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robertogreco : urbanfarming   25

Land & Freedom: Talking Food Systems
[See also: https://vimeo.com/channels/talkingfoodsystems ]

"Documenting the growth of urban agriculture and local food systems in several underserved San Diego neighborhoods, including some populated by recent refugees, this interactive multimedia project examines how communities are developing creative responses to the issues of hunger, limited access to healthy food, underemployment, and urban blight. Short video stories narrated by urban gardeners and farmers’ market advocates will be available online; the website and its contents, including a “storymap,” will be accessible by mobile devices through QR coded plaques. A public program during the summer harvest season in 2014 launched the website and provides additional opportunities for community engagement.

Media Arts Center San Diego partnering with Project New Village, Bayside Community Center, Humanities advisor A.L. Anderson-Lazo, Ph.D., and local residents from San Diego’s City Heights, Linda Vista, and Southeastern San Diego communities address the history and present-day growth of urban agriculture and neighborhood scale food systems through location based first person visual stories. The project compiles diverse stories of residents from underserved San Diego urban communities in an online interactive multimedia map; to offer a genuine look at where the food system falls short; and at the same time to provide a model of empowerment that envisions a healthier community of greater access and equity.

This project is based on and expands upon the research of Food Ways and Food Scapes by A.L. Anderson-Lazo, Ph.D. and Co/LAB.

For more information or to schedule a screening/presentation in your community, please contact Land & Freedom project director Brian Myers,
brian@mediaartscenter.org
(619) 230-1938

This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org."
sandiego  gardening  food  urbanfarming  urban  urbanism  urbangardening  2014  agriculture  urbanagriculture  local  cityheights  lindavista 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Community Mourns Closing of Urban Greenspace - YouTube
"A group of volunteers and patrons of Antonio's Nursery got together one last time to recall the good times of the short lived micro farm on 44th Street near University Avenue.

It's hard to imagine that weeks ago the lot was full of natural life. Visitors from the surrounding neighborhood stopped by to browse the flowers, trees and edible plants. Some purchased the plants to grow at home or were there to seek gardening advice from Antonio himself.

Others were just there. To them, the nursery offered an escape from the grey urban landscape and an opportunity to meet others. Tall corn and sunflowers blocked the view of asphalt streets and traffic. A small awning created a shaded meeting space.

"It wasn't just a business," said Andrea Carter, a frequent visitor of nursery.

Her sentiment was echoed by the others. In a neighborhood with great residential density and a lack of nature, parks and recreation centers, the nursery was a substitute for the community spaces newer, less dense neighborhoods might have.

Antonio's nephew Hector said the community needs green space where folks living in the city can learn about growing plants.

"It's basically a City Heights Balboa Park, without us having to go to Balboa Park," Hector said.

Antonio is a familiar face around City Heights. For years he's been growing and selling flowers across the alley at the IRC New Roots Aqua Farm and down the road at the City Heights Farmers' Market.

Some say before Antonio rented the vacant lot, an old decaying house sat empty on the property for some time and drug dealers moved in. In an attempt to rid the bad elements from the neighborhood, the house was demolished and the lot was enclosed with a chain link fence.

Antonio saw the vacant lot as an opportunity to expand his nursery operation. He leased the property at the beginning of the year and quickly turned it in into an urban oasis.

Neighbors quickly noticed the changes Antonio was making. Rich Macgurn is a caretaker at the nearby Remedy Garden. He said Antonio is magic with his hands and would often take stubborn seeds to Antonio to sprout and return as plants.

"He made this space look so alive. There were so many people coming in and out," Macgurn said. "It was really vibrant."

Unfortunately for Antonio, he was unaware of the zoning restrictions the property has. When city code enforcement officers showed up a few months after he broke ground, he was told he would need to cease operation of the nursery immediately.

