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Has the Internet Really Changed Everything? — Backchannel
[See also: http://kottke.org/16/04/on-technology-culture-and-growing-up-in-a-small-town ]

"How have decades of mass media and technology changed us? A writer returns to his remote hometown — once isolated, now connected. And finds unexpected answers."



"In the Napoleon of the 1980s, where I memorized the alphabet and mangled my first kiss, distractions were few. There were no malls to loiter, no drags to cruise. With no newsstand or bookstore, information was sparse. The only source of outside knowledge was the high school library, a room the size of a modest apartment, which had subscriptions to exactly five magazines: Sports Illustrated, Time, Newsweek, U.S. News & World Report, and People. As a teenager, these five magazines were my only connection to the outside world.

Of course, there was no internet yet. Cable television was available to blessed souls in far-off cities, or so we heard, but it did not arrive in Napoleon until my teens, and even then, in a miniaturized grid of 12 UHF channels. (The coax would transmit oddities like WGN and CBN, but not cultural staples like HBO or Nickelodeon. I wanted my MTV in vain.) Before that, only the staticky reception of the big three — ABC, CBS, NBC — arrived via a tangle of rabbit ears. By the time the PBS tower boosted its broadcast reach to Napoleon, I was too old to enjoy Sesame Street.

Out on the prairie, pop culture existed only in the vaguest sense. Not only did I never hear the Talking Heads or Public Enemy or The Cure, I could never have heard of them. With a radio receiver only able to catch a couple FM stations, cranking out classic rock, AC/DC to Aerosmith, the music counterculture of the ’80s would have been a different universe to me. (The edgiest band I heard in high school was The Cars. “My Best Friend’s Girl” was my avant-garde.)

Is this portrait sufficiently remote? Perhaps one more stat: I didn’t meet a black person until I was 16, at a summer basketball camp. I didn’t meet a Jewish person until I was 18, in college.

This was the Deep Midwest in the 1980s. I was a pretty clueless kid."



"“Basically, this story is a controlled experiment,” I continue. “Napoleon is a place that has remained static for decades. The economics, demographics, politics, and geography are the same as when I lived here. In the past twenty-five years, only one thing has changed: technology.”

Photog2 begins to fiddle with an unlit Camel Light, which he clearly wants to go smoke, even if it is 8 degrees below zero outside. But I am finding the rhythm of my pitch.

“All scientific experiments require two conditions: a static environment and a control — a testable variable that changes. Napoleon is the static environment; technology, the control. With all else being equal, this place is the perfect environment to explore societal questions like, What are the effects of mass communications? How has technology transformed the way we form ideas? Does access to information alone make us smarter?”

“How am I supposed to photograph that?” asks Photog2."



"As we discuss other apps on his home screen — YouTube, eBay, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo — I realize that my line of questions are really just attempts to prove or disprove a sentence that I read on the flight to Dakota. The sentence appears on page 20 of Danah Boyd’s book, It’s Complicated, a study of the social lives of networked teens:
What the drive-in was to teens in the 1950s and the mall was in the 1980s, Facebook, texting, Twitter, instant messaging, and other social media are to teens now.

I cannot shake the sentence, which seems to contain between its simple words a secret key, a cipher to crack my inquiries into technology and change. Napoleon didn’t have a drive-in in the 1950s, or a mall in the 1980s, but today it definitely has the same social communications tools used by every kid in the country. By that fact alone, the lives of teenagers in Napoleon must be wildly different than they were 20 years ago. But I lack the social research finesse of Boyd, who could probably interrogate my thesis about technology beyond anecdote. So I change the topic to something I know much better: television."



"Whether with sanguine fondness or sallow regret, all writers remember their first publishing experience — that moment when an unseen audience of undifferentiated proportion absorbs their words from unknown locales.
I remember my first three.

Napoleon had no school newspaper, and minimal access to outside media, so I had no conception of “the publishing process.” Pitching an idea, assigning a story, editing and rewriting — all of that would have baffled me. I had only ever seen a couple of newspapers and a handful of magazines, and none offered a window into its production. (If asked, I would have been unsure if writers were even paid, which now seems prescient.) Without training or access, but a vague desire to participate, boredom would prove my only edge. While listlessly paging through the same few magazines over and over, I eventually discovered a semi-concealed backdoor for sneaking words onto the hallowed pages of print publications: user-generated content.

That’s the ghastly term we use (or avoid using) today for non-professional writing submitted by readers. What was once a letter to the editor has become a comment; editorials, now posts. The basic unit persists, but the quantity and facility have matured. Unlike that conspicuous “What’s on your mind?” input box atop Facebook, newspapers and magazines concealed interaction with readers, reluctant of the opinions of randos. But if you were diligent enough to find the mailing address, often sequestered deep in the back pages, you could submit letters of opinion and other ephemera.

This was publishing to me. My collected works were UGC."



