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LibreRouter
"The LibreRouter is an Open Source Hardware WiFi Router designed from the ground up for Community Networks.

Welcome to LibreRouter

Community Networks have been depending since their inception on modifying existing off-the-shelf routers to adapt them to their particular needs. Software development originated in Community Network groups and the Free Software movement as a whole, has pushed the barrier of innovation and helped comercial enterprises develop new products over the years.

This virtuous relation between hardware vendors and the community has been threatened by new regulation from the Federal Communitations Commision (FCC) – U.S.A. – which has led vendors to globally close up their routers to third party modifications, hindering open innovation and effectively closing the door to Community Networks in terms of access to the hardware they depend on.

The Libre Router project will design and produce a high performance multi-radio wireless router targeted at Community Networks needs. Global South reality and that of Latin America in particular will be specially considered in terms of cost and legal viability."
hardware  internet  mesh  networking  networks  meshnetworks  librerouter  opensource  wifi  routers 
july 2019 by robertogreco
pure JS WiFi QR Code Generator
"Ever wanted to create a cool QR code for your guests? But never wanted to type in your WiFi credentials into a form that submits them to a remote webserver to render the QR code? QiFi for the rescue! It will render the code in your browser, on your machine, so the WiFi stays as secure as it was before (read the code if you do not trust text on the internet :-))!

If you use the Save-button to store a code, this is still secure, as the data is stored in HTML5 localStorage and is never transmitted to the server (in contrast to cookie-based solutions).

Don't trust your browser either? Just pipe the string WIFI:S:<SSID>;T:<WPA|WEP|>;P:<password>;; through the QR code generator of your choice after reading the documentation.

Supported Scanners
Android
Barcode Scanner from ZXing.

NeoReader.

Every other Android Barcode Scanner based on the ZXing library.

Maemo
mbarcode with the mbarcode wifi plugin on Maemo 5.

iOS
The iOS Camera App has support for WiFi QR codes since iOS 11.

QR Reader for iPhone from TapMedia and Avira Insight QR Code Scanner by Avira Holding GmbH & Co. KG also support WiFi QR codes. Please note: Due to iOS design, third-party apps cannot modify WiFi settings directly and you'll have to copy&paste the details. The only alternative would be downloading a mobile profile from the Internet, but that would mean leaking your credentials to a third-party.

Other
Every other QR scanner out there should be able to scan the code too, but probably won't interpret it as intended. If your scanner supports WiFi QR codes, please send me a mail!"

[via: "TIL you can generate a QR code for your WiFi network. Print it out. Put it on wall. A guest can open camera app, point it at code, and connect to your network. https://qifi.org "
https://twitter.com/craigmod/status/1037932569071763456 ]
qrcodes  ios  android  wifi  shortcuts 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Old memories, accidentally trapped in amber by our digital devices
"Part of what humans use technology for is to better remember the past. We scroll back through photos on our phones and on Instagram & Flickr — “that was Fourth of July 5 years ago, so fun!” — and apps like Swarm, Timehop, and Facebook surface old locations, photos, and tweets for us on the regular. But sometimes, we run into the good old days in unexpected places on our digital devices.

Designer and typographer Marcin Wichary started a thread on Twitter yesterday about “UIs that accidentally amass memories” with the initial example of the “Preferred Networks” listing of all the wifi networks his computer had ever joined, “unexpected reminders of business trips, vacations, accidental detours, once frequented and now closed cafés”.

[image: screeshot of macOS wi-fi panel]

Several other people chimed in with their own examples…the Bluetooth pairings list, the Reminders app, the list of alarms, saved places in mapping apps, AIM/iChat status message log, chat apps not used for years, the Gmail drafts folder, etc.

John Bull noted that his list of former addresses on Amazon is “a massive walk down memory line of my old jobs and places of residence”. I just looked at mine and I’ve got addresses in there from almost 20 years ago.

Steven Richie suggested the Weather app on iOS:
I usually like to add the city I will be travelling to ahead of time to get a sense of what it will be like when we get there.

I do this too but am pretty good about culling my cities list. Still, there are a couple places I keep around even though I haven’t been to them in awhile…a self-nudge for future travel desires perhaps.

Kotori switched back to an old OS via a years-old backup and found “a post-breakup message that came on the day i switched phones”:
thought i moved on but so many whatifs flashed in my head when i read it. what if i never got a new phone. what if they messaged me a few minutes earlier. what if we used a chat that did backups differently

Similarly, Richard fired up Google Maps on an old phone and was briefly transported through time and space:
On a similar note to both of these, a while ago I switched back to my old Nokia N95 after my iPhone died. Fired up Google Maps, and for a brief moment, it marked my location as at a remote crossroads in NZ where I’d last had it open, lost on a road trip at least a decade before.

Matt Sephton runs into old friends when he plays Nintendo:
Every time my friends and I play Nintendo WiiU/Wii/3DS games we see a lot of our old Mii avatars. Some are 10 years old and of a time. Amongst them is a friend who passed away a few years back. It’s always so good to see him. It’s as if he’s still playing the games with us.

For better or worse, machines never forget those who aren’t with us anymore. Dan Noyes’ Gmail holds a reminder of his late wife:
Whenever I open Gmail I see the last message that my late wife sent me via Google chat in 2014. It’s her standard “pssst” greeting for me: “aye aye”. I leave it unread lest it disappears.

It’s a wonderful thread…read the whole thing. [https://twitter.com/mwichary/status/996056615928266752 ]

I encounter these nostalgia bombs every once in awhile too. I closed dozens of tabs the other day on Chrome for iOS; I don’t use it very often, so some of them dated back to more than a year ago. I have bookmarks on browsers I no longer use on my iMac that are more than 10 years old. A MacOS folder I dump temporary images & files into has stuff going back years. Everyone I know stopped using apps like Path and Peach, so when I open them, I see messages from years ago right at the top like they were just posted, trapped in amber.

My personal go-to cache of unexpected memories is Messages on iOS. Scrolling all the way down to the bottom of the list, I can find messages from numbers I haven’t communicated with since a month or two after I got my first iPhone in 2007.

