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robertogreco : urbanagriculture   7

Land & Freedom: Talking Food Systems
[See also: https://vimeo.com/channels/talkingfoodsystems ]

"Documenting the growth of urban agriculture and local food systems in several underserved San Diego neighborhoods, including some populated by recent refugees, this interactive multimedia project examines how communities are developing creative responses to the issues of hunger, limited access to healthy food, underemployment, and urban blight. Short video stories narrated by urban gardeners and farmers’ market advocates will be available online; the website and its contents, including a “storymap,” will be accessible by mobile devices through QR coded plaques. A public program during the summer harvest season in 2014 launched the website and provides additional opportunities for community engagement.

Media Arts Center San Diego partnering with Project New Village, Bayside Community Center, Humanities advisor A.L. Anderson-Lazo, Ph.D., and local residents from San Diego’s City Heights, Linda Vista, and Southeastern San Diego communities address the history and present-day growth of urban agriculture and neighborhood scale food systems through location based first person visual stories. The project compiles diverse stories of residents from underserved San Diego urban communities in an online interactive multimedia map; to offer a genuine look at where the food system falls short; and at the same time to provide a model of empowerment that envisions a healthier community of greater access and equity.

This project is based on and expands upon the research of Food Ways and Food Scapes by A.L. Anderson-Lazo, Ph.D. and Co/LAB.

For more information or to schedule a screening/presentation in your community, please contact Land & Freedom project director Brian Myers,
brian@mediaartscenter.org
(619) 230-1938

This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org."
sandiego  gardening  food  urbanfarming  urban  urbanism  urbangardening  2014  agriculture  urbanagriculture  local  cityheights  lindavista 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Seed Library - University of San Francisco (USF)
"The USF Seed Library is a joint project of the USF Urban Agriculture Program and Gleeson Library | Geschke Center. All USF students, faculty and staff are welcome to use the seed library. It is located next to the Gleeson Library Reference Desk.

How to use the USF Seed Library

1. Grab a “My Seed Library Log” sheet: provide your name and email address. You will use this log every time you borrow or bring back seeds.

2. Select seeds: seeds are shelved in the cabinet alphabetically by plant name. On your “My Seed Library Log," write down which seeds you are borrowing. Place your log in the return bin.

3. Plant your seeds!

4. Once the plants are mature, you may (but are not required to!) collect and dry seeds, and bring them back to the library.

5. Label the envelope or container you bring your seeds in, with plant name & variety, year harvested, and origin of where the seeds were grown. Blank labels for returned seeds are in a bin on the seed library cabinet. Place returned seeds in the “Seed Return” bin.

6. Update your personal log in the USF Seed Library Log (the 3-ring binder). Logs are arranged alphabetically by last name.

7. Select more seeds!

Note: You can donate any seeds, not just seeds collected from seed library plants. Please bring only organic/non-GMO seeds."
libraries  seedlibraries  seeds  plants  agriculture  gardening  usf  urbanagriculture 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Detroit: Urban Laboratory and the New American Frontier | Newgeography.com
"troubles of Detroit are well-publicized...economy in free fall, people streaming for the exits, worst racial polarization & city-suburb divide in America, its government is feckless & corrupt, & its civic boosters, even ones that are extremely knowledgeable, refuse to acknowledge the depth of the problems, instead ginning up stats & anecdotes to prove all is not so bad. But as with Youngstown, one thing this massive failure has made possible is ability to come up with radical ideas for the city, & potentially to even implement some of them. Places like Flint & Youngstown might be attracting new ideas & moving forward, but it is big cities that inspire the big, audacious dreams. & that is Detroit. Its size, scale, & powerful brand image are attracting not just the region’s but the world’s attention. It may just be that some of the most important urban innovations in 21st century America end up coming not from Portland or New York, but places like Youngstown &, yes, Detroit."
detroit  cities  economics  food  urban  urbanism  farming  future  optimism  urbanprairie  gamechanging  housing  michigan  urbanplanning  geography  agriculture  innovation  architecture  change  futurism  environment  sustainability  urbanagriculture  planning  research  parks  reconstruction  glvo 
december 2009 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: This Diseased Utopia: 10 Thoughts on Swine Flu and the City
"It's an important question. After all, it's incredibly easy, reading about sustainable cities, urban agriculture, and even the locavore movement, to conclude that chickens, pigs, cows, etc., have all been removed from the urban fabric as part of a profiteering move by Tyson and Perdue.

But there were very real epidemiological reasons for taking agriculture out of the city; finding a new place for urban agriculture will thus not only require very intense new spatial codes, it will demand constant vigilance in researching and developing inoculations"
disease  geography  cities  health  bldgblog  agriculture  farming  animals  locavore  sustainability  urbanagriculture  swineflu  history  epidemics  urban  urbanism  architecture  stevenjohnson  epidemiology  crisis 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Backyards could become community gardens in Santa Monica - Los Angeles Times
"Program would match willing homeowners with would-be gardeners, reducing the years-long waiting list for a plot of soil."
food  gardens  gardening  agriculture  urbanagriculture  santamonica  losangeles  community  urbangardening  permaculture  california  yards  faming 
april 2009 by robertogreco
solano community garden in downtown los angeles
"The Solano Canyon Community Garden occupies the former site of the Solano Avenue Elementary School, which was torn down in 1935 shortly after construction of the Pasadena Freeway. The freeway runs along side—and under—the garden. Part of the orchard is actually situated above the second tunnel of the northbound lane of the 101.

Community residents helped to establish this garden eight years ago. You'd think it had been there far longer. In addition to well-tended beds of vegetables and flowers, lively mosaics accent the common areas in walls, tables, sidewalks, and shaded benches. The mosaics are the work ofa local artist and gardener. Solano Canyon Garden is almost five acres in size. Two thirds of the space is devoted to an orchard and hillside planting beds for non local farmers. The remainder consists of common areas and 30 individual garden plots."
losangeles  community  gardens  gardening  urbangardening  permaculture  urbanagriculture  food  california  faming  urbanfarming 
april 2009 by robertogreco

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