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robertogreco : wood   72

Has This Neighborhood in Seoul Figured Out the Secret to Slow Living? - The New York Times
"The decline of vernacular architecture in the face of global urbanization is, of course, hardly new, though traditional Korean hanok are a particularly stark contrast to modern city living. Sit inside one and you immediately notice how sound and light travel differently as they’re absorbed into pine wood beams and diffused through pale mulberry-paper windows. When newly built, hanok are redolent with the bright scent of a coniferous forest; as they age, the fragrance softens toward pu-erh tea and damp bark. Their center of gravity is lower than other homes, creating a cocoon-like sensation; their radiant heating system — the ondol — means that residents sit, work and sleep on the floor.

But while any Korean can describe how a hanok feels, defining what a hanok is has proved elusive. “Hanok” simply translates to “Korean house,” though the term wasn’t used until the late 19th century, which brought the opening of the peninsula’s ports to international trade and, in turn, Western architecture. Before this, the hanok was merely a house. Today’s hanok, with its soot-black scalloped clay tiles laid atop wooden beams, resembles its 15th-century forebears. In 2015, the government legally defined hanok as a “wooden architectural structure built on the basis of the traditional Korean-style framework consisting of columns and purlins and a roof reflecting the Korean traditional architectural style,” leaving acres of room for interpretation."



"Indeed, this nostalgia for a simpler form of living is fueled by the dissatisfaction that many locals have expressed in the face of their country’s breakneck economic growth. Here, digital culture is richer and vaster than anywhere else: South Korea, home to the technology giants Samsung and LG, may have the world’s fastest internet and the highest rate of smartphone use, but amid the country’s accelerated 30-year transition from military state — which it was until the ’80s — to tech superpower, there’s a growing sentiment that somewhere along the road, much of the country’s own culture was lost. The hanok, then, has come to represent a safe vessel for introspection and a reassertion of Korean identity: a romantic return to the national architecture and, therefore, to a mythic, prelapsarian age. Rebuilding these houses is not only a chance to revisit a past that once was, free of influences from globalized monoculture, but also to create a future in Seoul that might have been."



"Tändler designed Lee Eunyoung’s hanok, one of the few one-story buildings in the village. The home is disarmingly simple: a minimally furnished, U-shaped space, encircling a madang. For the four-person family, moving into a hanok wasn’t just an aesthetic choice but an opportunity to atavistically reorient their lives. “We each have five outfits for Monday through Friday, plus one wedding outfit, one funeral outfit and one exercise outfit,” Lee Eunyoung says. The 37-year-old mother doesn’t buy toys for her two young boys, instead giving them paper and crayons or sending them out into the madang to play. This is another way the hanok has made Seoulites reconsider the way they live: By forcing them to decide how much stuff they really need, it inverts the dynamic between the house and the people within it, making the residents accommodate the dwelling, not the other way around. In doing so, they’ve discovered a different, slower way of living. Eventually, Lee Eunyoung’s children will grow up and find their own homes. Maybe they’ll go somewhere modern: a skyscraper, a glass-and-steel penthouse. But Lee says she’ll stay here, in the hanok, for the rest of her life"
slo  seoul  korea  architecture  homes  wood  2018  design  cv  housing  economics  preservation  culture 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Scientists Still Can't Decide How to Define a Tree - The Atlantic
"So far, there is no standout gene or set of genes that confers tree-ness, nor any particular genome feature. Complexity? Nope: Full-on, whole-genome duplication (an often-used proxy for complexity) is prevalent throughout the plant kingdom. Genome size? Nope: Both the largest and smallest plant genomes belong to herbaceous species (Paris japonica and Genlisea tuberosa, respectively—the former a showy little white-flowered herb, the latter a tiny, carnivorous thing that traps and eats protozoans).

A chat with Neale confirms that tree-ness is probably more about what genes are turned on than what genes are present. “From the perspective of the genome, they basically have all the same stuff as herbaceous plants,” he said. “Trees are big, they’re woody, they can get water from the ground to up high. But there does not seem to be some profound unique biology that distinguishes a tree from a herbaceous plant.”

Notwithstanding the difficulty in defining them, being a tree has undeniable advantages—it allows plants to exploit the upper reaches where they can soak up sunlight and disperse pollen and seeds with less interference than their ground-dwelling kin. So maybe it’s time to start thinking of tree as a verb, rather than a noun—tree-ing, or tree-ifying. It’s a strategy, a way of being, like swimming or flying, even though to our eyes it’s happening in very slow motion. Tree-ing with no finish in sight—until an ax, or a pest, or a bolt of Thanksgiving lightning strikes it down."
biology  botany  classification  trees  2018  verbs  rachelehrenberg  plants  science  genetics  multispecies  wood  longevity  andrewgroover  ronaldlanner  evolution  davidneale  genomes  complexity 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Kenzi Shiokava | Made in L.A. 2016: a, the, though, only | Hammer Museum
[via: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/miranda/la-et-cam-kenzi-shiokava-hammer-museum-20160705-snap-story.html ]

"Kenzi Shiokava’s work of the past fifty years has revolved around two very different sculptural forms, wood carving and assemblage. His elegantly carved totems and his staged groupings of plastic figurines offer a stark contrast in materials and methods. While wood carving is as old as the human species itself, assemblage is a form squarely rooted in the history of the twentieth century. Together each tradition bookends an art historical narrative, whose opposing poles are the sacred and the profane.

Born in Brazil, Shiokava is ethnically Japanese. His parents were among thousands of immigrant families fleeing severe economic hardship in the early twentieth century. Over the course of three generations, beginning with the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants in 1908, there was little if any assimilation. Yet Shiokava’s work embodies a cultural hybridity that is readily played out in the distinction between his wood and macramé totems, which he says represent, respectively, the Japanese and Brazilian sides of himself.

Prompted by his older sister’s move to the area, Shiokava arrived in Los Angeles in 1964. He attended art school in the city, receiving a bachelor’s degree from Chouinard Art Institute (a predecessor of California Institute of the Arts) in 1972 and a master’s degree from Otis Art Institute in 1974. Among Shiokava’s peers were a notable number of African American artists—including John Outterbridge, Noah Purifoy, and Betye Saar—all of whom were engaged with assemblage, a practice that by the early 1970s qualified as a Los Angeles tradition. Found objects are featured in Shiokava’s various types of work, such as the sculptures, reliefs, and totems. His assemblages are often marked by their juxtaposition of natural and industrially produced forms. Featuring plastic cartoon figures—the Hulk, Power Rangers, and Smurfs, to name but a few—the dioramas are a discrete turn away from the natural world, focusing instead on the lowest form of entertainment industry merchandising. But no matter how industrial, these figurines are for Shiokava a form of culture ripe for resuscitation from the places where they were once discarded when tastes changed. Paying keen attention to their poses, he arranges the figures within various found box forms, crafting ensembles whose costumes, gestures, and expressions, set within an arena and juxtaposed, produce a form of theater. They are restored and reanimated as products of the imagination."

