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Living With the Land: Four Seasons in Tibet • Lu Nan • Magnum Photos
“As part of an ongoing series, Living With the Land, we speak to Magnum photographers whose work explores a way of life tied closely to nature.

The  inhabitants of rural Tibet—as seen through the lens of Magnum photographer Lu Nan—live a relentlessly tough existence. From morning until night – when photographed near the turn of the millenium – they had endless work to do; in the spring, they sow, in the autumn, they harvest, before the summer, they shear wool which they twist into yarns. When they weren’t farming, they were sewing and weaving clothes and quilts. They are materially poor and their survival is closely bound to the whims of the weather. But, as Lu Nan explains, “Tibetan peasants do not talk about nature [as a separate entity], they are part of nature.”

In Tibet, the vast majority of peasants are Buddhists, but their religious faith is rarely fixed upon ceremony. “It is integrated into their daily life. This embodies itself in their attitude towards Nature, divinities and other living beings, as well as towards birth, aging, sickness, death and so on,” says Lu Nan. “Peasants do not use pesticides. Even if they are given out for free by the government, they still refuse to use them. The reason is very simple: pesticides will kill bugs. Life is fully respected here.”

Lu Nan spent seven years documenting these communities, resulting in the project titled, Four Seasons, which made up the third and final chapter of his Trilogy series. From 1996 to 2004, he made nine trips to Tibet and stayed three to four months each time, living alongside his subjects. His approach was methodical; he generally lodged at a government township and would visit any villages within a 2.5 hour walking distance from where he was staying. “On my last two trips, between August 2002 and May 2004, I worked in Tibet for fifteen months—six months for the first time and nine months for the second. During the work for Four Seasons, I photographed the entire spring sowing twice and the entire autumn harvest four times.”

Eighty-five percent of Tibetans are rural workers, and live lives that are fundamentally little removed from that of their ancestors. They plow their fields with oxen and horses, reap with sickles, and winnow wheat with the wind. Lu Nan witnessed a poetry in this machineless life. “What we hear is the ‘yo-heave-ho’ of driving draught animals, the songs of the women in the harvest, loudly thanking God for bestowing a bountiful harvest and the sound of threshing,” he says.

As a nationality, Tibetans value relationships deeply, especially among family members, says Lu Nan. “When you visit one family, if only the children are in the home, you can’t ask them where their parents are. Because of the harsh environment, poverty and lack of medical care, one of their parents may well have died. The children may begin to weep [if] asked such a question,” he explains. “Therefore, when one visits a family, one should instead ask how many people there are in the family and who they are and then you know whether the children’s parents are still alive.” Friendship outside of the family unit is also fundamental to their survival. “For example, when one family builds a house, every family in the village will send one person to help,” he adds.

Four Seasons offers a powerful and intimate study of a group of people with a profound connection to the land they live upon. This in turn leads to a deep appreciation of the present, evident in Lu Nan’s portraits. Quiet pleasure—and often sheer joy—is taken in tea making, braiding hair, lifting wheat, roasting barley, sitting with family or taking rest in the sun. “In their peaceful inner state, Tibetan peasants live and work leisurely and at ease, without being trapped by the past or disturbed by the future,” explains Lu Nan. “This is the state of happiness according to Buddhism, which resonates with the blessedness sought by Epicureanism, Stoicism and Spinozism.”

The project was heavily influenced by the work of German writer and statesman Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.“Goethe’s belief in the infinite value of living in the present and his overall vision of everything determines the level of Four Seasons,” says Lu Nan. “During the seven years of photographing Four Seasons, no matter how familiar I was with the peasants’ lifestyle and their customs, I was always prepared to leave empty-handed before I went to Tibet, because the fascination of life lies in its impermanence, which is also the inspiration and solace of life for me.””
tibet  lunan  photography  nature  morethanhuman  weather  seasons  time  multispecies  buddhism  religion  belief  faith  animals  agriculture  farming  happiness  epicureanism  stoicism  spinozism  goethe  spinoza  relationships  life  living  peasants  machines  land  landscape  geography  pleasure  pleasures  simplicity  leisure  work 
6 days ago by robertogreco
xkcd: Where Do Birds Go
[via: "It’s been raining a good deal here in central Texas recently, and whenever the rain comes and the birds disappear from our bird feeders I have the same thought, one which is memorialized in one of my favorite xkcd comics."
https://buttondown.email/ayjay/archive/notebooks-a-monk-and-the-death-of-a-poet/ ]
via:ayjay  birds  rain  weather  humanism  nature  interconnected  universal  universalism  xkcd  comics 
may 2019 by robertogreco
LOVELY WEATHER WE'RE HAVING.
"A video game about going outside.

Out now.

"The vibrantly colored world of Lovely Weather We're Having doesn't take you back to a specific time necessarily, but to a mind set, when the world seemed bigger and brighter and more mystifying."
-Jess Joho, Kill Screen

"Lovely Weather is a clever little mood stimulator on the contemplative end of the scale, a kind of dynamic Zen box. You open it and poke around a little and maybe close it, thinking “Is that all?”
And then you come back, and the weather’s different, and the time of day’s just so, and it takes your breath away."
-Matt Peckham, WIRED

"Watched the trailer and I have no idea what the game is about."
-Someone on reddit "

[See also:
https://glander.co/Lovely-Weather-We-re-Having
https://vimeo.com/136570202
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXGVxnEVJiE
https://glander.itch.io/lovely-weather-were-having ]
gaming  games  videogames  weather  srg  edg  toplay  location 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Why San Francisco Gets So Windy and Foggy in the Summer | Bay Curious | The California Report | KQED News
"Every day Will Pearson bikes from his home in San Francisco's Marina district to his office in the Financial District. His morning ride along the Embarcadero is pleasant and calm, but he has noticed the wind picks up significantly on his ride home.

"I’ve always wondered why different parts of the day have such different levels of wind," said Pearson.

Fortunately, it's not too complicated, said meteorologist Jan Null.

Here's the simple explainer from KQED cartoonist Mark Fiore."

[image]

"For more detail, here's the breakdown.

Why it's windier in the afternoon

• Air always moves from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure.
• Hot air rises and is less dense, and is typically low pressure, while cold air sinks and is dense, and is typically higher pressure.
• Over the course of the day, the air inland heats up in California. But air remains cool over the ocean — where the water stays about the same temperature all day.
• The cold, high-pressure air from over the ocean rushes inland, toward the warm, lower pressure air.
• It takes the path of least resistance, squeezing through sea-level gaps in the mountains and ridges — the biggest of which is at the Golden Gate.
• This creates something known as the Bernoulli Effect. "Think about a garden hose. You have the water cranked up all the way and you have the flow coming out of it. Well, you put your thumb over it, you restrict it down, and all of a sudden you shoot 20 yards across the driveway," said Null. "The same thing happens if you compress air down to a smaller gap like through the Golden Gate or the San Bruno Gap."

That's why the winds are strongest on the days where it's hottest inland and still cool on the coast, when the temperature and pressure difference is the biggest.

Why it's foggy in the summer

The temperature differences also explain why the Bay Area gets so much fog in the summer.

