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robertogreco : via:anthonyalbright   5

Artist Lara Favaretto Celebrates the Absurd and Existentially Tragic at MoMA PS1 | Highbrow Magazine
"Before leaving the exhibition, visitors are invited to choose one of the abandoned books from a large bookcase in the lobby.  Hidden in the pages of each book is a reproduction of an image that Favaretto has collected as source material throughout her career. Walking out of the museum with a book under arm, visitors are connected with the paradoxical delight of experiencing Favaretto’s work, in the face of a constant sense of depletion, obsolescence and loss."
ps1  installations  books  loss  obsolescence  depletion  2012  via:anthonyalbright  art  larafavaretto 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Conspiracy of Art - The MIT Press
"The images from Abu Ghraib are as murderous for America as those of the World Trade Center in flames. The whole West is contained in the burst of sadistic laughter of the American soldiers, as it is behind the construction of the Israeli wall. This is where the truth of these images lies. Truth, but not veracity. As virtual as the war itself, their specific violence adds to the specific violence of the war.

In The Conspiracy of Art, Baudrillard questions the privilege attached to art by its practitioners. Art has lost all desire for illusion: feeding back endlessly into itself, it has turned its own vanishment into an art unto itself. Far from lamenting the "end of art," Baudrillard celebrates art's new function within the process of insider-trading. Spiraling from aesthetic nullity to commercial frenzy, art has become transaesthetic, like society as a whole…"
abugraib  transaestheticism  insidertrading  privilege  art  via:anthonyalbright  books  2005  baudrillard 
august 2012 by robertogreco
G.D.P. Doesn’t Measure Happiness - NYTimes.com
"What these societies have in common is that rather than striving to be the biggest they instead aspire to be constantly better. Which, in the end, offers an important antidote to both the rhetoric of decline and mindless boosterism: the recognition that whether we are falling behind or achieving new heights is greatly determined both by what goals we set and how we measure our performance."
scandinavia  nordiccountries  economics  via:anthonyalbright  2011  well-being  happiness  growth  gdp  improvement  society  capitalism  competition  davidrothkopf  measurement  carolgraham  nicolassarkozy  josephstiglitz  bhutan  jeffreysachs  us  china  development  post-development  stability  sustainability  prosperity  wealth  australia  canada  singapore  japan  netherlands  norway  sweden  denmark  luxembourg  europe  fiscalresponsibility  humanism  shrequest1 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Ahem! Are You Talking to Me? (Or Texting?) - NYTimes.com
"Powers…came away thinking he'd witnessed “a gigantic competition to see who can be more absent from the people & conversations happening right around them. Everyone in Austin was gazing into their little devices — a bit desperately, too, as if their lives depended on not missing the next tweet.”

In a phone conversation a few weeks afterward, Mr. Powers said that he is far from being a Luddite, but that he doesn’t “buy into the idea that digital natives can do both screen and eye contact.”

“They are not fully present because we are not built that way,” he said.

Where other people saw freedom — from desktop, from social convention, from boring guy in front of them — Mr. Powers saw “a kind of imprisonment.”

“There is a great deal of conformity under way, actually,” he added.

& therein lies the real problem. When someone you are trying to talk to ends up getting busy on a phone, the most natural response is not to scold, but to emulate. It’s mutually assured distraction."
williampowers  davidcarr  etiquette  mobile  phones  cellphones  attention  presence  human  distraction  twitter  sxsw  via:anthonyalbright  rudeness 
april 2011 by robertogreco

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