Antonio and volunteers have since removed the plants and farming equipment from the lot. The few fruits hanging from vines on the fence are the only relics remaining of the once productive nursery. It's now just another familiar site in City Heights: a vacant lot collecting wind blown debris.

Nursery volunteer Ricardo Cantano said spaces like the nursery help shape a better community and this zoning restriction hinders the momentum.

"Regardless that that was the reason, I feel that the good impact in the community was bigger and there has to be a better way," said Cantano.

Andrea Carter said that because the nursery offered public, health, environmental and community benefits, Antonio should have been given more support to bring the lot up to code.

"We should be moving in this other direction of creating more of these kind of spaces and facilitating them to exist, not making it difficult for people who are not sophisticated in permitting and zoning," she said.

By Brian Myers"
sandiego  cityheights  2013  antonio'snursery  gardening  urbangardening  urbanfarming  brianmeyers 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Ashevillage | Sustainable Solutions in Action
"Ashevillage Institute is a nonprofit dedicated to sustainable solutions in action. We host educational programs with the goal of inspiring participants to walk their talk in their own backyards, neighborhoods, schools and cities."
asheville  northcarolina  permaculture  urbanfarming  education  naturalbuilding  construction  bees  sustainability  environment  natuarlbuildingschool  learning  food  community  workshops 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Spatial Agency
"…a project that presents a new way of looking at how buildings & space can be produced. Moving away from architecture's traditional focus on the look and making of buildings, Spatial Agency proposes a much more expansive field of opportunities in which architects and non-architects can operate. It suggests other ways of doing architecture.

In the spirit of Cedric Price the project started with the belief that a building is not necessarily the best solution to a spatial problem. The project attempts to uncover a second history of architecture, one that moves sharply away from the figure of the architect as individual hero, & replaces it with a much more collaborative approach in which agents act with, & on behalf of, others.

In all the examples on this website, there is a transformative intent to make the status quo better, but the means are very varied, from activism to pedagogy, publications to networking, making stuff to making policy - all done in the name of empowering others…"
centerforurbanpedagogy  mockbee  santiagocirugeda  coophimmelblau  freeuniversity  hackitectura  teamzoo  yalebuildingproject  wuzhiqiao  wholeearthcatalog  colinward  urbanfarming  supertanker  self-organization  selforganization  raumlabor  victorpapanek  eziomazini  jaimelerner  iwb  cohousing  mikedavis  doorsofperception  johnthackara  teddycruz  buckminsterfuller  centerforlanduseinterpretation  atelierbow-wow  elemental  antfarm  ruralstudio  amo  collaborativeproduction  collaboration  networking  policy  holisticapproach  systemsthinking  systemsdesign  activism  spacialagency  jeremytill  tatjanaschneider  nishantawan  matterofconcern  brunolatour  transformativeintent  openstudioproject  lcproject  empowerment  via:cityofsound  cedricprice  resource  designthinking  database  urbanism  space  uk  design  research  architecture 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Urban guides for cyberflâneurs - Reading Room - Domus [Review of Kati Krause's, A Smart Guide to Utopia and P. D. Smith's City. A Guidebook for the Urban Age]
"With a renewed understanding of the concept of city as a living organism…and focused on the power of small actions beyond large-scale urban planning, the book offers a comprehensive tour through spatial practices, diy networks, guerrilla activism and urban farmers, among others. More than a guide to discovering a city, it is a guide about how to make cities more liveable through small, simple interventions. Some of these actions embrace a new technological approach, such as the use of smartphones to enhance the urban experience."

