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robertogreco : via:timmaly   12

How Big is the Solar System?
"This is a classic exercise for visualizing just how BIG our Solar System really is. Both the relative size and spacing of the planets are demonstrated in this outdoor exercise, using a mere peppercorn to represent the size of the Earth. Guy Ottewell has kindly given permission for this electronic presentation of The Thousand-Yard Model; his exercise is presented in its original form, indexed with a few anchors to help you find you way around the large file. We also include a catalog describing several Ottewell publications. Image of the planets courtesy of NASA."
via:timmaly  scale  space  outerspace  solarsystem  science  nasa  size 
july 2015 by robertogreco
REDEF (Interest Mix): A FashionREDEF ORIGINAL: A Q&A With Abe Burmeister and Tyler Clemens, Founders of Outlier
"Q: When I say wearable technology, what's the first thing that comes to mind?

Abe Burmeister: Um. I'm gonna go take a nap.

We spend a lot of time reading about the history of apparel, and the Industrial Revolution started with spinning jenny machines to power cotton mills. None of that stuff ended up in your clothes. It changed how clothes were made radically, but there's no motors in your clothes, right? Like, almost none of it actually made it into the clothes. Velcro is a very simple machine. A zipper is really the main thing that came out of it that made it into your clothes.

So, there's an information revolution going on, and it's going to radically change how clothes are made, but whether it ends up inside your clothing, who knows? A lot of people are trying, and I think some interesting stuff will happen, but we'll have to wait and see.

I don't see any of it as inevitable. It's inevitable that it will change the environment around apparel. We'll see about the watch. Ringly just got a bunch of funding, maybe that's something.

Personally, I'm trying to eliminate as many beeps and buzzes from my life, so, it's interesting. I'm probably going to buy an Apple watch just to see what it's like. But, at the same time, I'm like, "You know what? I'm trying to turn off as many of those buzzes as possible, not get them closer to me.""



"Q: If you guys had to bet on one of these information revolution era technologies to vastly change how we are producing clothing, whether that's 3D printing or VR fitting rooms, what would you put your money on?

Tyler Clemens: For me, I think it has something to do with health. So, if there's a way to put—

Abe Burmeister: To me it's been, and I'm surprised this wasn't Tyler's answer, actually, but we've been looking at bonding technology and how garments are actually put together. It's super labor intensive.

We make most of our stuff in the U.S. We visit the factories where we're fairly certain people are getting paid at least minimum wage, they're treated well, they're not locked in, you know, things like that.

That was a really early lesson when I started visiting the Garment District. I was like, "I have no idea what a sweatshop is." You have this vision in your head, like, sweatshop, but when you actually start going into the ground, you don't know what it is.

It's immigrant labor. There's never been any success in getting anybody but the bottom rungs of the economic labor market to sew on a mass level, right? So, you even see it in China. People don't want to be sewing anymore. The market's moving to Vietnam. And there's also fantastic, really beautiful, high-end factories emerging there, which is great.

But to me, chasing the labor to the bottom rung... We're less price-sensitive than more commodity-driven companies, but if our factories said, "Hey, the price doubles tomorrow," we wouldn't be happy. Even though we'd be happy the workers would be getting paid more.

Eventually, if the world is going to keep developing in a positive way, we need to eliminate this kind of drudge-type labor that's very repetitive. I'd rather have a world where people weren't running the same garment through the machine every day, the same stitch. That's the kind of job that would be great if it disappeared, right?

There is a pleasure in making a garment. You know, you're producing something real. But, at the same time, I'm not lining up for a job at a sewing factory. Almost nobody with fluent English capabilities is in America. I think you get the same kind of echoing throughout other countries as well. Italy, they're bringing workers in from China to make "made in Italy" garments.

And in China, we've talked to factories that are like, "Yeah, you know, the people just don't come back. They go away for Chinese New Year and half of them don't come back. They want jobs where they can sit at a computer all day now."

The bonding technology's interesting. The 3D printing, I think, is a long way off. Maybe one day it emerges.

Some people actually try to call it 3D printing, but the more advanced knitting technologies can pretty much just print out a sweater, which is pretty cool. So, stuff like that, I think, is where I would like to see the change happen, and where we're putting some energy in."