[See also: https://vimeo.com/165919705 ]
kenzishiokava  artists  art  losangeles  assemblage  wood  totems  hybridity  johnoutterbridge  noahpurifoy  betyesaar 
may 2017 by robertogreco
The Dramatic Ways Having Kids Can Change Your Design PracticeEye on Design | Eye on Design
"When the founders of Pupilpeople became parents two years ago, the graphic designers struggled to find quality toys for their baby boy. Disappointed with gimmicky, plasticky gadgets, unsafe and overly-instructive playthings, Sean Kelvin Khoo and Nicole Ong designed their own toys for little Elias instead.

This gave birth to OddBlocks, a set of eight cubes that each unpack into three curious objects. An off-kilter semi-circle, an asymmetrical rectangle and a trapezoid with a chewed-off top are just some of the 24 odd-shaped toys created to help children build from their imagination and discover new shapes and forms.

“A toy is meant to be played with, but a lot of times what we saw in the market was that the product became an educational tool,” explains Khoo. “It’s very Singaporean; everything must [be used to] train my child to be a genius… to be good at maths, good at physics…”

While agreeing that children learnt best through play, the young parents wanted to be less prescriptive in their designs. What started as an open-ended graphic puzzle turned into a three-dimensional product when their studio designer Kong Wen Da roped in industrial designer Jamie Yeo to help. The quartet came up with a sleek plastic prototype in less than half a year, but after testing it with Elias they realized its weight and sharp corners were inappropriate for children. Unlike the “cold” plastic, cork proved a lighter and more environmentally sustainable alternative. The designers were also delighted to discover this made the blocks ideal for printmaking.

Printmaking is just one of several functions that Pupilpeople have found for OddBlocks, and used workshops they conduct under their new initiative Why, O, Why! (w, o, w!), a design school for kids where the eight-year-old studio is developing more products and experiences to nurture creativity in children. For Ong, this is a baby step towards her dream of running a childcare center to address the lack of play and joy in learning among children in Singapore. Growing up, Ong hardly recalls playing, and was creatively stumped the first time she played Lego with Elias. “I was like, ‘Build what? What can I do with it?’” Watching her son have fun building whatever he imagined helped Ong learn that play could establish a sense of discovery. “Is it the children’s fault for not enjoying [what they do] or is it our fault for not exposing themselves enough to find what they love?” she asks.

This also explains Pupilpeople’s recent shift from client work to design education. Khoo discovered a love for teaching when he signed up to lecture part-time 2011. Three years later, the arrival of a Risograph printer in the studio enabled him to experiment with teaching outside of design school. Inspired by overseas initiatives such as the ad-hoc Parallel School, which focuses on art and design as a process, Khoo, Ong and their designer, Kong, founded Areas of Interest to conduct workshops based on the philosophy of “making as a way of thinking”. In one early class, they challenged participants to design and produce printed matter within the limitations of Risograph technology.

“We wanted to create a platform where people could do things that were not typically what we see as design output, and we were trying to challenge what design is,” he explains.

From this year onwards, Khoo will be conducting his experiments on a large scale as a full-time lecturer at Singapore’s pioneering design college, Temasek Design School. While excited by the possibilities that lie ahead, Khoo refuses to tie himself down to a desired outcome and stresses how discovery will continue to be at the heart of both practising and teaching design.

“Design is a form of play,” he says. “Rather than a didactic way of teaching… trying to make clones of myself, I’m trying to discover each individual student’s unique disposition, their own individuality.”"
design  singapore  2016  pupilpeople  sfsh  toys  graphicdesign  seankelvinkhoo  nicoleong  oddblocks  teaching  printmaking  classideas  wood  cork  risograph  proces  thinking  making  howweteach  howwelearn  education  learning  schools  children  process 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Here's Why Ikea Is Discontinuing Everyone's Favorite Shelf
"Expedit, we hardly knew ye. Ikea recently announced that the popular shelving system is not long for this world, and the internet responded with rage. But there's a really good reason for Ikea to get rid of Expedit. And in fact, it's not really going away at all.

Ikea says it's replacing Expedit with a new line of shelving, called Kallax, beginning in April. The furor over the decision has been swift—especially from vinyl collectors, amongst whom Expedit is something of a cult item. In fact, there's even a 20,000-person strong Facebook page devoted to saving the easily-stackable shelves.

But chew on this: Ikea uses a whopping one percent of the world's wood supply. That's 17.8 million cubic yards of wood. Much of that goes into making the veneer you find on many of Ikea's most popular products, including Expedit.

Now, let's look at Kallax. Ikea reports that the internal dimensions of the system are exactly the same as Expedit—so Kallax will still fit your vinyl collection just fine. So what's changing? The thickness of the wide outer edge that makes Expedit so distinctive. It seems like a minuscule change to us, but it's not. Sales numbers for Expedit aren't public, but we know that Ikea sells some 41 million similar Billy bookcases a year.

If Ikea can cut even a centimeter of wood on each of those products, it will save massively on material costs. It's also going to help them make good on their claim of sustainability. Right now, 25 percent of Ikea wood is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (though, as one commenter points out, the certification was recently thrown into question). Last year, they pledged to increase that number to 50 percent within five years. And when you're selling hundreds of millions of products a year, even the smallest savings count.

So this decision probably has nothing to do with design, and not much to do with stirring up excitement—though that doesn't hurt—either. It's just good business at a truly massive scale. So mourn for Expedit—but remember that it's being replaced by basically the same thing, and it's coming from a more sustainable company.

Still, it's sad to see Expedit proper go. As the proud owner of one unit, it's by far the most photogenic shelf I've ever owned (see below). Drop your own images in the comments—who knows, maybe Ikea will change its mind.

Update: Ikea has released images of Kallax, and it looks pretty damn nice. The company also comments that the surface will be more scratch-resistant and more child-friendly, thanks to a slight corner bevel. Crucially, Kallax is described as "a new name" for Expedit"
okea  kallax  expedit  wood  furniture  2014 
june 2016 by robertogreco
The Minecraft Generation - The New York Times
"Seth Frey, a postdoctoral fellow in computational social science at Dartmouth College, has studied the behavior of thousands of youths on Minecraft servers, and he argues that their interactions are, essentially, teaching civic literacy. “You’ve got these kids, and they’re creating these worlds, and they think they’re just playing a game, but they have to solve some of the hardest problems facing humanity,” Frey says. “They have to solve the tragedy of the commons.” What’s more, they’re often anonymous teenagers who, studies suggest, are almost 90 percent male (online play attracts far fewer girls and women than single-­player mode). That makes them “what I like to think of as possibly the worst human beings around,” Frey adds, only half-­jokingly. “So this shouldn’t work. And the fact that this works is astonishing.”