"“What are your favorite apps?”

This time my corny question is fielded by Katelyn, another student who my mother suggests will make a good subject for my harebrained experiment. During her study hall break, we discuss the hectic life of a millennial teenager on the plains. She is already taking college-level courses, lettering in three varsity sports, and the president of the local FFA chapter. (That’s Future Farmers of America, an agricultural youth organization with highly competitive livestock judging and grain grading contests. It’s actually a huge deal in deep rural America, bigger than the Boy and Girl Scouts. Katelyn won the state competition in Farm Business Management category.)

To the app question, she recites the universals of any contemporary young woman: Snapchat, Instagram, Pinterest. She mentions The Skimm as a daily news source, which is intriguing, but not as provocative as her next remark: “I don’t have Facebook.”

Whoa, why?

“My parents don’t support social media,” says the 18-year-old. “They didn’t want me to get Facebook when I was younger, so I just never signed up.” This is closer to the isolationist Napoleon that I remember. They might not ban books anymore, but parents can still be very protective.

“How do you survive without Facebook?” I ask. “Do you wish you had it?”

“I go back and forth,” she avers. “It would be easier to connect with people I’ve met through FFA and sports. But I’m also glad I don’t have it, because it’s time-consuming and there’s drama over it.”

She talks like a 35-year-old. So I ask who she will vote for.

“I’m not sure. I like how Bernie Sanders is sounding.”

I tell her a story about a moment in my junior civics class where the teacher asked everyone who was Republican to raise their hand. Twenty-five kids lifted their palms to the sky. The remaining two students called themselves Independents. “My school either had zero Democrats or a few closeted ones,” I conclude.

She is indifferent to my anecdote, so I change the topic to music.

“I listen to older country,” she says. “Garth Brooks, George Strait.” The term “older country” amuses me, but I resist the urge to ask her opinion of Jimmie Rodgers. “I’m not a big fan of hardcore rap or heavy metal,” she continues. “I don’t understand heavy metal. I don’t know why you would want to listen to it.”

So no interest in driving three hours in the snow to see AC/DC at the Fargodome last night?

“No, I just watched a couple Snapchat stories of it.”

Of course she did.

While we talk, a scratchy announcement is broadcast over the school-wide intercom. A raffle drawing ticket is being randomly selected. I hear Jaden’s name announced as the winner of the gigantic teddy bear in my mother’s office.
I ask Katelyn what novel she read as a sophomore, the class year that The Catcher in the Rye was banned from my school. When she says Fahrenheit 451, I feel like the universe has realigned for me in some cosmic perfection.

But my time is running out, and again I begin to wonder whether she is proving or disproving my theories of media and technology. It’s difficult to compare her life to mine at that age. Katelyn is undoubtedly more focused and mature than any teenager I knew in the ’80s, but this is the stereotype of all millennials today. Despite her many accomplishments, she seems to suppress the hallmark characteristic of her ambitious generation: fanatic self-regard. Finally, I ask her what she thinks her life will be like in 25 years.

“I hope I’ll be married, and probably have kids,” she says decisively. “I see myself in a rural area. Maybe a little bit closer to Bismarck or Fargo. But I’m definitely in North Dakota.”

I tell her that Jaden gave essentially the same answer to the question. Why do you think that is?

“The sense of a small community,” she says, using that word again. “Everyone knows each other. It’s a big family.”"
internet  technology  rexsorgatz  2016  isolation  cv  web  online  culture  distraction  media  film  music  quietude  publishing  writing  worldliness  rural  howwelive  thenandnow  change  community  smalltowns  schools  education  journalism  books  censorship  fahrenheit451  raybradbury  thecatcherintherye  jdsalinger  newspapers  communication  socialmedia  snapchat  facebook  instagram  pinterest  theskimm  news  danahboyd  youtube  ebay  yahoo  twitter  videogames  gaming  subcultures  netflix  teens  youth  connectivity  childhood  college  universities  highered  highereducation  midwest  television  tv  cable  cabletv  cosmopolitanism  urban  urbanism  interneturbanism  1980s  northdakota  homogeneity  diversity  apclasses  aps  religion  ethnicity  race  exposure 
april 2016 by robertogreco
The Secret Lives of Tumblr Teens | New Republic
"In the dark ages—the 1980s, ’90s, or even the early 2000s—kids had to wait for nerd camp to be among their own kind. Wong told me if he’s up at 4 a.m. after a bad day, he can go online and talk to his Australian friends; Tumblr users know their audience is active in multiple time zones. Powerful users send a joke ricocheting around the globe.

