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robertogreco : urbangardening   17

Land & Freedom: Talking Food Systems
[See also: https://vimeo.com/channels/talkingfoodsystems ]

"Documenting the growth of urban agriculture and local food systems in several underserved San Diego neighborhoods, including some populated by recent refugees, this interactive multimedia project examines how communities are developing creative responses to the issues of hunger, limited access to healthy food, underemployment, and urban blight. Short video stories narrated by urban gardeners and farmers’ market advocates will be available online; the website and its contents, including a “storymap,” will be accessible by mobile devices through QR coded plaques. A public program during the summer harvest season in 2014 launched the website and provides additional opportunities for community engagement.

Media Arts Center San Diego partnering with Project New Village, Bayside Community Center, Humanities advisor A.L. Anderson-Lazo, Ph.D., and local residents from San Diego’s City Heights, Linda Vista, and Southeastern San Diego communities address the history and present-day growth of urban agriculture and neighborhood scale food systems through location based first person visual stories. The project compiles diverse stories of residents from underserved San Diego urban communities in an online interactive multimedia map; to offer a genuine look at where the food system falls short; and at the same time to provide a model of empowerment that envisions a healthier community of greater access and equity.

This project is based on and expands upon the research of Food Ways and Food Scapes by A.L. Anderson-Lazo, Ph.D. and Co/LAB.

For more information or to schedule a screening/presentation in your community, please contact Land & Freedom project director Brian Myers,
brian@mediaartscenter.org
(619) 230-1938

This project was made possible with support from Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, visit www.calhum.org."
sandiego  gardening  food  urbanfarming  urban  urbanism  urbangardening  2014  agriculture  urbanagriculture  local  cityheights  lindavista 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Community Mourns Closing of Urban Greenspace - YouTube
"A group of volunteers and patrons of Antonio's Nursery got together one last time to recall the good times of the short lived micro farm on 44th Street near University Avenue.

It's hard to imagine that weeks ago the lot was full of natural life. Visitors from the surrounding neighborhood stopped by to browse the flowers, trees and edible plants. Some purchased the plants to grow at home or were there to seek gardening advice from Antonio himself.

Others were just there. To them, the nursery offered an escape from the grey urban landscape and an opportunity to meet others. Tall corn and sunflowers blocked the view of asphalt streets and traffic. A small awning created a shaded meeting space.

"It wasn't just a business," said Andrea Carter, a frequent visitor of nursery.

Her sentiment was echoed by the others. In a neighborhood with great residential density and a lack of nature, parks and recreation centers, the nursery was a substitute for the community spaces newer, less dense neighborhoods might have.

Antonio's nephew Hector said the community needs green space where folks living in the city can learn about growing plants.

"It's basically a City Heights Balboa Park, without us having to go to Balboa Park," Hector said.

Antonio is a familiar face around City Heights. For years he's been growing and selling flowers across the alley at the IRC New Roots Aqua Farm and down the road at the City Heights Farmers' Market.

Some say before Antonio rented the vacant lot, an old decaying house sat empty on the property for some time and drug dealers moved in. In an attempt to rid the bad elements from the neighborhood, the house was demolished and the lot was enclosed with a chain link fence.

Antonio saw the vacant lot as an opportunity to expand his nursery operation. He leased the property at the beginning of the year and quickly turned it in into an urban oasis.

Neighbors quickly noticed the changes Antonio was making. Rich Macgurn is a caretaker at the nearby Remedy Garden. He said Antonio is magic with his hands and would often take stubborn seeds to Antonio to sprout and return as plants.

"He made this space look so alive. There were so many people coming in and out," Macgurn said. "It was really vibrant."

Unfortunately for Antonio, he was unaware of the zoning restrictions the property has. When city code enforcement officers showed up a few months after he broke ground, he was told he would need to cease operation of the nursery immediately.

Antonio and volunteers have since removed the plants and farming equipment from the lot. The few fruits hanging from vines on the fence are the only relics remaining of the once productive nursery. It's now just another familiar site in City Heights: a vacant lot collecting wind blown debris.

Nursery volunteer Ricardo Cantano said spaces like the nursery help shape a better community and this zoning restriction hinders the momentum.

"Regardless that that was the reason, I feel that the good impact in the community was bigger and there has to be a better way," said Cantano.

Andrea Carter said that because the nursery offered public, health, environmental and community benefits, Antonio should have been given more support to bring the lot up to code.

"We should be moving in this other direction of creating more of these kind of spaces and facilitating them to exist, not making it difficult for people who are not sophisticated in permitting and zoning," she said.

By Brian Myers"
sandiego  cityheights  2013  antonio'snursery  gardening  urbangardening  urbanfarming  brianmeyers 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The Gerrard Winstanley Mobile Field Center, New York City Chapter | Dismal Garden
"The Gerrard Winstanley Radical Gardening Space, Reclamation Mobile Field Centre and Weather Station, (European Chapter). 2000
 
A custom made bike trailer that, when in transit, becomes a compact, weatherproof, lockable unit; roadworthy and user-friendly. It is designed to travel between allotments, parks, playgrounds, schools and squares, where it is parked, quickly assembled and made ready for action.
 