Frey is an admirer of Elinor Ostrom, the Nobel Prize-­winning political economist who analyzed the often-­unexpected ways that everyday people govern themselves and manage resources. He sees a reflection of her work in Minecraft: Running a server becomes a crash course in how to compromise, balance one another’s demands and resolve conflict.

Three years ago, the public library in Darien, Conn., decided to host its own Minecraft server. To play, kids must acquire a library card. More than 900 kids have signed up, according to John Blyberg, the library’s assistant director for innovation and user experience. “The kids are really a community,” he told me. To prevent conflict, the library installed plug-ins that give players a chunk of land in the game that only they can access, unless they explicitly allow someone else to do so. Even so, conflict arises. “I’ll get a call saying, ‘This is Dasher80, and someone has come in and destroyed my house,’ ” Blyberg says. Sometimes library administrators will step in to adjudicate the dispute. But this is increasingly rare, Blyberg says. “Generally, the self-­governing takes over. I’ll log in, and there’ll be 10 or 15 messages, and it’ll start with, ‘So-and-so stole this,’ and each message is more of this,” he says. “And at the end, it’ll be: ‘It’s O.K., we worked it out! Disregard this message!’ ”

Several parents and academics I interviewed think Minecraft servers offer children a crucial “third place” to mature, where they can gather together outside the scrutiny and authority at home and school. Kids have been using social networks like Instagram or Snapchat as a digital third place for some time, but Minecraft imposes different social demands, because kids have to figure out how to respect one another’s virtual space and how to collaborate on real projects.

“We’re increasingly constraining youth’s ability to move through the world around them,” says Barry Joseph, the associate director for digital learning at the American Museum of Natural History. Joseph is in his 40s. When he was young, he and his friends roamed the neighborhood unattended, where they learned to manage themselves socially. Today’s fearful parents often restrict their children’s wanderings, Joseph notes (himself included, he adds). Minecraft serves as a new free-­ranging realm.

Joseph’s son, Akiva, is 9, and before and after school he and his school friend Eliana will meet on a Minecraft server to talk and play. His son, Joseph says, is “at home but still getting to be with a friend using technology, going to a place where they get to use pickaxes and they get to use shovels and they get to do that kind of building. I wonder how much Minecraft is meeting that need — that need that all children have.” In some respects, Minecraft can be as much social network as game.

Just as Minecraft propels kids to master Photoshop or video-­editing, server life often requires kids to acquire complex technical skills. One 13-year-old girl I interviewed, Lea, was a regular on a server called Total Freedom but became annoyed that its administrators weren’t clamping down on griefing. So she asked if she could become an administrator, and the owners said yes.

For a few months, Lea worked as a kind of cop on that beat. A software tool called “command spy” let her observe records of what players had done in the game; she teleported miscreants to a sort of virtual “time out” zone. She was eventually promoted to the next rank — “telnet admin,” which allowed her to log directly into the server via telnet, a command-­line tool often used by professionals to manage servers. Being deeply involved in the social world of Minecraft turned Lea into something rather like a professional systems administrator. “I’m supposed to take charge of anybody who’s breaking the rules,” she told me at the time.

Not everyone has found the online world of Minecraft so hospitable. One afternoon while visiting the offices of Mouse, a nonprofit organization in Manhattan that runs high-tech programs for kids, I spoke with Tori. She’s a quiet, dry-­witted 17-year-old who has been playing Minecraft for two years, mostly in single-­player mode; a recent castle-­building competition with her younger sister prompted some bickering after Tori won. But when she decided to try an online server one day, other players — after discovering she was a girl — spelled out “BITCH” in blocks.

She hasn’t gone back. A group of friends sitting with her in the Mouse offices, all boys, shook their heads in sympathy; they’ve seen this behavior “everywhere,” one said. I have been unable to find solid statistics on how frequently harassment happens in Minecraft. In the broader world of online games, though, there is more evidence: An academic study of online players of Halo, a shoot-’em-up game, found that women were harassed twice as often as men, and in an unscientific poll of 874 self-­described online gamers, 63 percent of women reported “sex-­based taunting, harassment or threats.” Parents are sometimes more fretful than the players; a few told me they didn’t let their daughters play online. Not all girls experience harassment in Minecraft, of course — Lea, for one, told me it has never happened to her — and it is easy to play online without disclosing your gender, age or name. In-game avatars can even be animals.

How long will Minecraft’s popularity endure? It depends very much on Microsoft’s stewardship of the game. Company executives have thus far kept a reasonably light hand on the game; they have left major decisions about the game’s development to Mojang and let the team remain in Sweden. But you can imagine how the game’s rich grass-roots culture might fray. Microsoft could, for example, try to broaden the game’s appeal by making it more user-­friendly — which might attenuate its rich tradition of information-­sharing among fans, who enjoy the opacity and mystery. Or a future update could tilt the game in a direction kids don’t like. (The introduction of a new style of combat this spring led to lively debate on forums — some enjoyed the new layer of strategy; others thought it made Minecraft too much like a typical hack-and-slash game.) Or an altogether new game could emerge, out-­Minecrafting Minecraft.

But for now, its grip is strong. And some are trying to strengthen it further by making it more accessible to lower-­income children. Mimi Ito has found that the kids who acquire real-world skills from the game — learning logic, administering servers, making YouTube channels — tend to be upper middle class. Their parents and after-­school programs help them shift from playing with virtual blocks to, say, writing code. So educators have begun trying to do something similar, bringing Minecraft into the classroom to create lessons on everything from math to history. Many libraries are installing Minecraft on their computers."
2016  clivethompson  education  videogames  games  minecraft  digitalculture  gaming  mimiito  robinsloan  coding  computationalthinking  stem  programming  commandline  ianbogost  walterbenjamin  children  learning  resilience  colinfanning  toys  lego  wood  friedrichfroebel  johnlocke  rebeccamir  mariamontessori  montessori  carltheodorsorensen  guilds  mentoring  mentorship  sloyd  denmark  construction  building  woodcrafting  woodcraft  adventureplaygrounds  material  logic  basic  mojang  microsoft  markuspersson  notch  modding  photoshop  texturepacks  elinorostrom  collaboration  sethfrey  civics  youtube  networkedlearning  digitalliteracy  hacking  computers  screentime  creativity  howwelearn  computing  froebel 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Japan's Minimalist Version of Lego Is Actually Awesome | WIRED
"I’M GOING TO say something blasphemous: Lego bricks are ugly.

Don’t get me wrong. The little Danish building blocks have plenty of inner beauty, sure, and are one of the 20th century’s most enduring designs. They can be infinitely reconfigured, which means kids’ ideas about design can be endlessly reconfigured as well. Famous architects have said they do what they do because of Lego. Nevertheless, the plastic bricks are not pretty.