[image: screenshot of Messages in iOS]

There and elsewhere in the listing are friends I’m no longer in touch with, business lunches that went nowhere, old flames, messages from people I don’t even remember, arriving Lyfts in unknown cities, old landlords, completely contextless messages from old numbers (“I am so drunk!!!!” from a friend’s wife I didn’t know that well?!), old babysitters, a bunch of messages from friends texting to be let into our building for a holiday party, playdate arrangements w/ the parents of my kids’ long-forgotten friends (which Ella was that?!), and old group texts with current friends left to languish for years. From one of these group texts, I was just reminded that my 3-year-old daughter liked to make cocktails:

[screenshot]

Just like Sally Draper! Speaking of Mad Men, Don’s correct: nostalgia is a potent thing, so I’ve got to stop poking around my phone and get back to work.

Update: I had forgotten this great example about a ghost driver in an old Xbox racing game.
Well, when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together — until he died, when i was just 6.

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years.

but once i did, i noticed something.

we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came.

and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST.

See also this story about Animal Crossing. (via @ironicsans/status/996445080943808512)"
digital  memory  memories  2018  jasonkottke  kottke  traces  animalcrossing  videogames  games  gaming  flickr  wifi  marcinwichary  death  relationships  obsolescence  gmail  googlhangouts  googlechat  iphone  ios  nostalgia  xbox  nintendo  messages  communication  googlemaps  place  time  chrome  mac  osx 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Y-Fi
"Experience Loading Animations / Screens in wifi speeds around the world. This website was inspired by this conversation I had on twitter. I was home (Nigeria) for a bit before I started work and was annoyed at how long I had to look at loading animations. I wondered how long people wanted to wait around the world screaming.

Notes / How this works

• Data about wifi speeds is from: Akamai's State of the Internet / Connectivity Report.

• I chose countries based on what suprised me and to get diversity across speeds.

• To get most data about loading times, I used a combination of Firefox DevTools and the Network Panel on Chrome DevTools. For Gmail I used this article on Gmail's Storage Quota.

• The wifi speeds and sizes of resources are hard-coded in so you can see them and the rest of the code at the repo.

• Any other questions / thoughts? Hit me up on twitter!"

[via: https://twitter.com/YellzHeard/status/890990574827851777 via @senongo]
omayeliarenyeka  internet  webdev  webdesign  wifi  broadband  nigeria  loading  speed  diversity  accessibility  paraguay  egypt  namibia  iran  morocco  argentina  india  southafrica  saudiarabia  mexico  china  chile  greece  ue  france  australia  russia  kenya  israel  thailand  uk  us  taiwan  japan  singapore  hongkong  noray  southkorea  perú 
july 2017 by robertogreco
BRCK | Rugged, Portable WiFi Hotspot & Battery Extender
"We’re a team of software developers, engineers and technologists who are from Africa and live here. We have a long history of building things, such as Ushahidi, Crowdmap and the iHub. Our expertise runs from cloud software to fingerprint scanners for mobile devices to high-level medical device prototyping and manufacturing.

The BRCK was designed and prototyped in Nairobi, Kenya. We wanted a connectivity device that fit our needs, where electricity and internet connections are problematic both in urban and rural areas.

As we laid out what such a device would look like – physically robust, able to connect to multiple networks, a hub for all local devices, enough backup power to survive a blackout – we realized that the way the entire world is connecting to the web is changing. We no longer only get online via desktops in our office with an ethernet connection, we have multiple devices, and mobile connectivity is crucial."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/brcknet/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BExylz5FIRU/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BFl2RW3lIVf/ ]
wifi  internet  hardware  brck  nairobi  kenya  ushahidi  ihub  crowdmap  connectivity 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Guildlings
"We know a place where mages run raves,
harpies haunt the suburbs,
and a road trip can save the world.

Follow us.

Guildlings is a fantasy adventure
in a world of wizards and wifi.
Coming to mobile in 2017."
videogames  mobile  games  fantasy  edg  srg  gaming  ios  adventure  wifi 
february 2016 by robertogreco
This Beautiful App Lets You See the Cell Towers, Wifi Signals, and Satellites Around You
"You’re aware that your cell service comes from cell towers. And that your mapping app is made possible by GPS satellites. And that wifi signals deliver your fail videos. But the sight of that invisible world is breathtaking.

This summer, a Dutch artist named Richard Vijgen released a video of a project he was working on called the Architecture of Radio. It was an augmented reality app that revealed the waves and signals in a given room, pulling information from publicly available databases on cell tower locations and satellites. It revealed an unearthly, web-like network of invisible infrastructure that powers our world—and unsurprisingly, a lot of people wanted to try it for themselves.

Sadly, the app itself wasn’t ready for public consumption... until today. You can now download the $3 iOS app for iPhone or iPad. When you fire it up, you see a cobalt-blue screen where the app takes your GPS location and loads a series of datasets drawn from a global database that includes the cell towers around you and the satellites overhead (like this one). All in all, the database includes “7 million cell towers, 19 million Wi-Fi routers and hundreds of satellites.”

As you pan around your house, the app identifies signals and waves as you move: There’s a cell tower 589 meters to my left. If it was night, I could look out for a Russian satellite from 1964 passing to the south. It’s a bit like having x-ray glasses on.

The app warns that it is “not a measurement tool.” For example, the atmospheric waves and dots that texture the screen are an interpretation of waves, not a scientific reality. But the actual datapoints are real, based on your GPS coordinates and scraped from a database, which is pretty cool. Or terrifying, if you’re more of a tin-foil hat person.

“Most people seem to be amazed by the density of signals, some think it’s a bit scary, others just think it’s beautiful,” Vijgen told Gizmodo over email. In the end, it’s a lovely reminder of the vast network all around us, hidden in plain sight. You can get it here."

[See also:
http://www.architectureofradio.com/
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/architecture-of-radio/id1035160239 ]
applications  ios  2015  wifi  ipad  iphone  richardvijgen  celltowers 
november 2015 by robertogreco
PirateBox by David Darts
"PirateBox is a self-contained mobile communication and file sharing system. Simply turn it on to transform any space into a free and open communications and file sharing network."

[See also: http://piratebox.cc/
http://piratebox.cc/openwrt:diy

http://occupyhere.org/
http://librarybox.us/index.php ]

[via: http://www.furtherfield.org/programmes/event/piratebox-cutlery-auto-net ]
projectieas  occupy.here  hardware  darknets  networks  opensource  communication  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  tecnology  davidarts  librarybox  wifi  filesharing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Open Garden
"Fixing the mobile Internet. Together.

