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robertogreco : visualarts   7

It's About Time | The Evergreen State College
Quick—what time is it? Your answer probably comes from a smartphone that connects you instantly to information across the globe. New technologies drive new experiences of time and writers and artists respond to those new experiences with startling innovations in form and vision.

Through the critical study of art and literature, we will explore the experience of time in the modernist period—roughly defined as the first half of the 20th century. In those decades, airplanes, automobiles, telephones and radio sped up time and the modernists responded in kind. How did they experience time? How is this different from our own experience of it?

To answer those questions, we will not only study modernist art and literature, but also live like modernists. We will begin the fall quarter with a voyage, sailing the waters of Puget Sound on a 100-year-old schooner. We will slow down by using the technologies of the past. Students will write with ballpoint pens and typewriters, draw from observation and move into abstraction, use film photography, memorize poetry and go to museums, all in the hopes of living more slowly. During both fall and winter quarters we will study movements such as Romanticism, Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Cubism, Dada, Abstraction and Surrealism in visual art and literature. Students will engage with authors like James Joyce, Marcel Proust and Virginia Woolf and artists like Pablo Picasso and Marcel Duchamp.

Students in this program can expect to examine art, literature and culture in the modernist period; learn how to draw, paint and write in various ways from naturalism to abstraction; understand the basic principles behind artistic and literary representation in the modernist period; and go on field trips using "slow" technologies (train, boat, walking).
evergreenstatecollege  coursedescriptions  programdescriptions  2014  arthistory  art  history  visualarts  writing  literature  trevorspeller  shawnosha  gregmullins  time  modernism  proust  culture  marcelproust 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth | The Evergreen State College
"Fifty years ago, Buckminster Fuller contemplated our planetary future and our limited ability to imagine alternative futures in his book, Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth . In this program, we will consider what it means to be astronauts on our home planet and how to creatively imagine healthy and sustainable future scenarios. Guiding questions for the program will include: What shapes cultural values and how do cultures change, adapt and form new paths? How do we weave together various branches of knowledge into a healthy system and vision for the world? What do we make with the abundance of material goods that fill our daily lives? How do we design objects and spaces to create a more sustainable and fulfilling existence?

To address these questions, we will consider traditions of the past and present that demonstrate cultural responses to environmental limits and possibilities. Yogic philosophy, for example, offers critical guidelines for sustainable living and we will explore the principles and practices of this tradition. We will examine the ideologies of the Arts and Crafts movement, the modernist avant-garde, social sculpture and art as social practice. These will be connected with the environmental movement and current trends such as upcycling, cradle-to-cradle design and the resurgence in handiwork and traditions of craft.

Students will research and construct their own “Operating Manuals” over the course of the three quarters. This will include a critical look at alternative and utopian models for living, as well as engage with powerful sustainability and justice movements already at work in our community. This program will challenge students to engage through readings and weekly seminar discussions, field visits and research papers, as well as visual art projects and critiques.

In fall quarter, we will build vocabularies and skills for thinking about sustainability and community transformation. Studio work in two- and three-dimensional design and ceramics will emphasize redesigning, repurposing and reusing the proliferation of materials available all around us. Yoga labs will help us to integrate work in the classroom and studio with yogic thought and somatic experiences. Study and comparison of cross-cultural examples of sustainability practices will guide the development of our Operating Manuals.

In winter quarter, we will work to develop community projects and/or individual visual artworks. We will work with organizations such as Sustainable South Sound and The Commons to develop applied projects. Students will research and report on local and regional alternative, intentional communities. Our critical analysis of sustainability discourses will inform all of our studio work.

Spring quarter will offer opportunities to further develop and implement community projects. These may take the form of public art projects, sculptures or installations that enhance public spaces such as community or school gardens or parks. They may also involve facilitating public art processes that integrate the concepts and design principles central to this program."
evergreenstatecollege  coursedescriptions  programdescriptions  2014  buckminsterfuller  anthropology  karengaul  evanblackwell  anthonytindill  architecture  design  art  arthistory  history  community  consciousness  consciousnessstudies  sustainability  sustainabilitystudies  somaticstudies  culturalstudies  culture  visualarts  spaceshipearth 
september 2014 by robertogreco
River Reciprocity | The Evergreen State College
"This interdisciplinary science and visual arts program is focused on rivers, streams, and watersheds and is designed for beginning students in art and ecology. Students will explore the role of art and science in helping people develop a deep and reciprocal relationship with a watershed. We will study physical stream characteristics that affect the distributions and relationships among biological organisms. We will develop observational skills in both art and science as well as keep illustrated field journals that are inspired by a connection to a specific stream.

The first half of the program focuses on the Nisqually River watershed. Through readings and field studies, students will learn the history of the watershed, study concepts in stream ecology, learn to identify native plants in the watershed, and learn about current conservation efforts. We will work with local K-12 schools to conduct water quality testing, identify aquatic macroinvertebrates, and provide environmental education to elementary school students. The study of freshwater ecology will include basic water chemistry, stream flow dynamics, primary productivity, organic matter and nutrient dynamics, aquatic insect taxonomy, ecological interactions, current threats to freshwater ecosystems, and ecological restoration. The program will focus on current research in riparian zones, streams, rivers, and watersheds. Students will have opportunities to be involved in small-scale group research projects in stream ecology. An overnight field trip will be organized to provide in-depth experiences in the field and study of rivers on the Olympic Peninsula.