Tsumiki bricks, on the other hand, are lovely. Tokyo architecture firm Kengo Kuma and Associates made them with forest conservation organization More Trees, and bills them as “Japanese Lego.” Unlike Lego bricks, which are plastic, Tsumiki pieces are made of Japanese cedar (and manufactured using wood certified by the Forest Stewardship). And unlike the brick-shaped Lego blocks, each Tsumiki block is shaped like an inverted “V.” Triangular notches in the legs let the Tsumiki blocks wedge together, making them versatile like Lego bricks, albeit not as sturdy; some of the assembly models shown in Kuma’s Tsumiki brochure look about as solid as a house of cards. More Trees sells the blocks through its site, for about $70 a kit.

Still, Kuma—recently selected to build Japan’s 2020 Olympic stadium chosen—has created a clever spin on an age-old kind of Japanese toy. Tsumiki translates directly to “blocks,” and most traditional Tsumiki are exactly that—cubical, cylindrical, or pyramid-shaped blocks with way of latching together. Kuma’s Tsumiki are triangular, for the strength that this shape provides. All told, these popsicle stick-like blocks are much more in line with the principles of contemporary Japanese architecture than their predecessors: They’re natural in material, spatially economical, and relentlessly simple. Perfect for inspiring Japan’s next generation of architects."

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BBAmKfjtopJ/ ]
design  wood  toys  play  japan  lego  kengokuma  tsumiki  building  blocks 
february 2016 by robertogreco
crap futures — constraint no. 4: education
"We hesitated a bit before tackling this one, because education is such a vast and complex subject. But as far as constraints on possible futures go, education is impossible to ignore. Skill sets and thought paths are determined at an early age, shaping and constraining future possibilities for entire generations of pupils. (It is worth rediscovering Ken Robinson’s 2008 talk on changing paradigms in relation to educational constraints.) There are serious consequences to enforcing the constraint of economic utility on education, drastically narrowing curricula to what are considered core subjects, replacing older - not to say obsolete or useless - technologies with newer ones in the classroom, and so on. Maslow’s evocative maxim, often attributed to Mark Twain for reasons unknown, comes to mind: ‘It is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.’ Today this might be paraphrased as: ‘Give a child a computer, and everything has to be coded.’ Or 3D printed. Or laser cut. Or CNC machined. Obviously the more of these tools girls and boys are given, the better for them and the country they live in.

Unfortunately, recent educational trends in the UK paint a rather bleak picture where constraints are concerned. An article from the BBC on the rise of 3D printing in schools states: ‘the key inspiration … has been what is loosely termed the “digital maker” movement’. But why digital maker movement and not simply maker movement? The article goes on to tell us that ‘"Fab lab" stands for a “fabrication laboratory”, where digital ideas are turned into products and prototypes.’ Again, why digital ideas and not just ideas? What is it about a fablab that needs to be wholly digital and not a hybrid of materials and practices? (Some spaces and curricula do seek to fuse the old ‘shop’ class with the new computer lab, but other concerns may arise - as in the case a few years ago of controversial DARPA military funding to put a thousand DIY workshops in US high schools.)

A UK Government report, meanwhile, that lays out the agenda on 3D printing in education there, includes the following ‘points to consider’: ‘Who will use it? What will it be used for?’ These are good questions, too seldom asked. As for the questions that were not asked, they might include: ‘What will happen to the old machines?’, ‘What will happen to the old knowledge?’ and ‘What is lost in the headlong rush to full digitalisation?’ 3D printing holds an enormous amount of potential, as boundary pushing movements like 3D Additivism demonstrate. But the 3D printer and the laser cutter shouldn’t be the only tools in the box, and deskilling leads to a narrowing of possibilities for everyone.

Roland Barthes, writing in the 1950s about the sudden shift from traditional wooden toys to plastic ones, observed:
Wood makes essential objects, objects for all time. Yet there hardly remain any of these wooden toys…. Henceforth, toys are chemical in substance and colour; their very material introduces one to a coenaesthesis of use, not pleasure. These toys die in fact very quickly, and once dead, they have no posthumous life for the child.

A word of warning to those who would abandon old areas of knowledge and useful materials too quickly."
crapfutures  2016  rolandbarthes  wood  education  children  durability  materials  time  slow  plastic  future  futures  3dprinting  digital  digitization  3dadditivism  fablabs  darpa  diy  making  makermovement  economics  purpose  additivism  fablab 
january 2016 by robertogreco
An Undertaking on Vimeo
"Michael Yates’ passion for working with wood arose from the wood’s accessibility, its palpable presence and the hope that his efforts would last. But when his grandmother requested that he build her casket, the stability of oak collided with an evocative “conversation” with impermanence, death and the inevitability of absence. In spite of his initial fear and resistance due to our culture’s steadfast avoidance of the D-word, Yates eventually agreed to build the casket and began the real work of constructing a genuine relationship with life, death and sawdust.

See more at darkrye.com
Follow us on Twitter twitter.com/darkryemag
and Instagram instagram.com/darkryemag "

[via: "Just showed this video to students as a perfect example of #ethnography about, through *and* for #design: https://vimeo.com/83513993 "
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/649345214063185920 ]
via:anne  wood  death  culture  michaelyates  design  ethnography  video 
october 2015 by robertogreco
christian sjöström develops link modular furniture system
"‘link’ intends to put the user in charge, simultaneously stimulating their creativity and decreasing throwaway mentality. it’s a playful, modular furniture system that is able to adapt, by need or choice, to any room or situation. designed by danish designer christian sjöström, ‘link’ was influenced by molecular structures and utilizes a similar system of freely linking components. users are able to sculpt, design, and build to the extent of their imaginations.

sjöström wanted to focus on making an easily comprehensible, functional piece of furniture. parts include three varying lengths of wood, each with a ball-joint on the end. the joint is used to connect any two lengths together, and aside from that, there’s no rules. a ‘link’ prototype was built using ash and ball-joints of 3D printed SLS material. "
furniture  modular  modularity  christiansjöström  wood  2015  design 
march 2015 by robertogreco
What Reclaimed Wood Meant — Kate Losse
"But if I went to the desert for space, when I got there I discovered another element that is abundant in desert architecture that was visually startling to me in its newness after the hard, gray-green industrial tones of the Bunker. This "new" material-- wood-- seemed so interesting to me that in 2011 I made a Facebook album called Reclaimed Wood to chart the material and its aesthetic progress to popularity, of which I was already certain. The first photos I took were of the ceiling in an old Ice Locker that Donald Judd, the original gentrifier, had purchased in Marfa. Built in the early 1900s, the locker had heavy white stucco and iron walls but the most beautiful, heavy, old, vintage wooden railroad beams in its ceiling; the effect of the wood was to soften what would be a hard industrial space into a pleasing, welcoming, artisanal atmosphere, and this is why Judd bought the building and converted it into an artist workshop and studio space. Judd, in a sense, predicted Reclaimed Wood forty years before everyone else caught on. All of the buildings he purchased in Marfa are masterful, original, unstudied versions of what has now become a national craze: the American industrial building with a soft, artistic and artisanal side. In Marfa these buildings were built for the railroad and then abandoned, decayed, and converted to art functions later. Thus their combined hardness/softness has had decades to develop.