“Tumblr culture has developed over the past five years as the smart weird kid in school connected with all the other smart weird kids from all the other schools all over the world,” said Strle. This brand of Tumblr humor often focuses on what I think of as micro-humiliations, tiny moments of social awkwardness that can feel absolutely crushing for a teenager figuring out how to be a person in the world. Anonymous kids with witty user names like Larsvontired or Baracknobama post incisive one-liners confessing their most vulnerable moments of social mortification. Sometimes those one-liners spread across continents, tweaked by thousands of other teens who add their own jokes as they reblog the original. The very best tweaks spread further, reblogged again and again, reappearing periodically in the feed, disconnected from time. Some posts get more than a million notes—imagine a joke whispered in biology class getting a laugh from a city the size of San Francisco.

“Increasingly, the lingua franca is absurdist dada,” explained Strle, usually rendered in the uncapitalized and unpunctuated casualness of instant messages.

A decade of trend pieces has deemed millennials to be narcissists, but Tumblr humor for this generation is self-deprecating and anti-aspirational: “how do fourteen year olds get pregnant, I can’t even get a high five from a guy,” “how many eye contact until date,” “i just said hi to someone and they didn’t hear me i’m never trying that again.” There is more self-loathing than self-love (“*looks in a mirror* you again”) as well as pleas for clemency from social prison (“you like attention? how dare you. how dare anyone like being loved”). Being a social outcast can make you a better social observer of the gap between our real selves and our public image:
two types of chats

group chat: lol look at this meme you pieces of shit

private chat: i don’t know anymore. im hoping that someday i’ll just know what to do. sorry for complaining and thanks for always listening to me

When this post appeared in my feed, I sent it to several friends who use a group chat at work: “How do they know?” A friend in media with a Twitter following in the tens of thousands responded: “That teen observation is PENETRATING.” We spent several minutes analyzing the joke. “People think other people are impressed by voicey cynicism in the public square,” he added. “But in private we’re all really nice and anxious”—the essential divide between Twitter users and Tumblr users."




"Two months after the termination of the Tumblr teens, Fast Company ran a puff piece on Dennis Hegstad and his empire. “He’s not just tweeting for fun; he’s tweeting for big money—and he’s winning,” the magazine wrote. “In Hegstad’s model, clients are charged a fee for services that include affiliate marketing, lead generation, and content distribution. In other words, getting the goods in front of the right kind of eyeballs. Campaigns run as high as six figures.” By then, many of Exposely’s sources of revenue had disappeared. A remaining campaign peddled sunglasses whose lenses supposedly worked like an Instagram filter.

Lilley and Greenfield said Hegstad had promised them equity in Exposely, and Hegstad confirmed they’d discussed both equity and becoming partners, but the company’s future was uncertain. Exposely still exists, and Hegstad is listed as the founder on its web site, but the day I talked to him the site was down—its security certificate had expired. Hegstad agreed Exposely was the apparent reason several blogs were terminated and that users associated with the site were still at risk. “A lot of the Tumblr bloggers who were using Exposely a year ago that haven’t used it in almost a year have lost their blogs.” "
tumblr  culture  teens  youth  online  web  socialmedia  2016  elspethreeve  spam  internet  exposely  exposure  attention  advertising  adsense  so-relatable  money  yahoo  relatability 
february 2016 by robertogreco
more than 95 theses - Things I Hate about Tumblr
"A partial list:

1. Tumblr Radar on the Dashboard

2. Recommended Blogs on the Dashboard

3. Occasional promoted content on the website

4. Constant promoted content on the iOS app

5. When I try to post something using the Tumblr bookmarklet on Chrome, I can’t resize the posting window: when I drag it to the size I want, it instantly resizes itself

6. Once I get something posted, instead of a simple confirmation message I get an outrageously, violently animated image of celebration, complete with falling confetti and a leaping avatar, as though I’ve just won the lottery

7. Significantly inconsistent posting behavior among (a) the website, (b) the iOS app, © the share-sheet in iOS — for instance, the iOS app doesn’t recognize Markdown

I just don’t know whether I can put up with this crap any more. There’s so much of it."

[And a response from Naum Trifanoff https://twitter.com/naum/status/617076055547883520 +
http://azspot.net/post/123143841390/things-i-hate-about-tumblr :

"Permit me to add:

1. Total bookmarklet failure for an increasing number of sites – when you click on the bookmarklet bar tab and the resultant dialog panel containing url info and highlighted text never returns. Then, I must close that tab, open up a browser tab, and manually fill in a post with all the details. Sort of defeats the raison d'être for Tumblr.

2. The act of reblogging is a far more complex one than simply posting a link or quote – often, your post type is restricted, and then there is addendum content added that grows ever more tricky to format or suppress. I dare say that Tumblr reblogging is more laborious than creating a simple blog post.

3. Default dashboard view doesn’t show my Tumblr blogs. Yes, they’re accessible from a menu pulldown, so this probably falls into the category of minor nitpicking.