• There is a system of high pressure over the Pacific Ocean called the North Pacific High. In the summer, it gets stronger, creating big clockwise winds over the ocean.
• Those winds push the surface water of the ocean away from the California coastline.
• Very cold water from deep in the ocean rises to the surface. This is called upwelling.
• Something known as the California Current also brings cold water south from Alaska.
• When the sea breeze blows over this much colder water, condensation forms — creating fog.
• The fog comes inland in the summer for similar reasons as the wind: While it stays cool by the ocean, the high temperatures inland create lower pressure, and the fog is sucked in through gaps in the mountains, like the Golden Gate.

That's why we see picturesque summer fog rolling in past the Golden Gate Bridge in the afternoon.

"Nothing's going to move them out until the sun comes up the next morning and evaporates it," said Null.

Our topography also explains why one neighborhood can be foggy, like the Sunset, and another warm, like the area in Sausalito known as the Banana Belt. The hills and ridges direct the path of the fog and wind, creating these microclimates.

Will our fog and wind remain?

The amount of summer fog has decreased 33 percent over the last century, studies have found. Warming oceans and climate change could continue to affect the complicated weather systems that create our unique Bay Area fog and wind."
sanfrancisco  weather  fog  bayarea  2018  explainer  visualization  markfiore  jannull  meteorology  classideas 
august 2018 by robertogreco
kelly norton: The Pleasant Places to Live
"“pleasant” here means the mean temperature was between (55° F and 75° F), the minimum temperature was above 45° F, the maximum temperature was below 85° F and there was no significant precipitation or snow depth."



"5 Most Pleasant Places
LOS ANGELES, CA 183 days/yr
SAN DIEGO, CA 182 days/yr
OXNARD, CA 166 days/yr
SIMI VALLEY, CA 156 days/yr
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 153 days/yr

5 Least Pleasant Places
MC ALLISTER, MT 14 days/yr
NORTHEAST OF RENO, NV 15 days/yr
CLANCY, MT 15 days/yr
DOUGLAS, WY 15 days/yr
EAST OF CEDARVILLE, CA 16 days/yr"
climate  weather  2014  foreden 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Which City Has The Most Unpredictable Weather? | FiveThirtyEight
"You can easily make out the path of the Rocky Mountains in this map. Cities just to the east of them — like Denver and Great Falls, Montana — have much more unpredictable temperatures than almost any place to the west of them.

Cities just to the east of the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico have the most predictable temperatures. San Diego’s temperatures are the most predictable of anywhere in the continental United States (Honolulu’s are the most predictable overall). Seattle and San Francisco have highly predictable temperatures, as does the Florida peninsula."
weather  predictions  2018  statistics  climate  california  visualization  honolulu  sandiego  hawaii  losangeles  sanfrancisco  fresno  phoenix  westcoast  classideas  foreden 
june 2018 by robertogreco
The Typical Weather Anywhere on Earth - Weather Spark
"Get monthly, daily, and hourly graphical reports. Great for event and trip planning!"
weather  climate  cities  classideas  infoviz  visualization 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Word Origin | Turkish Winds | Mavi Boncuk
[via: https://twitter.com/kitabet/status/881536700408885248 ]

"Gündoğusu: dry and cold East wind

Keşişleme : South East wind of Istanbul. Nautical sailor use. Keşiş, monk EN. from the direction of Keşişdagi/Uludag of Bursa. Also | Samyeli | Akyeli

Kıble: hot and moist South wind.

Lodos:hot South West wind. Nautical sailor use. Also Kabayel | kumkarası

Günbatısı: hot and humid West wind.

Karayel: North West wind following rain.

Yıldız: cold North wind. Nautical sailor use.

Poyraz: North East wind.Cold and snow in winter. Choppy seas and white foam on the peaks of waves..

İmbat: from Italian "İmbatto"[1]. Meltem of sea. Seasonal Aegean wind blowing from sea to land.

Sam Yeli: Desert wind. Usually used in Southeast Turkey.

Etezyen: May-September winds. East Mediterranean and Aegean wind from North.

Bora: High Northern winds.Used interchangeably with Poyraz.

Meltem: The Meltemi wind was known by the old Greeks as the Etesian[2]northern winds, and results from a high pressure system laying over the Balkan/Hungary area and a relatively low system over Turkey. Although this katabatic[3] wind can bring about harsh sailing conditions it also provides cooling, low humidity and good visibility. Furthermore, it can be characterized as one of the few Mediterranean winds that do not necessarily die out at the end of the day and can easily last more than three to six days.

Possibly from Italian maltempo m (plural maltempi) foul weather EN; kötü hava. tempo da lupi - lousy weather. Tempo= time EN. From Latin tempus, from Proto-Indo-European *tempos (“stretch”), from the root *temp- (“to stetch, string”).

[1] imbatto [im-bàt-to]
Imbatto wind, the sea wind blowing toward the coast

[2] recurring annually —used of summer winds that blow over the Mediterranean from Latin etesius, from Greek etēsios, from etos year .

[3] A katabatic wind, from the Greek word katabatikos meaning "going downhill", is the technical name for a drainage wind, a wind that carries high density air from a higher elevation down a slope under the force of gravity. Sometimes also called fall winds. Examples of true katabatic winds include the bora (or bura) in the Adriatic, the Bohemian Wind or Böhmwind in the Ore Mountains, the mistral, the Santa Ana in southern California, the tramontane, and the oroshi in Japan.

Not all downslope winds are katabatic. For instance, winds such as the foehn, Chinook, or bergwind, are rain shadow winds where air driven upslope on the windward side of a mountain range drops its moisture and descends leeward drier and warmer.
wind  winds  weather  words  turkey  turkish  language  names  naming 
july 2017 by robertogreco
FRACTAL - 4k StormLapse on Vimeo
"The ingredient based explanation for supercell thunderstorms cites moisture, wind shear, instability and lift as the reasons for their formation. I prefer to focus on the big picture. Supercell thunderstorms are a manifestation of nature's attempt to correct an extreme imbalance. The ever ongoing effort to reach equilibrium, or viscosity, is what drives all of our weather, and the force with which the atmosphere tries to correct this imbalance is proportional to the gradient. In other words, the more extreme the imbalance, the more extreme the storm.

This collection of timelapses was gathered over the last six years. The project started out as wanting to be able to see the life-cycles of these storms, just for my own enjoyment and to increase my understanding of them. Over time, it morphed into an obsession with wanting to document as many photogenic supercells as I could, in as high a resolution as possible, as to be able to share with those who couldn't see first hand the majestic beauty that comes alive in the skies above America's Great Plains every Spring. After more than 100,000 miles on the road and tens of thousands of shutter clicks later, this is the result. I hope you enjoy watching it as much as I enjoyed creating it.

Keep an eye out for a long form version of my storm timelapses, as these are a small sample of what I've been able to gather. I'm not sure yet how the extended version will be released. If you have any ideas regarding distribution or would like to license my work for your own project, please contact me: ChadLCowan@gmail.com

I love teaching people about storms and severe weather and how to safely document them. Feel free to email me if you have any interest in joining me for a chase. June is by far the best time to go out, as the storms are more photogenic and slow moving than any other month.

