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robertogreco : zines   38

GitHub - jkriss/zinepdf
"This is a short Python 2 script that will take a 7-8 page pdf, legal size, and turn it into a single sheet foldable zine."
jessekriss  python  zines  papernet  typesetting  printing  print 
4 days ago by robertogreco
Zine machine!
“That magic is what means this web page is also a zine if you print it! Go ahead, try pressing your 🖨️ Print button now. You will need to set the page to landscape and make sure there’s no margins or scaling. We want to print on the edge, baby! You should see a preview laid out like this:”



“Steal this zine!
Please take this template and copy it for your own work.

This is a Glitch app!
Since it’s all hosted on Glitch, this friendly fish will give you the instructions to take a peek at the code and fire up your own version.

Creative Commons Licence
The content and images are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Code highlighting via Prism.js.”
class  ideas  paper  zines  papernet  templates  css  webdesign 
8 weeks ago by robertogreco
Of Anarchy and Amateurism: Zine Publication and Print Dissent, by Sheila Liming [.pdf]
[via: https://are.na/block/2959533 ]

"Because they are not usually sold in stores (and because, more often than not, you have to know where to look) you rarely see them. But sines—homemade, mash-up publications suiting a variety of interests, needs, and cadres—exist, constituting a belligerently voiced need for alternative media venues even in our modem age of widespread Internet use and so-called digital democracy. Fag School, Sniffle' Glue, Slug and Lettuce, and Gutter Flowers are the titles of several nines that emerged in the United States between the 1970s and early 1990s. Many of them survive today, viewed as literary appendages of a movement of youth un-rest and social apprehension. While some embrace the opportunities of new media and have "gone digital" (for example, through web-sites like paperrad.com or in e-tines, electronically distributed sines that reach their audiences via e-mail instead of through the Postal Service), still many others maintain a commitment to the ethics of low-tech media production. They continue to be photocopied, hand-drawn, or hand-stitched and circulated according to the old roles: by mail, at zinc conventions, or at shows."
anarchy  anarchism  zines  amateurism  amateurs  publishing  self-publishing  selfpublishing  sheilaliming  lowtech  making  ephemeral  low-tech 
november 2018 by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: How to make a zine
"A guide to ideating, publishing, and distributing a DIY zine, written by Rona Akbari and illustrated by Somnath Bhatt."
zines  howto  classideas  tutorials  somnathbhatt  ronaakbari  publishing  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Zines are the future of media
"My favorite Nieman Lab prediction for journalism in 2018 (including this one I wrote myself [http://www.niemanlab.org/2017/12/watch-out-for-spotify/ ]) is Kawandeep Virdee’s “Zines Had It Right All Along.” [http://www.niemanlab.org/2017/12/zines-had-it-right-all-along/ ]

His actual prediction is that in 2018, digital media “will reflect more qualities that make print great.” Virdee distills a shortlist of qualities of zines and quarterly mags that he thinks are portable to digital:

• Quarterlies are a pleasure to read with a variety in layout and pacing
• They’re beautiful to hold.
• They’re less frequent, and much better.
• Even the ads are well-crafted, and trusted.
• Zines have an enormous variety.
• They’re experimental and diverse.
• This gives them a freshness and surprise.
• They’re anti-formalist; they’re relatable.

“Most sites look the same,” Virdee writes. “It can be weird and wonderful.”

The positive example he gives isn’t a text feature, but the NYT video series “Internetting with Amanda Hess.” It’s an odd choice because digital video hasn’t had much of a problem picking up on a zine aesthetic or giving us that level of freshness and surprise; it’s digital text that’s been approaching conformity.

It’s also weird that Virdee works product at Medium, which is one of the sites that, despite or maybe because of its initial splash, is kind of the poster child for the current design consensus on the web. If Virdee is making the case that Medium (and other sites) should look a lot less like Medium, that would be the most exciting thing that Medium has done in a couple of years.

The other point I’d add is that zines and quarterlies look the way they do and feel the way they feel not because of a certain design aesthetic they share, or a design consensus they break from, but because of how they’re run, who owns them, and why they’re published. They look different because they are different. So maybe we need to look at the whole package and create an… oh, I don’t know, what’s the phrase I need… an “indie web”?"
timcarmody  kawandeepvirdee  zines  publishing  blogs  blogging  digital  publications  2017  2018  quarterlies  classideas  cv  conformity  medium  media  predictions  design  originality  weirdness  aesthetics  freshness  internet  amandahess  web  online  graphicdesign  layout  webdesign  indie  indieweb  diversity  anti-formalism  relatability  surprise  variety  craft  pacing  howwewrite  howweread  print  papernet 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Design Resources
"Select websites, tools, assets, and readings for working in and learning about design.