4. Search, though it has improved in recent months. [Yes, it has improved. Very much so!]

5. “Activity” dashboard panel is nice, but it could be a lot more useful. Also, when you have ~100K followers, the “Latest Notes” scroll is not very useful – a simple filter where I could just see where somebody added text (or content) instead of just all the likes and reblogs would be awesome.

I suppose we all should be thankful and celebrate that since moving to the online place where things go to die, nevertheless, Tumblr is still chugging along." ]

[My responses to Alan:

"@ayjay I've got #8 (related to #7) for you, right from your post. Tumblr thinking it’s smarter than it is. pic.twitter.com/lI7MTSYzto "
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/617063344000733184

"Also noting that the markdown editor struggles with > for blockquotes. It works, but open again to edit & they revert to ASCII codes."
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/617063915353079808

Additional notes:

- I'm nowhere near quitting, but Alan's #7 (and the wonkiness of the Markdown editor, which I have abandoned for the rich text editor and its own problems) really wastes a lot of my time.

- My version of the iOS app (an old one since I'm stuck in iOS6) is nowhere near as bad as the version Alan is running, doesn't even show promoted content.

- I haven't used the bookmarklet but for a handful of times in the last few years precisely because of the problems mentioned above. I guess that's why my complaints are fewer — through my workflow, I've abandoned parts of Tumblr slowly over times and that leaves me with a narrower view of features that mostly work.

- Of what he notes, Naum's #2 is the one that gets me the most. I think this is related to the broken editors (Markdown, rich text, and even HTML). ]
tumblr  interface  markdown  alanjacobs  2015  yahoo  bookmarklets  naumtrifanoff 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Beyond alt-text — Medium
"There’s a wave of new senior corporate positions in accessible technology. But who can they hire?"



"The challenge is not technological, it’s psychological. I am a big believer in the infinite possibilities inherent in innovative thinking applied to advanced mechanical and computing sciences. But first and foremost, those who shape our digital world have to wrap their brains around the fact that not everyone is shaped like them, moves like them, perceives the world like them. Deep and lasting impressions about human diversity need to be made to alter the mindsets of all the creative links in the chain from invention to fabrication to implementation to marketing to sales to end users. One little “oh, I never thought of that” can derail the entire process of making the next big thing great for everyone."



"The challenge is not technological, it’s psychological. I am a big believer in the infinite possibilities inherent in innovative thinking applied to advanced mechanical and computing sciences. But first and foremost, those who shape our digital world have to wrap their brains around the fact that not everyone is shaped like them, moves like them, perceives the world like them. Deep and lasting impressions about human diversity need to be made to alter the mindsets of all the creative links in the chain from invention to fabrication to implementation to marketing to sales to end users. One little “oh, I never thought of that” can derail the entire process of making the next big thing great for everyone."



"Yahoo is searching for two front-end mobile and web engineers — with strong backgrounds in online accessibility. That’s the rub. We need experienced staff who can guide the company’s developers and speak their language and who are steeped in assistive and accessible technology. While we could bring on a great engineer and give them on-the-job training on the various web and mobile accessibility standards, techniques and tools, that just won’t work for us. These new hires need to know more than the existing accessibility team and teach us what’s new and what’s next. This is the kind of knowledge universities should be adding to their design and engineering curricula. And it’s not just Yahoo — every Silicon Valley company is on the hunt for just these kinds of candidates."



"And, if the dreams of many of us in the field can be realized, colleges and universities will eventually be offering specializations or minors or even majors in Inclusive Design or Accessible Technology within their computer science and design departments. We’re working on it."
sarahendren  2015  larrygoldberg  yahoo  microsoft  at&t  ibm  technology  accessibility  apple  flickr  video  online  internet  curriculum 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The apparent difficulty of living in my head, freelancing, working for large organisations and then descending in to paranoia. |
"So that’s where I am now. Toughing it out in the freelance world, sometimes turning down opportunities because I can’t reconcile my own feelings while at the same time running out of money and wondering if it’s more or less morally responsible to make sure my kids get fed vs working for an org where I’d feel uncomfortable."



"So I mistrust the government, home office and civil service, fine. I don’t need to go anywhere near them. I don’t think I’m going to end up in a position of being asked to A/B test the message on the side of the Home Office van.

I’m also not really a nail that’s standing out the furtherest.

But what happens, and this is something I probably do have the opportunity to mess around with, if I start getting all anti the Cameron Internet Firewall, and I get involved with building a secure decentralised news distrubution channel? What happens in 10 years time, when someone turns up and says… “You should see some of the things your son has been doing in private on the internet, maybe you want to come and help us?“, although of course that sounds stupid.

Here’s another ridiculous one, “Wouldn’t it be such a shame if your daughter was bullied, in just the way Cameron’s firewall was going to prevent but you opposed, and we all know how bullying can end”

Like, anything my family do on the internet could be used against me. How utterly foolish to think that could ever happen, obviously it won’t!