"The book also talks about urban life, religion, street art, waterfronts, traffic jams and many other things that shape our urban experiences, despite the fact that we may often think they are disconnected from each other. As Smith points out, this is the age of the Edge City, where the age-old distinctions between urban and suburban are disappearing, leaving us immersed in a landscape without boundaries where distance is only a subjective feeling."
history  pdsmith  urbanexploration  baudelaire  cyberflaneurism  petercook  mariapopova  adamgreenfield  toread  cities  activism  technology  interventions  urbanfarms  urbanfarming  networks  diynetworks  diy  2012  landscape  place  edgecity  ethelbaraona  utopia  urbanplanning  benhammersley  flaneur  urbanism  urban  books  katikraus 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Small Places of Anarchy in the City: Three Investigations in Tokyo | This Big City
“Tokyo, a city of parts where the individual defines the large scale shows the elimination of the hierarchical city, quietly dismissing accumulated forms of power in favour of a situation in which everyone is free to realize their possibilities. Tokyo makes it possible for slim segments of the population to generate their own environments in scattered oases of a vast metroscape. What emerges here is the idea of the city of unimposed order, consisting of communal self-determination on one hand and individual freedom on the other. Here authority is practical, rather than absolute or permanent, and based in communication, negotiation.

Small places of anarchy are zones of human-scale action, attachment and care. They can:

1) Replace state control with regards to an aspect of city life.

2) Take away that aspect from the requirement of majority rule.

3) Promote unimposed order as the style working…"
tokyo  japan  chrisberthelsen  cities  anarchism  anarchy  diy  gardening  urbangardening  urbanfarming  flatness  chaos  yoshinobuashihara  order  selfdetermination  authority  maps  mapping  adaptability  unschooling  deschooling  urban  urbanism  glvo  negotiation  communication  environment  place  meaning  meaningmaking  activism  scale  human  humanscale  2011  horizontality  horizontalidad 
september 2011 by robertogreco
The Urban Farming Guys | The Urban Farming Guys
"Food hitting our plates with who knows what pumped into it and growing economic uncertainty. We took the seeds in our pockets and every square foot we owned and went about like mad scientists testing out innovative ideas from all around world and making them work in one of the most blighted neighborhoods in the US. Everything from urban fish farming to alternate energy. Now let's pass it on... to our neighborhoods and the nations. We believe you are part of the solution."
food  farming  urbanfarming  gardening  foodproduction  urbangardening  tcsnmy  kansascity  agriculture 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Interventionist's Toolkit: Places: Design Observer
"Driven by local and community issues and intended as polemics that question conventional practice, these projects reflect an ad hoc way of working; they are motivated more by grassroots activism than by the kind of home-ec craft projects (think pickling, Ikea-hacking and knitting) sponsored by mainstream shelter media, usually under the Do-It-Yourself rubric. (Although they do slot nicely into the imperative-heavy pages of Good and Make magazines.) They are often produced by emerging architects, artists and urbanists working outside professional boundaries but nonetheless engaging questions of the built environment and architecture culture. And the works reference edge-condition practitioners of earlier generations who also faced shifts within the profession and recessionary outlooks: Gordon Matta Clark, Archigram, Ant Farm, the early Diller + Scofidio, among others."
politics  urban  social  urbanism  activism  interventioniststoolkit  designobserver  favelachic  diy  economics  crisis  greatrecession  recession  serendipitor  amphibiousarchitecture  architecture  design  urbanfarming  farming  make  making  mirkozardini  anarchism  anarchitects  anarchitecture  space  place  diyurbanism  culture  archigram  matta-clark  antfarm  dillerscofidio  agitpropproject  the2837university  ios  diller+scofidio  agriculture  gordonmatta-clark 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Farm Proper | Set & Drift
"The Farm Proper is a mobile, urban farm under development in the lot behind THE BAKERY, the Set & Drift and mi-workshop collaborative studio space in Barrio Logan.