[categories]
Accessibility resources
Books and zines
Browser features
Brushes
Colors and color palettes
Fonts
Icons and emoji
Inspiration and criticism websites
Mockups
Prototyping tools
Stock graphics
Stock photography
User testing and interactive feedback tools
Design Resources
Select websites, tools, assets, and readings for working in and learning about design.

made by @skullface · view/contribute on GitHub
Accessibility"
design  resources  reference  jessicapaoli  fonts  icons  emoji  webdesign  webdev  color  palettes  stockphotography  stockgraphics  graphics  browsers  zines  extensions  chrome  prototyping 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Why the Internet Didn’t Kill Zines - The New York Times
"As a lonely teenager growing up in Virginia, I fed off any pop culture that could show me different ways of being from what I saw on “The Cosby Show” reruns or read about in an Ann M. Martin book. This was the early 2000s, before social platforms had taken off: LiveJournal was still in its infancy; Tumblr had not yet been created. Friendster and Myspace, the most popular of the networks that did exist, were more about sharing perfectly angled photos than having conversations or bouncing ideas off someone. When, in college, a spirited English teaching assistant (who once canceled class for the week to attend a riot-grrrl punk reunion show in Washington) introduced me to zines and the early feminist publishing movement of the 1990s, I felt as if I had been given a lifeline to the outside world. Those self-published, unofficial magazines offered tangible glimpses of radical feminism, social-justice movements, queer history and subcultures that I always knew existed but had little access to. The world seemed to open up for me.

In theory, the maturation of the internet should have killed off the desire for zines entirely. The web is a Gutenberg press on steroids, predicated on free software platforms created by companies that invest considerable sums to lure people to their sites and make exactly the kind of content I craved growing up. Millions, maybe hundreds of millions, of posts are published to social-media sites each day. And yet somehow, it can feel impossible to engage with new ideas, even as our compulsive inability to stop scrolling exposes us to an unending stream of new content. Yes, you can catch tweetstorms on Twitter, watch someone’s life unfold on Instagram, do deep dives into hashtags on Tumblr or watch video diaries on YouTube that explore diverse perspectives, but the clutter of everything else happening at the same time online can make it difficult to really digest and absorb the perspective being offered.

Which might be part of the reason zines never disappeared — and are even available in abundance in 2017. A few months ago, I walked into a Laundromat in Brooklyn where a former cellphone kiosk had been transformed into a feminist queer shop called the Troll Hole. I was thrilled to find it stocked with the same kinds of small booklets I consumed in college, though much better designed and produced. They contained nonbinary coming-of-age stories, photo essays featuring gender nonconforming people of Latin-American descent, trans Muslim narratives, first-generation essays, fat-positive imagery. I scooped up as many as I could rationally read in one sitting.

Many of the offline zine projects I came across have some online presence, too. Sula Collective, for example, which describes itself as a journal by and for people of color, actually started out on the web as an art magazine for people growing up “in the suburbs and Deep South,” as one of its founders, Kassandra Piñero, put it to me. It was meant for anyone who “didn’t have access to galleries and events.” Piñero is 21, and the only world she has ever known is one that is also lived partly online. But she found that publishing on the internet often had the unintended and unconscious effect of causing her to cater to the aesthetics of those platforms. “The internet should be a place with no rules, and freedom, but it’s not,” Piñero said. “There is a certain pressure to conform to certain aesthetics.” It was something I had noticed myself. Each social-media platform tends to reward certain behaviors and styles of posting, all in the interest of building fans and followers who are invested in the performance of a persona (maybe even more so than the Geppetto-like person orchestrating it all). Instagram is a place for intimate-seeming photos, Twitter for clever quips and collaborative memes. Facebook demands an unmitigated rawness that can be terrifying at times. With all, the works are often made to fit the platform, not the other way around.

Producing zines can offer an unexpected respite from the scrutiny on the internet, which can be as oppressive as it is liberating. Shakar Mujukian, publisher of The Hye-Phen — a zine by and about queer and trans Armenians who, as he puts it, often “feel as ignored and invisible as their motherland” — told me via email that just because technology can fully replace something doesn’t mean it should. He described zines as the precursor to personal blogs, but personal blogs have been on the decline over the last decade. And zines can’t get replies or hateful remarks in a comments section. Publishing ideas outside the mainstream can make an author incredibly vulnerable; the web is polluted with a culture of toxicity that invites attacks. Zines, in Mujukian’s vision, “are essentially about reclamation. You get to make your own media and define your own narrative in the way you want to and can.”

Karen Gisonny is the periodicals librarian at the New York Public Library and specializes in alternative publications and zines. We’ve spoken over the years about alternative media and the role that it plays among the people who make it and consume it. She noted that zines allow for an “element of freedom that’s not beholden to anyone.” We think of the web as a place for freedom, but with zines, authors control every aspect, from the design to the distribution. When I visited her at the library, she showed me some of her newest acquisitions, which included the first issue of Dr. RAD’s Queer Health Show, a guide for self-exams and checkups for all gendered bodies, and Blue Collar Review, a journal of progressive working-class literature that is made in Virginia. She explained that zines could be seen as a historical record of the current moment. To their creators, zines can feel like necessary means of defiance, even resistance to cultural norms that rarely acknowledge them.

Devin N. Morris, who edits and publishes 3 Dot Zine, told me that he sees self-publishing as a political and radical act. He’s a young queer artist from Baltimore, and the zines he creates reflect that experience and create a historical narrative that otherwise would be ignored. For him, the act of creating a zine is more about defining his reality on his terms and legitimizing it than it is about the novelty of making indie media and distributing it. It was a sentiment I heard from almost every zine creator I spoke to. Morris, who recently hosted an indie-press fair at the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, said that zines have a way of encouraging people to have “inspiring interactions in real life.” He described a hunger to physically interact beyond simple likes or direct messages. Social apps weren’t made to inspire that desire; they were created so that there would be no need.