More than 5 million people use Open Garden today. By joining Open Garden, you are joining forces to make the Internet better, faster and more reliable – for everyone, including yourself. Open Garden allows all devices (including smart phones, tablets, laptops and “wearables”) to work together and find the best connections at any time. The more people use it, the better it gets."
opensource  mesh  networking  internet  wifi  meshnetworks  meshnetworking  opengarden  connectivity 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Check Out the Internet - Knight Foundation
"To bridge the digital divide by allowing New York residents with limited broadband access to borrow portable Wi-Fi hotspot devices for up to a year.

In a city where 27 percent of households don’t have access to broadband, The New York Public Library will expand its efforts to bridge the digital divide by allowing the public to borrow portable Wi-Fi hotspot devices for up to a year. Through its pilot project launching in September, the project seeks to reach 10,000 households, providing 24/7 quality access to people whose current access to the Internet is limited to 40-minute, once-a-day time slots, available on a first-come, first-serve basis in one of the library’s 92 branches. Providing continuous access will expand their ability to participate fully in the modern economy and allow them to continue to learn, work, explore and create after the library’s doors have closed."

[See also: http://www.knightfoundation.org/press-room/press-mention/cpl-nypl-wifi-hotspot-lending-programs-funded-knig/ ]
wifi  nypl  via:litherland  knightfoundation  access  boradband  digitaldivide  2014  libraries  nyc 
june 2014 by robertogreco
This Tool Boosts Your Privacy by Opening Your Wi-Fi to Strangers | Enterprise | WIRED
"Network owners may ask what incentive beyond altruism might motivate them to share limited Wi-Fi resources with strangers. The Open Wireless Router creators argue their software will be more convenient and secure than the buggy default firmware in typical Netgear and Linksys devices. Unlike those rarely-updated devices, the OpenWireless.org router firmware will be security-audited and allow users to check for updates on the devices’ smartphone-friendly web interface and quickly download updates. “We want to get a much better router in peoples’ hands that will improve their overall experience and security,” says Krishnan.

Krishnan argues that users also will benefit, both personally and on a societal level, from the barrier to surveillance that comes from sharing their network with strangers. “This is not just a neighborly good thing to do,” he says. “If you allow this kind of guest usage, it will make your traffic part of the mix and not associated with you. That gives you some protection.”

But Kamdar points instead to security guru Bruce Schneier’s famous argument that despite the security risks, leaving your Wi-Fi open is an act of civic hospitality. “To me, it’s basic politeness,” Schneier wrote in 2008. “Providing internet access to guests is kind of like providing heat and electricity, or a hot cup of tea.”

Given the kind of widespread network surveillance that’s been revealed in the years since Schneier wrote that line, no one would be considered rude for keeping their network locked down. With the right tools and protections, though, sharing Wi-Fi might become as common as any other baseline social kindness. “For some users,” Kamdar says, “A smile from a friend or neighbor is incentive enough.”"
wifi  security  surveillance  privacy  2014  eff  bruceschneier  civics 
june 2014 by robertogreco
jedahan/haiku-wifi · GitHub
"haiku wifi is a neighborhood bulletin board, hosted on a router, living in the wireless cloud.

look for wireless networks to see the current haiku. connect to the haiku network to write a new haiku."

[in use: http://cooper-wifi-poetry.tumblr.com/]
poetry  writing  wifi  projectideas  occupy.here  haiku  classideas  via:caseygollan 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Our Comrade The Electron - Webstock Conference Talk
"Termen had good timing. Lenin was just about to launch a huge campaign under the curiously specific slogan:

COMMUNISM = SOVIET POWER + ELECTRIFICATION OF THE WHOLE COUNTRY

Why make such a big deal of electrification?

Well, Lenin had just led a Great Proletarian Revolution in a country without a proletariat, which is like making an omelette without any eggs. You can do it, but it raises questions. It's awkward.

Lenin needed a proletariat in a hurry, and the fastest way to do that was to electrify and industrialize the country.

But there was another, unstated reason for the campaign. Over the centuries, Russian peasants had become experts at passively resisting central authority. They relied on the villages of their enormous country being backward, dispersed, and very hard to get to.

Lenin knew that if he could get the peasants on the grid, it would consolidate his power. The process of electrifying the countryside would create cities, factories, and concentrate people around large construction projects. And once the peasantry was dependent on electric power, there would be no going back.

History does not record whether Lenin stroked a big white cat in his lap and laughed maniacally as he thought of this, so we must assume it happened."



"RANT

Technology concentrates power.

In the 90's, it looked like the Internet might be an exception, that it could be a decentralizing, democratizing force. No one controlled it, no one designed it, it was just kind of assembling itself in an appealing, anarchic way. The companies that first tried to centralize the Internet, like AOL and Microsoft, failed risibly. And open source looked ready to slay any dragon.

But those days are gone. We've centralized the bejesus out of the Internet now. There's one search engine (plus the one no one uses), one social network (plus the one no one uses), one Twitter. We use one ad network, one analytics suite. Anywhere you look online, one or two giant American companies utterly dominate the field.

And there's the cloud. What a brilliant name! The cloud is the future of online computing, a friendly, fluffy abstraction that we will all ascend into, swaddled in light. But really the cloud is just a large mess of servers somewhere, the property of one American company (plus the clouds no one uses).

Orwell imagined a world with a telescreen in every room, always on, always connected, always monitored. An Xbox One vision of dystopia.

But we've done him one better. Nearly everyone here carries in their pocket a tracking device that knows where you are, who you talk to, what you look at, all these intimate details of your life, and sedulously reports them to private servers where the data is stored in perpetuity.

I know I sound like a conspiracy nut framing it like this. I'm not saying we live in an Orwellian nightmare. I love New Zealand! But we have the technology.

When I was in grade school, they used to scare us with something called the permanent record. If you threw a spitball at your friend, it would go in your permanent record, and prevent you getting a good job, or marrying well, until eventually you'd die young and friendless and be buried outside the churchyard wall.

What a relief when we found out that the permanent record was a fiction. Except now we've gone and implemented the damned thing. Each of us leaves an indelible, comet-like trail across the Internet that cannot be erased and that we're not even allowed to see.

The things we really care about seem to disappear from the Internet immediately, but post a stupid YouTube comment (now linked to your real identity) and it will live forever.