After some months in Texas, I returned to the city and noticed that wood was steadily appearing everywhere and spreading. It began in small coffee shops like Four Barrel coffee shop (along with its textile counterpart, nautical rope, which often accompanies wood as a nod to wood's ship-ly connotations of pirates and sailors) and spread to restaurants and finally, back to the same tech company offices that I had left in pursuit of space and more organic forms. That's to say that the irony of all of this is that no environments have been more committed to retrofitting themselves with reclaimed wood than the very spaces that drive the technology that drives people to seek refuge from technology in more open, organic spaces. As technology filled our lives, so did our lives become increasingly filled with soft wooden beams and forms, a kind of reverse de-industrialization of the technical space using organic materials. We now plant these warm-colored, gnarled wooden objects like talismans amid our screens, a reminder of organic shapes, something to touch that, reassuringly, can't be swiped on.

It is thus that we have reached Peak Reclaimed Wood, where some restaurants and coffee shops are so plastered in vintage wooden planks and beams that there is no room for a single new plank of wood (in these spaces, the wood becomes less an accent than an attempt to create the illusion of living in a cabin, which is a related desire to reclaimed wood, but not identical. The desire to live in a coffee-house-as-cabin-- or to import actual cabins into your tech cafeteria, as Twitter did-- is something like a desire to live in the country or the past, without actually living there). And so, because aesthetics have to shift when they become saturated, what is next?

In my next post I will address what comes after Reclaimed Wood and why I think the next turn will be to 80s Hilton-esque business hotel stylings and what that means about us and what we need now."

[via: https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/549965313295781888 ]

[See also (referenced within: "Facebook IRL: A Short History of Facebook's Design Aesthetic"
http://www.katelosse.tv/latest/2014/2/4/facebook-irl-a-short-history-of-facebooks-design-aesthetic
katelosse  wood  texas  marfa  technology  materials  software  2014  aesthetics  donaldjudd  design  trends 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Tripitaka Koreana | Atlas Obscura
"Taking 16 years to carve, the massive Buddhist canon known as the Tripitaka Koreana is a staggering collection of wooden printing blocks known as one of the most complete doctrinal texts in the entire religion and is said to not contain even one error across its tens of thousands of "pages."

Originally carved in the late 11th century as a devotional work meant to change the fortunes of a feudal war in Korea by invoking the Buddha, the original version of the writings were eventually destroyed by a Mongul fire. The second edition of the work, which still exists today was commissioned between 1236 and 1251, again in an effort to curb an invasion of hostile forces. 

Once completed, this second collection of Buddhist doctrine, law, and philosophy covered 81,258 wooden print blocks, containing 52,382,960 flawless characters. The mind-boggling work was moved to a temple known as Haeinsa in 1398 and has been housed across four separate buildings ever since, weathering centuries of time. 

Today the ancient birch wood tablets have all been treated to prevent any further decay and are still located in the same temple housing they have been for centuries. The collection is not only listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but is also the 32nd National Treasure of Korea."
libraries  wood  books  buddhism  korea  archives 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Official BioLite Site | Home of the CampStove
"BioLite Stoves make cooking on wood as clean, safe & easy as modern fuels while generating electricity to charge phones, lights and other electronics off-grid"

[See also: BioLite BaseCamp
https://vimeo.com/98297569

"The BioLite BaseCamp is a complete off-grid cooking and energy solution for groups, powered by wood. Thoughtful features like folding legs and a one-touch grill-to-boil lever make it easy and comfortable to use while BioLite's unique technology captures waste heat to produce electricity. The large cooktop and side fuel entry enable large-format cooking while an accompanying USB light aids in nighttime or low-light conditions."]
camping  equipment  via:steelemaley  outdoors  chargers  stoves  wood  biolite 
july 2014 by robertogreco
The Pallet Project | STUDIOMAMA
"The Pallet Project started life For 10, TEN, X project at 100% Design 2008. The idea was to created a product that could be made for £10 or less.

The first pallet range was a pallet chair, a hanging light, a floor light and some stools. The first pallet chair was made out of two pallets and 50 screws. The floor lamp made out of 1 pallet, 15 screws, a bolt, some reused cable and a light fitting.

As part of the London Design Festival, 2009 Pallet Project was shown at jeweller Jacqueline Rabun's London showroom. As well as the chairs there were 6 new pieces, lights, cabinets, plant holders, chair and a chandelier. And special 'crafty' pallet stool was designed for a DIY supplement in the Guardian Weekend.

The Pallet Project grew to take on a life of it's own with people all over the world buying and downloading the instructions and making versions of pallet chairs for personal use as well as community and public projects.

The Pallet Furniture was shortlisted in the furniture category of the 2010 Brit Design awards at the Design Museum, London.

Instructions to make the chair, light and a stool are available from the Studiomama shop."
pallets  furniture  studiomama  wood  2008 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Carles Enrich inserts plywood box inside renovated Barcelona apartment
"Spanish architect Carles Enrich has inserted a plywood box beneath the vaulted ceilings of an early 20th-century apartment in Barcelona to create a new bathroom and kitchen unit."
architectire  design  plywood  carlesenrich  wood  openstudioproject  lcproject  interiors  barcelona  homes  housing 
may 2014 by robertogreco
ANALOG MEMORY DESK - Kirsten Camara
"A desk to record all the small items you write down once, but intend to forget tomorrow.

I've come to realize that I'm somewhat obsessed with how we remember the past. This is the latest installment in that series and a more serious attempt at furniture making. There are a hundreds of little things that we don't try to remember every year or even every week. Does the sum of all these tiny parts produce a new narrative on our lives?

1,100 yards of paper will record the lists, the phones numbers you call once, the pixel size of that box on that website, the street name of that business, and the long division you try to remember.

Made out of hard maple, butcher paper and a glass panel."

[via: http://mmodulus.tumblr.com/post/79548996003/analog-memory-desk-una-mesa-para-recordar-todos ]
furniture  wood  memory  design  desks  paper  papernet 
march 2014 by robertogreco
ELISA STROZYK
""Wooden Textiles" convey a new tactile experience. We are used to experience wood as a hard material; we know the feeling of walking across wooden floors, to touch a wooden tabletop or to feel the bark of a tree. But we usually don't experience a wooden surface which can be manipulated by touch.