And it perhaps reflects why zines can feel so much more intimate than a Facebook post. The deliberation and care that goes into making them is important. The internet is especially adept at compressing humanity and making it easy to forget there are people behind tweets, posts and memes."
jennawortham  zines  2017  publishing  internet  web  online  livejournal  tumblr  myspace  friendster  twitter  tweetstorms  youtube  attention  clutter  karengisonny  alternative  classideas  devinmorris  3dotzine  thehye-phen  shakarmujukian  kassandrapiñero  sulacollective  care  craft  deliberation  politics  radicalism  artapp 
march 2017 by robertogreco
The REAL REVIEW Tells Us What it Means to Live Today - 032c Workshop
"032c contributor and highly productive architecture critic Jack Self has a new quarterly magazine called Real Review, and it has the world’s most enviable tagline: “What It Means To Live Today.”

The contributor list includes writers such as Oliver Wainwright, Pier Vittorio Aureli, and Sam Jacobs, and the articles span subjects as such the “Duck House” architecture of North Korea, Prince Charles vs The Sex Pistols on the Thames, and the “cybernetic socialist orgasm” of Allende’s Chile.

Yet it is the format that best indicates the magazine’s objective: rather than the indie-mag cliche of perfect-bound, matte-stock A4 pages, Self and executive editor Shumi Bose went for a long, thin structure, that opens like a thick and demented travel brochure. It is designed to be stuffed into jeans pockets, not sitting idle on coffee-table. It is a designed to be thumbed, read, and passed around like samizdat.

The title is another dead giveaway: REAL proudly presses the medium of “the review” as a perfect form for approaching 21st century architecture: one that can critically evaluate anything from artistic movements to failed utopias. The magazine is therefore at once errant and urgent, writing about the present through the tangled archeology of what currently surround us.

032c spoke to Self about his new magazine, and the uses of living in a post-apocalyptic world."
magazines  classideas  jackself  shumibose  print  zines 
july 2016 by robertogreco
NewHive
[See also: “Beautiful disasters: NewHive is making the web weird again”
http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/18/5420246/can-newhive-make-the-web-weird-again-zach-verdin ]

"NewHive is a multimedia publishing platform. We provide a blank space and custom tools to simplify the process of creating rich multimedia experiences on the web.

Get started with our User Guide [http://newhive.com/newhive/user-guide ] and Frequently Asked Questions [http://newhive.com/newhive/faq ].

Say hello. Ask about job opportunities. Get in touch with our press and media team. Inquire about partnership and business development opportunities.

We are committed to supporting creators on the NewHive platform.
We do this in a variety of ways, including:

Commissioned Projects

NewHive regularly commissions multimedia mixtapes, singles, zines, ebooks, curated exhibitions, and solo projects by emerging and established artists engaged with the Internet. Creators receive a stipend and technical support. Proposals are reviewed on a rolling basis. Get in touch: m@newhive.com.

Interview Series

NewHive publishes interviews on a weekly basis. These conversations focus on the creative process, and aim to promote a better understanding and appreciation of the arts. Search #interviews to read about the community on NewHive.

Events / Exhibitions

NewHive partners with institutions to increase the profile of our creators. Most recently we collaborated with the Goethe-Institut San Francisco on Image as Location, an exhibition that showcased artists who are remixing their favorite works of art. Previously we teamed up with Gray Area to co-organize UPLOAD.gif, a weekend-long festival celebrating the animated GIF file format.

ZACH VERDIN
Cofounder / CEO

CARA BUCCIFERRO
Cofounder / Designer

ABRAM CLARK
Cofounder / Engineer

MELISSA BRODER
Director of Media

info@newhive.com "

["What is NewHive?

NewHive is a multimedia publishing platform for the easy creation of webpages called newhives. These pages are artist-controlled, embeddable, and may be simply compiled into collections. We provide an intuitive and easy-to-use, graphical user interface. To put it simply, NewHive allows users to create webpages without having to write code or use a rigid interface.

Do I have to pay to use NewHive?

NewHive is totally and completely free!
How do I create a newhive?

To create a newhive page, click on the create icon in the bottom right-hand corner. For help creating a newhive click on the ? while in the editor."]
newhive  multimedia  webrococo  remixing  web  webpublishing  online  internet  remixculture  gifs  gif  animatedgifs  zachverdin  abramclark  carabucciferro  melissabroder  upload.gif  webdev  ebooks  zines  mixtapes  art  community  onlinetoolkit  classideas  multiliteracies  webdesign 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Independent Publishing Resource Center | Independent Publishing Resource Center
"IPRC’S Mission & Vision

The IPRC’s Mission is to facilitate creative expression, identity and community by providing individual access to tools and resources for creating independently published media and artwork.

About

Since its inception in 1998 the center has been dedicated to encouraging the growth of a visual and literary publishing community by offering a space to gather and exchange information and ideas, as well as to produce work.

We’ve empowered thousands of people to create and publish their own artwork, writing, zines, books, websites, comics and graphic novels.

In our 18 years of operation, we’ve provided artistic services to upwards of 27,000 Oregonians through membership, use of the Center, workshops and outreach programs. By gathering such diverse people under one roof, the IPRC nourishes an expansive and productive community. In fact the IPRC is at the very heart of Portland’s vibrant do-it-yourself (DIY) artistic and literary communities is a creative home for many local artists, and an incubator for the independent creative spirit that makes Portland unique.

We’ve helped community members find their artistic voices, especially disenfranchised youth (including GLBT, minority, at-risk, and homeless youth) whose lifestyles and experiences tend to be marginalized in the major media.