The chilling effect is basically me going “fuck it” and getting out of tech altogether. It’s a bit hard saying “Don’t be evil” when they’re twisting the arm of someone you love… and fortunately there’s been no examples of that kind of thing going on, so I bet we’re all fine.

I’m getting that much closer to jacking it all in and becoming an artist.

Who honestly wants to be the next brilliant mind to go up against the government?

I’m even begining to believe that agency world working for big brands isn’t that particularly evil after all, well, as long as they pay taxes and decent wages to their works… ah, fuck it all."
revdancatt  2013  work  labor  tradeoffs  freelancing  employment  cv  purpose  privacy  internet  web  google  yahoo  flickr  independence  trust  business  capitalism 
august 2013 by robertogreco
i miss delicious.com
" Delicious is the Rome, Jerusalem, and Paris of my existence as an academic these days. It's where I make my friends, how I get the news, and where I go to trade. All this from a little server that does nothing but share bookmarks in public.
...For two years I've been using Delicious as an information organizer. It's produced an impressive encyclopedia of the most interesting information, images, articles, citations, books, and subjects on the internet to which I might want to refer. Consider my dissertation tag, under which are a wide variety of online images and Google books that I'll be using for my research. Not only can I come back to them, but I can also find related subjects—dissertation material related to walking—and navigate seamlessly from one to another. As an improvement on the index card system—or on my own terrifying piles of articles, even now ornamenting my bookshelf, or even on the folders within folders within folders of word documents—this represents a definite improvement."

"There is nothing like Delicious out there in terms of an community for finding grass-roots curators and beholding their careful, discerning brilliance over time.  Not twitter, where we all snark meaninglessly; not tumblr, which buries precious information beneath a flood; not Zotero, where it's nearly impossible to browse strangers or follow them from afar.  

In the end, I don't care that the people were more reliable than Yahoo, or that corporate America destroyed my intellectual commons.  I miss you, Delicious.  Give me my library back."

[More: https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308703279855058944 and https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308679134744293376 and others]
joguldi  research  del.icio.us  socialbookmarking  community  twitter  zotero  intellectualcommons  2013  libraries  yahoo  data  privacy  connectivism  collectivism  folksonomy  tags  tagging  learning 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Maps, Maps And MOAR Maps At The Society Of Cartographers And Expedia | Gary's Bloggage
"History has a habit of repeating itself and so does the map. From primitive scratchings, through ever more sumptuous pieces of art, through to authoritative geographical representations, the map changes throughout history. Maps speak of the hopes, dreams and prejudices of their creators and audience alike, and with the advent of neogeography and neocartography, maps are again as much art as they are geographical information.

... will that do?"
noaa  bigdata  data  exploration  aaronstraupcope  flickr  googlemaps  bingmaps  agi  osm  openstreetmap  yahoo  nokia  geography  stamen  mattbiddulph  garygale  2012  history  neocartography  mapping  maps 
september 2012 by robertogreco
gilest.org: In defence of Flickr
"The thing with Flickr (and I say this as a declared Flickr lover) isn't that it is no longer awesome (because it most definitely is), but that it is no longer fashionable.

The web has matured a lot in recent years, to the point where websites have become brands. Brands that can advertise and market themselves, brands that work hard to influence the minds of the younger internet users. The brands want to lure people in with the promise of free stuff and social networks, in return for personal information. Which of course, having grown up with Facebook, many of today's teens and 20-somethings are perfectly happy to give away.

I know I probably sound like a moaning old grandad at this point, but: Flickr has never been like that. It offered a service, in exchange for money. That's a tried and tested way of doing things. It worked very well before the internet came along, and there's no reason why it shouldn't continue to work now.

And what a service it offer…"
gilesturnbull  marissamayer  instagram  yahoo  photography  services  2012  flickr 
august 2012 by robertogreco
gilest.org: In defence of Flickr
"Flickr costs money, which makes it less fashionable than sites that claim to offer more for nothing. But to me, Flickr is the better choice. It has never stopped being awesome. Long may its awesomeness continue."
flickr  photography  photos  yahoo  marissamayer  gilesturnbull  2012  via:Preoccupations  payment 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Millsin' About
[on Evening Edition http://evening-edition.com/ ]

"In other words: stay at your “hyper-connected pieces of glass” (awful, stupid phrase) for long enough to entertain this dick’s attempt to fix journalism with a fucking newsletter on the web (and then to follow him on TWITTER, FAST WEB STYLE), but then step away and go get some artisanal whatever in your cool shirt, you jerk.