Follow me on these social media channels for more storm content:
instagram.com/stormtimelapse
twitter.com/stormtimelapse
facebook.com/stormlapse

+--------------------------+

"Big whirls have little whirls that feed on their velocity, and little whirls have lesser whirls, and so on to viscosity." - Meteorologist Lewis Fry Richardson ("Weather Prediction by Numerical Process." Cambrige University Press, 1922)

This quote sums up perfectly what I've come to realize about weather and storms over the past 10 years of studying, forecasting and chasing them, and the part that I find most fascinating. On each scale level from synoptic-scale, which covers areas the size of multiple states, all the way down to micro-scale, which could be an area as small as your backyard, the fluid which we call air abides by the same universal physical laws of nature and thus acts in a very similar manner and patterns.

A cold front, for example, is a phenomenon which is widely understood to mean a large scale line of advancing cold air, hundreds of miles long, along which supercell thunderstorms sometimes form. Within these smaller storm-scale environments, something called a rear-flank gust front forms on the southern end of the low pressure area of the mesocyclone, where the rain cooled air wraps around. This is effectively a storm's cold front. The cool air is more dense than the warm air, and because of this, advances into the region of lower density, just like the larger cold front on which the storm formed.

The stunning supercell storm structure we see is along these relatively small, storm-scale cold fronts. This is what forms the "hook" on radar. Here, just as with the larger scale weather systems, the wedge of denser cool air at the surface meets the warm, moist, buoyant air in front of a storm, forcing it aloft and through the cap where the potential energy is realized. Given the right conditions, this development can be explosive.

While Richardson's quote is more regarding turbulence than thermodynamics, his theory from nearly 100 years ago that our atmosphere behaves as a fractal has turned out to be spot on. A "top down" transfer of energy and behavior occurs, resulting in a Russian nesting doll of smaller scale systems that bear a striking resemblance to the larger.

+--------------------------+

I would like to offer a special thanks to my good friend Kevin X Barth who helped me edit this together, and found some semblance of a story arc in many disparate pieces. Kevin is an amazingly talented and creative artist in his own right, having won an Emmy as the editor of the ESPN 30 for 30 film WHEN THE GARDEN WAS EDEN. Check out his website if you're looking for an excellent editor or director for your project: kevinxbarth.com

A big thanks to Tom Lowe as well, without whom I would probably still be trying to figure out what an intervelometer is. Tom is the mastermind behind Timescapes, the revolutionary timelapse film from a few years ago. He was kind enough to share his wealth of knowledge, as well as some camera gear."
storms  via:kottke  classideas  weather  video  timelapse 
june 2017 by robertogreco
ScratchX
"Play with Experimental Extensions to Scratch!

With Experimental Extensions, you can create Scratch projects that connect with external hardware (such as electronic devices and robotics) and online resources (including web data and web services)."

[See these:
- Arduino
- Text to Speech
- ISS Tracker
- Sound Synthesizer
- Twitter
- Weather ]
scratch  arduino  twitter  sound  texttospeech  weather  iss 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Japan’s New Satellite Captures an Image of Earth Every 10 Minutes - The New York Times
"A sense of perspective is unavoidable from 22,000 miles out. Looking down at Earth from that distance — almost three times farther than the diameter of the planet itself — allows a view of the globe as a massive organic system, pulsing with continuous movement. Below, images from the Himawari-8 weather satellite's first official day paint a living portrait of the western Pacific, with Typhoons Chan-hom and Nangka spinning slowly westward.

Locked into a stationary orbit above New Guinea, the satellite takes 144 photographs of the entire planet a day, three times as many as its predecessor. The images show how weather systems evolve and help forecasters develop more nuanced models of Earth’s atmosphere.

The satellite can see features down to about a third of a mile in size — twice the resolution of similar weather satellites that watch other parts of the globe.

NOAA and NASA aim to launch a similar advanced weather satellite, GOES-R, next March. The satellite will hover over either the eastern Pacific or the Caribbean and will track weather systems moving toward the United States."
space  weather  earth  satelliteimagery  derekwatkins  2015  satellites 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Blog - Wolff Olins Blog - A new flag for Britain
"We approached the challenge in a few ways:

Weather responsive flag
Similar to the physical version that flaps in the wind, our new flag responds to the British weather.

[image]

Patchwork flag
The old flag was designed as a two-colour solution because of reproduction constraints. What if we use different colours and materials to create a flag that represents the different people and communities that make up Britain? Plastic, gold and new threads are woven into the design. Some of the colours have been taken from the Royal Standard.

[image]

Designer flag
The UK is full of brilliant designers. Let’s collaborate with Peter Saville or Paul Smith to design an iconic flag.

[image]

Please note, these have not been designed by Peter or Paul—they are nasty ripoffs.

3D flag
Who needs a flag anyway? The Romans had a golden eagle on a pole and they ran the world for 500 years. What about a 3D flag based on the angles proposed in the original Union Jack? Imagine our victorious athletes holding aloft Britain’s orb.

[image]

Internet flag
What about all those little flags that are flown across the internet? We need a flag that has been optimised for a new digital context. Our animated gif flag symbolises Britain as the meeting place for people from anywhere in the digital and physical realm.

[image]

Cool flag
And what about a flag that is just cool.
Pink = Northern Ireland
Green= Wales
Red= England

[image]

Serious flag
Okay… so we’ve had some fun with this brief. But seriously… the original flag is mega cool and it also appears in the corner of loads of other countries flags (like Australia). And it’s a really great brand – blue, red and white triangles have become a defining graphic language of Britain. So with that in mind we propose this flag.

[image]

It’s a simplified version of the original that removes the crosses and keeps the iconic elements - a central focus, angles and colours. It’s easier to draw and it looks great.

As much as we’d love to see one of these little beauties flying out in the world – Scotland, as you cast your vote today just remember what affect your vote could have on that lovely Union Jack."
2014  flags  wolffolins  via:lizette  britain  uk  scotland  weather  symbols  symbolism  evolvinglogos  design  identity  logos 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Citymapper- the ultimate transit app- New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, Washington DC, Boston, London, Paris, Berlin, Madrid, Barcelona, Rome, Milan on the App Store on iTunes
"The ULTIMATE TRANSIT APP! * 2013 Apple's App of the Year (runner-up) * Apple Editor's Choice * Grand Prize Winner of MTA NYC App Quest 2013 * Best Overall Mobile App 2014 (GSMA/Mobile World Congress) * Designs of the Year 2014 - London Design Museum * Essential App of the Year- Stuff Magazine *

Live in: San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, Washington DC, Boston. London, Paris, Berlin, Madrid, Barcelona, Milan, Rome. (more coming)

- "Citymapper is quite simply the best travel app to be introduced to New York City"- NYTimes
- "The most useful app I have on my Phone."
- "Its reason alone to get an iPhone. It's that good."
- "Life changing. This app really changes the way you travel."
- "I never thought I could love an app so much."