We’ve helped countless individuals to discover themselves through art, and to reach and inspire others in the community by publishing and sharing their work. We’re always looking for volunteers to help our outreach programs."

[via: http://theokbb.tumblr.com/post/136224475227/one-of-the-first-places-that-i-visited-when-i ]
portland  oregon  diy  books  publishing  zines  lcproject  openstudioproject  art  printing  iprc 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Article: Rise of the Risograph, Part One / Features / Nothing Major
"Once marketed to schools as a cheap copier, the Risograph has become a fave of graphic designers, artists, zine publishers, and arts institutions. Part one: Rise of the Machine."

[Parts two and three:

"So, now that we know what a Risograph is, who's using it, and how?"
http://nothingmajor.com/features/18-rise-of-the-risograph-part-two/

"This week, we're checking in with art institutions to see how they use Risographs."
http://nothingmajor.com/features/24-rise-of-the-risograph-part-three/ ]
risograph  print  printing  mattputrino  via:robinsloan  design  openstudioproject  lcproject  classideas  zines  glvo  srg 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Gandhi’s Printing Press — Isabel Hofmeyr | Harvard University Press
"At the same time that Gandhi, as a young lawyer in South Africa, began fashioning the tenets of his political philosophy, he was absorbed by a seemingly unrelated enterprise: creating a newspaper. Gandhi’s Printing Press is an account of how this project, an apparent footnote to a titanic career, shaped the man who would become the world-changing Mahatma. Pioneering publisher, experimental editor, ethical anthologist—these roles reveal a Gandhi developing the qualities and talents that would later define him.

Isabel Hofmeyr presents a detailed study of Gandhi’s work in South Africa (1893–1914), when he was the some-time proprietor of a printing press and launched the periodical Indian Opinion. The skills Gandhi honed as a newspaperman—distilling stories from numerous sources, circumventing shortages of type—influenced his spare prose style. Operating out of the colonized Indian Ocean world, Gandhi saw firsthand how a global empire depended on the rapid transmission of information over vast distances. He sensed that communication in an industrialized age was becoming calibrated to technological tempos.

But he responded by slowing the pace, experimenting with modes of reading and writing focused on bodily, not mechanical, rhythms. Favoring the use of hand-operated presses, he produced a newspaper to contemplate rather than scan, one more likely to excerpt Thoreau than feature easily glossed headlines. Gandhi’s Printing Press illuminates how the concentration and self-discipline inculcated by slow reading, imbuing the self with knowledge and ethical values, evolved into satyagraha, truth-force, the cornerstone of Gandhi’s revolutionary idea of nonviolent resistance."

[via: https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/568156442240229376 ]
gandhi  printing  press  media  history  books  toread  2013  isabelhofmeyr  nonviolence  resistance  ethics  satyagraha  truth  truth-force  reading  writing  slow  newspapers  contemplation  reflection  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  thoreau  self-discipline  information  slowjournalism  journalism  publishing  zines  howweread  howwrite 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Oroma Elewa Unearths ‘The Way We Plait’, Limited... | DYNAMIC AFRICA
"Oroma Elewa Unearths ‘The Way We Plait’, Limited Edition Pop’Africana Zine.

When Oroma Elewa's creative endeavor into the world of publishing first launched in 2009 in the form of Pop’Africana, it was more than a breath of fresh air. Curated by Elewa, both the print and digital platforms featured carefully conceptualized text and images ranging from fashion editorials and photography, to style features and intimate interview profiles of carefully selected creatives. All this and more made it incredibly difficult to see the project end in 2012.

Now, five years later, those of us who still feel unfulfilled by the hijacked and somewhat unfulfilled ‘Africa rising’ narrative, and still reference Oroma and her work when seeking Africa and diaspora-sourced inspiration, can breathe easy once again.

A few days ago, after a series of hints and teasers on instagram, Oroma released the first installment in Pop’Africana’s new limited edition zine series. The first edition, “The Way We Plait,” is an intimate chronicle of the details and processes that go into hair braiding. Inspired by a mixture of intrigue and curiosity, it “draws heavily from observations and experiences in the culture of hair making,” from scalp sensitivity to the hands of the hair maker. What’s more, the zine honors the iconic legacy of late Nigerian photographer J.D. Okhai Ojeikere who passed away earlier this year."
zines  oromaelewa  2014  Pop’Africanam  toread  jdokhaiojeikere  photography  africa  nigeria  africarising 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Sampson Starkweather Strips it Down to Just Chapbooks | HTMLGIANT
"Hey Sampson, what’s the deal with chapbooks?

Funny, that’s how I start all my stand-up comedy gigs. It kills of course. So I wanted to start with a quote from James Haug’s Why I Like Chapbooks (Factory Hollow, 2011), who waxes lyrical “Chapbooks are stealth books./ They can slip under a door./ They don’t impose. They suggest./ They’re not one thing or another. They don’t take much time. They’re sly and easy to ignore. They imply, insinuate, inquire./ They don’t expect an answer./ They have a long history; they have no history.”

Chapbooks are the currency of underground poetry publishing, and tied to a sense of community and gift-ish economy, mostly run by poets who want to give something back and create a home for the work they believe in. Chapbooks are the new of the new, in the world of poetry most poets’ first publications come through chapbooks, so if you want to know the future (of poetry), read chapbooks. Chapbooks tend to be exciting and tied to a counter-culture because they provide a space for more experimental, esoteric or avant-garde work to be published that contests and university presses or bigger presses who may be more concerned with money wouldn’t take the risk on or didn’t think would sell…Chapbooks are like the opposite of money. Which is so money!

