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robertogreco : zachlieberman   4

lessons for students — Medium
"lesson 1: Everything is about curiosity …

lesson 2: The world is Hungry for Ideas …

Lesson 3: Questions are key. Questions lead to conversation, conversation leads to learning.

At the School for Poetic Computation we start the first day always with the same activity — sit quietly by yourself for 20–30 mins and write down every question you have about what we are studying. Then, in smaller groups (and then finally in a larger group) we organize and collate these questions, developing a taxonomy. In some ways this is a contrast to typical school term, where you are presented with a syllabus that kind of lays out the answers.

The reason we do this is that invariably questions lead to discussion and talking and we’re really of the mindset that education is basically structured conversation — that the key to learning is talking, and through talking, we can find better metaphors, better illustrations, better explanations to make harder things simple, or explain how a gets to z.

Lesson 4. Together we know more …

Lesson 5: Simple and honest things win …

Lesson 6: Artistic practice is research, take that obligation seriously.

You are a researcher.

I’ve made the argument for a long time that artistic practice is a form or research, the same way a car company might have an R&D department to think about cars of the future, artists are a kind of R&D department for humanity thinking about different possible futures. It’s important to take the job of research seriously: to study the history, to take notes about process, to publish, etc. In terms of history, I think it’s crucial to know your field, who came before you and to explore the work of the past. We have a tendency to work and think ahistorically (think about how often you hear about “what a revolutionary time we live in”) and it can present profound limitations to creative practice. Note taking is also crucial — I think the more you approach the creative process as a study vs some sort of magical moment of inspiration, the more fruitful your work will be. Finally, publishing is crucial. Scientists write papers, synthasize findings, etc — artists should do the same. In my case, I use open source as a mechanism, but there are plenty of mechanisms for publishing. I think it’s a crucial part of taking R&D seriously.

Lesson 7: Everything operates at a time scale you don’t know.

You are a farmer.

I’ve found (from over a decade working in media art) that things you do take time and work in timescales that you don’t understand. A project you start one year will come back years later, or an idea you have can only be realized at some later point in your life. I think it’s hard as a student to understand timescale. I try to use the metaphor of a farmer, since it feels to me that things you do one year might have impacts years later.

At eyeo festival two years ago I mentioned to the audience during a talk that at the beginning of every class I tell students, “I adopt you.” After the talk, someone came up to me and he said, “10 years ago, I was in a workshop you gave in Brazil where you said, ‘I adopt you’… I didn’t even recognize you here, but when you said that on stage I remembered that moment. Your workshop is why I started doing what I do now.” When I think about that workshop, all I can remember that it was in a hot and stuffy computer lab, I can’t remember anything from that day just that it was, but being face to face with my former student reminded me that the work you at one time can come back many years later. Plant seeds, tend soil, be a farmer.

Lesson 8: Take the time you need.

There’s a tendency in programming education to have these “learn x in y time” type books and approaches. “Learn C++ in 30 days”, “Learn HTML in 24 hours”, etc. It’s important to remind students to take the time they need.

As a side note: at SFPC we are fortunate to have Amit Pitaru as a co-founder and steering committee member, and Amit to me is one of the best advocates for this notion of taking time. I think of him almost as a kind of sherpa for education. check out his talk at eyeo 2013 (https://vimeo.com/69477201) where mid-way through he breaks into a spontaneous discussion of learning.

Lesson 9: Find your team.

One of the best things you can do as a student is find and surround yourself with people who are supportive, understanding and help you know your own value. I think that is a crucial part of success.

Lesson 10: The past gets made again

I found this amazing book from 1993 called the art of computer designing:

archive.org version of the book [https://archive.org/details/satoArtOfComputerDesigning ]

It’s a pretty amazing book because it’s very fresh even by today’s standards — there’s clever and fun ideas of using shapes and geometry:

but the best part of the book is the afterword, where the author thanks a bunch of people and also members of the Bauhaus. He writes:
I would also like to acknowledge my favorites, Russian Avant-garde, Futurism and Bauhaus, whose brilliant typefaces and designs have in many ways shaped my own mind. If the artists of these movements where alive now to work with computers, I am certain they would discover new artistic possabilities. The work of past ages accumulates, and is remade again.