And we have to track all this stuff, because the economic basis of today's web is advertising, or the promise of future advertising. The only way we can convince investors to keep the money flowing is by keeping the most detailed records possible, tied to people's real identities. Apart from a few corners of anonymity, which not by accident are the most culturally vibrant parts of the Internet, everything is tracked and has to be tracked or the edifice collapses.

What upsets me isn't that we created this centralized version of the Internet based on permanent surveillance.

What upsets me, what really gets my goat, is that we did it because it was the easiest thing to do. There was no design, forethought, or analysis involved. No one said "hey, this sounds like a great world to live in, let's make it". It happened because we couldn't be bothered.

Making things ephemeral is hard.

Making things distributed is hard.

Making things anonymous is hard.

Coming up with a sane business model is really hard—I get tired just thinking about it.

So let's take people's data, throw it on a server, link it to their Facebook profiles, keep it forever, and if we can't raise another round of venture funding we'll just slap Google ads on the thing.

"High five, Chad!"

"High five, bro!"

That is the design process that went into building the Internet of 2014.

And of course now we are shocked—shocked!—when, for example, the Ukrainian government uses cell tower data to send scary text messages to protesters in Kiev, in order to try to keep them off the streets. Bad people are using the global surveillance system we built to do something mean! Holy crap! Who could have imagined this?

Or when we learn that the American government is reading the email that you send unencrypted to the ad-supported mail service in another country where it gets archived forever. Inconceivable!

I'm not saying these abuses aren't serious. But they're the opposite of surprising. People will always abuse power. That's not a new insight. There are cuneiform tablets complaining about it. Yet here we are in 2014, startled because unscrupulous people have started to use the powerful tools we created for them.

We put so much care into making the Internet resilient from technical failures, but make no effort to make it resilient to political failure. We treat freedom and the rule of law like inexhaustible natural resources, rather than the fragile and precious treasures that they are.

And now, of course, it's time to make the Internet of Things, where we will connect everything to everything else, and build cool apps on top, and nothing can possibly go wrong."



"What I'm afraid of is the society we already live in. Where people like you and me, if we stay inside the lines, can enjoy lives of comfort and relative ease, but God help anyone who is declared out of bounds. Those people will feel the full might of the high-tech modern state.

Consider your neighbors across the Tasman, stewards of an empty continent, who have set up internment camps in the remotest parts of the Pacific for fear that a few thousand indigent people might come in on boats, take low-wage jobs, and thereby destroy their society.

Or the country I live in, where we have a bipartisan consensus that the only way to preserve our freedom is to fly remote controlled planes that occasionally drop bombs on children. It's straight out of Dostoevski.

Except Dostoevski needed a doorstop of a book to grapple with the question: “Is it ever acceptable for innocents to suffer for the greater good?” And the Americans, a more practical people, have answered that in two words: “Of course!”

Erika Hall in her talk yesterday wondered what Mao or Stalin could have done with the resources of the modern Internet. It's a good question. If you look at the history of the KGB or Stasi, they consumed enormous resources just maintaining and cross-referencing their mountains of paperwork. There's a throwaway line in Huxley's Brave New World where he mentions "800 cubic meters of card catalogs" in the eugenic baby factory. Imagine what Stalin could have done with a decent MySQL server.

We haven't seen yet what a truly bad government is capable of doing with modern information technology. What the good ones get up to is terrifying enough.

I'm not saying we can't have the fun next-generation Internet, where everyone wears stupid goggles and has profound conversations with their refrigerator. I'm just saying we can't slap it together like we've been doing so far and expect everything to work itself out.

The good news is, it's a design problem! You're all designers here - we can make it fun! We can build an Internet that's distributed, resilient, irritating to governments everywhere, and free in the best sense of the word, like we dreamed of in the 90's. But it will take effort and determination. It will mean scrapping permanent mass surveillance as a business model, which is going to hurt. It will mean pushing laws through a sclerotic legal system. There will have to be some nagging.

But if we don't design this Internet, if we just continue to build it out, then eventually it will attract some remarkable, visionary people. And we're not going to like them, and it's not going to matter."
internet  surveillance  technology  levsergeyevichtermen  theremin  electricity  power  control  wifi  intangibles  2014  maciejceglowski  physics  music  invention  malcolmgladwell  josephschillinger  rhythmicon  terpsitone  centralization  decentralization  cloud  google  facebook  us  government  policy  distributed  anonymity  ephemeral  ephemerality  tracking  georgeorwell  dystopia  nsa  nest  internetofthings  erikahall  design  buran  lenin  stalin  robertmoog  clararockmore  maciejcegłowski  iot  vladimirlenin 
february 2014 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."

[via: https://twitter.com/davidtedu/status/438579734922805248 ]

[See also: http://occupyhere.org/
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:a567897ee14f ]

"Expanded Hardware
LibraryBox v2.0 now runs on a wide variety of hardware, including the preferrred MR3020, but also the MR3040, the WR703N, and much more. Now you can choose the hardware best for your particular need, and build your LibraryBox to suit.

Statistics
LibraryBox v2.0 now collects statistics on its use, and displays them to users. On the homepage, you can see the top 10 most downloaded items, and on the statistics page you can see both number of users per day and a full list of all downloads. These statistics are completely anonymous, and no identifying information about users is retained.

Bootstrap 3.0
The entirety of the web interface has been redesigned. Not only is the web front end now on the USB drive (making development much easier) but it's based on the Bootstrap 3 framework. This standard makes it simple for libraries and individuals to modify the interface to suit their needs.

Auto Sync/Mesh
LibraryBox v2.0 has a service built in that will allow you to have installed Boxen located in physically inaccessible areas that can be automatically updated simply by bringing a "master" box into range of their wifi signal. The remote Boxen will automatically see the Master, and update their content to match, no intervention or attention necessary.

Easier Installation
Making your own LibraryBox couldn't be much easier than the v2.0 makes it. Copy some files, update one file via a web browser, and then just wait while the software does its work. One-step installation!

Custom Configurations
We've moved most of the request configuration options to the USB thumb drive, allowing users to very easily change things like the SSID of the LibraryBox, the power of the wifi, the wifi channel, and even the local hostname of the LibraryBox server. It's never been easier to customize to just your needs."
librarybox  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
february 2014 by robertogreco
occupy.here / a tiny self-contained darknet
"What is it?
Each Occupy.here router is a LAN island in an archipelago of affiliated websites.