Chapbooks also have such a materiality and visceral physical life, because they are mostly handmade and handbound and come in all shapes, sizes (from Small Fires matchbooks to The Pines LP records) and textures imaginable (god I love texture!), made from old military uniforms, childhood blankets, prison cups, cardboard, vinyl, rubber, bolts, matchbooks, you name it. It is this handmade element and imagination and of course each chapbook’s limited nature that gives them such value, and ties them to history and an archival existence. Chapbooks are a link to the human that I think is more important than ever right now in the face of ever increasing digital media and publishing, Chapbooks are like Sarah Connor and her son (John Connor) facing the Terminators in Terminator 2: the hope of all mankind and the future of the human race lie in their hands. Also, they are perfect to read on the subway!"

[Via:
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/538120884657995776
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/538121092934557696
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/538121130263855104

See also: "I wish academics would release chapbooks of solo essays & half-baked ideas, the way musicians release EPs, demos, B-Sides, alt-takes, etc."
https://twitter.com/ezbrooks/status/531901193199837185 ]
chapbooks  sampsonstarkweathher  academia  zines  ideas  projectideas  classideas  b-sides  eps  texture  handmade  publishing  diy  lcproject  openstudioproject  jameshaug  inquiry  stealth 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Samizdat - Wikipedia
"Samizdat distinguishes itself not only by the ideas and debates which it helped spread to a wider audience, but also by its physical form. The hand-typed, often blurry and wrinkled pages which possessed numerous typos and nondescript covers helped to separate and elevate Russian samizdat from Western literature. Though the physical form of samizdat grew out of the simple lack of resources and necessity of inconspicuousness, dissidents in the USSR began to fetishize samizdat for the sharp contrast between samizdat’s ragged appearance and the appearance of texts published by the state. The form of samizdat itself took precedence over the ideas expressed in it, and came to symbolize the resourcefulness and rebellious spirit of citizens of the Soviet Union. In effect, the physical form of samizdat itself elevated the reading of samizdat to a prized clandestine act"

[via: http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2014/10/06/interpretation/ ]
samizdat  sovietunion  ussr  ingenuity  resourcefulness  zines  literature  form  aesthetics  rebellion  clandestine 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Hampshire College Zine Collection
"The Hampshire College Zine Collection is located in the Harold F. Johnson Library at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. The collection was started in the 1990′s by students who were creating their own zines and adding zines to the collection from friends and fellow zinesters from around the US. In 2007, the Zine Collective, a now-defunct Hampshire College student group, began to reorganize the zine collection and moved it to the 2nd floor of the library. Between 2008-2010, the Zine Collective added hundreds of new zines to the collection and made copies of some of the zines to distribute for free at college events. In the Fall of 2013 the zines were moved down to the 1st floor where they are currently located in a bookshelf between the Research Help and Media Services offices.

We are a non-circulating zine library with over 800 zines, and are still adding more! If you’re interested in donating your zine(s), please take a look at our Donations page. For more information about zines and how to find your way around our website, check out the FAQ."
zines  hampshirecollege  collections  archives 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Toward a Poetics of Skateboarding | The American Reader
"But for all of its private jargon, skateboarding’s poetry has never been linguistic. It is forever embodied and also, though this is difficult to speak of seriously, spiritual. How else to explain its appearance in Uganda without even a single retail outlet to support it? In fact, the only conveyable language of skateboarding, outside of participation and socialization in the activity itself, has always been spoken through film.

In broad terms, skate media splits time between documentation and advertisement, and their commercial evolution has skewed ever more crass and spectacular. Recent work from select video artists, however, attempts to confront the activity’s basic mystery and meaningful meaninglessness. Non-skateboarders have tended not to look very closely at these films. They mostly do not care. Skateboarders meanwhile care far too much to care exactly why. In any case, it’s here that an attempt toward a poetics of skateboarding must begin."



"Nor can we call such an effort unselfish. My own struggle with the mystery of skateboarding began five years ago, fifteen after I first stepped onto a board, when I began work on my second novel. The problem I encountered was that none of skateboarding’s confectionary can or should be dismissed. Speaking technically and contra Ian Mackaye, skateboarding today is a sport and a hobby both, along with countless other things: a therapy, an obsession, a conservative anti-drug. In its basic meaninglessness, skateboarding has become the tool that takes the shape of whoever’s hand it’s in."



"What in those first years had fit awkwardly into a de facto rubric of athletics—a sport to be timed and judged for athletic merit—became in the 1970s something more rhetorical. The ethos was the punk scavenging of revolution by way of repurposing. Whatever prefigurations of the object we had seen, never before had they been deployed creatively. To speak in China Mieville’s terms, what emerged was something counterposed to the comfort of the uncanny. The activity, new, unrecognized, and bounded only by imagination, was abcanny."



"While the basic spirit of skateboarding might have remained constant since the addition of polyurethane, the marketplace around it quite obviously has not. Now and once again the importance of skateboarding in our time is on the increase. Today, it is on Fox. It is on ESPN with real-time algorithms for evaluating tricks. Once more the marketplace would have us comprehend skateboarding as a sport.