Citymapper is reinventing the everyday urban transit app and making the large complicated city simple and usable. A to B trip planning, real-time departure data on all modes of transit where available, weather, alerts, disruptions, cab booking through Hailo and everything you need and may not even realize that you need to manage your life in the city."

[See also: https://citymapper.com
https://twitter.com/Citymapper ]
ios  iphone  applications  maps  mapping  cities  android  via:robinsloan  transit  tripplanning  publictransit  publictransportation  weather 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Science Studio
"The Weight of Mountains

Here’s a short film by a children’s book illustrator about “the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed, based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp.” It’s eye-meltingly gorgeous and starkly scientific. The tone is meditative and incantatory, turning geological terms into epic poetry. If you’ve ever wanted to read John McPhee’s “Annals of the Former World” but only have 11 minutes, watch this."

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/87651855

"This is a short film about the processes by which mountains are created and eventually destroyed. It is based upon the work of British geographer L. Dudley Stamp, and was shot in Iceland.

Physical geography and geology is an enormous and fascinating subject, and this film only touches upon the surface of the discipline. For those who wish to further advance their knowledge in this field, additional reading and research is recommended.

The film was created as part of The Weight of Mountains filmmaker residency program. For more information please visit twom.is/

Animation courtesy of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio" ]
via:vruba  2014  johnpablus  ldudleystamp  mountains  earth  science  earthscience  landscape  geology  film  scale  height  geography  history  naturalhistory  oceans  atmosphere  platemovement  platetectonics  sun  frost  eathering  wind  weather  erosion  glaciers  ice  rain  water  denudation  nature  gravity  johnmcphee 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Gerrard Winstanley Mobile Field Center, New York City Chapter | Dismal Garden
"The Gerrard Winstanley Radical Gardening Space, Reclamation Mobile Field Centre and Weather Station, (European Chapter). 2000
 
A custom made bike trailer that, when in transit, becomes a compact, weatherproof, lockable unit; roadworthy and user-friendly. It is designed to travel between allotments, parks, playgrounds, schools and squares, where it is parked, quickly assembled and made ready for action.
 
When stationary the trailer opens to reveal a small photocopier, a library of books available for photocopying and a small weather station. On top is a solar panel which harvests solar energy while the trailer is outside. (A full battery is enough energy to make one copy.)
 
The library consists of a unique collection of books on DIY culture, permaculture, urban gardening, alt/energy systems, utopias and issues of gentrification. The bike is named after Gerrard Winstanley, the leader and spokesperson for "the Diggers", a group of 17th Century indigent peasants who tried to defy the enclosure of common land by private interests: occupying it en masse, digging it up and cultivating it for food."

[See also: The Gerrard Winstanley Mobile Field Center, European Chapter, 2000
http://www.dismalgarden.com/projects/gerrard-winstanley-mobile-field-center-european-chapter

and http://clconleyarhs4973.wordpress.com/2013/04/06/sustainable-structures-41-43/
http://www.temporaryservices.org/mobile_struct_rsrce3.html
http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/free_radical/ ]
2000  nilsnorman  mobile  bikes  biking  gardening  openstudioproject  lcproject  diy  unschooling  deschooling  permaculture  urbangardening  urban  urbanism  utopia  pocketsofutopia  weather  weatherstations  nomadism  cityasclassroom  nomads 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene - NYTimes.com
"This chorus of Jeremiahs predicts a radically transformed global climate forcing widespread upheaval — not possibly, not potentially, but inevitably. We have passed the point of no return. From the point of view of policy experts, climate scientists and national security officials, the question is no longer whether global warming exists or how we might stop it, but how we are going to deal with it."



"The challenge the Anthropocene poses is a challenge not just to national security, to food and energy markets, or to our “way of life” — though these challenges are all real, profound, and inescapable. The greatest challenge the Anthropocene poses may be to our sense of what it means to be human. Within 100 years — within three to five generations — we will face average temperatures 7 degrees Fahrenheit higher than today, rising seas at least three to 10 feet higher, and worldwide shifts in crop belts, growing seasons and population centers. Within a thousand years, unless we stop emitting greenhouse gases wholesale right now, humans will be living in a climate the Earth hasn’t seen since the Pliocene, three million years ago, when oceans were 75 feet higher than they are today. We face the imminent collapse of the agricultural, shipping and energy networks upon which the global economy depends, a large-scale die-off in the biosphere that’s already well on its way, and our own possible extinction. If homo sapiens (or some genetically modified variant) survives the next millenniums, it will be survival in a world unrecognizably different from the one we have inhabited."



"But the biggest problems the Anthropocene poses are precisely those that have always been at the root of humanistic and philosophical questioning: “What does it mean to be human?” and “What does it mean to live?” In the epoch of the Anthropocene, the question of individual mortality — “What does my life mean in the face of death?” — is universalized and framed in scales that boggle the imagination. What does human existence mean against 100,000 years of climate change? What does one life mean in the face of species death or the collapse of global civilization? How do we make meaningful choices in the shadow of our inevitable end?

These questions have no logical or empirical answers. They are philosophical problems par excellence. Many thinkers, including Cicero, Montaigne, Karl Jaspers, and The Stone’s own Simon Critchley, have argued that studying philosophy is learning how to die. If that’s true, then we have entered humanity’s most philosophical age — for this is precisely the problem of the Anthropocene. The rub is that now we have to learn how to die not as individuals, but as a civilization."



"I found my way forward through an 18th-century Samurai manual, Yamamoto Tsunetomo’s “Hagakure,” which commanded: “Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily.” Instead of fearing my end, I owned it. Every morning, after doing maintenance on my Humvee, I’d imagine getting blown up by an I.E.D., shot by a sniper, burned to death, run over by a tank, torn apart by dogs, captured and beheaded, and succumbing to dysentery. Then, before we rolled out through the gate, I’d tell myself that I didn’t need to worry, because I was already dead. The only thing that mattered was that I did my best to make sure everyone else came back alive. “If by setting one’s heart right every morning and evening, one is able to live as though his body were already dead,” wrote Tsunetomo, “he gains freedom in the Way.”"



"The human psyche naturally rebels against the idea of its end. Likewise, civilizations have throughout history marched blindly toward disaster, because humans are wired to believe that tomorrow will be much like today — it is unnatural for us to think that this way of life, this present moment, this order of things is not stable and permanent. Across the world today, our actions testify to our belief that we can go on like this forever, burning oil, poisoning the seas, killing off other species, pumping carbon into the air, ignoring the ominous silence of our coal mine canaries in favor of the unending robotic tweets of our new digital imaginarium. Yet the reality of global climate change is going to keep intruding on our fantasies of perpetual growth, permanent innovation and endless energy, just as the reality of mortality shocks our casual faith in permanence.

The biggest problem climate change poses isn’t how the Department of Defense should plan for resource wars, or how we should put up sea walls to protect Alphabet City, or when we should evacuate Hoboken. It won’t be addressed by buying a Prius, signing a treaty, or turning off the air-conditioning. The biggest problem we face is a philosophical one: understanding that this civilization is already dead. The sooner we confront this problem, and the sooner we realize there’s nothing we can do to save ourselves, the sooner we can get down to the hard work of adapting, with mortal humility, to our new reality.

