recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : updates   8

Auto Update policy - Google Chrome Enterprise Help
"Chrome devices receive automatic updates regularly that enhance both the device itself and the software on the device. Chrome device updates are designed to be simple for the user and, therefore, include updates to the device, Chrome operating system, browser and firmware. However, end-to-end updates for all our devices to ensure the highest levels of security requires dependencies on many third-party hardware and software providers so we cannot indefinitely ensure that older Chrome devices will receive updates to enable new OS and browser features."

[contains full listing of Chromebook models and their "Auto Update Expiration date"]
chromebooks  google  chromeos  updates 
may 2019 by robertogreco
9 Facts About Computer Security That Experts Wish You Knew
1. Having a strong password actually can prevent most attacks…
2. Just because a device is new does not mean it's safe…
3. Even the very best software has security vulnerabilities…
4. Every website and app should use HTTPS…
5. The cloud is not safe — it just creates new security problems…
6. Software updates are crucial for your protection…
7. Hackers are not criminals…
8. Cyberattacks and cyberterrorism are exceedingly rare…
9. Darknet and Deepweb are not the same thing… "
2015  anneleenewitz  security  computers  passwords  updates  software  hackers  https  web  internet  online  cloud  darkweb  deepnet  cyberattacks  cyberterrorism 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Pasta&Vinegar » The update problem with “smart artifacts”
[new link: http://www.nicolasnova.net/pasta-and-vinegar/2014/01/11/the-update-problem-with-smart-artifacts ]

Ars Technica [http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/01/smart-tvs-smart-fridges-smart-washing-machines-disaster-waiting-to-happen/ ] has a good piece about the problems that one may encounter with smart devices. The list they make is strikingly interesting IMO:
“the “Internet of things” stands a really good chance of turning into the “Internet of unmaintained, insecure, and dangerously hackable things.”

These devices will inevitably be abandoned by their manufacturers, and the result will be lots of “smart” functionality—fridges that know what we buy and when, TVs that know what shows we watch—all connected to the Internet 24/7, all completely insecure.

[...]

Flaws and insecurities will be uncovered, and the software components of these smart devices will need to be updated to address those problems. They’ll need these updates for the lifetime of the device, too. [...] In addition to security, there’s also a question of utility. Netflix and Hulu may be hot today, but that may not be the case in five years’ time. New services will arrive; old ones will die out. Even if the service lineup remains the same, its underlying technology is unlikely to be static.“

This necessity to have “updates” is problematic given the tendency tech companies have to badly handle them:
“That costs money, it requires a commitment to providing support, and it does little or nothing to promote sales of the latest and greatest devices. In the software world, there are companies that provide this level of support—the Microsofts and IBMs of the world—but it tends to be restricted to companies that have at least one eye on the enterprise market. In the consumer space, you’re doing well if you’re getting updates and support five years down the line.“
smartdevices  internetofthings  maintenance  nicolasnova  2014  updates  insecurity  security  technology  iot 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Admiralty charts (maps) | The National Archives
One of the characteristics of an Admiralty chart is that it is continually updated and corrected.
Dates of survey and compilation are minutely recorded, as are those of the corrections continually made to maintain the accuracy and utility of the chart.
mapping  maps  updates  admiralitycharts  charts  corrections  change  accuracy  evolution  versioning  versions  via:litherland 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Update | Contents Magazine
"More and more, what we post to the internet isn’t brand new: it’s an update—new information that builds on something posted earlier. Updates are everywhere… it’s time to give the update its due.
An update is simply a post with a history. But because data plus time almost always reveals a story, that history is rich with possibility. …

…the ascendancy of the update means that our content is increasingly likely to have a future. When we build the relationship between a post and its updates into our code, we allow our users to follow the development of our content over time. …

…the more we enhance our ability to follow ideas and stories over time, the more complex those ideas can become…

…what’s disorienting about our media today isn’t that our stories fail to end, but that we often sever the connections between them…

I leave these thoughts unfinished; I’ve summoned ideas and left them in suspense. Surely we’ll develop these ideas over time, but how are you ever to know?"
contentsmagazine  facebook  sbnation  changes  corrections  twitter  paulford  media  change  persistence  online  web  future  time  journalism  news  contents  2012  unfinished  updates  mattthompson 
august 2012 by robertogreco
NewsDiffs | Tracking Online News Articles Over Time
"NewsDiffs archives changes in articles after publication.
Currently, we track nytimes.com, cnn.com, politico.com and the bbc.co.uk.

NewsDiffs, which was born out of the Knight Mozilla MIT hackathon in June 2012, is trying to solve the problem of archiving news in the constantly evolving world of online journalism.

The New York Times recently highlighted NewsDiffs in the public editors column (which had previously discussed the difficulties of revisions in the digital age).

You can browse our repository of articles. Or you can take a look at some of the examples of articles that have changed.

If you are a developer, you can check out the Github repository.

If you want updates, you can subscribe to our newsletter, or you can follow NewsDiffs on Twitter."

[via: http://contentsmagazine.com/articles/the-update/ ]
bbc  politico  cnn  nytimes  changes  updates  mit  journalism  news  tracking  newsdiffs 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Twitter by Post - The Morning News
"…if you get the chance to look at some old letters—properly old, from the first half of the 20th century, or older—you’ll see that they weren’t always long screeds. In fact they were often kept short and to the point.

A bit like social media updates, actually.

A letter back then might simply ask one question. The reply would answer it. Just that. A letter might describe a single event, or pass on a single piece of news. I’m pregnant. Your father is dying. I was sent on patrol last night, and I survived. I love you. I still love you. I no longer love you.

Simple, short messages. That’s what the post was for. That’s why postal services were so frequent, and why there were so many deliveries.

The post mattered. People love updates."
communication  gilesturnbull  2011  shortform  mail  letters  updates  socialmedia  postcards  usps  twitter 
december 2011 by robertogreco
WikiLeaks and continuity: What if we had a news outlet exclusively focused on follow-up journalism? » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Sure, you could say, bloggers both professional and amateur already do that kind of follow-up work; legacy news outlets themselves do, too. But: they don’t do it often enough, or systematically enough. They often lack incentive to, say, localize a story like the War Logs for their readers. Or to contextualize it. Or to, in general, continue its existence. An independent outlet wouldn’t prevent other news shops from doing follow-up work on their own stories or anyone else’s, just as PolitiFact’s presence doesn’t preclude other outlets from engaging in fact-checking. A standalone shop would, however, serve as a kind of social safety net — an insurance policy against apathy.

As Lab contributor C.W. Anderson remarked on Monday: “I wonder what it would take for a story like the ‘War Logs’ bombshell to stick around in the public mind long enough for it to mean something.”

I do, too. I’d love to find out."
wikileaks  jayrosen  2010  megangarber  journalism  media  digitalmedia  socialmedia  wiki  updates  follow-up  continuity  timeshifting  timestretching  futureofjournalism 
august 2010 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read