I love this last sentence of the book,
“the work of past ages accumulates, and is remade again”

It’s a reminder (and license) that the job of every generation is to remake the past.
sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputation  2015  zachlieberman  teaching  pedagogy  learning  education  curiosity  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  time  scale  purpose  questions  questionasking  art  research  conversation  osamusato  andrewzolli  amitpitaru  mitchgoldstein  ideas  howweteach  howwelearn  schools  arteducation  inquiry  inquirybasedlearning  convesation  askingquestions  björk 
november 2015 by robertogreco
An Artist in Every Library — Medium
"A large-scale residency program placing an artist in every library, archive and museum would rejuvenate institutions and promote critical engagement with information."



"Zach Lieberman has famously said that ‘art practice is the R&D lab for humanity’. In an age where many of our most important challenges lie in our relationship with information, it’s vitally important for artists to be engaging at this intersection. Indeed, it is happening: Deep Lab, a congress of artists and researchers recently held at Carnegie Mellon offers a good survey for the variety of methods, materials an approaches that are being used by artist to engage with information issues."



"First, two ground rules:

The Artists is not cheap labor. Some librarians reading this post might be thinking: this is an excellent idea! We need poster making / data visualization/ <insert useful task here>. We can get an artist to do it! This is not how it works. To get full benefit from these engagements, the work done must be artist-driven and free from constraints.

The Library is not a free studio. While artists should be encouraged to bring projects and ideas into the residency, it’s important that the work done is not just in the institution, but with the institution. Artists should be expected to collaborate with staff, and to immerse themselves in the communities and expertise of the host organization.

The focus here is on symbiosis, on the creation of a relationship where the artist and the institution, along with the community at large, benefit. It is not about bringing art into libraries, but art making, and all of the messiness and rigor and criticality and questioning that comes with it."
art  residencies  libraries  museums  2015  zachlieberman  collections  archives  jerthorp  glvo 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Eyeo2012 - Zach Lieberman on Vimeo
"Unexpected — Live Performance, Technology and the Risk of Something (or Everything) Going Wrong. ie, Learning to Love Chance."

"A world without heartbreak is a world without heart."

Don't miss the poem at the end about failure (full text here: https://github.com/ofZach/eyeo_2012_remarks/ ]:

"What can go wrong? …

… this is a love letter to those who are on the frontlines, and if you are not on the frontlines, an invitation to join us. What I say to students is the world is hungry for ideas. We need you. …

and so I say: go. press play. compile. turn on the power, turn off the lights, turn on the lights, open the curtain, open the doors, start the show, invite people, post the video, send the link, push the code to git, hit save, hit run, run with it. go with it. go.

what is the worst that can happen?

a world without heartbreak is a world without heart. all we need to do is keep pushing, and we'll get there."

[See also: http://thesystemis.com/ ]
risktaking  thezone  inthezone  zones  via:jenlowe  hillmancurtis  andycameron  openframeworks  electronics  heartbreak  happiness  life  human  golanlevin  versionitis  risk  love  technology  design  art  failure  eyeo  eyeo2012  2012  zachlieberman 
august 2012 by robertogreco
openFrameworks
"openFrameworks is an open source C++ toolkit designed to assist the creative process by providing a simple and intuitive framework for experimentation. The toolkit is designed to work as a general purpose glue, and wraps together several commonly used libraries, including:

OpenGL, GLEW, GLUT, libtess2 and cairo for graphics
rtAudio, PortAudio or FMOD and Kiss FFT for audio input, output and analysis
FreeType for fonts
FreeImage for image saving and loading
Quicktime and videoInput for video playback and grabbing
Poco for a variety of utilities
The code is written to be massively cross-compatible. Right now we support five operating systems (Windows, OSX, Linux, iOS, Android) and four IDEs (XCode, Code::Blocks, and Visual Studio and Eclipse). The API is designed to be minimal and easy to grasp.

Simply put, openFrameworks is a tool that makes it much easier to make things with code. We find it super useful, and we hope you do too."
benfry  caseyreas  arturocastro  theodorewatson  zachlieberman  matthewgingold  stevevarga  jeffcrouse  diederickhuijbers  damianstewart  lukaszkarluk  philipwhitfield  joshnoble  christophbuchner  jasonvancleave  kylemcdonald  gregborenstein  jamesgeorge  elliotwoods  open  frameworks  design  software  processing  openframeworks  art  visualization  opensource  c++  programming 
august 2012 by robertogreco

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