The choice is a clear one. We can continue acting as if tomorrow will be just like yesterday, growing less and less prepared for each new disaster as it comes, and more and more desperately invested in a life we can’t sustain. Or we can learn to see each day as the death of what came before, freeing ourselves to deal with whatever problems the present offers without attachment or fear.

If we want to learn to live in the Anthropocene, we must first learn how to die."
environment  royscranton  2014  anthropocene  disturbance  climatechange  iraq  collapse  civilization  hurricanesandy  hurricanekatrina  neworleans  weather  disasters  globalwarming  climate  death  fear  life  living  nola 
march 2014 by robertogreco
earth
"a visualization of global weather conditions
forecast by supercomputers
updated every three hours

ocean surface current estimates
updated every five days"
climate  weather  wind  maps  mapping  earth  visualization  oceans  currents  temperature  realtime 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Old Weather - Our Weather's Past, the Climate's Future
"Old Weather aims to recover worldwide weather observations to help improve climate model predictions"
crowdsourcing  data  history  science  weather  oldweather  climate 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Kennedy: Capture the Now on the App Store on iTunes
[Main site: http://kennedyapp.com/]

"Capture the now with Kennedy – a new way to mark moments in time complete with surrounding context of the things happening around you.

With a single tap Kennedy will capture your location, the date and time, the current weather conditions, the latest world news headlines together with what music you're listening to at the time. Add a note or a photo and then save it to the archive of captured moments.

Use the archive to relive past moments. Remember where you were when that big news event happened, or show all those moments when it was raining or when you were listening to that much loved song.

All the data that Kennedy captures can be easily exported as an industry standard JSON or CSV file so if you love to code you can create your own data visualisations or import them into online data viz tools.

Other features include:
Edit your photos (stored in the app) to add effects and make adjustments.

Choose from different headlines that were happening at the time and view the actual news article.

View a map of where you were stood when you captured the now.

Filter the archive to find locations, weather conditions and more."
ios7  ios  applications  iphone  moments  brendandawes  kennedy  metadata  location  time  date  weather  context  news  visualization  photography  filtering 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Thingful
[via: "Thingful indexes public #IoT resources incl weather stations, air quality, energy & sharks, icebergs, buoys, etc." https://twitter.com/uah/status/411236605169389568

and "Thingful http://thingful.net is now live - a discoverability engine for the Public Internet of Things, announced at #thingmonk last week" https://twitter.com/uah/status/411231793225142273 ]
internetofthings  thingful  internet  sensors  data  weather  weatherstations  airquality  energy  icebergs  buoys  sharks  iot 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Cloudy With a Chance of Beer - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic
"The Weather Company’s Vikram Somaya talks about why marketers are clamoring for weather data."
vikramsomaya  alexismadrigal  local  hyperlocal  advertising  2013  weather  data 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Los Angeles County Weather Reports
"A weekly appreciation of Los Angeles through weather reports.

Every Monday.

Traffic Reports every Friday."
losangeles  weather  traffic  blogs 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Jed Carter — Eyes on The Sky
"I made a book. It documents my major self-initiated project this year: a process-based investigation into generative design and the weather. It’s a record of the sky, of the colours that change so slowly it’s almost impossible to see. A bit like a visual almanac.

I linked 64 public-access web cameras across Europe, recording the colour of the sky, at each point, at regular intervals. Together, the cameras paint the weather, once every hour. The book collects a week of paintings."
weather  books  jedcarter  webcams  sky  visualization  datavisualization  glvo  patterns  color  colors 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Forecast
"The same API that powers Forecast.io and Dark Sky for iOS can provide accurate short­term and long­term weather predictions to your business, application, or crazy idea. We’re developers too, and we like playing with new APIs, so we want you to be able to try ours hassle-free: all you need is an email address."
weather  forecast  darksky  forecast.io  api 
march 2013 by robertogreco
A Vast Machine
"A Vast Machine is a historical account of climate science as a global knowledge infrastructure. Weather and climate observing systems cover the whole world, making global data. This infrastructure generates information so vast in quantity and so diverse in quality and form that it can be understood only through computer analysis — by making data global. These processes depend on three kinds of computer models: data models, used to combine and adjust measurements from many different sources; simulation models of weather and climate; and reanalysis models, which recreate climate history from historical weather data. A Vast Machine argues that over the years data and models have converged to create a stable, reliable, and trustworthy basis for establishing the reality of global warming."
books  via:robinsloan  climate  simulations  climatescience  science  weather  computing  globalwarming 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Good-bye Sustainability, Hello Resilience | Conservation Magazine
"Yet today, precisely because the world is so increasingly out of balance, the sustainability regime is being quietly challenged, not from without but from within. Among a growing number of scientists, social innovators, community leaders, NGOs, philanthropies, governments, and corporations, a new, complementary dialogue is emerging around a new idea—resilience: how to help vulnerable people, organizations, and systems persist, perhaps even thrive, amid unforeseeable disruptions. Where sustainability aims to put the world back into balance, resilience looks for ways to manage an imbalanced world."
conservation  sustainability  resilience  climate  change  climateurbanism  warming  weather  andrewzolli  via:aljavieera  systemsthinking  wickedproblems 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Deep map - Wikipedia
"Deep map refers to an emerging practical method of intensive topographical exploration, popularised by author William Least Heat-Moon with his book PrairyErth: A Deep Map. (1991).

A deep map work most often takes the form of engaged documentary writing of literary quality; although it can equally well be done in long-form on radio. It does not preclude the combination of writing with photography and illustration. Its subject is a particular place, usually quite small and limited, and usually rural.

Some[who?] call the approach 'vertical travel writing', while archeologist Michael Shanks compares it to the eclectic approaches of 18th and early 19th century antiquarian topographers or to the psychogeographic excursions of the early Situationist International[1] http://www.mshanks.com/2012/07/10/chorography-then-and-now/ [2] http://documents.stanford.edu/michaelshanks/51.

A deep map goes beyond simple landscape/history-based topographical writing – to include and interweave autobiography, archeology, stories, memories, folklore, traces, reportage, weather, interviews, natural history, science, and intuition. In its best form, the resulting work arrives at a subtle, multi-layered and 'deep' map of a small area of the earth.

In North America it is a method claimed by those interested in bioregionalism. The best known U.S. examples are Wallace Stegner's Wolf Willow (1962) and Heat-Moon's PrairyErth (1991).

