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robertogreco : visualisation   6

Sensory Substitution
"Can sensory data be fed through unusual sensory channels? And can the brain learn to extract the meaning of such information streams?

Yes and yes. Sensory substitution is a non-invasive technique for circumventing the loss of one sense by feeding its information through another channel. We are leveraging this technique to develop a non-invasive, low-cost vibratory vest to allow those with deafness or severe hearing impairments to perceive auditory information through small vibrations on their torso."
senses  synesthesia  visualisation  informationdavideagleman  substitution 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Portion Sizes in 'Last Supper' Paintings Grew Over Time | LiveScience
"The researchers' analysis showed that portion sizes of main courses (usually eel, lamb and pork) depicted in the paintings grew by 69 percent over time, while plate size grew by 66 percent and bread size grew by 23 percent.
food  history  portions  health  leonardodavinci  visualisation  obesity 
march 2010 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sensing the immaterial-material city
"I've created a public group at Flickr called Sensing the City, so if you have similar photos, do add them there. I'd be interested to see what turns up.

While it's a very different sensibility and approach to the aforementioned explorations of radio frequencies - it's often a very material city, rather than immaterial; just hidden - in the context of discussions around instrumenting the fabric of our cities via urban informatics it's interesting to consider how much of this already occurs on our streets. And despite being marked by traffic cones and fluorescent work jackets it's become an invisible activity, somewhat ironically, for passers-by. These people are sensors."
danhill  design  urbanism  materiality  visualisation  cities  urban  visualization  ubicomp  space  flickr  rfid  mobile  nearfield  wireless  networkedcities 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Immaterials: the ghost in the field
"we hope that this work goes some way towards building better spatial and gestural models of RFID, as material for designers to build better products and to take full advantage of the various ways in which spatial proximity can be used. And with this better understanding we hope to be able to discuss and design for privacy and the ‘leakage’ of data in a more rigorous way."
berg  berglondon  timoarnall  jackschulze  visualization  rfid  sensors  visualisation  touch  nfc  nearfield  video  aesthetics  design  data  blindness 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: architectural arteries
"After seeing James’ quick attempts at making maps with Cloudmade, I had a play, and made some maps of the UK, pulling out everything apart from the roads and rail. Sure, it’s a well-worn metaphor, but there’s something in the infrastructure making the landscape."
maps  mapping  cloudmade  cartography  openstreetmap  chrisheathcote  via:migurski  infrastructure  landscape  visualisation  geography  osm 
september 2009 by robertogreco
sevensixfive: How to: Draw the Voronoi Diagram
"Drawing Voronoi diagrams by hand has renewed my interest in the stuff. There are lots of scripts out there for making instant vector crystal foam in just about any modeling or CAD platform, but it's more interesting for me right now to slow it down, take it step by step, and really try to understand the geometries involved. More a heuristic than an algorithm, executing it demands and reinforces the kind of zoned out close attention that almost becomes the whole point of drawing in the first place. The artifact that you get at the end it is just an unexpected bonus: the physical record left by the process of thinking out loud on paper. Below is a rough pseudocode (thanks, mike!) for building it up from a set of points."
continuouspartialattention  process  drawing  craft  voronoi  topology  visualisation  sevensixfive  geometry  structure  space  design  networks  growth  diagrams  fredscharmen 
september 2009 by robertogreco

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