The Farm Proper is an experimental project created by a collaborative of artists, designers, and backyard growers to inspire urban cultivation and pocket farms. Using abandoned/defunct shopping carts as our medium, we have designed a scenario to take over a temporarily available industrial lot to provide the community with organically grown food."
farming  urban  urbanfarming  reuse  thefarmproper  barriologan  sandiego  agriculture 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Backyard Bunnies Are the New Urban Chickens - GOOD Blog - GOOD
"Why rabbit is the most sustainable meat for the city farmer. (Plus: How to cook it, and how to raise your own.)"
animals  cooking  meat  rabbits  urbanfarming  sustainability  locavore  local  food  recipes  via:javierarbona 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Hantz Farms | World's Largest Urban Farm Planned for the City of Detroit
"It’s our dream to rejuvenate our city by returning to our agrarian roots, by creating the world’s largest urban farm right here in Detroit, a sustainable producer and seller of homegrown fruits and vegetables as well as clean energy. Owned, operated and staffed by Detroiters, Hantz Farms will provide: * Hundreds of “green” jobs for local residents, with on-the-job education. We’ll help Detroit progress to the mixed economy that’s so important for our future. * A generous supply of fresh, local, safe produce for our families and the region. ... * Detroit’s Future A cleaner, greener environment for our children. We’ll clear away the garbage, the blight, the debris, and in their place grow healthful crops and produce non-polluting wind energy. ... * Synergy for local businesses... * Consolidation of city resources."
farms  detroit  agriculture  urbanfarming  farming  culture  cities  urban  work  sustainability  food 
january 2010 by robertogreco
5.5 designers: 'guide to free farming' project
"'the guide to free farming' project was presented in the form of a book that aimed to
design  art  urban  flora  traps  fauna  animals  farming  urbanfarming  hunting  gathering  urbanism  agriculture 
december 2009 by robertogreco
John Gerzema: The post-crisis consumer | Video on TED.com
"John Gerzema says there's an upside to the recent financial crisis -- the opportunity for positive change. Speaking at TEDxKC, he identifies four major cultural shifts driving new consumer behavior and shows how businesses are evolving to connect with thoughtful spending."
trends  johngerzema  community  volunteerism  crisis  ideas  consumer  ted  consumerism  values  savings  conspicuousconsumption  quality  transparency  business  travel  mobility  liquidity  value  libraries  cable  sharing  lending  learning  education  continuingeducation  diy  urbanfarming  sustainability  infrastructure  environment  creditcards  cooperation  trust  crowdsourcing  artisinal  glvo  localcurrency  green  consumption  kogi  carrotmobs  incentives  twitter  ethics  fairplay  empathy  respect 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Matt Hern » URBAVORE
"All too often the tendency is to turn gardening & local eating into another ‘lifestyle option’, another accoutrement for bland yuppies to brandish, an aesthetic pose. Something fun, edifying & likely real healthy, but not much else...rethinking food politics is an overtly political stance – & taken seriously will cause havoc to certain social milieus. When people like me start growing our own food, we take money out of pockets of local grocers. That’s reality...same thing happens when lots of us start riding bikes everywhere: we stop buying cars & gas & it hurts business. This also occurs when we start closing streets down or living in co-op housing or planting fruit trees all over the city. All of this is all good & fun & ecological & “green,” but really it presents a direct, antagonistic challenge to capitalism. And so it should be. I want planting gardens to be not just an aesthetic activity or an attempt to ameliorate capitalism’s worst excesses but the first punch in a brawl."
matthern  food  politics  economics  capitalism  urbanfarming  urban  farming  biking  culture  society  bikes  policy  trends  money  local  agriculture 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Next American City » Daily Report » Farming for Apartment-Dwellers
"Artists Britta Riley and Rebecca Bray want to take urban agriculture to a whole new level with their window farm projectWindow Farms. The idea? Grow your vegetables in vertical farms in your windows. Once they developed a prototype for Riley’s apartment they workshopped the idea with some nascent New York window farmers to see what worked and what didn’t. I spoke with Britta Riley about the project at the Eyebeam Gallery where a sample window farm was on display."
