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Infovore » Towards a canon of “hypertext literature / interactive fiction / digital narrative”
Kim asked on Twitter:

“Is there a canon for digital narratives / interactive stories / hypertext literature yet? A list of accepted classics and forms?”
What followed was a lot of us going “we don’t know”. And I wasn’t exactly helpful, by pointing out that those three things are (in some ways) completely different.

But. Nobody got anywhere but not being helpful, and to do so, I’m going to express (a bit) of an opinion, and hopefully something a little absolute. I hate list posts, but let’s put something down for people to argue about.

So, specifically: if I had to draw up a Canon – a canon of the interactive-story-thingies (we all know what they are – “things that the reader/audience interpret differently by interacting” is my best explanation) what would I include?

The rough goals were: not necessarily the best, but important pillars; no bias to high- or low- brow; trying to cover all media appropriately; interpret the question as broadly as you would like; don’t take too long over it. Here’s where I am:

Cent mille milliards de poèmes, Raymond Queneau, 1961
The Unfortunates, BS Johnson, 1969
Zork, Infocom, 1980
The Warlock of Firetop Mountain, Steve Jackson/Ian Livingstone, 1982
Trinity, Infocom, 1985
The Secret of Monkey Island, 1990
253, Geoff Ryman, 1996
The Last Express, Jordan Mechner et al, 1997
Spider and Web, Andrew Plotkin, 1998
Planescape Torment, Black Isle, 1999
Galatea, Emily Short, 2000
The Beast, 2001
Half-Life 2, Valve Software, 2004
Gravitation, Jason Rohrer, 2008
Dear Esther, thechineseroom, 2008/2012
Fiasco, Jason Morningstar, 2009
Sleep No More, Punchdrunk, 2011
The Walking Dead, Telltale Games, 2012
30 Flights of Loving, Blendo Games, 2012

Things I wanted represented: pre-digital works; early, web-based hyperfiction; text-based IF, both classic and modern; things that are clearly videogames; an ARG (and the Beast still, in many ways, feels like the best); tabletop roleplaying; mechanical storytelling; a selection of Infocom writers (Moriarty, Meretzky)."
fiction  games  hypertext  interactive  narrative  literature  hypertextliterature  2013  tomarmitage  zork  monkeyisland  writing  stories  storytelling  srg  if  interactivefiction 
january 2013 by robertogreco
MoMA | Video Games: 14 in the Collection, for Starters
"We are very proud to announce that MoMA has acquired a selection of 14 video games, the seedbed for an initial wish list of about 40 to be acquired in the near future, as well as for a new category of artworks in MoMA’s collection that we hope will grow in the future. This initial group, which we will install for your delight in the Museum’s Philip Johnson Galleries in March 2013, features:

• Pac-Man (1980)
• Tetris (1984)
• Another World (1991)
• Myst (1993)
• SimCity 2000 (1994)
• vib-ribbon (1999)
• The Sims (2000)
• Katamari Damacy (2004)
• EVE Online (2003)
• Dwarf Fortress (2006)
• Portal (2007)
• flOw (2006)
• Passage (2008)
• Canabalt (2009)"
zelda  corewar  marblemadness  yars'revemge  supermario  supermario64  streetfighterii  nethack  donkeykong  spaceinvaders  tempest  zork  snake  pong  minecraft  chronotrigger  animalcrossing  grimfandango  jenovachen  pacman  tetris  anotherworld  myst  simcity2000  simcity  vib-ribbon  thesims  katamaridamacy  eveonline  dwarffortress  portal  flow  passage  canabalt  moma  design  videogames  art  gaming  games  paolaantonelli  2012 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Revisiting 'Zork': What We Lost in the Transition to Visual Games - Technology - The Atlantic
"Text-based adventures were written as much as they were designed, employing tantalizing adjectives to create a sense of the world"
philipbump  2012  gaming  play  games  videogames  storytelling  writing  text-basedadventures  zork 
january 2012 by robertogreco

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