In Great Britain, the method is used by those who use the terms 'spirit of place' and 'local distinctiveness'. BBC Radio 4 has recently undertaken several series of radio documentaries that are deep maps. These are inspired by the 'sense of place' work of the Common Ground organisation."
via:selinjessa  writing  williamleastheat-moon  verticaltravelwriting  documentary  documentation  radio  photography  illustration  place  rural  michaelshanks  topography  psychogeography  situationist  autobiography  archaeology  stories  storytelling  memory  memories  weather  interviews  naturalhistory  bioregionalism  parairyerth  wolfwillow  wallacestegner  localdistinctiveness  bbcradio  bbs  radio4  deepmaps  maps  mapping  commonground  folklore  science  intuition 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Nebula 12
"The Nebula 12 is a concept developed by Micasa LAB, Zürich. Using meterological data from MetOff the Nebula forms to represent outside weather: wake up to a flooding yellow light on a sunny day, or below a real cloud on that overcast winter morning. The cloud involves some peculiar techniques, liquid nitrogen, WiFi, and high power vacuum suction."
via:bopuc  ambientsignaling  clouds  nebula  weather 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Traditional Turning on Vimeo
"During the past 20 years Robin Wood has produced and sold over 30,000 wooden plates and bowls from his small workshop nestled into a Peak District hillside. Creating items for everyday use and making a living from his work as a craftsman is a fundamental principle underpinning Robin's working lifestyle. He seems very happy with the path he has chosen but his activities are not restricted to wood turning.

Robin is also Chairman of the Heritage Craft Association heritagecrafts.org.uk, is featured in many television craft programmes, and shares his skills and knowledge with others by running classes in bowl turning and spoon carving. He also writes a very interesting and informative craft blog. greenwood-carving.blogspot.co.uk
Dave and Lynwen went along to see him turn a bowl. artisanco.com "

[via: http://kottke.org/12/11/stay-small-or-go-big ]
bowlturning  weather  studios  workshops  tradition  2012  robinwood  bowls  plates  turning  small  slow  simple  making  eating  food  wood  craft 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Weathermob
"Who doesn’t have something to say about the weather…

Weathermob makes it easy to say something about the weather you’re in, through video, photo, comments or making a quick report by touching a couple of buttons – this is your chance to be a weatherwoman or weatherman.

Your local weather – live

Get the latest local forecasts alongside live reports on current weather conditions from Weathermob users.

See your friends’ weather

Follow reports from your friends and family – see who’s having the best weather and how they feel about it. Know your mother’s weather before you even speak to her…"
weathermob  mobile  crowdsourcing  iphone  applications  ios  weather 
august 2012 by robertogreco
imbriferous, adj. : Oxford English Dictionary
OED WoTD, ‘imbriferous, adj.’, ‘Rain-bringing, showery’ —
words  weather  rain  precipitation  showers  via:Preoccupations 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Dark Sky for iPhone and iPad
"Dark Sky is a new kind of weather app. It uses state-of-the-art weather forecasting to predict when it will rain or snow — down to the minute — at your exact location, and presents it to you alongside the most beautiful radar visualizations you’ve ever seen."
ipad  darksky  radar  visualization  applications  via:tealtan  prediction  weather  ios  iphone 
june 2012 by robertogreco
A Ship Adrift | booktwo.org
"A Ship Adrift takes the data from that weather station and applies it to an imaginary airship piloted by a lost, mad AI autopilot…

If the wind whips eastwards across the roof of the Southbank centre at 5mph, then the Ship Adrift floats five miles to the East. See the sharp tack the Ship made on the night of the 27th / 28th January? That’s the weather turning; the next day, we froze in London; a few days later, snow…

As the Ship drifts, it looks around itself. It doesn’t know where it is, but it is listening. It’s listening out for tweets and foursquare check-ins and posts on dating sites and geotagged Wikipedia articles and it is remembering them and it is trying to make something out of them. It is trying to understand.

The ship is lost, and I don’t know where it’s going. I don’t know what it’s going to learn, but I want to work with it to tell some stories. I want to build a system for cooperating with software and chance. There is no what or why or where or when…"

[See at: http://shipadrift.com ]
web  internetofthings  geolocation  wikipedia  storytelling  foursquare  twitter  london  weather  data  shipadrift  jamesbridle  spimes  iot 
february 2012 by robertogreco
City Walks and Tactile Experience
"This paper is an attempt to develop categories of the pedestrian’s tactile and kinaesthetic experience of the city. The beginning emphasizes the haptic qualities of surfaces and textures, which can be “palpated” visually or experienced by walking. Also the lived city is three-dimensional; its corporeal depth is discussed here in relation to the invisible sewers, protuberant profiles, and the formal diversity of roofscapes. A central role is ascribed in the present analysis to the formal similarities between the representation of the city by walking through it and the representation of the tactile form of objects. Additional aspects of the “tactile” experience of the city in a broad sense concern the feeling of their rhythms and the exposure to weather conditions. Finally, several aspects of contingency converge in the visible age of architectural works, which record traces of individual and collective histories."
urban  walking  urbanism  cities  tacticalurbanism  materiality  textures  sufaces  porosity  roofscapes  movement  pulse  rhythm  experiential  time  touch  patina  history  atemporality  MădălinaDiaconu  weather  plato  johnlocke  hobbes  vitruvius  sensation  contact 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Youngsters plug into coding the Centre for Life - Science & Technology - News - nebusiness.co.uk
"For three years, Young Rewired State has been showing young people the joys of coding using open government data such as crime figures and weather data. This year, Newcastle got involved for the first time. JOHN HILL finds out more about how everyone got on, and how the project may help raise interest in a valued skill."

[See also: http://youngrewiredstate.org/ ]
events  unconferences  workshops  lcproject  data  government  hackerdays  coding  programming  2011  citizenship  activism  crime  weather  cityapi 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Musical Sculptures Translate Weather Data Into Art - Maria Popova - Life - The Atlantic
"Nathalie Miebach defies genres and crosses disciplinary boundaries to combine data visualization with color, shape, and sound"
nathaliemiebach  visualization  weather  art  crossdisciplinary  color  shape  music  sound 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Did Columbus cause The Little Ice Age?
"I'm slowly working my way through Charles Mann's 1493 and there are interesting tidbits on almost every page. One of my favorite bits of the book so far is a possible explanation of the Little Ice Age that I hadn't heard before put forth by William Ruddiman.

"As human communities grow, Ruddiman pointed out, they open more land for farms and cut down more trees for fuel and shelter. In Europe and Asia, forests were cut down with the ax. In the Americas before [Columbus], the primary tool was fire. For weeks on end, smoke from Indian bonfires shrouded Florida, California, and the Great Plains."

Burning like this happened all over the pre-Columbian Americas, from present-day New England to Mexico to the Amazon basin to Argentina. Then the Europeans came…"
1493  newworld  civilization  ancientcivilization  history  classideas  books  toread  climatechange  anthropocene  weather  climate  geo/us  2011  kottke  williamruddiman  charlesmann  precolumbian  postcolumbian 
july 2011 by robertogreco
ifttt
"ifttt puts the internet to work for you by creating tasks that fit this simple structure:

ifthisthenthat

Think of all the things you could do if you were able to define any task as: when something happens (this) then do something else (that).

The (this) part of a task is called a Trigger (). Some example triggers are "if I'm tagged in a photo on Facebook" or "if I tweet on twitter."

The (that) part of a task is called an action (). Some example actions are "then send me a text message" or "then create a status message on Facebook."