When stationary the trailer opens to reveal a small photocopier, a library of books available for photocopying and a small weather station. On top is a solar panel which harvests solar energy while the trailer is outside. (A full battery is enough energy to make one copy.)
 
The library consists of a unique collection of books on DIY culture, permaculture, urban gardening, alt/energy systems, utopias and issues of gentrification. The bike is named after Gerrard Winstanley, the leader and spokesperson for "the Diggers", a group of 17th Century indigent peasants who tried to defy the enclosure of common land by private interests: occupying it en masse, digging it up and cultivating it for food."

[See also: The Gerrard Winstanley Mobile Field Center, European Chapter, 2000
http://www.dismalgarden.com/projects/gerrard-winstanley-mobile-field-center-european-chapter

and http://clconleyarhs4973.wordpress.com/2013/04/06/sustainable-structures-41-43/
http://www.temporaryservices.org/mobile_struct_rsrce3.html
http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/free_radical/ ]
2000  nilsnorman  mobile  bikes  biking  gardening  openstudioproject  lcproject  diy  unschooling  deschooling  permaculture  urbangardening  urban  urbanism  utopia  pocketsofutopia  weather  weatherstations  nomadism  cityasclassroom  nomads 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Outside the Citadel, Social Practice Art Is Intended to Nurture - NYTimes.com
"Known primarily as social practice, its practitioners freely blur the lines among object making, performance, political activism, community organizing, environmentalism and investigative journalism, creating a deeply participatory art that often flourishes outside the gallery and museum system. And in so doing, they push an old question — “Why is it art?” — as close to the breaking point as contemporary art ever has.

Leading museums have largely ignored it. But many smaller art institutions see it as a new frontier for a movement whose roots stretch back to the 1960s but has picked up fervor through Occupy Wall Street and the rise of social activism among young artists."

"Social-practice programs are popping up in academia and seem to thrive in the interdisciplinary world of the campus. (The first dedicated master of fine arts program in the field was founded in 2005 at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, and today there are more than half a dozen.) But for art institutions the problems are trickier: How can you present art that is rarely conceived with a museum or exhibition in mind, for example community projects, often run by collaboratives, that might go on for years, inviting participation more than traditional art appreciation?"

"The Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, for example, is constructing a final work by the artist Mike Kelley, who committed suicide last year, that will function as a kind of perpetual social-practice experiment. Although Kelley was never identified with the movement, he specified before his death that the work, “Mobile Homestead” — a faithful re-creation of his childhood ranch-style home that will sit in a once-vacant lot behind the museum — should not be an art location in any traditional sense but a small social-services site, with possible additional roles as space for music and the museum’s education programs. Whether visitors will understand that the house is a work of art and a continuing performance is an open question. Smaller institutions like the Hammer Museum and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and the Queens Museum of Art, which is acknowledged as a pioneer of social-practice programming, have also begun bringing the movement into the spotlight. (Tania Bruguera, a New York artist who is known for helping immigrants and has been supported by the Queens Museum and Creative Time, sometimes explains social-practice art with an anti-Modernist call to arms: “It’s time to restore Marcel Duchamp’s urinal to the bathroom.”)"
art  glvo  mikekelly  2013  socialpractice  socialpracticeart  tradeschool  activism  museums  via:ablerism  performance  community  communityorganizing  environmentalism  communities  journalism  participatoryart  participatory  ows  occupywallstreet  mobilehomestead  gardening  urbangardening  detroit  taniabruguera  natothompson  creativetime  randykennedy  lauraraicovich  queensmuseumofart  museumofcontemporaryartdetroit  moca  walkeraercenter  carolinewoolard  justinlanglois  pablohelguera  ncmideas  ncm 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Small Places of Anarchy in the City: Three Investigations in Tokyo | This Big City
“Tokyo, a city of parts where the individual defines the large scale shows the elimination of the hierarchical city, quietly dismissing accumulated forms of power in favour of a situation in which everyone is free to realize their possibilities. Tokyo makes it possible for slim segments of the population to generate their own environments in scattered oases of a vast metroscape. What emerges here is the idea of the city of unimposed order, consisting of communal self-determination on one hand and individual freedom on the other. Here authority is practical, rather than absolute or permanent, and based in communication, negotiation.

Small places of anarchy are zones of human-scale action, attachment and care. They can:

1) Replace state control with regards to an aspect of city life.

2) Take away that aspect from the requirement of majority rule.