[via: “Very interesting interview w/ the founders of @Outlier. ⌘F "sewing" for a provocative section… http://www.mediaredefined.com/a-fashionredef-original-a-qa-w-1009251383.html
https://twitter.com/robinsloan/status/570641334530236417

and

“takes while to get going but this interview is interesting as hell http://www.mediaredefined.com/a-fashionredef-original-a-qa-w-1009251383.html via @robinsloan ” [+screenshot of the question and opening lines about wearable technology]
https://twitter.com/doingitwrong/status/570696532749647873 ]

[Some follow-up:
“@doingitwrong @robinsloan Thanks for this. Thinking about our family relationship to sewing. ”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570719008506257409

“@doingitwrong @robinsloan But also thinking about pockets as wearable technology. https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:pockets Joinery. Access.”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570719257949970432

“@rogre @doingitwrong Wow I would love to read your extended thoughts on this! Grecolaborativo & sewing as social media (??)”
https://twitter.com/robinsloan/status/570755963361177600

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong On it.

For now…
1. @vruba http://tinyletter.com/vruba/letters/6-14-america … and @bldgblog https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:b0b610fa3b45
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570802756438503424

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong
2. visual stimuli
http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/tagged/sewing/

3. mending
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:mending
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570803959666855937

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong
4. @LangeAlexandra “3D printers have a lot to learn
from the sewing machine”
http://www.dezeen.com/2014/05/08/3d-printers-have-a-lot-to-learn-from-the-sewing-machine/
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570804635725725696

“@robinsloan @doingitwrong
and

5. tailoring (no refs, other than if falling under the solarpunk umbrella)
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:7bab45bb0cb5
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/570804967780458496 ]
abeburmeister  tylerclemens  outlier  intervies  clothing  wearables  via:robinsloan  via:timmaly  2015  manufacturing  repetition  labor  sweatshops  glvo 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Randall Munroe Of xkcd Answers Our (Not So Absurd) Questions | FiveThirtyEight
"WH: In “What If?” you often rely on estimation techniques to develop reasonable answers to pretty complex questions. For example, in the Supernova neutrino radiation question, you reconciled two things that happen at extremely different orders of magnitude. Of the estimation techniques you use, which do you think is the most applicable for people to apply to their daily life? What’s a technical takeaway you’d like to see people use more?

RM: One thing that bothers me is large numbers presented without context. We’re always seeing things like, “This canal project will require 1.15 million tons of concrete.” It’s presented as if it should mean something to us, as if numbers are inherently informative. So we feel like if we don’t understand it, it’s our fault.

But I have only a vague idea of what one ton of concrete looks like. I have no idea what to think of a million tons. Is that a lot? It’s clearly supposed to sound like a lot, because it has the word “million” in it. But on the other hand, “The Adventures of Pluto Nash” made $7 million at the box office, and it was one of the biggest flops in movie history.

It can be more useful to look for context. Is concrete a surprisingly large share of the project’s budget? Is the project going to consume more concrete than the rest of the state combined? Will this project use up a large share of the world’s concrete? Or is this just easy, space-filling trivia? A good rule of thumb might be, “If I added a zero to this number, would the sentence containing it mean something different to me?” If the answer is “no,” maybe the number has no business being in the sentence in the first place.

One thing that’s been really helpful for me is to memorize random quantities to serve as reference points. I remember that Wyoming is the smallest state and has a bit over half a million people, and that New York’s metro area has about 20 million. Boston’s has 5 million, and Tokyo’s has 35 million. “One in 100 Americans” is 3 million people, and “1 in 100 people” is 70 million. Once I have those reference points, when I hear “10 million people have lost power in the storm,” I at least have something to compare it to.

But I’m also wary of people saying “everyone should know” some skill from their area of expertise, because people have their own stuff to deal with. It’s easy for me to imagine an abstract person and then say, “Wouldn’t it be better if that person knew how to program?” And maybe it would. But real people are complicated and busy, and don’t need me thinking of them as featureless objects and assigning them homework. Not everyone needs to know calculus, Python or how opinion polling works. Maybe more of them should, but it feels a little condescending to assume I know who those people are. I just do my best to make the stuff I’m talking about interesting; the rest is up to them."