Anyone within range of an Occupy.here wifi router, with a web-capable smartphone or laptop, can join the network “OCCUPY.HERE,” load the locally-hosted website http://occupy.here, and use the message board to connect with other users nearby. The open source forum software offers a simple, mobile-friendly interface where users can share messages and files.

The project has developed in parallel with the Occupy movement and seeks to offer a network of virtual spaces where both committed activists and casual supporters can communicate.

Due to its distributed and autonomous design, Occupy.here is inherently resistant to Internet surveillance. Building up a collective network infrastructure that is owned and controlled by its users can lay the groundwork for other uses and applications. We don't have to choose between abstaining from social media and entrusting our data to corporate interests. We just need to take a greater responsibility for our own online services.

The idea
The project started in October 2011, with the goal to create a written supplement to the spoken conversations in Liberty Square (aka Zuccotti park). I wasn’t able to spend as much time in the park as I wanted, so I thought about how I might connect with others who passed through intermittently via an “offline forum.” Restricting the forum to those within the local wifi range created a self-selecting audience, and also (perhaps) created one more incentive to visit the occupation.

Since Liberty Square has been cleared and the Occupy Wall Street movement is now more decentralized, the goals for the project have adjusted. Instead of (or, perhaps, in addition to) augmenting the experience of being in an OWS encampment, we are building an archipelago of virtual spaces to host conversations similar to those in Liberty Square. More than ever, both “activists” and ”non-activists” alike need to have spaces for open discussion.

The new focus is to create a distributed network of wifi locations, each serving those in its immediate vicinity. These separate networks will soon be able to connect to each other, although that functionality is still under development.

How you can help
The project seeks collaborators of all kinds. You can help write the code, build and host your own wifi node, or simply participate in the conversation.

Dan Phiffer is the founder and lead developer, with further contributions from GitHub user Phaeilo. You should join us!"

[See also; http://rhizome.org/editorial/2013/oct/1/tiny-self-contained-darknet/ ]
danphiffer  occupy  ows  occupywallstreet  codeforamerica  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Cloak VPN :: Push Button Security
"Cloak is a service for your Mac, iPhone, and iPad that keeps you safe when you’re connected to public wireless networks like those found at coffee shops, hotels, airports, and conferences.

Exactly how unsafe are public hotspots? Here's a recent CBC report about Firesheep, a hacking tool that makes it shockingly easy to steal your stuff:"
vpn  wifi  mobile  cloak  mac  security  via:mattthomas 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Karma — We like things simple and honest.
"With Karma you pay for data as you go, and take it with you on a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot. The more you share your connection, the more free data you earn. Karma calls this: social bandwidth. Read more on our blog, or in articles on The Verge, Gizmodo and Mashable."
wireless  bandwidth  infrastructure  karma  sharing  mobile  wifi 
november 2012 by robertogreco
You Are the Network
"Seamless connectivity allows people to connect any supported device to the mesh and thus to the Internet with no effort or configuration. Install, done. No buttons, no pairing, no manual discoverability. Open Garden can use different physical ways to connect in general; today\'s version concentrates on Bluetooth. Bluetooth normally requires to manually put one of the devices into discoverable state, which only lasts a few minutes. We eliminated the need for this, saving battery, improving privacy, and, most importantly, allowing devices to connect with no user intervention. Devices learn about each other in a variety of ways instead of Bluetooth discovery, including through a cloud service and using local chatter.

An immediate future direction for us is multi-path access. Normally today, you access the Internet using only one path. For example, when your phone gets on Wi-Fi, it no longer uses its 4G connection; if you are in an area with multiple Wi-Fi hotspots, you only use one…"
osx  mac  windows  p2p  mobile  android  wireless  wifi  sharing  mesh  meshnetworks 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Electric Imp powered Walkie Talkie on Vimeo
"Using a cheap greetings card audio component, a toy Walkie Talkie bought at a flea market and an Electric Imp, I created a WiFi powered audio device.

Clicking the image of Neil Armstrong triggers the audio in the Walkie Talkie."
projectideas  make  arduino  wifi  brendandawes  2012  electricimp 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Practical Magic | Think Quarterly by Google
"The most original innovations spring from mucking about, not from thinking hard. Perhaps that’s really why all this is happening now – components are getting smaller and cheaper, computing is becoming disposable, networking is getting easier – but I don’t think this is driven just by technology. It’s driven by a generation of inventors who’ve learned the power of fast, cheap ‘making’ on the web and want to try it in the world.

This, to me, is as exciting as the day I downloaded a browser. We’re seeing the connectivity and power of the web seeping from our devices and into our objects. Everyday objects, yes, but also new generations of extraordinary objects – flying robot penguin balloons, quadrocopters that can play tennis, Wi-Fi rabbits that tell you the weather."
google  innovation  russelldavies  tinkering  berglondon  berg  wifi  arduino  mikekuniavsky  html  web  internet  making  hacking  internetofthings  spimes  2011  iot 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Humans Are The Routers
"Free communications is an essential human right. The 21st Century will be defined by the idea that no Government, no power shall ever block or filter the right of all men and women to communicate together again. It is my dream that within my lifetime that dictatorship shall be banished from this planet and unfiltered and true democracy shall flourish everywhere. It is time that our Faustian bargains with brutal dictators for short-term concerns end and a new covenant directly made with citizens everywhere seeking freedom will take its place. OpenMesh is a first step to help create a world where such a covenant can take hold in a world where brave people armed with new electronic tools can never be blocked or silenced ever again."
technology  internet  politics  social  networking  mesh  openmesh  connectivity  humanrights  access  government  communication  web  online  networks  openmeshproject  routers  wireless  wifi 
february 2011 by robertogreco
YOUrban — Immaterials: Light painting WiFi
"The city is filled with an invisible landscape of networks that is becoming an interwoven part of daily life. WiFi networks and increasingly sophisticated mobile phones are starting to influence how urban environments are experienced & understood. We want to explore & reveal what the immaterial terrain of WiFi looks like & how it relates to the city.