What kind of myopia could make this seem interesting? What I hate most about this tech scene: the cronyism. If Yahoo launched this, it would be LOL City, but because it’s a twat Gruber likes (part of the Twat x Twat network of Twatcasting or whatever), we have to pretend this is real?"
twatcasting  cronyism  yahoo  design  muledesign  daringfireball  johngruber  2012  millsbaker  eveningedition 
july 2012 by robertogreco
How Yahoo Killed Flickr and Lost the Internet
"Flickr is still very valuable. It has a massive database of geotagged, Creative Commons- and Getty-licensed, subject-tagged photos. But sadly, Yahoo's steady march of incompetence doesn't bode well for making use of these valuable properties. If the Internet really were a series of tubes, Yahoo would be the leaking sewage pipe, covering everything it comes in contact with in watered-down shit.

Flickr's last best hope is that Yahoo realizes its value and decides to spin it off for a few bucks before both drop down into a final death spiral. But even if that happens, Flickr has a long road ahead of it to relevance. People don't tend to come back to homes they've already abandoned."
instagram  facebook  2012  mathonan  photography  yahoo  flickr 
may 2012 by robertogreco
YouTube - Disruptive Heroes, Caterina Fake
Caterina covers several topics as she talks about hacking the organization and ‘going rogue’: intrinsic motivation, passion, conformism, control, schools, learning, entrepreneurship, organizations, systems, leadership, etc.
caterinafake  entrepreneurship  unschooling  deschooling  education  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  management  administration  leadership  passion  goingrogue  organizations  hierarchy  bureaucracy  schools  conformism  control  systems  hacking  hackdays  yahoo  flickr  hunch  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  disruption  innovation 
june 2011 by robertogreco
How to Get Around the New York Times Paywall
"But with a few extra steps, users can still access the NYT’s content for free. The company still wants to drive readers back to its Web site via search engines and social media like Twitter and Facebook. This being the case, visits generated from third-party sources, like Google or Bing or Twitter, don’t count off on your 20 monthly views.

That means one could easily go to the front page or the section pages, find a headline they want to read and copy and paste it into Google. This would count only as a Google-driven source. The same works for the Wall Street Journal and Financial Times.

The company added, “There will, however, be a five-article limit a day for people who visit the site from Google.” Notably, the site didn’t mention Bing, Yahoo, or other search engines. It follows, then, that you could exhaust five referred visits from as many search engines as there are out there. Just get a little creative."
nytimes  paywall  twitter  bing  google  workarounds  2011  search  yahoo  frugalweb  web  online 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Anatomy of a Crushing (Pinboard Blog)
"A number of people asked about the technical aspects of the great Delicious exodus of 2010, and I've finally had some time to write it up."
pinboard  scaling  performance  infrastructure  servers  del.icio.us  migration  yahoo  2010  2011  maciejceglowski  bookmarks  bookmarking  maciejcegłowski 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Google Unveils Delicious Bookmark Importer
"Google has just rolled out a convenient new tool for importing your Delicious bookmarks to Google Bookmarks.<br />
The simple importer takes your Delicious login credentials (or lets you use a one-click OAuth button) and imports all your bookmarks, preserving labels or tags.<br />
Considering Google’s rather broad reach as a company, the importer is likely more than just a friendly bid for more Google Bookmarks users.<br />
Bookmarks was launched in 2005, but it’s never been a huge hit — or a money maker — for the company. Last year, Google launched Lists for Bookmarks, a more social feature for bookmarking that put the product into direct competition with Yahoo’s Delicious. At the time, Delicious founder Joshua Schachter was still a Google employee."
google  bookmarking  bookmarks  yahoo  del.icio.us  utilities 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Delicious's Data Policy is Like Setting a Museum on Fire
"Yahoo! is going to shutter its social bookmarking service Delicious, the web learned today, and with it will sink an incredibly valuable source of collectively curated knowledge. You can easily export your own bookmarks (no verdict yet where we should all meet up to import them to) but what if you want to export other peoples'? That's at least half the value of the service, socially curated discovery."
del.icio.us  yahoo  data  history  curation  curating  tags  tagging  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  2010  archives  loc  web2.0 
december 2010 by robertogreco
R.I.P. Delicious: You Were So Beautiful to Me
"It was beautiful. And now it's gone.<br />
<br />
The Library of Congress should have bought it, similar to the way it has now archived every Tweet ever tweeted.<br />
<br />
So much value. So unappreciated. So tragically lost. Where will we all gather next, where our bookmarks can be centralized for maximum network effect? Perhaps this story demonstrates that's not the right question to ask."
del.icio.us  social  yahoo  2010  readwriteweb  tags  tagging  value  cv  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Yahoo Builds the Nostradamus of Search Engines | Fast Company
"Bold predictions are made every day. We'll reduce our carbon emissions by 50% in 20 years, boast business leaders. No, make that 80% in 15 years. We'll cut the deficit in half by 2015, pandering politicians claim. That leaves us with dozens of conflicting estimates and ballpark figures that are soon forgotten. It's hard to hold experts to their predictions, but that could all change soon thanks to an experimental search engine from Yahoo.