[via: https://twitter.com/doingitwrong/status/508015133147561984 ]
randallmunroe  via:timmaly  xkcd  scale  numbers  comparison  data  magnitude  communication  people  humans  coding 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Nothing Says "Sorry Our Drones Hit Your Wedding Party" Like $800,000 And Some Guns
"On December 12, 2013, a drone struck and killed 12 members of a wedding party in Yemen. If the U.S., which claims the strike was clean and justified, didn’t pony up the $800,000 in cash and guns as reparations, then who did?"
drones  droneproject  military  via:timmaly  2014 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Sente 6 for Mac: Academic Reference Manager
"Academic Reference Management for Mac and iPad. Free for small libraries. Essential for all libraries.

Sente 6 will change the way you think about academic reference management. It will change the way you collect your reference material, the way you organize your library, the way you read papers and take notes, and the way you write up your own research. If you do academic research, you need Sente 6.

It is easy to get started with Sente. Both the Mac and iPad apps are free and they provide you with a basic account on our servers. Upgrade to a premium account for unlimited libraries and more sync space.

Your Research Hub
Sente is the most powerful and flexible academic reference manager available. Sente makes it easier then ever to acquire, organize, read, annotate and cite academic research material. And Sente runs on all your Macs and iPads, with cloud-based sync, so your research library is always up-to-date on all your devices.

Sente's beautiful user interface makes it a pleasure to use. When you look at Sente, you see your research and your ideas, not our software. Single collection tabs let you focus on one group of references at a time, like all those references with the To Be Read status. Single reference tabs let you focus on the one reference you are currently reading. And full screen mode maximizes the use of every bit of your screen real estate while eliminating distractions.

Gather
Sente makes building your research library easier than ever. Targeted browsing lets you add references from many web sites such as EBSCOHost, JSTOR, and PubMed with just a click, without leaving Sente. Another click downloads the PDF and adds it to your library.

Bulk searches can automatically retrieve hundreds or thousands of references from many sources such as PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and hundreds of university and research libraries. Best of all, they remain active in the background, alerting you daily to new references in your fast-moving field.

Get started by importing libraries directly from EndNote, Bookends, Papers, Mendeley, Zotero, and Reference Manager.

Organize
Sente has the tools you need to stay organized, even as your library grows to thousands of references or more. Hierarchical QuickTags give you unprecedented power for cataloging your references.

Built-in smart collections give you quick access to your library. Custom smart collections let you create just the subsets you need. Custom statuses make it easy to make Sente fit your personal research workflow.

Batch editing makes it easy to edit any combination of fields in dozens or hundreds of references at once.

Customize
Sente lets you customize your library to meet your specific needs. Custom statuses help you keep track of your references through each step of your research workflow. Custom reference types let you handle whatever kind of references you might need. Custom attributes let you add any special fields you might need to any reference type. And you can configure the reference editor to present your data just the way you want to see it.

Cloud Sync
Sente lets you create synchronized copies of your libraries and place them on any number of Macs and iPads, anywhere in the world, and all copies will stay in sync automatically.

Once you turn it on, it just works—continuously and behind the scenes—and everything syncs: references, PDFs (including highlighting), notes, even customizations.

Create full-access copies for your own computers and restricted copies for sharing with students or colleagues. Even if you don't need to sync multiple devices, it's a great backup strategy too.

Read, Annotate, Take Notes
Highlight passages in your PDFs and capture quotations and your own thoughts in notes, using Sente's powerful annotation tools. Create any number of notes for each reference and easily jump from any note back to its linked place in the text. Best of all, your notes and highlighting are immediately synced through the cloud across all copies of your library.

Bibliographies
Of course, in the end, you need to write up your own work. Sente supports all the popular Mac word processors, including Pages, Word, Mellel, Scrivener, Nisus Writer, Open Office, and other applications that support Rich Text Format. More than 100 bibliography formats are included and you can create your own or tweak existing formats to meet your needs. Citations can even appear in footnotes, if your style requires that.

If you collaborate with people who write with Microsoft Word and EndNote, on a Mac or Windows, you will be able to exchange drafts with them seamlessly because Sente reads and writes docx files that are compatible with EndNote.