This film is about investigating & contextualising WiFi networks through visualisation. It is made by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen, Einar Sneve Martinussen. The film is a continuation of our explorations of intangible phenomena that have implications for design & effect how both products & cities are experienced. Matt Jones has summarised these phenomena as ‘Immaterials’, & uses sociality, data, time & radio as examples. Radio & wireless communication are a fundamental part of the construction of networked cities. This generates what William Mitchell called an ‘electromagnetic terrain’ that is both intricate & invisible, & only…"

[More: http://www.nearfield.org/2011/02/wifi-light-painting AND http://yourban.no/2011/03/07/making-immaterials-light-painting-wifi/ ]
timoarnall  jørnknutsen  einarsnevemartinussen  wifi  urban  urbanism  cities  immaterials  mattjones  williammitchell  visualization  wireless  networkedcities  invisible  maketheinvisiblevisible  electormagneticterrain  radio  sociality  data  time  design  context  landscape  invisiblelandscape  networks 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Wi-Fi Hurts Trees, Early Study Finds | Neon Tommy
"An initial test by German researchers shows the proliferation of wireless Internet is causing discoloration, disgfiguration and disease in trees.<br />
<br />
The electromagnetic radiation emitted by Wi-Fi access points may have a negative effect on the growth of plants, according to the study at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. The researchers note a larger and longer test is needed to verify the results because previous studies have shown Wi-Fi to be pretty safe.<br />
<br />
The study focused on 20 ash trees. The trees nearest to a Wi-Fi point ended up with a "lead-like shine" on the leaves because of leaf skin death.<br />
<br />
More will be known about this possible damaging effect of Wi-Fi in February when the researchers attend an unnamed conference."
wifi  trees  nature  radiation  plants 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Eight Great Tips for Traveling with the iPad | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"The iPad is an almost perfect travel computer. It’s easy to carry, works as a guide, a map, a book and it’s crazy-long battery life will let you sit back and watch another movie while your laptop-toting companions search for a power outlet. But as convenient as it is, a little preparation will make things even smoother. Here are some things you should do before you leave the house."
ipad  travel  applications  offline  maps  mapping  power  accessories  3g  wifi  offmaps  weather  language  tips 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Mary Meeker: Economy Is Recovering, Mobile Is Exploding, And The iPhone Is Awesome.
"Meeker thinks we’re in a new computing cycle with the mobile web. Meeker believes Apple’s iPhone and iPod touch are leading the way here, big time. She thinks the mobile web will be 10 times as big as the more traditional desktop Internet, and that it will grow much faster.
technology  economics  trends  iphone  apple  facebook  internet  digital  ecommerce  business  mobile  location-based  wifi  gps  3g  bluetooth 
november 2009 by robertogreco
#2 Every Building with a Shoebox in it’s Basement « geobloggers
"a + b + c) Overtime a building will gain a corpus of photos not only of itself but also it’s neighbors.

The building need not do anything else with the photos, its main job it to protect them. Obviously it would be lovely if it did do something with the photos, an ever changing wall of shimmering self images and so on, but yada, yada, copyright, blah, etc. The city becomes it’s own protective cultural distributed archiving network.… what if Cloudgate were built with servers and wireless inside, right from the start, offering to consume the photos taken of it. You take a shot with a wireless enabled camera and it could store a copy for you. It’s building up a library of itself, in all seasons, in all weather. Meanwhile you, have a backup, findable by time and browsing, stored safely in the Cloud!"
via:blackbeltjones  architecture  memory  photography  publicspace  revdancatt  ubicomp  embedded  flickr  future  wifi  geotagging 
june 2009 by robertogreco
OLPC-toting Rwandan students flock to airport for free WiFi - Engadget
"OLPC may be facing some tough times as of late, but there's no denying that the little-laptop-that-could has made an impact where it's been distributed, as evidenced by this latest indication of the project's reach in Rwanda. Apparently, in addition to helping students with their schoolwork, the laptop is also teaching them the fine art of finding free WiFi, and this particular group seems to have quickly discovered that the Kigali International Airport is one of the best spots in town. And just what are they using the laptops to look up in their time outside the classroom? Bruce Lee and Jean-Claude Van Damme, who, coincidentally, also brings the world together in his own special way."

