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robertogreco : vegan   4

isra hirsi on Twitter: "fighting against the climate crisis doesn’t equal veganism and beach clean ups, it equals fighting big corporations that are killing millions." / Twitter
"fighting against the climate crisis doesn’t equal veganism and beach clean ups, it equals fighting big corporations that are killing millions.

friendly vegans!! check ur privilege before getting upset at this tweet. many folks can’t afford going vegan and/or are dependent on parents/guardians as their source of food. also some non vegan foods are sacred to many cultures, so let’s not be eurocentric!!"

...

"veganism is 1. inaccessible to many and 2. doesn’t take into account cultures that value certain non vegan foods. i’m not saying veganism doesn’t do anything, but i do think working towards taking down fossil fuel companies is 10x more important and has a bigger impact"
israhirsi  2019  vegan  veganism  climatejustice  climatechange  eurocentrism  privilege  diet  food  pollution  collectivism  individualism  fossilfuels  culture 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
Elizabeth Sawin on Twitter: "I’m so frustrated by the framing that says climate change efforts are either systemic change or individual action and that one is a distraction from the other. https://t.co/SeqllDewtI" / Twitter
“I’m so frustrated by the framing that says climate change efforts are either systemic change or individual action and that one is a distraction from the other.

[link to article: “You can’t save the climate by going vegan. Corporate polluters must be held accountable.” https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2019/06/03/climate-change-requires-collective-action-more-than-single-acts-column/1275965001/ ]

Many individual actions to slow climate change are worth taking. But they distract from the systemic changes that are needed to avert this crisis.

I mean who would say “treating your female coworkers with respect is just virtue signaling; what we really need is equal pay legislation”. We can work, learn, change, and grow as individuals and work towards systemic change both at once.

Why does this keep coming up? Any insight?

Here’s what I had to say last time this was up.

[link to: “Individual carbon footprints or collective systemic change? Both! - Resilience” https://www.resilience.org/stories/2019-03-04/individual-carbon-footprints-or-collective-systemic-change-both/

“What is most important, to live with as small a carbon footprint as possible or to prioritize collective action to change laws, rules, and incentives? For me, this is not the right question to ask.”]

So apparently I’m not ready to let this go. I just got home. Tired/sad/mad from a day of writing about climate change. And here are my beans, almost fully cooked in our “wonderbag” this affordable insulated bag that keeps a pot hot for hours, just by holding the heat in. [two images]

Beans and boiling water went in at noon. Now almost fully cooked and no energy added. I feel a little less mad/sad because of this one small maybe insignificant thing. This is not a distraction. For me it is essential part of keeping going.

There you have it my final word (I promise) but jeez, I want to experience little tastes of the climate safe world we are going to make together, it’s not a distraction and it’s not virtuous, it’s just a little taste of something hopeful.”
elizabethsawin  2019  activism  climatechange  sustainability  individualism  collectivism  thisandthat  systems  actions  vegan  veganism  feminism  virtuesignaling  carbonfootprints  resilience  law  rules  incentives 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
Why Aren’t Figs Considered Vegan? | TASTE
Sorry if this ruins figs for you.

Like those of dumplings and sandwiches, the definition of veganism isn’t set in stone. Some practitioners eschew honey and sugars refined with animal-bone char, since both involve products derived from animals. Others avoid Italian aperitifs like Campari dyed with carminic acid, which is derived from crushed beetles. And then there are figs, which in and of themselves are obviously not animals, but are technically in part derived from them.

Botanically, figs aren’t fruits; they’re flowers that bloom internally, and like many flowers, they’re pollinated and propagated by insects. Specifically, fig wasps, one unique species per each of the 8,000 or so species of fig.

In the last days of her life, the female fig wasp subsists solely on figs before climbing through the tiny opening of one inverted flower to lay her eggs. Having accomplished her evolutionary purpose—not to mention having ripped off her antennae and wings when she squeezed her way inside the fig’s narrow entry—the wasp dies inside the fig while her babies gestate. Once hatched, the larvae wriggle free of the fig to continue the cycle of life. But the mother wasp is enzymatically digested by the fig until it becomes one with the plant that killed it and birthed her young. The whole routine is gross enough to turn some vegans off of figs completely, though of course this varies from person to person. But don’t worry—those crunchy bits in a fig are seeds, not wasp limbs. At least, most of the time."
fig  fruit  vegan  2019  campari  food  insects  wasps  flowers 
april 2019 by robertogreco

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