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robertogreco : vessels   2

‘Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay,’ by Christopher Benfey - NYTimes.com
"Surely the word “vessel” must rate high among the loveliest in the English language. Its meaning contains (vessel-like) a well-wrought urn, a far-­sailing ship, a throbbing vein. Spoken, its whispering consonants cut swiftly past. Printed, its letters even resemble a boat: jutting prow, double-curved hull, high stern. Can it be a coincidence that this Middle English artifact encloses — centered perfectly — the Latin esse, the primal verb “to be”?

And to paraphrase Emily Dickinson only slightly, there is no vessel like a book. Especially when it’s as well wrought and far-sailing as Christopher Benfey’s “Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay,” a book about earthen vases, epic voyages and ancestral blood. Part memoir, part family saga, part travelogue, part cultural history, it takes readers on a peripatetic ramble across America and beyond, paying calls on Cherokee potters, Bauhaus craftsmen, colonial clay-diggers and the author’s brick-mason grandfather."
craftsmanship  quakers  history  art  toread  books  christopherbenfrey  blackmountaincollege  vessels  emilydickinson  bmc  quaker 
august 2012 by robertogreco
doug johnston: Sash Cord Studies
"These vesels, masks and sculptures utilize an old crafting technique in which rope or cord is coiled and stitched to forms bowls and baskets. The technique is itself based on the ancient method of making ceramic coiled pots as well as coiled basketry. The method explores ways of transforming a linear material into three-dimensional objects, an interest I have also studied in other materials such as yarn or plastic tubing. I also see the process as a form of analog 3D printing/prototyping performed by a sewing machine and with much less precision. In this way the "3D file" is in my head as I begin each piece and its formation happens by making certain adjustments to the work w"hile sewing. The process has its own limitations, largely determined by the sewing machine, and each piece takes on deformations and glitches that give it unique personality.

The studies use the raw 100% cotton braided cord, often called sash cord, and colored sewing thread…"
wearables  vessels  brooklyn  nyc  glvo  textiles  design  art  dougjohnston  wearable 
february 2012 by robertogreco

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