Developed by the company's Barcelona research lab, Time Explorer is a search engine for the past, present, & future. Results are displayed on a timeline that stretches years back *& forward. Move your mouse over the future part of the timeline, & you get predictions for what was supposed to happen in that year from as much as 20 years ago. For example, the timeline for "North Korea" lets us know that the rogue state should have developed some 200 nuclear warheads--according to an inaccurate op-ed in the NY Times by Nicholas Kristof in 2004."
yahoo  search  future  past  present  predictions  2010  accuracy 
august 2010 by robertogreco
What Happened to Yahoo
"Why would great programmers want to work for a company that didn't have a hacker-centric culture, as long as there were others that did? I can imagine two reasons: if they were paid a huge amount, or if the domain was interesting and none of the companies in it were hacker-centric. Otherwise you can't attract good programmers to work in a suit-centric culture. And without good programmers you won't get good software, no matter how many people you put on a task, or how many procedures you establish to ensure "quality."

Hacker culture often seems kind of irresponsible. That's why people proposing to destroy it use phrases like "adult supervision." That was the phrase they used at Yahoo. But there are worse things than seeming irresponsible. Losing, for example."
paulgraham  hackers  entrepreneurship  yahoo  technology  startups  startup  management  media  programming  culture  business  google  history  software  hackerculture  facebook  markzuckerberg  tcsnmy  hiring  leadership  values  business-iness  lcproject  hierarchy 
august 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Blind Search
"Type in a search query above, hit search then vote for the column which you believe best matches your query. The columns are randomised with every query.
search  google  bing  microsoft  yahoo  searchengine  comparison  blind 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Sparrow - iPhone Location Updater for Fire Eagle and Twitter
"Sparrow is the simplest way to update your location on iPhone. With one tap, you can tell Fire Eagle and Twitter exactly where you are. No other iPhone app does so little, so well. Check-in with Sparrow, and get on with your life."
fireeagle  twitter  iphone  applications  geodata  yahoo  geolocation  mapping  geotagging  location  mobile  gps  via:preoccupations  ios 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Ping - At First, Funny Videos. Now, a Reference Tool. - NYTimes.com
"And now YouTube, conceived as a video hosting and sharing site, has become a bona fide search tool. Searches on it in the United States recently edged out those on Yahoo, which had long been the No. 2 search engine, behind Google. (Google, incidentally, owns YouTube.) In November, Americans conducted nearly 2.8 billion searches on YouTube, about 200 million more than on Yahoo, according to comScore."
youtube  search  yahoo  internet  online  information  research  media  millennials  education  informationliteracy  trends  culture 
january 2009 by robertogreco
smush it!
"Image optimization is an art that not many people master. There are many good image editing tools that allow us to get the best visual result for a certain file size but "under the hood" a lot more optimization can be done. Smushit.com is a service that goes beyond the limitations of Photoshop, Fireworks & Co. It uses image format specific non-lossy image optimization tools to squeeze the last bytes out of your images - without changing their look or visual quality. You'll get a report of how many bytes you can save by optimizing your images and all the changed images as a single zip for download."
webtools  onlinetoolkit  images  imageoptimization  yahoo  compression  optimization  webdesign  webdev  technology  performance 
october 2008 by robertogreco
What Getting Buzzed Says About Yahoo - GigaOM
"In a few hours, story...was viewed > 200,000 times...attracted > 350 comments...lot of traffic and a gigantic amount of engagement by Yahoo visitors...traffic sent our way by Yahoo was many times traffic we get from, say, Digg or StumbleUpon."
yahoo  web  yahoobuzz  internet  audience 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Yahoo Mail hopes to lure users with 'ymail.com' [and 'rocketmail.com'] | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
"Because "yourname@yahoo.com" is likely taken by now, a lot of people must resort to unpleasant and hard-to-remember addresses such as "yourname1988@yahoo.com." Yahoo wants to give people a new chance with a name they like. "
yahoo  email  identity 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Reputation Parent - Yahoo! Design Pattern Library
"A person participating in a social structure expects to develop a reputation and hopes for insight into the reputations of others, but each designed model of participation and reputation embodies its own set of biases and incentive structures. Balancing
patterns  reputation  yahoo  community  design  ux  social  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  abuse  blogosphere  collectiveintelligence  commenting  interaction  networking  trust  society  ratings  ranking  identity 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Get Started With the Yahoo HTTP Geocoder API - Webmonkey
"Yahoo's HTTP Geocoder API is easy to use, and its output is easy to incorporate into your applications. This article will describe its features and show some examples of how to access the results."
yahoo  geocoding  mapping  maps  location  tutorial  webdev  webdesign  api  howto 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Creative Commons Search
"will help you find photos, music, text, books, educational material, and more that is free to share or build upon utilizing Creative Commons enabled search services at Google, Yahoo!, and Flickr. You can also access this tool via the Firefox web browser.