Free Sente Account
You can download and use both the Mac and the iPad versions of Sente for free. This will give you a free Sente account that can be used to create any number of reference libraries, each with up to 100 references. And you can sync up to 250MB of attachments with a free account. For many users, the free account is all they will ever need.

Unlimited Libraries, Unlimited Sync*
People who need to create larger libraries can upgrade to a premium Sente account for just $59.99 if you are a student, faculty or staff at an accredited academic institution (or just $79.99 without an academic affiliation). With a premium account, you can use both the Mac and the iPad apps to create libraries of any size. And a premium account provides you with unlimited sync space."
via:timmaly  pdf  software  mac  osx  ios 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Reaching My Autistic Son Through Disney - NYTimes.com
[Don't read this here, go read the entire article.]
[Update (20 Sept 2014): Now Radio Lab has done a story. http://www.radiolab.org/story/juicervose/ ]

"Owen’s chosen affinity clearly opened a window to myth, fable and legend that Disney lifted and retooled, just as the Grimm Brothers did, from a vast repository of folklore. Countless cultures have told versions of “Beauty and the Beast,” which dates back 2,000 years to the Latin “Cupid and Psyche” and certainly beyond that. These are stories human beings have always told themselves to make their way in the world.

But what draws kids like Owen to these movies is something even more elemental. Walt Disney told his early animators that the characters and the scenes should be so vivid and clear that they could be understood with the sound turned off. Inadvertently, this creates a dream portal for those who struggle with auditory processing, especially, in recent decades, when the films can be rewound and replayed many times.

The latest research that Cornelia and I came across seems to show that a feature of autism is a lack of traditional habituation, or the way we become used to things. Typically, people sort various inputs, keep or discard them and then store those they keep. Our brains thus become accustomed to the familiar. After the third viewing of a good movie, or a 10th viewing of a real favorite, you’ve had your fill. Many autistic people, though, can watch that favorite a hundred times and seemingly feel the same sensations as the first time. While they are soothed by the repetition, they may also be looking for new details and patterns in each viewing, so-called hypersystemizing, a theory that asserts that the repetitive urge underlies special abilities for some of those on the spectrum.

Disney provided raw material, publicly available and ubiquitous, that Owen, with our help, built into a language and a tool kit. I’m sure, with enough creativity and energy, this can be done with any number of interests and disciplines. For some kids, their affinity is for train schedules; for others, it’s maps. While our household may not be typical, with a pair of writerly parents and a fixation on stories — all of which may have accentuated and amplified Owen’s native inclinations — we have no doubt that he shares a basic neurological architecture with people on the autism spectrum everywhere.

The challenge is how to make our example useful to other families and other kids, whatever their burning interest. That’s what Team Owen seems to be talking about. How does this work? Is there a methodology? Can it be translated from anecdote to analysis and be helpful to others in need?"



"The room gets quiet. It’s clear that many of these students have rarely, if ever, had their passion for Disney treated as something serious and meaningful.

One young woman talks about how her gentle nature, something that leaves her vulnerable, is a great strength in how she handles rescue dogs. Another mentions “my brain, because it can take me on adventures of imagination.”

A young man, speaking in a very routinized way with speech patterns that closely match the “Rain Man” characterization of autism, asks me the date of my birth. I tell him, and his eyes flicker. “That was a Friday.”

When I ask the group which Disney character they most identify with, the same student, now enlivened, says Pinocchio and eventually explains, “I feel like a wooden boy, and I’ve always dreamed of feeling what real boys feel.” The dorm counselor, who told me ahead of time that this student has disciplinary issues and an unreachable emotional core, then compliments him — “That was beautiful,” she says — and looks at me with astonishment. I shrug. He’d already bonded in a soul-searching way with his character. I just asked him which one.

It goes on this way for an hour. Like a broken dam. The students, many of whom have very modest expressive speech, summon subtle and deeply moving truths.

There’s a reason — a good-enough reason — that each autistic person has embraced a particular interest. Find that reason, and you will find them, hiding in there, and maybe get a glimpse of their underlying capacities. In our experience, we found that showing authentic interest will help them feel dignity and impel them to show you more, complete with maps and navigational tools that may help to guide their development, their growth. Revealed capability, in turn, may lead to a better understanding of what’s possible in the lives of many people who are challenged."