"Wooden Textiles" is a material that is half wood-half textile, between hard and soft, challenging what can be expected from a material or category. It looks and smells familiar but feels strange, as it is able to move and form in unexpected ways.

The processes to transform wood into a flexible wooden surface is its deconstruction into pieces, which are then attached to a textile base. Depending on the geometry and size of the tiles each design shows a different behavior regarding flexibility and mobility. There are various possible applications, for example as floorings, curtains, drapes, plaids, upholstery or parts of furniture."

[See also: http://thisispaper.com/Elisa-Strozyk-Wooden-Textiles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmf7OK6fKck

and

http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/lamps.html
http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/woodenrug.html
http://www.elisastrozyk.de/seite/woodtex/woodencarpet.html ]
wood  fabric  textiles  elisstrozyc  glvo  foldable  wearables  wearable  design  triangles 
december 2013 by robertogreco
We Sit Together: Utopian Benches from the Shakers to the Separatists of Zoar :: Princeton Architectural Press
"Whether for protest, religious congress, companionship, eating, or comfort, sitting communally remains one of the most powerful and prevalent of human social activities. This simple act held special significance in numerous utopian communities that emerged in nineteenth-century America, and was given physical presence in the form of a variety of styles of wooden benches. Fascinated by these expressions of harmony and equality, renowned British artist Francis Cape sought out and made measured drawings of remaining examples.

We Sit Together presents twenty-five of Cape's beautifully reconstructed benches drawn from twenty utopian sects, active from 1732 to the present, ranging from well-known communities like the Shakers to more obscure groups like the Separatists of Zoar. Introduced by noted curator Richard Torchia, and featuring crisp photographs and lovingly handmade drawings of the benches, along with installation photographs by Aaron Igler, this rarely seen slice of Americana will appeal to the collector, woodworker, student of American history, or anyone who just likes to take a seat."

[See also: http://issuu.com/papress/docs/we_sit_together ]
shakers  furniture  franciscape  religion  protest  benches  wood  aaronigler  books 
november 2013 by robertogreco
jay nelson
[via: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=me5oTPhITOA ]

"Directing an Experience

I’m interested in architectural forms because of the weight they carry in our lives. on the most basic level they provide us with a safe place to rest and think but they also determine the way we interact with each other and create a frame for the outside world. Arranging the pieces of a structure is infinite and those arrangements make us who we are.

While working through projects I have come to consider the different pieces of a structure, how these parts are arranged and what they represent. A window is a way of directing a persons gaze towards a view or an idea I want to share. I use Furniture to influence interaction with a space an art work or another person. The roof and walls encourage privacy, intimacy and inwardness. lighting draws the gaze.

In a museum a bench is placed in front of a painting. It is a visual cue telling the person to stop and sit this distance from the artwork. The bench may be just as important as the painting in evoking an experience. This gesture was the starting point for my current work. Typically a painter makes a painting for a structure but why not make a structure for a painting.

The objective in my work is using structures to direct an experience . Sometimes I’m directing an experience for my self like with my mobile structures and dwellings and other times Im directing an experience for an audience.

My work is project based, for an exhibit I come up with a vision for the the whole show and then build the elements as one piece, which means as a painter the paintings and then the structure that holds the paintings. If I'm building a mobile structure or dwelling its designed around an experience I plan to have, a trip I will take or time I will spend in a structure."
jaynelson  wood  forts  art  artists  treehouses  sanfrancisco  outersunset  sfsh  classideas  sunsetdistrict 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Glimpt
"We decided we wanted to help them develop a more modern series of furniture. After having visited several villages and different cooperatives in the Andes we finally settled on Yungay as the village where we would set to work. In Yungay there was a little cooperative that worked with furniture making. During our visits we were impressed by their very high standards of craftsmanship and above all by the skill of the people who carved pictures in wood.

So day after day of soup followed by fried guinea-pigs and washed down with Inca Cola finally lead to the production of a series of coffee tables called Prehistoric Aliens. Our main difficulty was not a shortage of good ideas but rather the language barrier. Neither of us spoke any Spanish but we were faced with a situation where this was the only possible language for communication. The first few weeks we had been helped by our American friend Nick, but after a while we had to manage by ourselves. After keen language practice on the computer every evening, and getting a lot of hands on experience every day in the workshops, we finally managed to make some Spanish sounding words and were rewarded with the nicknames Gordo and Chato (Chubby and Shorty) by our fellow workers."

[via: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1672896/swedish-design-and-peruvian-craft-meet-as-prehistoric-aliens ]
design  craft  sweden  furniture  artisans  wood  woodworking  perú 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Traditional Turning on Vimeo
"During the past 20 years Robin Wood has produced and sold over 30,000 wooden plates and bowls from his small workshop nestled into a Peak District hillside. Creating items for everyday use and making a living from his work as a craftsman is a fundamental principle underpinning Robin's working lifestyle. He seems very happy with the path he has chosen but his activities are not restricted to wood turning.

Robin is also Chairman of the Heritage Craft Association heritagecrafts.org.uk, is featured in many television craft programmes, and shares his skills and knowledge with others by running classes in bowl turning and spoon carving. He also writes a very interesting and informative craft blog. greenwood-carving.blogspot.co.uk
Dave and Lynwen went along to see him turn a bowl. artisanco.com "

[via: http://kottke.org/12/11/stay-small-or-go-big ]
bowlturning  weather  studios  workshops  tradition  2012  robinwood  bowls  plates  turning  small  slow  simple  making  eating  food  wood  craft 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Pruned: The 25-Year Riverine Journey of a Wooden Boulder Carved out of a Felled 200-Year-Old Oak Tree
"Beginning in 1978, when a spherical chunk of oak got lodged in a stream as he was moving it to his studio, the sculptor David Nash has documented its long riverine journey.

“For 25 years,” Nash writes, “I have followed its engagement with the weather, gravity and the seasons. It became a stepping-stone into the drama of physical geography. Spheres imply movement and initially I helped it to move, but after a few years I observed it only intervening when absolutely necessary - when it became wedged under a bridge.”