[Related: Kids in Guinea Study Under Airport Lamps: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/19/AR2007071901225.html OR http://www.mylot.com/w/newsarticle/336286.aspx ]
olpc  africa  education  learning  wifi  cyberspace  cyberculture  technology  children  mobile  twitchboard  culture 
february 2009 by robertogreco
5 Companies Building the "Internet of Things" - ReadWriteWeb
"The "internet of things" is a concept that describes a wireless network between objects. In a way, it parallels the current network of addressable web pages (aka the "world wide web"), except "the internet of things" would include addressable inanimate objects that could be anything from your home's refrigerator to the shoes on your feet. Although this world of web-connected things has been much discussed for years, we've seen little movement pushing the concept forward. At least, until now."
internetofthings  tikitag  arduino  microcontrollers  mir:ror  blogjects  rfid  nearfield  wifi  internet  future  web  twitchboard  objects  things  programming  hardware  webdesign  trends  innovation  nabaztag  pachube  zerog  spimes  iot  webdev 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Gamasutra - Interview: Aspyr's Treasure Troves To Use DS As 'Real-Life Treasure Hunt'
""We're creating a real-life treasure hunt, and the DS and this software is acting as your treasure map, your trophy case, and your audiovisual canvas," ... For example, each item emits a distinct sound, which include musical notes and phonetic noises; the items can then be replicated and arranged on a Mario Paint-like musical grid. Like items and other custom creations, these resultant compositions can be traded with other players. But Leingang may be most excited about the subtle real-world activities his game might inspire. "We're using the DS' capabilities as a portable device above and beyond just the fact that I can put it in my pocket or sit on the couch or sit in the bathroom and play it. We're taking this thing and really flexing its muscles as being something that can travel anywhere across this globe," he said. He went on to explain some of the surprising effects the game has had on his own everyday routine in an effort to uncover fresh hotspots."
nintendo  ning  ds  games  gaming  location  location-based  wifi  videogames  hyperlocal 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Call me on my iPod Touch - Truphone releases app for the kids
"UK-based Truphone, a VoIP service provider for Wifi/data enabled handsets, today unveils a special version for owners of the latest version of the iPod Touch. The move is significant. The software effectively turns the Touch into a mobile phone, if limited to calls over WiFi. But there will be plenty of young people and college students who will use the Touch now for calls over their campus networks. For not only is the software free (available from the Apple store here), but the calls will be too: to other iPod touch owners, to customers of Truphone’s Internet telephony service, and to Google Talk users. Other features are planned like calling to normal landlines, calling and IM to Skype and MSN, as well as Facebook and Twitter integration. To make calls the Touch needs a headset and microphone like those for the iPhone or a microphone adaptor (Truphone will also be marketing an adaptor)."
iphone  ipodtouch  applications  voip  touch  mobile  truphone  wireless  wifi  skype  googletalk  im  ios 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Easy Wi-Fi for AT&T | iPhone Central | Macworld
"grab Devicescape’s Easy Wi-Fi for AT&T (iTunes link) and you can cut through the convoluted process lot a hot knife through butter. Simply input your 10-digit AT&T telephone number into the app's preferences, then fire up the application next time you want to jump on an AT&T network; Easy Wi-Fi will take care of the rest for you. Of course, you need to be an AT&T subscriber in order to get free access to the hotspots in the first place, so iPhone owners visiting from outside the U.S. are unfortunately out of luck."
iphone  applications  wifi  at&t  wireless  utilities  ios 
december 2008 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Wi-fi structures and people shapes
"Sensing the wi-fi like this is almost akin to dowsing - detecting the presence of unseen forces - and mimics the sensation of users attempting to discern where the wi-fi signal is strong."
cityofsound  wireless  wifi  3d  visualization  architecture  internet  infographics  data  mapping  design  technology  australia  drawing  libraries  body  posture  bodies 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Nameo: Single-Button Business Card Replacement For The iPhone [compare to: http://gethandshake.com/]
"To use Nameo, you open up the application on your iPhone and hit “Connect” as your peers do the same. The app will detect other phones in the vicinity and will display a list of available contacts. Clicking on a name will add that contact’s information to your iPhone’s address book. The process is very intuitive, though there was a noticeable lag time whenever I tried to add a contact."
iphone  applications  contacts  businesscards  social  wifi  ios 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Protecting against Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, RFID data attacks | News - Security - CNET News
"Using a laptop, cell phone headset, building access badge, credit cards, or even a passport can make you a walking target for data thieves and other criminals, a security expert warned at the Last HOPE hacker conference here late Friday."
rfid  security  privacy  wifi  data  passports  mobile  phones 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Click opera - Bronze Age iPods at Skara Brae
"If the Bronze Age folk left because of poor wifi coverage, they can come back right away; I can honestly say I've never been anywhere with as much open signal as Orkney and Shetland."
momus  wifi 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Joiku - JoikuSpot Light Beta
"JoikuSpot is a free mobile software solution that turns Nokia Smartphones to WLAN HotSpots."
n95  mobile  phones  wireless  wifi  freeware  nokia  hotspot 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - Sanctuaries of Disconnection
"Connectivity now so cheap, pervasive, democratic, common...will be small movement among individualists, trend-setters, early adopters to disconnect...renowned personage...rejects cell phones, email, and is available ONLY face to face."
kevinkelly  predictions  future  connectivity  mobile  phones  internet  web  online  wifi  sanctuary  scarcity  disconnection 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Fictional radio-spaces · Touch
"In this project called “the bubbles of radio” Ingeborg Marie Dehs Thomas used critical, visual design as a way of exploring the perception of many kinds of electromagnetic fields."
visualization  electronics  art  design  drawing  interface  everyware  maps  mobile  nearfield  nfc  infographics  communication  bluetooth  radio  science  sound  wifi 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Goodbye Supermodernism | varnelis.net
"new architecture for the 21st century will be less concerned with sensation & affect, less obsessed with either box and blob, and more concerned with new kind of place-making, enabling us to dwell more creatively in both “real” & network space"
architecture  theory  urban  supermodernism  postmodernism  place  design  nonplaces  mobile  phones  presence  ambientintimacy  communication  thirdplaces  wireless  wifi  web  online  internet  kazysvarnelis 
november 2007 by robertogreco
CitiTag: a wireless location-based multiplayer city game
"CitiTag is a wireless location-based multiplayer game, designed to enhance spontaneous social interaction and novel experiences in city environments by integrating virtual presence with physical. In the first version of CitiTag you roam the city with a G
psychogeography  play  ubicomp  arg  locative  location-based  location  pervasive  mobile  phones  wireless  physical  games  gaming  gps  urban  wifi 
november 2007 by robertogreco
YouTube - Mob Rules (part 1 of 5)
"Closing keynote of WebDirections South 2007 - an exploration of the future of mobile communications, now that half of humanity has a mobile phone."
markpesce  business  medicine  censorship  communication  internet  mob  mobs  gamechanging  cooperative  community  politics  copyright  distributed  economics  expression  freedom  free  future  revolution  innovation  mesh  mobile  networking  networks  social  wireless  wifi  sms  technology  usability  trends  power  poor  phones  strategy  society  web  online  health  services  credentials  wellness  knowledge  change  reform  chaos  hierarchy  meritocracy  learning 
november 2007 by robertogreco
hyperpeople » Blog Archive » Mob Rules (The Law of Fives)
"ONE: The mob is everywhere. TWO: The mob is faster, smarter and stronger than you are. THREE: Advertising is a form of censorship. FOUR: The mob does not need a business model. FIVE: Make networks happen."
markpesce  business  medicine  censorship  communication  internet  mob  mobs  gamechanging  cooperative  community  politics  copyright  distributed  economics  expression  freedom  free  future  revolution  innovation  mesh  mobile  networking  networks  social  wireless  wifi  sms  technology  usability  trends  power  poor  phones  strategy  society  web  online  health  services  credentials  wellness  knowledge  change  reform  chaos  hierarchy  meritocracy  learning 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Meraki Wireless Network | Affordable Internet Solution | Free WiFi
"Meraki’s mission is to bring affordable Internet access to the next billion people. Meraki’s new approach to wireless networking empowers individuals and groups to bring access to local communities, anywhere in the world."
access  wireless  wifi  mit  mobile  networking  p2p  gamechanging  future  free  collaboration  community  internet  technology  broadband  hardware  mesh 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Digital Urban: Connected to the World but not to the City - The Local Cloud
"Devices such as the iPhone are also of interest due to lack of GPS, compared Nokia N95...question arises for urban use if a GPS is necessary, in 4 minute wait for satellite fix we can simply look up at a street sign and type in it"
googlemaps  iphone  ipod  touch  location  locative  navigation  pervasive  wifi  wayfaring  n95  nokia  gps 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Eye-Fi Wireless Camera SD Memory at The Photojojo Store
"Never scrounge around for a USB cable again! Eye-fi is a magical orange SD memory card that will not only store 2GB worth of pictures, it'll upload them to your computer, and to Flickr, Facebook, Picasa (or 14 others) wirelessly, invisibly, automatically
photography  wifi  memory  hardware  gadgets  wireless  cameras  flickr  digital  technology  mobile 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Vodafone Receiver » #19 | Generation Mesh
"For Generation Mesh, Starbucks – as well as independent cafés, parks and other public spaces where it is possible to access the wireless internet – is a vital site for social interaction, professional support, collaboration and, even, community."
wireless  coworking  telecommuting  social  computers  game  public  internet  online  wifi  web  interaction  relationships  society  work  collaboration  community  networks  networking  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobile  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  urban  urbanism  culture  economics  freelance  gamechanging  network  mesh  starbucks 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Spark | CBC Radio
"The Warbike turns this wireless network activity into sound. As you cycle the streets, you'll hear the activity of this invisible communications layer that permeates our public spaces. Who knew that so much was going on?"
art  sound  place  wireless  wifi  bikes  music  audio 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Loki - You Can Get There From Here
"Combining GPS-like location, local search and one-button access to location-based content, Loki is the first web-based application to make the Internet revolve around you. Literally."
gps  googlemaps  directions  geotagging  location  location-based  locative  mapping  maps  search  firefox  wifi  extensions  browser  spatial  tagging  tags  wireless  networks  navigation  findability  geography  geocoding  interactive  mobile  tracking  browsers 
october 2007 by robertogreco
pasta and vinegar » Selective disConnectvity
"I take jokes such as Isolatr very seriously: our world values connection so much that it’s not only connection to devices but also connections to people that are important. The word “serendipity” is now everywhere, what’s next: a renaissance of the misanthropes?"
technology  theory  mobile  networks  panopticon  convergence  culture  surveillance  socialnetworks  connectivity  community  communication  howardrheingold  media  wifi  socialnetworking  privacy  social  forgetting  digital  balance  slow  disconnectivity 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Stichting Kunst en Openbare Ruimte - Howard Rheingold and Eric Kluitenberg, Mindful Disconnection: Counterpowering the Panopticon from the Inside
"media experts Howard Rheingold and Eric Kluitenberg ask us to consider if unquestioned connectivity – the drive to connect everything to everything, and everyone to everyone by means of electronic media – is necessarily a good thing."