"For nearly a decade, Owen has been coming to see Griffin in this basement office, trying to decipher the subtle patterns of how people grow close to one another. That desire to connect has always been there as, the latest research indicates, it may be in all autistic people; their neurological barriers don’t kill the desire, even if it’s deeply submerged. And this is the way he still is — autism isn’t a spell that has been broken; it’s a way of being. That means the world will continue to be inhospitable to him, walking about, as he does, uncertain, missing cues, his heart exposed. But he has desperately wanted to connect, to feel his life, fully, and — using his movies and the improvised tool kit we helped him build — he’s finding his footing. For so many years, it was about us finding him, a search joined by Griffin and others. Now it was about him finding himself.

“Owen, my good friend,” Griffin says, his eyes glistening, “it’s fair to say, you’re on your way.”

Owen stands up, that little curly-haired boy now a man, almost Griffin’s height, and smiles, a knowing smile of self-awareness.

“Thank you, Rafiki,” Owen says to Griffin. “For everything.”

“Is friendship forever?” Owen asks me.

“Yes, Owen, it often is.”

“But not always.”

“No, not always.”

It’s later that night, and we’re driving down Connecticut Avenue after seeing the latest from Disney (and Pixar), “Brave.” I think I understand now, from a deeper place, how Owen, and some of his Disney Club friends, use the movies and why it feels so improbable. Most of us grow from a different direction, starting as utterly experiential, sorting through the blooming and buzzing confusion to learn this feels good, that not so much, this works, that doesn’t, as we gradually form a set of rules that we live by, with moral judgments at the peak.

Owen, with his reliance from an early age on myth and fable, each carrying the clarity of black and white, good and evil, inverts this pyramid. He starts with the moral — beauty lies within, be true to yourself, love conquers all — and tests them in a world colored by shades of gray. It’s the sidekicks who help him navigate that eternal debate, as they often do for the heroes in their movies.

“I know love lasts forever!” Owen says after a few minutes.

We’re approaching Chevy Chase Circle, five minutes from where we live. I know I need to touch, gently, upon the notion that making friends or finding love entails risk. There’s no guarantee of forever. There may be heartbreak. But we do it anyway. I drop this bitter morsel into the mix, folding around it an affirmation that he took a risk when he went to an unfamiliar place on Cape Cod, far from his friends and home, and found love. The lesson, I begin, is “to never be afraid to reach out.”

He cuts me off. “I know, I know,” he says, and then summons a voice for support. It’s Laverne, the gargoyle from “The Hunchback of Notre Dame.”

“Quasi,” he says. “Take it from an old spectator. Life’s not a spectator sport. If watchin’s all you’re gonna do, then you’re gonna watch your life go by without you.”

He giggles under his breath, then does a little shoulder roll, something he does when a jolt of emotion runs through him. “You know, they’re not like the other sidekicks.”

He has jumped ahead of me again. I scramble. “No? How?”

“All the other sidekicks live within their movies as characters, walk around, do things. The gargoyles only live when Quasimodo is alone with them.”

“And why’s that?”

“Because he breathes life into them. They only live in his imagination.”

Everything goes still. “What’s that mean, buddy?”

He purses his lips and smiles, chin out, as if he got caught in a game of chess. But maybe he wanted to. “It means the answers are inside of him,” he says.

“Then why did he need the gargoyles?”

“He needed to breathe life into them so he could talk to himself. It’s the only way he could find out who he was.”

“You know anyone else like that?”

“Me.” He laughs a sweet, little laugh, soft and deep. And then there’s a long pause.

“But it can get so lonely, talking to yourself,” my son Owen finally says. “You have to live in the world.”"
autism  learning  parenting  comics  disney  health  movies  communication  fables  myths  legends  morals  ablerism  capabilities  abilities  differentlyabled  capacities  howwelearn  howweteach  neurotypical  psychology  dignity  interestedness  connection  love  howwelove  friednship  teaching  listening  folklore  via:timmaly  ronsuskind  interested 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Something About How Steve Roggenbuck's Poetry Will Save the Internet
[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Roggenbuck ]

"Twenty-six-year-old Roggenbuck, a self-declared “internet poet,” is the antidote. Since 2010 Roggenbuck has been an obsessive user of Twitter, Facebook and multiple Tumblrs, but his best work is his YouTube videos. In these videos, he spews hysterical riffs and one-liners of wildly varying comprehensibility to a camera he points at himself, usually to the backing of an exhilarating electronic soundtrack, usually somewhere beautiful outside.