3) Promote unimposed order as the style working…"
tokyo  japan  chrisberthelsen  cities  anarchism  anarchy  diy  gardening  urbangardening  urbanfarming  flatness  chaos  yoshinobuashihara  order  selfdetermination  authority  maps  mapping  adaptability  unschooling  deschooling  urban  urbanism  glvo  negotiation  communication  environment  place  meaning  meaningmaking  activism  scale  human  humanscale  2011  horizontality  horizontalidad 
september 2011 by robertogreco
The Urban Farming Guys | The Urban Farming Guys
"Food hitting our plates with who knows what pumped into it and growing economic uncertainty. We took the seeds in our pockets and every square foot we owned and went about like mad scientists testing out innovative ideas from all around world and making them work in one of the most blighted neighborhoods in the US. Everything from urban fish farming to alternate energy. Now let's pass it on... to our neighborhoods and the nations. We believe you are part of the solution."
food  farming  urbanfarming  gardening  foodproduction  urbangardening  tcsnmy  kansascity  agriculture 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Five Innovative Urban Gardening Programs in Los Angeles - The GOOD List - GOOD
"The idea is not new, but it’s being resurrected in cities throughout the country (and, for that matter, the world), in part because it’s one way of fighting childhood obesity, which, along with diabetes, is a serious health concern for children of all ages. The number of urban gardens in the United States has grown dramatically in such cities as Los Angeles, Detroit, Milwaukee, and San Francisco, where local governments and residents agree that these gardens are an important way to give children and residents access to healthy food like locally grown fresh produce. Below is a list of innovative programs and initiatives emerging in the Los Angeles area."
losangeles  pasadena  urbangardening  gardening 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Alice Waters–Edible Schoolyard Takedown in the 'Atlantic Monthly': Wrong, Wrong, Wrong | Serious Eats
Reacting to Caitline Flanagan's article in the Atlantic: "Nothing I've read has disgusted me this much since... well, Cleaving. Inflammatory race-baiting rhetoric aside, my first issue (and there are many) is that her point of departure seems to be the idea that the single purpose of schooling is to equip students to pass state-imposed milestones; to quote, "doing well on the state tests" and "passing Algebra I."
edibleschoolyard  alicewaters  education  learning  schools  unschooling  deschooling  progressive  caitlinflanagan  gardening  class  race  urbangardening  teaching  schooling  food  edlevin  seriouseats  lcproject  rote  rotelearning 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The Garden School» A Montessori Toddler Community in Portland, Oregon
"The Garden School opened in September 2008 in Northeast Portland, Oregon. Nestled inside a home, the school provides a warm, welcoming setting for children. Our intention is to create a natural and peaceful environment that allows the toddler to follow his inherent wisdom with gentle guidance. ... Beautiful outdoor areas - including a space for gardening and plenty of room for exploration - encourage children to interact with nature. In addition, the children participate in the preparation of an organic, communal meal each day."
schools  gardens  urbangardening  urbanfarming  montessori  portland  oregon  preschool  daycare  tcsnmy  csl 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Heavy Petal » Five reasons why container farming rules
"I meet so many urban gardeners who long for land. Who dream of larger spaces to grow… well, more. Can’t say I’m completely innocent, either. I’ll admit it: I have yard lust. Whenever I walk through residential neighbourhoods and spot an expanse of lawn or concrete, I tear it up and replace it with abundant veggie gardens, fruit trees and flower beds – if only in my mind.
containers  gardening  farming  food  csl  tcsnmy  backyard  urban  urbangardening  urbanfarming  agriculture 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Victory Gardens San Diego!
"Victory Gardens San Diego is a collaborative effort of many individuals and several gardening, farming, educational and food-justice groups"
sandiego  food  gardening  urbangardening  sustainability  green  tcsnmy  activism 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Backyards could become community gardens in Santa Monica - Los Angeles Times
"Program would match willing homeowners with would-be gardeners, reducing the years-long waiting list for a plot of soil."
food  gardens  gardening  agriculture  urbanagriculture  santamonica  losangeles  community  urbangardening  permaculture  california  yards  faming 
april 2009 by robertogreco
MyFarm - Growing Vegetables. Growing Community
"MyFarm is a decentralized urban farm. We grow vegetables in backyard gardens throughout the city. By increasing local food production we are creating a secure and sustainable food system. Using organic practices we strive to grow the best tasting most nutritious vegetables."
sanfrancisco  gardens  gardening  yards  california  entrepreneurship  vegetables  bayarea  food  organic  green  permaculture  urbangardening  urbanfarming  farming  agriculture 
april 2009 by robertogreco
solano community garden in downtown los angeles
"The Solano Canyon Community Garden occupies the former site of the Solano Avenue Elementary School, which was torn down in 1935 shortly after construction of the Pasadena Freeway. The freeway runs along side—and under—the garden. Part of the orchard is actually situated above the second tunnel of the northbound lane of the 101.

Community residents helped to establish this garden eight years ago. You'd think it had been there far longer. In addition to well-tended beds of vegetables and flowers, lively mosaics accent the common areas in walls, tables, sidewalks, and shaded benches. The mosaics are the work ofa local artist and gardener. Solano Canyon Garden is almost five acres in size. Two thirds of the space is devoted to an orchard and hillside planting beds for non local farmers. The remainder consists of common areas and 30 individual garden plots."
losangeles  community  gardens  gardening  urbangardening  permaculture  urbanagriculture  food  california  faming  urbanfarming 
april 2009 by robertogreco

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