We know on first glance that skateboarding, in its dominant form of street activity, stands apart from ball and net athletics. It seems uninterested, too, in velocity and stopwatch performances. But the first challenge to the rubric of sport begins even lower, at a semiotic level. You and I could, if we wanted, go and shoot lazy jumpshots on a netless schoolyard hoop, or go to the driving range and smack buckets of balls into the green void. We can take our gloves to the park and throw grounders and pop flies and apply tags to invisible runners. But for any of these to qualify as “basketball,” “golf,” or “baseball,” we would require the structure of competition and order of rules.

Systems such as these have no bearing on skateboarding, of which even the most negligible acts, no matter how brief or private, simply are skateboarding. Consider: between my home and the nearest skatepark is a well-paved boulevard with sewer caps embedded into the blacktop every half block or so. A source of joy for me is to push down this boulevard and pop tiny ollies over these sewer caps, sometimes barely scraping my tail, other times popping hard and pulling my knees up to my chest. These are not tricks proper, just ways to see and engage with the street’s reality. This is not, as athletes might call it, practice; I am not training for a future event. It is travel, yes, but the joy has little to do with the scenery or distance covered. In the purview of skate competition, this pushing down the boulevard, the single most fun I have in any given day, is not a scorable act of skateboarding. It is worth zero and it is worth everything.

In a world increasingly data-driven and surveilled, skateboarding lives beneath scoring and resists all datazation by establishing everything as a performance. It deflects the surveillance state by its primal devotion to documenting and sharing itself, monitoring every possible development, repetition, and failure. It pre-empts the onslaught of observation by embracing it. To pre-empt is to deflect, but also to admit defeat. Luckily, skateboarders are shameless—in this way, they’re the perfect actors to play the role of themselves.

Our potential heuristic now approaches what literary and cultural theorists today speak of, with a smirk, as the so-called authentic self. But a skater, whether standing on his stage, behind a camera, or at a keyboard, sees and thinks and performs precisely as what and who he is. What other memberships function in this or a similar manner? Parenthood. Romantic partnership. Citizenship. Does artistry?

***

To date, the most complete attempt to theorize skateboarding has been Iain Borden’s Skateboarding, Space and the City: Architecture and the Body (Berg, 2001). Borden, a Professor of Architecture and Urban Culture at The Bartlett, University College London, treats the activity of skateboarding as a Lefebvrian practice with a potential to become its own sort of architecture: not of construction, but by the “production of space, time, and social being.” He traces the history of skateboarding into the 1990s’ street skating movement, and speaks of the way this “oppositional subculture” rethinks architecture “as a set of discrete features and elements…recomposing it through new speeds, spaces and times.” The gears of capitalism create spaces in which behavior is prescribed and easily accounted for. Skateboarding’s opposition is thus a compositional process, partially of the individual body, which is recomposed against the “intense scopic determinations of modernist space,” and partially of a deeper critique of urban life: “production not as the production of things but of play, desires and actions.”"



"By contrast, today’s most compelling skateboarding films aim to capture not only the play of skateboarding, but enact what Borden calls the “positive dialectic that restlessly searches for new possibilities of representing, imagining and living our lives.” The “Panoramic Series” from Philip Evans, for example, relieves the actor from the full burden of attention. Here Evans follows Phil Zwijsen through his hometown of Antwerp:"



"The skater, Austyn Gillette, appears only after the environmental context, resulting in a portrait not of one or the other, but both. The subject is, as skateboarding’s always has been in practice, the interactions between city and individual body. Alongside recent work by Mike Manzoori, Evan Schiefelbine and select others, these films find energy beyond the progressive trickery of athletics, or the documentation of extant geographies. They combine the skateboarder’s practice—creative, productive—with a distinctly non-skateboarding meta-awareness of the activity’s potential for meaning. Their grounding within the geist of skateboarding is obvious: there is nothing a skater spots more quickly than the fraud, or tourist. These are films made by skateboarders who have lived within the activity’s world, and who choose to leverage the activity as a tool to understand itself. How long, they ask, must a toy endure before it becomes something else? What does it become, and does this mean it has ceased to be a toy?"



"Roberto Bolaño called surrealism “something convulsive and vague, that familiar amorphous thing.” If indeed there is ever to be a poetics of skateboarding, familiarity will have to play a role. Suvin argued that science fiction’s value lay in its ability to effect cognitive estrangement. Campbell’s film documents and creates ostranenie by the re-presentation of a familiar world as captured by, and portrayed through, the glance of the radical dreamer. In fact, what Cuatros does better than any film I’ve seen is remind us that skateboarding’s heuristic usefulness is ontological. Its topos is not that there is a world inside the world, but rather: there is a world the exact shape and texture of the world that you know laid seamlessly over top of it, and you, for some reason, fail to see how beautiful it can be.

Convulsive, vague, and conveyed by slidy looks. Campbell’s subject is our ineffable, binding thing, that lurking, trembling essence that he can only render by images and motions of the surreal. The artist whose art was born from skateboarding has made an object about skateboarding that conveys this birth and mode of being. Skateboarding infects the filmmaker infects the musicians infects the viewer. Viewer goes out skating. Skateboarding is self-perpetuating in this way. It is always itself and something else, it is infectious, it is comprehensive and sublatable to the core. This is how the infinite comes to be—once born, skateboarding can never now die.