The journey is so extraordinary — made more so perhaps by the fact that it's so well-documented — that we can't help but quote the rest of Nash's accounts:…"
theelements  water  tides  dwyryd  rivers  landscape  wood  nature  motion  movement  time  davidnash  art 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Tom Sachs: Working to Code
"HOW TO SWEEP
Part 1 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kt-VlZpz-8E

"LOVE LETTER TO PLYWOOD
Part 2 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVxldyIa0Bg

"SPACE CAMP
Part 3 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-jSSTGqU5c

"COLOR
THE COMPREHENSIVE COLOR CODE
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2011"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBM_9W_e_D4

"TEN BULLETS
THE STUDIO MANUAL
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2010"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49p1JVLHUos

10 Bullets, INTRO
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28reJVNLk80

10 Bullets, #1: "WORK TO CODE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAIYVmRCX-Q

10 Bullets, #2: "SACRED SPACE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1GL4JT0sa4

10 Bullets, #3: "BE ON TIME"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6pUonbzPLU

10 Bullets, #4: "BE THOROUGH"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-gVtV67Gnc

10 Bullets, #5: "I UNDERSTAND"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGn84iuBdHw

10 Bullets, #6: "SENT DOES NOT MEAN RECEIVED"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n06LcXljbM

10 Bullets, #7: "KEEP A LIST"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRl1WOzo1zg

10 Bullets, #8: "ALWAYS BE KNOLLING"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-CTkbHnpNQ

10 Bullets, #9: "SACRIFICE TO LEATHERFACE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8heORFuGOY

10 Bullets, #10: "PERSISTENCE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDbJQoEjfbo
studios  work  2010  2012  howwework  tenbullets  tomsachs  video  art  color  space  wood  plywood  sweeping  vanneistat  2011  knolling  persistence  lists  listmaking  confirmation  understanding  thoroughness  time  punctuality  code 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Hanauchi-ya renovation project by Tadashi Yoshimura Architects | Spoon & Tamago
"Late last year Tadashi Yoshimura Architects ended a year-long renovation project of Hanauchi-ya, a 200-year old wooden home located in Nara prefecture, about an hour out of central Osaka. Despite undergoing what was thought to be several thoughtless prior renovations and decades of water damage, the plan – all along – was to reuse existing materials as much as possible. As expected, this proved to be a technical nightmare with recurring surprises (“oh look, another wall behind the wall we just tore down”) making it virtually impossible for the architects to ever leave the site.

But look at those results! The seamlessness between old and new materials makes it feel like we’ve been transported back to the 1800s. There are some fascinating pictures of the process up on the architect’s blog. Of note, these pictures of taking reclaimed mud and using it to make walls."
osaka  tadashiyoshimura  renovation  preservation  history  wood  design  japan  architecture  homes 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Nau : The Thought Kitchen » The Signal Shed
"If you look for it, you might not see it. Rising high above Wallowa Lake…Eastern Oregon sits the award-winning Signal Shed—a 130-square-foot modern mountain outpost. Built with mostly recycled materials, the outbuilding is simple in detail, yet beautiful in design: recaptured wood siding is stained dark to help the shed blend into the natural landscape. Cedar shutters protect the windows and secure the interior in the winter. A large, sliding barn door opens to create an outdoor living space. And the entire structure is built on floating piers to lessen its impact.

It’s the ultimate expression of minimalism…Its simple beauty, low-impact design and effortless utilitarianism…

To get a closer look, we decided, with some stealthy sleuthing, to track down its mastermind—Ryan Lingard. The Portland architect was more than willing to sit down with us and share his insight into his process of sustainable design, off-the-grid building, and how he did it all for under $10k."

[See also: http://www.rlingard.com/ AND http://www.rlingard.com/index.php?/build/signal-shed/ AND http://signal-shed.com/home.html ]
oregon  homes  houses  tinyhouses  glvo  ryanlingard  architecture  design  wood  signalshed  cabins 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Designing and Building a New Desk - The Cheap Geek
"This lead me down a path of designing and building my own desk while tying to keep it under 150$. I initially drew up a design in Google sketchup, a great free 3D modeling application, and slowly began tweaking it. My initial design requirements consisted of a very thin top somewhere between 1"-2" supported by two sawhorses. I also needed the ability to get power and Ethernet to the machine without seeing any cabling. I settled on the following design."

[via: http://bettertastethansorry.com/2011/03/desk/ ]
desks  furniture  studio  design  diy  howto  wood  glvo 
april 2011 by robertogreco
2009/10/03 - The Minister's Tree House - a set on Flickr
"I had about half a day to adventure. Alexis and I drove out Calfkiller highway to check potential places for a cleanup. The road was narrow, winding and without a shoulder. It was also relatively clean. Probably not the best place to adopt.

From there we headed east to Cumberland County and found our way to the tree house. And since we were right there we went to Stonehaus and enjoyed a free wine tasting. It was a nice morning. :-)"
tennessee  treehouses  homes  buildings  wood  assemblage  glvo 
december 2010 by robertogreco
AraucoPly Mueblería, Arauco | Plataforma Arquitectura
"Este mes Arauco nos presenta AraucoPly Mueblería, un tablero de terciado en el que se van alternando chapas de madera en forma perpendicular al sentido de las fibras con una excelente construcción interior, obteniendo un tablero de alta resistencia, cuya cuidada terminación lo hacen excelente para las aplicaciones en interiores, diseño y mueblería.<br />
<br />
AraucoPly Mueblería es un tablero que casi no presenta nudos, y que tiene la ventaja de poder ser intervenido, pintado o barnizado fácilmente, lo que lo hace muy versátil."
wood  chile  design  furniture  plywood 
november 2010 by robertogreco
AraucoPly Mueblería, Arauco | Plataforma Arquitectura
"Este mes Arauco nos presenta AraucoPly Mueblería, un tablero de terciado en el que se van alternando chapas de madera en forma perpendicular al sentido de las fibras con una excelente construcción interior, obteniendo un tablero de alta resistencia, cuya cuidada terminación lo hacen excelente para las aplicaciones en interiores, diseño y mueblería.

AraucoPly Mueblería es un tablero que casi no presenta nudos, y que tiene la ventaja de poder ser intervenido, pintado o barnizado fácilmente, lo que lo hace muy versátil."
wood  chile  design  furniture  plywood 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Bike Shelf «
"While visiting many friends small apartments here in SF and more so in NY, I noticed that there is a void when it comes to elegant bike management. Bikes always get in the way – either in the hall, or leaning up against a bookshelf or something. So, I decided to design something to fix that problem. Until I think of a better name, I am calling it the Bike Shelf."
bikes  biking  design  furniture  wood  storage 
october 2010 by robertogreco
tor palm: south africa project
"as part of their final project from the carl malmsten furniture studies in stockholm, sweden tor and mattias of tor palm, wanted to utilize their woodworking skills and collaborate with
sweden  torpalm  stockholm  southafrica  design  furniture  wood  lighting  craftsmanship 
august 2010 by robertogreco
rintala eggertsson architects: library in thailand
"sami rintala of rintala eggertsson architects lead a group of NTNU trondheim university (norway) architect students on a social project. they worked together to build a two storey library building for safe haven orphanage in ban tha song yan village, thailand near the burma border for 42 children ranging in different ages.

the task was to utilize local materials and building techniques to create a building that would solve the problems of education in the orphanage in the most practical way. at the same time, the design also worked with the surrounding environment, with research on natural ventilation systems and sunshades completed and incorporated into the building. the structure was built from natural lava stone from the site, concrete bricks, wood and bamboo. the lower level of the library houses the books and a computer area while the upper level is more for lounging, play and enjoying the books.

the project was organized by tyin tegnestue, trondheim, norway and NTNU teacher hans skotte."