farming  urban  urbanfarming  agriculture  plants  apartmentdwelling  tcsnmy 
october 2009 by robertogreco
The Garden School» A Montessori Toddler Community in Portland, Oregon
"The Garden School opened in September 2008 in Northeast Portland, Oregon. Nestled inside a home, the school provides a warm, welcoming setting for children. Our intention is to create a natural and peaceful environment that allows the toddler to follow his inherent wisdom with gentle guidance. ... Beautiful outdoor areas - including a space for gardening and plenty of room for exploration - encourage children to interact with nature. In addition, the children participate in the preparation of an organic, communal meal each day."
schools  gardens  urbangardening  urbanfarming  montessori  portland  oregon  preschool  daycare  tcsnmy  csl 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Heavy Petal » Five reasons why container farming rules
"I meet so many urban gardeners who long for land. Who dream of larger spaces to grow… well, more. Can’t say I’m completely innocent, either. I’ll admit it: I have yard lust. Whenever I walk through residential neighbourhoods and spot an expanse of lawn or concrete, I tear it up and replace it with abundant veggie gardens, fruit trees and flower beds – if only in my mind.
containers  gardening  farming  food  csl  tcsnmy  backyard  urban  urbangardening  urbanfarming  agriculture 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Worldchanging: Bright Green: How To Be A Green School
"Teachers and students want to do good things for the environment, but sometimes they can't see the wood for the trees. Zac Goldsmith sets out five things all schools can do. ... 1 Good food ... 2 Cooking and growing ... 3 The school run ... 4 Energy savings ... 5 Waste"
schools  green  sustainability  environment  food  farming  urbanfarming  agriculture  cooking  energy  waste  conservation  local  transportation  tcsnmy  lcproject 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Hyperlocavore - A free yard sharing community
"Join hyperlocavore to find or start a yard share in your town. CSAs and community gardens fill up fast. Food is expensive! Grow together!"
yardsharing  urbanfarming  tcsnmy  community  environment  local  green  gardening  activism  socialnetworking  agriculture  locavore  sharing  sustainability  urban  farming 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Edible Schoolyard
"The Edible Schoolyard (ESY), a program of the Chez Panisse Foundation, is a one-acre organic garden and kitchen classroom for urban public school students at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School in Berkeley, California. At ESY, students participate in all aspects of growing, harvesting, and preparing nutritious, seasonal produce.
tcsnmy  schools  education  learning  science  food  edibleschoolyard  farming  urbanfarming  curriculum  agriculture  sustainability  environment  california  green  health  urban  local  organic  nutrition  ecology  gardening  classes  foodeducation  classideas 
april 2009 by robertogreco
MyFarm - Growing Vegetables. Growing Community
"MyFarm is a decentralized urban farm. We grow vegetables in backyard gardens throughout the city. By increasing local food production we are creating a secure and sustainable food system. Using organic practices we strive to grow the best tasting most nutritious vegetables."
sanfrancisco  gardens  gardening  yards  california  entrepreneurship  vegetables  bayarea  food  organic  green  permaculture  urbangardening  urbanfarming  farming  agriculture 
april 2009 by robertogreco
solano community garden in downtown los angeles
"The Solano Canyon Community Garden occupies the former site of the Solano Avenue Elementary School, which was torn down in 1935 shortly after construction of the Pasadena Freeway. The freeway runs along side—and under—the garden. Part of the orchard is actually situated above the second tunnel of the northbound lane of the 101.

Community residents helped to establish this garden eight years ago. You'd think it had been there far longer. In addition to well-tended beds of vegetables and flowers, lively mosaics accent the common areas in walls, tables, sidewalks, and shaded benches. The mosaics are the work ofa local artist and gardener. Solano Canyon Garden is almost five acres in size. Two thirds of the space is devoted to an orchard and hillside planting beds for non local farmers. The remainder consists of common areas and 30 individual garden plots."
losangeles  community  gardens  gardening  urbangardening  permaculture  urbanagriculture  food  california  faming  urbanfarming 
april 2009 by robertogreco

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