But the dreamscape of Cuatros Sueños Pequeños is not an expression of this infinity. Rather, it is mimetic. What world is this?, asks the skateboarder. A familiar one we have seen so many times that it’s rendered unseeable. More importantly, what is to be done in it? The answer, like Campbell’s film, is incoherent, and thank goodness. The answer is anything at all."
skating  skateboarding  skateboards  quantification  measurement  urban  urbanism  surveillance  iainborden  meaning  film  video  robertobolaño  thomascampbell  cuatrosueñospequeños  performance  datazation  repetition  monitoring  failure  documentation  process  capitalism  henrilefebvre  space  place  play  culture  movement  infectiousness  inspiration  feral  ecosystems  socialbeing  time  architecture  landscape  kylebeachy  understanding  experience  robertzemeckis  pontusalv  punk  metrics  schematics  markets  poetics  filmmaking  darkosuvin  sciencefiction  ianmackaye  technology  history  circumstance  california  socal  sports  chinamieville  abcanny  zines  creativity  competition  commercialization  commercialism  commoditization  diy  systems  rules  revolution  resistance  practice  authenticity  artistry  philipevans  philzwijsen  colinkennedy  stasis  motion  austyngillette  mikemanzoori  evanschiefelbine  javiermendizabal  madarsapse  dondelillo  cities  meaninglessness  participation  participatory  democracy  tribes  belonging  identity  spirituality  social  socializati 
july 2014 by robertogreco
zgsd
"the zinester's guide to san diego, find copies in the zine section of che cafe. feel free to send any asks about anything"
sandiego  travel  local  checafe  zines  kennetheby-gomez  keneby-gomez 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Cybernetics on the Prairie | Complex Fields
"The core of this project takes the form of BCL/IGB, a commissioned public artwork in three parts: a printed mural, a reprinted collection of historic texts, and a recreated historical computer. I intended the work as a monument to an under-recognized episode in my home institution’s history, constructed in a form appropriate to the content.

More ambitiously, this work is an attempt to deal with the nature of institutional memory, especially in the context of scientific research. More personally, I entered the project as a way to learn how one might successfully navigate the complex moral and philosophical challenges of teaching, research and administration in a modern American University."

[Related: http://bcl.ece.illinois.edu/
http://bcl.ece.illinois.edu/hutchinson/
http://complexfields.org/here/158
http://diabeticfootonline.blogspot.com/2013/07/of-phantom-limbs-and-foreign-bodies.html

[The Whole University Catalog http://spinelessbooks.com/wholeuniversity/ and in .pdf: http://spinelessbooks.com/wholeuniversity/catalog.pdf ]
biologicalcomputerlab  instituteforgenomicbiology  kevinhamilton  sybernetics  complexfields  ncmideas  projectideas  zines  education  history  teaching  biology  research  wholeuniversitycatalog  humbertomaturana  herbertbrün  counterculture  1960s  1969  univeristyofillinois  deschooling  unschooling  pedagogy  radicalpedagogy 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Journal of Radical Shimming
"The Journal of Radical Shimming is...
an on-going, intermittanly published platform of R76. It serves as a continuing space of consideration for the groups projects, as well as an area to consider areas of concern and excitement that might go on to serve as platforms for actions in the making. Visit the JRS here."
zines  art  publications  red76  journalofradicalshimmering 
july 2012 by robertogreco
MoMA.org | Millennium Magazines
Throughout the twentieth century, innovations in international avant-garde visual arts and design were often first expressed in the informal context of a magazine or journal. This exhibition, drawn from the holdings of The Museum of Modern Art Library, follows this practice into the twenty-first century, exploring the various ways in which contemporary artists and designers use the magazine as an experimental space.

The works on view, all published since 2000, represent a broad array of international titles—from community newspapers to image- only photography magazines to conceptual design projects. These publications illustrate a diverse range of image-making, editing, design, printing, and distribution practices. There are connections to the past lineage of artists’ magazines and the little architecture and design magazines of the twentieth century, as well as unique applications of new image-editing and printing methods. Assembled here, these contemporary magazines provide a firsthand view of the latest practices in art and design in print and represent MoMA Library’s sustained effort to document and collect this medium."
it'snicethat  insituteforsocialhypocrisy  infopool  exhibitions  hotandcold  hunterandcrook  hereandthere  thehappyhypocrite  graphic  gagarin  foerster  fillip  faund  faqnp  fashionfashion  fabrikzeitung  theexhibitionist  theexcuse  espous  elsie  elk  ledictateur  derdiedas  dearreader  daddy  correspondencia  copenhagenfreeuniversity  conveyormagazine  condiment  0_100  clubdonny  chimurenga  charley  capricious  cabinet  bidoun  apartamento  davidsenior  rachaelmorrison  moma  art  zines  magazines 
july 2012 by robertogreco
main page : 0-100 Editions
"0_100 focus on contemporary photograph. Each issue is a sort of collective vision about a theme we ask to submit for. The final result is a selection of the pictures and photographers we love more in a small format without text and comments (just a legenda for the credits - even the theme is hidden at the end). 0_100 is quarterly printed in Milan, in a strictly limited edition of 100 copies, each numbered."
0_100  art  books  zines  magazines  photography 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Temporary Culture
"Temporary Culture

publishes books in the field of fantastical literature,
including My Man and other Critical Fictions by Wendy Walker;
the Hugo-nominated Hope-in-the-Mist by Michael Swanwick;
and The Man with the Knives by Ellen Kushner

produces the Avram Davidson website

the Critical Fiction website and forum « criticalfiction.net »

and The Endless Bookshelf website

and was once a photocopy ’zine"
literature  fantasticalliterature  books  publishing  zines  via:maxfenton 
july 2012 by robertogreco
TEMPORARY SERVICES - Non-commercial since 1998
"Experiencing art in the places we inhabit on a daily basis remains a critical concern for us. It helps us move art from a privileged experience to one more directly related to how we live our lives. A variety of people should decide how art is seen and interpreted, rather than continuing to strictly rely on those in power. We move in and out of officially sanctioned spaces for art, keeping one foot in the underground the other in the institution. Staying too long in one or the other isn’t healthy. We are interested in art that takes engaging and empowering forms. We collaborate amongst ourselves and with others, even though this may destabilize how people understand our work."

