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robertogreco : wine   14

Expensive wine is for suckers. This video shows why. - Vox
"Therein lies the problem with wine: you have the science of turning a great fruit into a great drink. Then you have what are seemingly objective quality variables like balance and complexity. But layered onto that is a mountain of subjective opinions, people trying to prove their sophistication, and a whole lot of marketing. The nature of wine makes it really hard to tell the difference between expertise, nonsense, and personal preference.

Take wine comments, for example. There's no doubt that people can learn through training how to identify different grapes and regions, and develop the vocabulary to distinguish and describe subtle flavors and aromas. But at the same time, people are always vulnerable to the influence of their expectations. And time and again, researchers have been able to trick even expert wine tasters.

By dyeing a white wine red, researchers at the University of Bordeaux showed how easily visual cues can dominate wine students' sense of smell. When they thought the white wine was a red one, they described it using words commonly applied to red wines (incidentally, those words are typically dark objects like red berries or wood).

Another powerful cue is price. We can't help but associate price with quality, and most of the time it's probably a good assumption that you're paying more for a reason. But does that association hold up for wine? I bought three red wines at different prices to see if my coworkers could tell the difference.

Would they be able to tell which wine was the most expensive? Would they enjoy that wine more than the others? Check out the video above to see our results."

[direct link to video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVKuCbjFfIY ]
wine  taste  food  drink  2015  ratings  price  pleasure  money 
may 2015 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: If you say "scale up," you don't understand humanity
"The trick to sharing "best practices" is to stop doing that. Instead, share "our practices" and let ideas meet, collide, mix, and take root differently in each place. The trick to "scaling up" is the same - stop trying. If BMW has to "Americanize" their cars in order to sell them in the United States (adding cup holders, etc), what makes people like Intel or the KIPP or TFA foundations so arrogant as to imagine that they can replicate themselves among vastly different communities?

Instead we imagine, attempt, describe, converse. We pass along concepts, not plans. We share observations, not blueprints. We accept that whether it is a child or a school, we can not evaluate anything with a checklist or a score, but only with very human description.

That's a less rational world which requires more humane effort, and it contains troubling mountains and deep valleys because it is not flat. But it is the world in which we actually live."
heartofdarkness  wine  diversity  differences  norming  norms  standardization  rttt  nclb  arneduncan  benjamindistraeli  williamgladstone  cottonmather  hybridization  worldisflat  universaldesign  scalingup  scalingacross  germany  france  uk  us  americanization  localism  local  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  comparativeeducation  blueprints  society  americanexceptionalism  exceptionalism  reform  britisshemprire  thomasfriedman  assimiliation  cooexistence  frenchcolonialism  terroir  deborahfrieze  margaretwheatley  anglocentrism  decolonization  colonization  humanscale  human  scaling  scale  education  schools  2012  irasocol 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Don't Hate the Franzia: A Case for Boxed and Blended Wines - Ari LeVaux - Food - The Atlantic
"Go buy a box of Franzia Cabernet (not the Merlot or Chianti), which I consider a decent yardstick of value in a good cheap blend. The box costs $15 for five liters. A standard wine bottle has 750 ml, so the Franzia works out to about $2.25 a bottle—about what they pay in Europe for a bottle of good, cheap wine, usually blended. Do a taste test comparing that Franzia to any $15 bottle on the shelf. Unless you choose well or get lucky, the Franzia easily wins at least half the time. And even when it loses, ask yourself: Was the bottle seven times better than the box? That's a personal question, of course, one that's directly linked to your wallet.

Boxed wine has a bad rap largely because once upon a time notoriously bad wine was often sold that way. Sometimes it still is, but so what? That's not a reflection on the packaging."
wine  food  drink  value  franzia 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Half Dracula, Half Cinderella: Spotlight on the aperitivo for the olds: LA BICICLETTA
"It's been around for decades, and if you ever go to Tuscany you should ask at ANY bar, from the crappiest to the fanciest, for a bicicletta. Not to be confused with the Spritz that they serve around Venice.
bicicletta  drinks  drink  wine  campari  recipes  glvo 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Y2K, Dot-com Party Sushi, and Vodka Luges - Food Media - - CHOW
"When the ball drops on January 1, we’ll be entering a new decade. Isn’t it funny to think that just 10 years ago we were eating sushi all the time, working at dot-coms, and wearing high-tech-looking shoes with wavy Space Age soles? Imagine if somebody had told us that beards, pickles, and backyard chickens would be cutting-edge, 2010 fashion. CHOW.com busted out the time capsule to investigate more of what we were eating and drinking in 1999, and how it’s changed. Take a look…"

[via: http://www.hereandnow.org/2010/01/rundown-11/ ]
food  trends  00s  2000s  lists  diy  frugality  simplicity  affordability  organics  drink  fish  seafood  sustainability  local  farmersmarkets  restaurants  starbucks  independent  pop-uprestaurants  beer  wine  smoking  diet 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Grape expectations - The Boston Globe
"lesson of experiment is that our experience is end result of elaborate interpretive process, in which brain parses sensations based on expectations. If we think wine is red, or that certain brand is better, we will interpret senses to preserve that beli
psychology  brain  perception  wine  taste  expectation 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Mind Hacks: Higher price makes cheap wine taste better
"The volunteers rated the 'more expensive' wine as significantly more likeable despite being identical to the 'cheaper' wine....However, it has also been previously found to correlate with ratings of pleasantness of smells, tastes and even music."
behavior  brain  cognition  food  health  neuroscience  perception  psychology  wine  bias  money 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The Papernet
"There is a limit to computer magic because human language is also magic and computers are still dumb." see also: http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2006/12/17/meat/#papernet
mobile  williamgibson  travel  ubicomp  wikipedia  internet  howwework  gamechanging  qrcodes  productivity  maps  mapping  paris  PDF  notebooks  moleskines  wikis  drawing  diy  archiving  wine  recipes  webdev  paper  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] The Papernet
"Information wants to be used not managed...I want to use the Internets for the things they are good at — like distribution and searchification — but I am not ready to give up something I can hold in my hands."
mobile  williamgibson  travel  ubicomp  wikipedia  internet  howwework  gamechanging  qrcodes  productivity  maps  mapping  paris  PDF  notebooks  moleskines  wikis  drawing  diy  archiving  wine  recipes  webdev  paper  computing  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The Frontal Cortex : The Subjectivity of Wine
"a panel of wine professionals to select their top picks in the red and white category. All of the wines were tasted blind. The result is a beguiling list of delicious plonk. But I was most interested in just how little overlap there was between the diffe
experts  food  neuroscience  wine  science 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Grape Expectations: Vines May Love Vivaldi
"Just in through the grapevine: Music helps grow healthier plants. That's the preliminary result of research by Italian scientists who have been examining vineyards exposed to classical music to see if sound makes the plants grow larger and more quickly."
botany  music  wine  science  plants  sound  agriculture 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Argentina On Two Steaks A Day
"When the meat is cooked, it is roasted in thick pieces over open coals by obsessive meat chefs who have been cooking meat all their lives, for other people who have been eating meat all their lives, in a country that takes its meat extremely seriously. Y
argentina  food  travel  maciejceglowski  icecream  beef  meat  wine  maciejcegłowski 
april 2006 by robertogreco

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