Triggers and Actions come from Channels. Channels are the unique services and devices you use everyday, activated specifically for you. Some example channels:"
ifttt  internet  web  social  management  tools  tasks  automation  twitter  facebook  del.icio.us  email  phones  weather  onlinetoolkit 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Qatar could create robot clouds to cool World Cup watchers - CNN.com
"Researchers at Qatar University's engineering school have come up with a novel way to cool the stadiums ahead of the 2022 World Cup... giant flying saucers!Actually, they have announced plans to develop giant artificial remotely controlled "clouds" made up of high-tech materials that will be positioned between the blistering sun and the still-to-be-built football stadiums in the Gulf emirate.Dr. Saud Ghani, head of a Mechanical and Industrial Engineering group at Qatar University, tells CNN that the artificial robotic cloud could potentially drop the temperatures on the pitch by 10 degrees Fahrenheit."
robots  qatar  worldcup  2022  clouds  robotclouds  weather 
march 2011 by robertogreco
WeatherSpark | Interactive Weather Charts
"A rich, interactive map with the current conditions from thousands of locations worldwide.

Incredibly smooth radar playback for the last two hours - or any period in the last five years. US only, extended playback is subscription only

Pan and zoom through a graphical forecast, seamlessly transitioning to averages and historical data.

Compare the weather across locations for any time period.

Multiple forecasts shown in seventeen graphs - get precisely the data you want."
weather  visualization  data  history  interactive 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Studying Impact of ‘Superstorm’ on California - NYTimes.com
"California faces the risk not just of devastating earthquakes but also of a catastrophic storm that could tear at the coasts, inundate the Central Valley and cause four to five times as much economic damage as a large quake, scientists and emergency planners warn.<br />
The potential for such a storm was described at a conference of federal and California officials that ended Friday. Combining advanced flood mapping and atmospheric projections with data on California’s geologic flood history, over 100 scientists calculated the probable consequences of a “superstorm” carrying tropical moisture from the South Pacific and dropping up to 10 feet of rain across the state."
california  floods  hurricanes  atmospheric-river  weather  climate  naturaldisasters 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Romance has lived too long upon this river
"Romance has lived too long upon this river; a single-serving web page that tells you how high the tide is at London Bridge: explicitly close up, but also, roughly, at a glance.

The scale runs from zero metres (low tide is typically around 1m deep at London Bridge) to 7.6m (this is around the peak for Spring tides, so if the water fills the screen you know it’s a big one).

The Thames and its related activities are of course the Hello World of real-time data, but I also wanted this to be useful. So Romance… also serves as a weather forecast, warning you if you need to wrap up or take a brolly when you go out."

[Text from: http://shorttermmemoryloss.com/portfolio/project/romance-has-lived-too-long-upon-this-river/ ]

[via: http://magicalnihilism.com/2010/12/29/romance-has-lived-too-long-upon-this-river/ ]
london  visualization  river  weather  art  ambient  forecasting  tides  Thames 
january 2011 by robertogreco
World Wide Weather Guy [Related: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernoff_face]
"The World Wide Weather Guy (WWW Guy) is a weather nut. He always has The Weather Channel® on and is constantly checking weather conditions around the world on the web. As a matter of fact, he is so interested in the weather that his appearance changes depending on the weather conditions in the location he's thinking about! Talk about empathy.

His face color changes depending on the temperature.
His ear color changes depending on the dew point.
His nose size changes depending on barometric pressure.
His eyes look in the direction of the wind.
His hair waves around at a speed that is dependent on the wind speed.
He has a little perspiration problem that varies depending on the humidity.
If the visibility is below 1 mile he gets a little hard to see.
The background color changes to indicate day (pink) or night (blue)."
craighickman  weather  faces  chernofffaces  empathy 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Radarmatic
"You’re looking at the level of precipitation in the air, as measured by a network of weather radar sites called NEXRAD.<br />
<br />
The National Weather Service makes the raw data from 200 radars across the continental US and overseas available on noaa.gov for anyone to use, usually within minutes of being generated. Radarmatic caches and translates the radar data from its native binary format to JSON and then republishes it as a web service.<br />
<br />
The radar imagery on the home page is rendered in-browser using Javascript and the HTML5 canvas element."
weather  maps  mapping  nws  meteorology  html5  geography  radar  faa  dod  dBZ  noaa 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Pruned: Flutter Field
"WeatherField is a shape-shifting energy generation park in Abu Dhabi. The park is organized and designed to respond efficiently and creatively to climate. Energy generation becomes a public performance, dynamic, reactive, and interactive. The park is active when weather events are active, and calm when weather is calm, in each instance offering the public a compatible experiences."