"AGAINST COMPETITION… GROUP WORK & WORKING WITH OTHERS… BUILDING LONG-TERM INFRASTRUCTURE TO SUPPORT SIMILAR WAYS OF WORKING"

[via: http://www.dismalgarden.org/pages/links.html
now here http://web.archive.org/web/20101029173446/http://www.dismalgarden.org/pages/links.html ]
temporaryservices  leisurearts  artproduction  competition  philadelphia  copenhagen  zines  publishing  marcfischer  salemsollo-julin  brettbloom  unschooling  deschooling  deinstitutionalization  everydaylife  artists  design  community  chicago  collective  activism  art  collaboration  nilsnorman  artleisure 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Dark Matter: Activist Art and the Counter-Public Sphere
"Like its astronomical cousin, creative dark matter also makes up the bulk of the artistic activity produced in our post-industrial society. However, this type of dark matter is invisible primarily to those who lay claim to the management and interpretation of culture - the critics, art historians, collectors, dealers, museums, curators and arts administrators. It includes makeshift, amateur, informal, unofficial, autonomous, activist, non-institutional, self-organized practices - all work made and circulated in the shadows of the formal art world. Yet, just as the astrophysical universe is dependent on its dark matter, so too is the art world dependent on its dark energy."

[Concept mentioned by Randall Szott here: http://intheconversation.blogs.com/art/2008/03/interview-with.html ]

[See also other articles here: http://gregorysholette.com/writings/writing_index.html ]

[Update 2 June 2014: Link is dead. Here's the Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20110911222745/http://www.journalofaestheticsandprotest.org/3/sholette.htm ]
art  culture  politics  media  activism  activistart  vernacular  counter-publicsphere  josephbeuys  proletarian  oskarnegt  alexanderkluge  resistance  subversion  outsiders  artcriticism  tinkering  amateur  glvo  bourgeois  darkmatter  gregorysholette  collectives  culturalresistance  hierarchy  gatekeepers  cultureindustry  artworld  invisibility  economics  temporaryservices  lasagencias  publicspace  tacticalmedia  deschooling  unschooling  zines  diy  outsider  shrequest1 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Nieves for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad
"Download and collect your favorite Nieves Zines, carefully edited and adapted for the multi-touch screen. Leaf through each Zine from front to back, identical to the original, all in a single app optimised for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Save your favorite pages as wallpaper. The app is updated with new issues every month, giving you the opportunity to experience out of print classics from the Nieves Zine catalogue." [via: http://www.thinkingforaliving.org/archives/6793 ]
nieves  zines  iphone  ipad  applications  ios  illustration  art 
december 2010 by robertogreco
zinepal.com
"Use zinepal.com to create your own magazines or zines for short. Select content from your favorite blogs, websites or RSS feeds and put it in your zine. zinepal.com creates an online version and a printable PDF. Then you print it and read it in your favorite coffee shop, e-mail it to your friends or just let them subscribe to your online zine feed."
zines  unbook  via:russelldavies  print  pdf  publishing  magazines  papernet 
march 2009 by robertogreco
SSC: The Small Science Collective
"- CLICK on a zine cover below for downloadable PDF templates of the zine (standard 8.5" x 11" paper), and sample pages. Use and distribute freely and as you please!
via:russelldavies  zines  science  projectideas  classideas  tcsnmy  papercraft 
february 2009 by robertogreco
MagCloud
"MagCloud enables you to publish your own magazines. All you have to do is upload a PDF and we'll take care of the rest: printing, mailing, subscription management, and more."

[more info: http://powazek.com/posts/984 ]
magazines  publishing  diy  make  printing  pdf  catalog  selfpublishing  onlinetoolkit  zines  via:preoccupations  classideas  self-publishing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
UrbanVelo - Bicycle Culture on the Skids
"Urban Velo is a reflection of the cycling culture in current day cities. Our readers are encouraged to contribute their words and art."
bikes  cities  urban  blogs  zines 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Blurb | Self publish with free BookSmart software for Windows or Mac
"So we put our minds together, and developed a creative publishing service simple and smart enough to make anyone an author – every blogger, cook, photographer, parent, traveler, poet, pet owner, marketer, everyone. (This means you.)"
books  publishing  selfpublishing  glvo  printing  design  writing  portfolio  photography  zines  printer  self-publishing 
june 2007 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about "Design and Making Things" » Archive » Crap Hound: Clipart mania zine
"His zine Crap Hound, is an insane (no, sorry, pathologically obsessed) collection of unique clipart culled from innumerable sources through the DIY grapevine."
zines  graphics  art  magazines  illustration  interviews  design  pingmag 
december 2006 by robertogreco

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