[Waybacked: http://web.archive.org/web/20130122023701/http://classic.skor.nl/article-2887-en.html ]
technology  theory  mobile  networks  panopticon  convergence  culture  surveillance  socialnetworks  connectivity  community  communication  howardrheingold  media  wifi  socialnetworking  privacy  social  forgetting  digital  balance  slow  diconnectivity 
june 2007 by robertogreco
area/code - plundr
Plundr is the world's first location-based PC game. Using state-of-the-art Wi-Fi Positioning System technologies (WPS), the game locates the user's computer in physical space and uses their location as part of the game.
games  wifi  videogames  play  nintendo  nintendods  ds  location-based  location 
june 2007 by robertogreco
DSButtons.com | An invitation to play
"Waiting for the bus, on the train, sitting in cafes – we're always up for starting a friendly match. Thing is, it's not always easy to tell if there are fellow DS gamers around."
buttons  ds  nintendo  nintendods  wifi  games  fun  play  social  society  space  interaction 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Japanese Museum spreads knowlege using Nintendo DS - Newlaunches.com
"The Nintendo DS is very popular in Japan and taking full advantage of its popularity is the Nation Western Fine Arts Museum. From the museum counter you can borrow a DS which comes with a special cartridge preloaded with the museum details. Each room in
nintendo  nintendods  ds  museums  technology  wifi  art 
october 2006 by robertogreco
BUTTONS: Between Blinks & Buttons
"Essentially, it is a camera that - using a mobile communication device - takes other's photos. Photos that were created by someone who pressed a button somewhere at the same time as its own button was pressed. Even more so, it reduces the cameras to thei

[http://www.blinksandbuttons.net/ and http://pohflepp.plugimi.com/?q=blinksandbuttons ]
photography  place  memory  technology  social  networks  design  art  time  cameras  mobile  wifi  sharing  space  saschapohflepp 
september 2006 by robertogreco
TuxPhone - TuxPhone
"TuxPhone is a project to develop open source (hardware and software) GSM/GPRS cellphone. Our objective is to create an open (in every sense of the word) cellphone platform that is convenient for creating novel applications."
diy  mobile  wifi  wireless  Linux  phones  hacks  opensource  TuxPhone 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Build-it-yourself cell phones | CNET News.com
"Surj Patel is building his own cell phone, bit by soldered bit."
diy  mobile  wifi  wireless  Linux  phones  hacks  opensource 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Chumby Industries
"Introducing chumby, a compact device that can act like a clock radio, but is way more flexible and fun. It uses the wireless internet connection you already have to fetch cool stuff from the web: music, the latest news, box scores, animations, celebrity
media  web  flash  fun  future  technology  toys  ubicomp  ambient  devices  electronics  wireless  wifi  radio  hardware  internet  life  rss  consumer  news  plush  networks  crafts  widgets 
august 2006 by robertogreco
pasta and vinegar » Is Nabaztag about calm computing?
"It seems that the usage study of the rabbits showed interesting results: people are more interested and rather used the message feature (sending messages, listening to certain nabcast; that is to say podcasts for nabaztag) than the ambient information fl
nabaztag  ambient  devices  wifi  internet 
june 2006 by robertogreco
NabazClapier
"NabazClapier is a little proxy to add features to your wifi rabbit. It filters some of the data that Nabaztag receives from the violet(c) site (www.nabaztag.com). It can also replace nabaztag.com, allowing the rabbit to work whithout any internet access.
nabaztag  ambient  tools  mac  osx  web  wifi  networks 
june 2006 by robertogreco
TechKwonDo__WiFi.Bedouin
"WiFi.Bedouin is a wearable, mobile 802.11b node disconnected from the global Internet. It forms a WiFi "island Internet" challenging conventional assumptions about WiFi and suggesting new architectures for digital networks that are based on physical prox
art  community  gadgets  internet  mobile  technology  urban  julianbleecker  lifeasgame  wireless  wifi  mobility  communication  electronics  networking  portable  wearable  nomads  neo-nomads  wearables 
october 2005 by robertogreco

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