[See also: http://www.archdaily.com/30764/safe-haven-library-tyin-tegnestue/ ]
architecture  design  libraries  learning  lcproject  education  thailand  rintalaeggertsson  wood 
december 2009 by robertogreco
atelier tekuto: HG house
"japanese firm atelier tekuto have completed HG house in setagaya-ku. the concept of
wood  small  japan  architecture  design  homes  ateliertekuto 
november 2009 by robertogreco
performa hub
"presented by performa, performa hub is a special project located in the new cooper union building in new york’s bowery district. the performa hub was set up to serve as performa’s headquarters during their biennale and was specially designed by berlin-based nOffice. the project will serve duty as the press office, meeting room and a venue for special events. the design consists of an odd shaped room that serves multi-functions simultaneously. the walls have been clad in plywood panels, many of which have windows or alcoves hidden behind them for use during special activities. there is also an amphitheatre made of stepped wooden levels. the performa biennale runs until november 22."
lcproject  schooldesign  tcsnmy  performa  performahub  architecture  design  wood  plywood  nOffice  multipurpose  thirdplaces  glvo  performance  meetingplace  galleries  amphitheater  thirdspaces 
november 2009 by robertogreco
dass: tree house hotel
"the tree house hotel designed by dass is a small hideout in nature - a microspace placed
housing  treehouses  trees  wood  homes  architecture  design  small  smallhomes 
october 2009 by robertogreco
kumiko inui: small house h
"located in takasaki gunma, small house h is a private residence designed
homes  wood  japan  design  glvo  kumikoinui 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Inhabitat » Ladonia: A Micronation Made of Driftwood and Nails
"Looking for a change of scenery? Consider moving to Ladonia, a micronation made up of driftwood, nails, and nine-story wooden “fortresses” located in the southwest corner of Sweden. Designed by Lars Vilks, the mock nation consists of two works of art: Nimis, a maze of 70 tons of driftwood and nails, and Arx, a stone and concrete sculpture that looks like a melting sandcastle." [see also: http://www.ladonia.net/]
art  ladonia  micronations  sweden  wood  sculpture  glvo 
august 2009 by robertogreco
jarmund/vigsnaes architecture: farm house
"located in toten, norway this farm house by jarmund/vigsnaes architecture echoes the materials and design
homes  wood  norway  design  architecture 
june 2009 by robertogreco
tonoma architects: 'double house'
"japanese architect tsuyoshi of tonoma has sent us in images
homes  housing  design  architecture  japan  tonoma  wood  ventilation  lighting 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Carved Success: Sam Maloof's Handmade Life : NPR
"When Maloof was still struggling to support his family, he turned down several lucrative offers to mass-produce his furniture — on principle. The black sheep of the family who never went to college now has three honorary degrees."
handmade  glvo  craft  sammaloof  furniture  wood  california 
april 2009 by robertogreco
scott javier: fingerprint pavillion
"the substructure consists of catenary derived ribs fabricated from a double thickness of spruce ply.
architecture  wood  glvo  structures  construction  make  plywood 
april 2009 by robertogreco
atelier bow-wow: 'small case study house' at redcat gallery
"atelier bow-wow, the tokyo architecture studio led by yoshiharu tsukamoto
and momoyo kajima explores the use and function of space within urban environments.
bow-wow developed the term 'pet architecture'—a style of small, ad hoc, multi-functional
structures that make the most of limited space, a phenomenon in densely developed cities
like tokyo that integrate need, improvisation and ingenuity.

in its first solo U.S. exhibition, atelier bow-wow shows three microstructures that
collectively offer a contemporary spin on the idea of minimal low-cost housing.
'small case study house' consists of 'BBQ coliseum', a circular structure directed toward
oil can barbeques, 'sunset house' and 'hammock house', all of which are built with salvaged
wood from deconstructed homes in los angeles."
architecture  design  homes  casestudy  atelierbow-wow  wood  losangeles  japan 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Archinect : Features : ShowCase: Final Wooden House
"I wanted to create an ultimate wooden architecture. I thought through this bungalow, which can be considered as a small and primitive house, it was possible to do a primitive and simultaneously new architecture. 350mm square profile cedar is piled endlessly. At the end of the process appears a prototypical place before architecture became architecture."
architecture  design  homes  housing  wood  glvo  simplicity  small  japan 
october 2008 by robertogreco
View a Slideshow of the Wooden House in Ranón - Slideshows - dwell.com
"In their design for The House of Steel and Wood, Belinda Tato and Jose Luis Vallejo of ecosistema urbano incorporated both the natural landscape of Ranón—a small town in the Asturias province of Spain—and the area’s long history of agricultural ar
architecture  design  wood  homes  housing 
march 2008 by robertogreco
CTT Madera: El Centro de Transferencia Tecnológica de la Madera,
"CTT, fue creado el año 2001 por la Corporación Chilena de la Madera, CORMA, para fomentar el uso de la madera de Pino Radiata como material constructivo en el país y promover la existencia de productos de calidad."
architecture  wood  chile  materials 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Pulse Laser: Drawing Olinda
"Ward has developed a drawing process which he works through to explore and interrogate ideas. Here we used it to develop ideas around products. His position for understanding how a product can manifest begins with a framework that includes how objects re
bbc  design  drawing  hardware  jackschulze  mattwebb  productdesign  sketching  radio  wood  making  prototyping  schulzeandwebb  berg  berglondon 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Fun Forever » The Natural and the Man-made co-existing side by side
"The use of wood for every surface, from the floor, walls and roof gives to the house cohesion with the forest. The Forest House created by F3 architectos is located in Cachagua, Chile."
chile  housing  homes  architecture  design  green  wood 
august 2007 by robertogreco
James Murphy Design
"Flight Deck cocktail table American black walnut slabs with hand rubbed lacquer."
design  furniture  wood 
july 2007 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: Binary marble adding machine
"Matthias Wandel has the coolest project ever, a binary marble computer"
computers  math  make  diy  technology  toys  wood 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Click opera - Notes on Fujimori
"This sensitivity and whimsicality is how Japan can mark its difference from China. No to Brutalism! No to idiotic skyscrapers! No to economic standardization!"
architecture  japan  terunobufujimori  miyazaki  treehouses  homes  gardens  housing  wood  materials  organic  tradition  slow  exhibits  landscape 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Gangster who built world's tallest log cabin | International News | News | Telegraph
"Dominating the skyline of Arkhangelsk, a city in Russia's far north-west, it is believed to be the world's tallest wooden house, soaring 13 floors to reach 144ft - about half the size of the tower of Big Ben."
architecture  design  russia  wood  crime  cabins 
march 2007 by robertogreco

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