search  creativecommons  free  copyright  media  photography  music  content  flickr  yahoo  google  blip.tv 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Matt McAlister » What would happen if the Internet knew where you were?
"Online media today is less about hosting web sites that push out HTML pages every day. It’s real power is derived from treating media as a service or rather about helping data find data. Fire Eagle is a great model of this world."
fireeagle  geotagging  location  maps  yahoo  location-based  locative  services 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Fire Eagle
"Secure & stylish way to share your location w/ sites & services online while giving you unprecedented control over your data & privacy. We're here to make whole web respond to your location & help you to discover more about world around you."
fireeagle  yahoo  location  location-based  geography  geotagging  geolocation  gps  mapping  maps  software  tomcoates  webapps  webdev  location-aware  locative  api  webdesign 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Yahoo! oneConnect™. A whole new way to communicate on your phone.
"Yahoo! oneConnect™ will be the first product that brings it all together—your people, your life, the ways you communicate—seamlessly, into the palm of your hand."
addressbook  mobile  phones  aggregator  communication  dopplr  facebook  iphone  lastfm  networking  socialnetworks  twitter  yahoo  location  messaging  sms  im  linkedin  myspace  flickr  last.fm 
february 2008 by robertogreco
OpenID Splash
"You already enjoy a bunch of great services with your Yahoo! account. With OpenID, your Yahoo! account now lets you go beyond Yahoo!. Plus, the free Yahoo! Sign-In Seal will help protect you from password theft, also known as phishing."
openid  yahoo  usability  security 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Case Study: Yahoo!'s Hot Innovation Incubator
"To infuse itself with startup energy, Yahoo began an offsite incubator late last year called Brickhouse (BusinessWeek, Feb. 26). Its job is to shorten the time it takes to bring new ideas to market."
yahoo  innovation  brickhouse  culture  technology  internet  web  online  flickr  organizations  administration  leadership  management 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Computing Heads for the Clouds
"IBM, Yahoo!, and Google are all putting the power of cloud computing to work. Here's a short primer on how the new technology works"
cloud  computing  internet  networking  collaboration  ibm  yahoo  google  cloudcomputing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Convenience Wins, Hubris Loses and Content vs. Context, a Presentation for Some Music Industry Friends at FISTFULAYEN
"I personally don’t have any more time to give and can’t bear to see any more money spent on pathetic attempts for control instead of building consumer value. Life’s too short. I want to delight consumers, not bum them out."
amazon  apple  audio  business  consumer  content  control  copyright  drm  music  technology  usability  users  trends  yahoo  entertainment  future  itunes 
october 2007 by robertogreco
There is no Web Operating System (or WebOS) (by Jeremy Zawodny)
"I've been getting quite frustrated and annoyed by the writing I've read in various places about the idea of a WebOS, Google OS, Yahoo OS...There is no Web Operating System. There will be no Web Operating System."
culture  data  opensource  services  socialsoftware  webos  web  trends  smallpieceslooselyjoined  technology  internet  web2.0  platform  os  yahoo  google 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Yahoo! MapMixer
"The world is a big place. There are thousands of maps out there that provide unique details about any given destination. MapMixer is a new site that combines those maps with Yahoo! Maps to give you a better view of the world."
maps  mapping  yahoo  usability  usergenerated  mashup  geography  geotagging  googlemaps  cartography  api  webapps  web2.0 
september 2007 by robertogreco
NPR : New Technology Predicts Browsing Behavior
"Adam Greenfield, author of Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing, spoke with Steve Inskeep."
advertising  marketing  adamgreenfield  technology  search  yahoo  browsing  web  internet  ai  ubicomp  ubiquitous  predictive 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Yahoo! Teachers
"Yahoo! Teachers is free for all teachers, administrators, and education specialists."
collaboration  collaborative  curriculum  networks  teaching  schools  yahoo  social  socialnetworks  socialsoftware 
march 2007 by robertogreco
idproxy.net - use your Yahoo! account as an OpenID
"idproxy.net lets you use your Yahoo! account to sign in to sites that support the OpenID standard"
hacks  identity  openid  yahoo  api  authentication  services  security  internet  web 
january 2007 by robertogreco
ZoneTag Photos
"Tagging made easy ZoneTag suggests likely tags for each photo, making it easy to add tags from your phone and even easier for you to find the photos later. The suggestions are based on tags made by you and your Flickr contacts in similar context, e.g. in
flickr  geotagging  gps  images  mapping  tools  nokia  mobile  phones  software  locative  location-based  location  jaiku  local  googlemaps  geocoding  freeware  yahoo  maps 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Yahoo! Search - Web Search
"This Yahoo! Search service finds content across the Web that has a Creative Commons license. While most stuff you find on the web has a full copyright, this search helps you find content published by authors who want you to share or reuse it, under certa
tools  internet  search  technology  creativecommons  yahoo  content  music  images  photography 
april 2005 by robertogreco

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