Students will develop beginning drawing skills and practice techniques for keeping an illustrated field journal. They will work in charcoal, chalk pastel, watercolor, and colored pencil. They will explore strategies for using notes and sketches to inspire more finished artworks. Through lectures and readings, students will study artists whose work is inspired by their deep connection to a place. Each student will visit a local stream regularly and, in the second half of the quarter, will create a series of artworks or an environmental education project that gives something back to their watershed."
aesthetics  ecology  environmentalstudies  environment  fieldstudies  naturalhistory  visualarts  art  watershed  carrileroy  luciaharrison  evergreenstatecollege  coursedescriptions  programdescriptions  2014  restoration  naturalresources  rivers  streams 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Art and Archive | The Evergreen State College
"We are living in the archive. The 21st century, age of the digital and of infinite information horizons, offers particularly fertile conditions for future artists, writers, curators, and educators to meet, collaborate, and reinvent their identities as cultural workers, memory agents, and experimental pedagogues. This program is designed to support students in the arts and humanities who are interested in forging a practice that combines creative and critical engagement with questions of memory, the writing of history, the document and the object, the history of exhibition and display, the gallery, museum, and archive.

We will investigate the ways that cultural institutions, including museums, ethnographic films, and documentary photography have written "official" histories; our own creative experiments will be directed toward critiquing and intervening in these visual narratives by working closely with archival materials. Our studios and laboratories will often be museums and archives; we will visit museums in Seattle and Portland, and we will spend time almost every week in a local archive, getting to know the Washington State Archives here in Olympia as artist-researchers.

This is an advanced program for students who are looking to develop their own research-based artistic practice and who want to pursue small-scale individual or collaborative projects within the context of a program structured around supporting that work through lecture/screenings, presentations, weekly writing workshop and project critique, and seminars on common readings. Students will plan independent work for the quarter under faculty guidance. Students will also share in leading class sessions that may include regular work-in-progress presentations, seminar facilitation, and other presentations of research related to program themes. Projects supported: critical/creative writing (we will do our best to blur the line between these), non-traditional writing for the moving image and performance, video and film, photography, and other visual arts."
art  arthistory  history  mediaarts  visualarts  writing  juliazay  evergreenstatecollege  coursedescriptions  programdescriptions  2014  archives  museums  museumstudies  libraries  curation 
september 2014 by robertogreco
A Jester’s Guide to Creative See[k]ing across Disciplines | American Journal of Play
"For many centuries and in many cultures, jesters recited tales of heroic exploits, but they did more than simply recount past events—they amused, cajoled, and spun tales that transported listeners to the edge of mysterious, unmapped territories. Through the transformative power of play and the imagination, they reworked what was already understood and created from it new realities that transcended the established order. The author maintains that such imaginative play is vital to creativity in any medium and is fundamental for optimal human development. She explores possibilities for cultivating creativity through the playful, paradoxical stance of the jester—a serendipitous and purposeful, strange and familiar, disruptive and productive figure. Her discussion, grounded in a visual-arts practice that leverages uncertainty and randomness, considers the role of play in light of its wider implications for knowledge and creativity."

[PDF: http://www.journalofplay.org/sites/www.journalofplay.org/files/pdf-articles/4-3-article-jesters-guide-to-creative-seeking-across-disciplines.pdf ]
challenge  howwelearn  howwework  productivity  strangeness  purpose  generalists  randomness  uncertainty  visualarts  imagination  play  serendipity  dianerosen  jester  jesters  cv  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  creativity  disruption 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Oral history interview with Ruth Asawa and Albet Lanier, 2002 June 21-Jul 5 - Oral Histories | Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
"An interview of Ruth Asawa and her husband, Albert Lanier, 2002 June 21-2002 Jul.5, conducted by Mark Johnson on June 21 and Paul Karlstrom on July 5, for the Archives of American Art, in the subjects' home/studio in San Francisco, Calif.

Asawa and Lanier shared their memories of Black Mountain College, Josef and Anni Albers (with whom they became close friends) and Buckminster Fuller. Part of their account of those years and the early stage of their marriage dealt with issues of race.

This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators."
ruthasawa  albertlanier  2002  interviews  blackmountaincollege  josefalbers  annialbers  buckminsterfuller  oralhistory  history  race  art  visualarts  glvo  interracialmarriage  markjohnson  artists  sanfrancisco  bmc 
july 2011 by robertogreco
charlotte.jarvis | Design Interactions at the RCA
"My practice is broadly participatory, creating environments for the examination of social interactions ranging from intimate exchanges to group mentality and behavioral norms. The work seeks to manipulate its participants by making the boundary between the real and the simulated ambiguous. I am concerned with investigating how the visual arts and design might respond to Teresa de Lauretis’ critical account of an effort to find another perspective, “a view from elsewhere”, which she describes as existing in the “social spaces carved in the interstices of institutions and in the chinks and cracks of the power-knowledge apparati.” I aspire to following this line of enquiry, testing the boundaries between product and performance, science and the creative, design and art, through both practical and academic research."

[See also: http://www.interaction.rca.ac.uk/charlotte-jarvis/future-not-noun-its-verb ]
charlottejarvis  design  art  participatory  performance  interaction  exchange  ambiguity  visualarts  teresadelauretis  perspective  empathy  socialspaces  inquiry  science  ncm  participatoryart 
february 2011 by robertogreco

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