buy art as investment...at same time, you can "consume" art as series of experiences...w/out ever buying...Materialist & postmaterialist ways of seeing - having & being - co-exist, for time being."
momus  cities  unproduct  travel  art  experience  glvo 
february 2008 by robertogreco
PingMag » Japanese Packaging Design #6: Imitating Nature
PingMag looks at some packaging that is inspired by more traditional and sustainable solutions...
design  japan  nature  packaging  trends  waste  green  environment  retro  sustainability  unproduct  pingmag 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Nokia remade - Raphael Grignani - Thoughts
"Remade offers a realistic and beautiful interpretation of upcycling and a tangible starting point for discussion. A discussion we have already started a few weeks ago when two designers from our team joined Jan Chipchase and a few others in Accra to disc
recycling  unproduct  nokia  janchipchase  mobile  phones  reuse  repairing  repurposing  business  cradletograve  future  sustainability  upcycling  repair 
february 2008 by robertogreco
textually.org: Nokia's Remade Concept
"The intent was to create a device made from nothing new....use of reclaimed and upcycled materials that could ultimately change the way we make things...designed to help inspire and stimulate discussion on how mobile devices might be made in the future."
nokia  sustainability  mobile  phones  reuse  recycling  materials  concepts  future  unproduct  repairing  repurposing  business  cradletograve  janchipchase  upcycling  repair 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect: Recycled, Upcycled: Remade
"Is it possible to make an upcycled mobile phone entirely from recycled materials? One that consumers want to buy? At a price that puts it within reach of the mass market? The discussion is well underway."
recycling  unproduct  nokia  janchipchase  mobile  phones  reuse  repairing  repurposing  business  cradletograve  future  sustainability  upcycling  repair 
february 2008 by robertogreco
OLPC One Laptop Per Child Easy to Repair and Recycle – Greener Electronics and Computers - thedailygreen.com
"How simple is it? In Nigeria a 5-year-old girl with a can-do spirit took it upon herself to troubleshoot and repair the OLPCs of her classmates, said Jepsen. A teacher encouraged her, and the class set up a "Laptop Hospital," where the kids learn to repair their own hardware.

How is this green? Shipping is greatly reduced if people can fix their own gadgets on site. Jepsen pointed out that communities in Peru that now have OLPCs take 20 days to reach via roads from major cities. Instead of tossing whole products that have one or two problems, people can swap out individual pieces, leading to much less resource use."
green  hardware  kids  olpc  sustainability  unproduct  repair  environment  maryloujepsen  repairing 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Leica M8: A Camera for Life
"Instead of dropping an M9 or M10, Leica is offering substantial upgrades to the M8 itself—mechanical and digital components, so it'll slowly evolve into a new camera"... wish more electronics manufacturers offered something like this
leica  sustainability  upgrades  recycling  reuse  gamechanging  unproduct  photography  cameras 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The Good Old Days - Chris Hecker's Website
"Yes, this catalog for a commercial product just told you not to buy more of its product, it told you how to conserve, improvise, Do It Yourself, and work around a problem with a shoe box. Those were the good old days."
play  lego  retro  toys  unproduct  sustainability  creativity  children  via:blackbeltjones 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Click opera - Before and after bling I understand. But "during bling"? That's just a blip.
"We are at our happiest when we are absorbed in what we are doing; the most useful way of regarding happiness is, to borrow a phrase of Clive James’s, as “a by-product of absorption.”""
postmaterialism  consumption  materialism  happiness  japan  environment  momus  unproduct  sustainability  consumerism  consumer  design  jeansnow  slow  magazines  society  culture  modernism  postmodernism  philosophy  social  connectedness  community 
january 2008 by robertogreco
8 trends to capitalize on in 2008
"Transient Sphere: consumers driven by experiences instead of fixed—entertainment, discovery, fighting boredom...live a transient lifestyle, freeing themselves from the hassles of permanent ownership and possessions."
trendwatching  trends  social  networking  design  future  experience  business  marketing  unproduct  entertainment  simplicity  branding  consumerism  fabbing  fabrication  ponoko  diy 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Jan Chipchase - Future Perfect: Extreme Personalisation
"working Nokia phones hacked/customised by Mehmet Erkök, industrial design lecturer at İstanbul Teknik Üniversitesi's Department of Industrial Product Design"
mobile  phones  nokia  design  hacks  technology  personalization  janchipchase  customization  modding  wow  wireless  unproduct  prototyping 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Wired 8.06: Exploring the Unmaterial World
"Sometimes not building is the right answer, but it is not one that architects are trained to recommend. When appropriate, AMO can even propose the destruction of buildings "
architecture  remkoolhaas  wired  bigidea  design  libraries  oma  amo  space  work  ideas  interaction  unproduct  notbuilding 
february 2007 by robertogreco

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