His most popular video is "make something beautiful before you are dead." I first saw it two years ago on a friend’s Tumblr and I was struck by Roggenbuck's raw vlogger solipsism, which would be grating if it weren’t backed up by equally raw virtuosity. The video starts quietly. Roggenbuck's in a room, affecting a piercing nasal midwestern twang as he muses to the camera about how he's "going to find the best deal."

It's a parody of every boring YouTube video blog you've seen, which Roggenbuck sets up only to explode seconds later in a dizzying epiphany. Suddenly he's outside in the woods, still holding his camera, popping out from bushes, shouting "two words, Jackass: Dog the Bounty Hunter," swinging an enormous tree branch and berating a dead tree stump for not being alive. Roggenbuck appears to have just broken out from a dark basement where he'd been imprisoned from a young age, raised entirely on AOL chatrooms, reality TV and Monster Energy Drinks. He's exhilaratingly callous about his own body, holding his camera inches from face despite a pretty intense outbreak of acne, at times so excited by his own words that the camera jerks crazily up and down with every cheesy self-help exhortation. When Roggenbuck yells "Get me in control of ABC Family and I will fuck this country up" while sprinting through a drizzly field to a dubstep soundtrack you feel like you're watching neurons firing and forging strange connections in real time. It's a selfie of the soul.

As impressive as the video is the outpouring of adoration in comments under "make something beautiful before you are dead." Most YouTube comments are petri dishes of cutting-edge hate speech, but a community of ebullient Roggenbuck worshipers has turned his comments sections into a virtual self-help seminar."



"Steve Roggenbuck would horrify the Jonathan Franzens of the world. Poetry is supposed to be serious and introspective—the opposite of the superficial, buzzing, electronic hellscape that critics imagine the internet to be. According Roggenbuck’s own creation myth, he's a product of that polarity: As an MFA student, he began to focus on the internet after one of his instructors commented on his misspelled, dashed-off-seeming poems, "save this for your blog." (He dropped out of the MFA program.)

But "save this for your blog" isn't quite the insult an MFA professor might image. New York Times economics columnist Paul Krugman (!) recently wrote about how poetry was once passed among networks of elites, "allow[ing] people both to discuss sensitive topics elliptically and to demonstrate their cleverness." Elliptical demonstrations of cleverness: Imagine what they would have thought of Tumblr! And the internet is more than just a staging ground—it's a huge source of inspiration and material for young artists, poets, technologists and writers.



Anyone who wants to understand the internet generation would do well to pay attention to Roggenbuck's oeuvre. It can be hard to get past Roggenbuck's aggressive naivety and goofy schtick, which can come across like the twee mirror to the strident net freedom diatribes of Wikileaks fanatics and hacktvists. You could say he's way too uncritical about the incentives embedded in the technologies he uses—created by huge corporations whose exact goal is to encourage the sharing he craves—and how that might negatively affect his work. But this is just to point out that are as many flaws in the the structures of the internet as there are in the people embedded in them. The best of Roggenbuck's work shows there's equally as much promise."

[See also: http://htmlgiant.com/author-spotlight/ultimately-beautiful-an-interview-with-steve-roggenbuck/

NC: Why did you drop out of your MFA program?

SR: i think if my life conditions were different, i never would have gone. i never had any illusons that it was going to magicaly transform my writeing, or that teaching was the perfect career fit for me. after undergrad i was in a long-term relationship, and we were planning to have a family in the next ~5 years. i felt like i needed to pursue a “career” that would bring in an income big enough to support a family. but i am also very stubborn about doing what i want with my tiem. i hate having a job, last year i maxed out my credit cards instead of getting a summer job. the mfa was kind of a compromise between what i really wanted (to be an artist all the time) and what was expected of me (standard middle-class career path)

i gained some things from my mfa experience.. i now have an acute awareness of what i don’t like about academic/lit culture, for exampel. i started fully embraceing my identity as an “internet poet” only after my workshop teacher left me a condescending comment on my poem, “save this stuff for your blog.” with my misspellings too, i was fueled by my teacher’s disapproval