[Quote from: http://spime.org/post/1017546133/weatherfield-is-a-shape-shifting-energy-generation]
weather  energy  abudhabi  weatherfield  responsive  adaptive  reactive  interactive  art  sculpture 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Eight Great Tips for Traveling with the iPad | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"The iPad is an almost perfect travel computer. It’s easy to carry, works as a guide, a map, a book and it’s crazy-long battery life will let you sit back and watch another movie while your laptop-toting companions search for a power outlet. But as convenient as it is, a little preparation will make things even smoother. Here are some things you should do before you leave the house."
ipad  travel  applications  offline  maps  mapping  power  accessories  3g  wifi  offmaps  weather  language  tips 
august 2010 by robertogreco
HAARP [Look at the thing. Wow.]
"HAARP is a scientific endeavor aimed at studying the properties and behavior of the ionosphere, with particular emphasis on being able to understand and use it to enhance communications and surveillance systems for both civilian and defense purposes." [via: http://chriswoebken.tumblr.com/post/964066970/via-www-haarp-alaska-edu]
atmosphere  haarp  auroral  environment  military  space  science  research  radio  wireless  weather  aurora  physics  nature  technology  ionosphere 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The Future — There’s an App for That - Gadgetwise Blog - NYTimes.com
"Part of my app fatigue stems from realizing the apps that I once loved, ones that transformed my cellphone into a digital Sherpa & untangled the labyrinthine boroughs of NYC, are no longer as useful as they once were. Retrieving a list of 15 sushi joints within walking distance does not help me decide where to go.
iphone  ipad  applications  filters  infooverload  curation  timespaceawareness  weather  time  space  sun  awareness  blisssearch  mobile  prediction  ios 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Surviving A Tsunami—Lessons from Chile, Hawaii, and Japan
"This report contains true stories that illustrate how to survive-and how not to survive-a tsunami. It is meant for people who live, work, or play along coasts that tsunamis may strike. Such coasts surround most of the Pacific Ocean but also include other areas, such as the shores of the Caribbean, eastern Canada, and the Mediterranean.
tsunamis  visualization  earthquakes  preparedness  geography  safety  weather  disaster  surfing  ocean  geology  travel  pacific  chile  japan  hawaii 
february 2010 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Glacier / Island / Storm
"The studio will be divided into three groups—one designing glaciers, one designing islands, one designing storms. Each group will mix vernacular, non-fossil fuel-based building technologies with what sounds like science fiction in order to explore the fine line between architectural design and the amplified cultivation of natural processes. Importantly, this will be done not simply for the sake of doing so (although there will be a bit of that…), but to address much larger questions of regional drought, international sovereignty, global climate change, and more."
architecture  biotechnology  geography  climate  weather  storms  glaciers  droughtislands  climatechange  sovereignty  fuel  maracaibo 
january 2010 by robertogreco
More heat, humidity coming to southern California, scientists predict | csmonitor.com
"Since 1990, heat waves with high humidity have increased in both frequency and intensity in southern California."
california  socal  climate  sandiego  losangeles  humity  weather  climatechange  heat  humidity 
october 2009 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Australians 'need more seasons'
"An Australian scientist says the continent needs five or six seasons to suit its climate.
climate  weather  australia  ecology  seasons 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Weather instrument on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"Weather = Change, which is why LA does not technically have weather most of the time according to Me."
julianbleecker  losangeles  weather 
april 2009 by robertogreco
The Civil Heretic - Freeman Dyson - Profile - NYTimes.com
"All 6 Dysons describe eventful child­hoods w/ people like Feynman coming by...father...always preaching virtues of boredom: “Being bored is the only time you are creative”...Around the Institute for Advanced Study, that intellectual Arcadia where the blackboards have signs on them that say Do Not Erase, Dyson is quietly admired for candidly expressing his doubts about string theory’s aspiration to represent all forces and matter in one coherent system. “I think Freeman wishes the string theorists well,” Avishai Margalit, the philosopher, says. “I don’t think he wishes them luck. He’s interested in diversity, and that’s his worldview. To me he is a towering figure although he is tiny — almost a saintly model of how to get old. The main thing he retains is playfulness. Einstein had it. Playfulness & curiosity. He also stands for this unique trait, which is wisdom. Brightness here is common. He is wise. He integrated, not in a theory, but in his life, all his dreams of things.”"
freemandyson  skepticism  science  play  curiosity  diversity  tcsnmy  physics  futurism  future  climate  globalwarming  time  weather  boredom  creativity  sandiego  geneticengineering  tinkering  learning  habitsofmind  howwework  richardfeynman  generalists  attention  nuclearweapons  algore  optimism  intellect  genius  interdisciplinary  problemsolving  ingenuity  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  orthodoxy  heretics  belief  debate 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Weather Underground for iPhone - (37signals)
"Weather Underground’s iPhone-optimized version is the best weather experience out there. I love how their forecast explains today’s weather relative to yesterday’s weather. I highly recommend bookmarking it on your iPhone home screen."
iphone  applications  weather  design  information  ux  csiap  ios 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Gareth McLean meets Alex Kingston | Life and style | The Guardian
"It's an odd place, but there are things that are nice about it, like the weather. You wake up knowing exactly what the day is going to be like and it's you that's going to do something different; the day itself is the same."
losangeles  weather  experience  life 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Scripps Institution of Oceanography Pier Tide Predictions
"The tide prediction curve above shows how fast the tide is rising or falling; you can see how long a height is sustained or see the heights at other times."
weather  surf  tides  lajolla  sandiego 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Core77 / Good stuff, Gatherer Jacket adapts to unexpected climate changes
"Merrell's new lightweight Gather Jacket helps hikers and climbers adapt to rapid temperature changes by filling pockets throughout the jacket with any found materials for increased insulation."
clothing  design  finalhome  glvo  disasters  weather  adaptability 
july 2008 by robertogreco
The JASON Project
"nonprofit subsidiary of the National Geographic Society...connects young students with great explorers & great events to inspire & motivate them to learn science...designed for 5-8th grade classrooms but are flexible enough to be adapted for higher or lo
education  weather  exploration  science  curriculum  teaching  learning  classideas  geography  history  oceans  collaboration  interactive  1to1  schools  elearning  environment  1:1 
june 2008 by robertogreco
No Student Left Indoors: Creating a Field Guide to Your Schoolyard
"Helping K-12 Teachers and students to discover, explore, observe, and record the nature in their schoolyard. For urban, suburban, and rural schools"
education  learning  outdoors  naturedeficitdisorder  lessons  nature  weather  schools  curriculum  teaching  students  children 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Nokia - Eco Sensor Concept
"The concept consists of two parts – a wearable sensor unit which can sense and analyze your environment, health, and local weather conditions, and a dedicated mobile phone."
bluetooth  nokia  ubiquitous  ubicomp  sensors  wireless  mobile  phones  energy  environment  recycling  health  green  weather 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Stranded at the airport? Don’t forget Rule 240 - TODAY: Travel - MSNBC.com
"Rule 240 — which states that in the event of any flight delay or cancellation caused by anything other than weather, the airline would fly me on the next available flight — not their next available flight, which might not leave for another 24 hours."
airlines  airports  travel  weather  flying  flights  rule240 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Pollen Robots ::: Pink Tentacle
"As hay fever season approaches, Tokyo-based weather forecasting company Weathernews, Inc. is deploying a 200-strong army of beady-eyed, ball-shaped robots nationwide to monitor the pollen situation."
robots  health  japan  allergies  pollen  plants  tokyo  weather  sensors  monitoring  maps  mapping  environment 
january 2008 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Future Snow
"1) Weather control is the future of urban design. 2) If a city wants to attract new residents it should try scenting the snow."
architecture  design  experience  smell  urban  infrastructure  future  scifi  weather  comments  place 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Carbonrally – climate change community focused on fun, social, and competitive challenges
"Reduce global warming by taking quick & easy challenges. Compete with others in your area and around the world."
change  climate  conservation  environment  games  play  online  gaming  activism  green  weather  competition 
november 2007 by robertogreco
The Cloud Appreciation Society
"At The Cloud Appreciation Society we love clouds, we’re not ashamed to say it and we’ve had enough of people moaning about them.Read our manifesto and see how we are fighting the banality of ‘blue-sky thinking’."
society  slow  weather  clouds  humor 
november 2007 by robertogreco
China Leads Weather Control Race | Wired Science from Wired.com
"Not content to push the edge in cloning, architecture and geological engineering, China's also leaving the rest of the world behind when it comes to controlling the weather."
china  weather  science  nature  control 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Magnetbox - The wisdom of clouds
"No one source is ever right all the time, so the idea is that if you aggregate them together, you don’t need to check several sources and you get a safer, more accurate forecast."
aggregator  weather  predictions  news 
october 2007 by robertogreco
SCR | KAZE TO DESKTOP
""Kaze to Desktop" is a screensaver which moves according to the current wind (=kaze) conditions of your city."
ambient  software  interface  weather  wind  fun  awareness  freeware  windows  desktop  ubiquitous  japan  screensavers 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Global warming: the final verdict | Climate change | Guardian Unlimited Environment
"A study by the world's leading experts says global warming will happen faster and be more devastating than previously thought ...a very conservative document - that's what makes it so scary"
earth  ecology  biology  environment  future  global  green  sustainability  weather  climate  globalwarming  nature  science  politics 
january 2007 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: The Weather Bowl
"you could turn the entirety of greater Los Angeles into a weather bowl, dedicated to the recreation of famous storms. Install some rotating fans and open-air wind tunnels, build some deflection screens in the Hollywood Hills, scatter smaller fans and blo
losangeles  local  weather  science  architecture  history  experiments  wind 
october 2006 by robertogreco
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