i never really liked the progam too much, but when my long-term relationship ended, i felt like i finaly had other options. i could live with my dad for free (or with various friends, as i eventualy decided), or i could at least split rent with more roommates in a cheaper neighborhood, without bothering/disappointing my partner

also my school started grating on me in more fundamental ways this past fall. my core audience is not poets in academia.. so why should i be seeking feedback from (only) poets in academia? i would get comments from my teachers, for example discouraging my misspellings, and i would kind of just dismiss them because i know they arent realy my main audience. but if i they’re not my audience, why am i asking for their feedback in the frist place? the feedback ive gotten from friends online has been much more valuable" ]

[More: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/11/is-this-loud-youtube-loving-poet-the-bard-of-the-internet/281189/ ]
via:timmaly  steveroggenbuck  poetry  internet  twitter  socalmedia  mfa  youtube  writing  reading  spelling  teaching  learning  graduateschool  highered  highereducation  literature  jonathanfranzen  daveeggers  kennethgoldsmith  piotrczerki  youth  life  living  thoreau  waltwhitman  yolo  commenting  video  literacy  schooliness  creativity  education 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Site 3 coLaboratory
"Site 3 coLaboratory is a 2,000 square foot member-run makerspace in a shed down an alley in Toronto’s west end. We are dedicated to making, teaching, learning and thinking about the intersection between art and technology. We make amazing things, and we will teach others to make amazing things, too.

The vision for the Site 3 coLaboratory is to have a space that will promote a four step cycle of create – display – teach – inspire.

• Create: A workspace which provides members with access to tools and equipment for working on projects. We presently have an electronics lab with soldering equipment, a CNC laser cutter, a full metal shop, industrial sewing machines, and welding equipment.

• Display: A gallery space for hosting regular events where members can display and promote projects.

• Teach: A classroom space for hosting regular events where members and guests can share their skills and learn from each other.

• Inspire: Site 3 exists to develop a community of people interested in making awesome things and promoting the entire cycle.

As a member-run organization, in addition to having access to the space, members have the responsibility of keeping it going: running classes, helping with fundraisers, gallery nights, and other events, and working on community projects.

Site 3 is a registered Ontario non-profit corporation (Site 3 coLaboratory Centre for Art and Technology, Ontario Corp. 1806341). We are looking for people to get involved, participate in this process, and help create and maintain this space."
art  diy  technology  site3  toronto  makerspaces  openstudioproject  via:timmaly  lcproject 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Animal Crossing Part #1 - WELCOME TO CAMP
"I've always heard a lot of good things about Animal Crossing, but I never owned a Gamecube. When it was released on the DS it received such positive reviews that I decided to give it a shot, despite the fact that it appears to have been created for small children suffering from down's syndrome and ADD.

I was not prepared for the shit that goes on in this children's game. The result is this.

I've documented the journey of Billy, a young, happy lad who believes he's going off to have fantastic adventures at summer camp. The following images have not been altered in any way (other than to rescale them or to identify which dialog option is being chosen).

This is a literal and practically contextual account of what happens to poor bastards sent to Animal Crossing.

This is the true story of Billy."
animalcrossing  via:timmaly  humor 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Murmuration - Mission Parameters
"A drone is a literary character. It is an imagined future that we are in the process of making present. Our understanding of the drones flying over Pakistan are informed as much by the science fiction of the past as they are by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism.

Drones allow us re-image ourselves on both ends of the camera and on both ends of the geopolitical trigger. Art frees us to imagine the world through other people’s eyes. Art can enable us to confront the implications of people sitting in one continent with the power to stalk and kill people in another. The collaborative performance of art between the artist and the audience is a public space where, rather than in secret labs or bunkers, we should be investigating the capabilities of drones.

Drones prove that the future is imagined before it is invented.

We invite you to imagine with us: what is the past, present, and future of the drone?"

[Text from: http://murmurationfestival.tumblr.com/post/46792061701/mission-parameters ]
drones  2013  adamrothstein  via:timmaly  oliviarosane  droneproject  writing  scifi  sciencefiction  technology  geopolitics  art  future 
april 2013 by robertogreco

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