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terry : crime   31

Tories reveal themselves as party of lawlessness and disorder
“Today, here in Manchester, the Conservative party takes its rightful place as the Party of Law and Order in Britain once again,” she began. Er … run that past us again, Priti. Psycho Geoff on his way home to the Cotswolds in the back of a police car under armed guard. The prime minister has been accused of groping two women at the same time and channelling public funds to a woman with whom he had an affair. The government judged by the supreme court to have acted unlawfully over prorogation. The full-on search to find a way of getting round the Benn Act. Mark Francois committing crimes against his own sanity. Right now, it was harder to find someone in the Tory party without serious form.
politics  conservatives  law  crime 
12 days ago by terry
'I wish it was a prank': Maurizio Cattelan on the surreal theft of his golden toilet
The burglars caused “significant damage and flooding” after removing the toilet, which was plumbed in, at around 4.50am this morning. A 66-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the incident. Thames Valley Police say that a group of offenders used two vehicles during the theft. Commentators on social media fear however that the work may be melted down.
art  sculpture  crime 
28 days ago by terry
Busted flush: Man arrested over theft of solid gold toilet in England
Det Insp Jess Milne said: “The piece of art that has been stolen is a high value toilet made out of gold that was on display at the palace. The artwork has not been recovered at this time, but we are conducting a thorough investigation to find it and bring those responsible to justice.” A 66-year-old man has been arrested in connection with the incident.
art  gold  sculpture  crime 
29 days ago by terry
Someone left old TVs outside 50 homes in Virginia while wearing a TV on his head. No one knows why.
“Everyone started coming out of their houses, walking around the neighborhood looking at the TVs there on the doorstep,” said Jeanne Brooksbank, one of the recipients, who lives in the Hampshire neighborhood. “It was very 'Twilight Zone.’ ”
television  crime 
8 weeks ago by terry
America’s mass shootings are a political choice
Empirically, the US is an outlier on gun violence because it is an outlier on gun access. Americans have easier access not just to guns, but specifically to military-designed semi-automatic weapons with large magazines that are able to murder with efficiency.
usa  politics  crime 
9 weeks ago by terry
‘No way to prevent this,’ says only nation where this regularly happens
From the headline on down, the piece is designed to skewer the tragic truth of contemporary America: we consider ourselves a civilized country but also accept without any real action that 10 or more people are going be executed in public every once in awhile while gathering to dance, to worship, to learn. Each successive posting of the article underscores that point with a clever cruelty: it happened here again and nowhere else.
crime  politics  satire  usa 
9 weeks ago by terry
‘No way to prevent this,’ says only nation where this regularly happens
DAYTON, OH—In the hours following a violent rampage in Ohio in which a lone attacker killed 10 individuals and injured 27 others, citizens living in the only country where this kind of mass killing routinely occurs reportedly concluded Sunday that there was no way to prevent the massacre from taking place.
politics  satire  usa  crime 
10 weeks ago by terry
‘No way to prevent this,’ says only nation where this regularly happens
EL PASO, TX—In the hours following a violent rampage in Texas in which a lone attacker killed 20 individuals and injured 26 others, citizens living in the only country where this kind of mass killing routinely occurs reportedly concluded Sunday that there was no way to prevent the massacre from taking place.
politics  satire  usa  crime 
10 weeks ago by terry
Cyber Security MSc | Lancaster University
In addition to the taught modules, you will also work on an individual research project, supervised by two academics from two of the four departments. Through this project, you will obtain an in-depth understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of cyber security and technology. You will put the skills and knowledge you have developed throughout the year into practice and gain experience of tackling real-world cyber security issues.
education  dataprotection  university  crime 
11 weeks ago by terry
Man arrested over UK's Lancaster University data breach hack allegations
Cops have cuffed a 25-year-old man from Bradford on suspicion of committing Computer Misuse Act crimes after Lancaster University suffered a data breach affecting more than 12,000 students and applicants.
data  dataprotection  universities  crime 
11 weeks ago by terry
Lancaster University hit by cyber attack, hundreds of students' personal data stolen
The full scale of the cyber attack was revealed yesterday (July 22), when university chiefs confirmed that hackers had breached IT systems and accessed student records. [...] It said it regretted that the breach has led to fraudulent invoices being sent to some undergraduate applicants demanding large sums of money.
data  dataprotection  universities  crime 
11 weeks ago by terry
Man's two 'page one' photos lead to arrest
Michael Millhouse, wearing a blue and black checkered coat, is painting decorative Christmas greetings on storefront windows in one photo published Dec. 13 in the Lewiston Tribune. The other image was taken from surveillance video footage that reportedly showed a then-unidentified man slipping a women's wallet in the pocket of that same coat and walking away.
money  weird  crime 
12 weeks ago by terry
Accused wallet thief pleads innocent to Zip Trip crime
Michael Millhouse, 43, of Clarkston, was pictured twice on the Lewiston Tribune's front page Dec. 13 - painting Christmas greetings on the windows of a Lewiston business directly above a surveillance camera image from the Clarkston Zip Trip on Bridge Street. The coincidence of the two pictures running one on top of the other led to Millhouse's arrest that morning in connection with the alleged theft. [...]

Millhouse told police he brought the wallet to his Lewiston business and intended to return it, the report states, but had forgotten about it and was too busy. Police recovered the wallet from Millhouse's business, police said, but the money was gone. The other contents were recovered.
wallet  money  crime 
12 weeks ago by terry
Found: 15 wallets from the 1940s, stolen and stashed behind a bathroom wall
The pastor took to Facebook to wage a longshot campaign to return the wallets to their owners. His post—which featured a photo of the find along with eight names from the discovered student identification cards—has since picked up more than 3,000 shares, and has so far helped facilitate one reunion. Betty Sissom, 89, currently living more than an hour away from Centralia in Chesterfield, Missouri, is now back in possession of treasures once lost, such as her old social security card, a photo of herself with her childhood crush, and a picture of her brother, who had been fighting in World War II at the time and has since passed away. “I was just so glad to get that,” CNN quoted Sissom as saying, “because I don’t have a picture of him.”
crime  money  society  history  memory 
12 weeks ago by terry
What do people in solitary confinement want to see?
According to many human-rights organizations, the prolonged lack of human contact and sensory deprivation that inmates experience in solitary confinement qualifies as torture. The legislative campaign that Tamms Year Ten spearheaded succeeded in closing the prison. The photo-request project continued, in affiliation with the watchdog group Solitary Watch. Now known as Photo Requests from Solitary, it is run by Reynolds, Jean Casella, a co-director of Solitary Watch, and Jeanine Oleson, a professor of photography at Parsons School of Design.
photography  crime  society 
july 2019 by terry
Majority of people return lost wallets – here's the psychology and which countries are the most honest
Overall, 51% of those who were handed a wallet with smaller amounts of money reported it, compared with 72% for a larger sum. The most honest countries were Switzerland, Norway and the Netherlands whereas the least honest were Peru, Morocco and China.

So why is this and what does it tell us about the psychology of honesty? To get an idea, I ran a very informal focus group to find out what kinds of things people may ask themselves when making a decision to return a found wallet. A common view was that no one wanted to appear to act in a socially unacceptable way, and nobody wanted to appear to be a thief. And, of course, the more money in the wallet, the greater the crime.
crime  morality  ethics  society  money 
june 2019 by terry
Van Gogh’s gun, 'most famous weapon in art history', sells for €162,500
The auctioned Lefaucheux pinfire revolver is almost certainly the weapon used, although this cannot be conclusively proved. The type of weapon, its calibre, its severely corroded state and the location and circumstances of the find strongly suggest it is the gun. In the evening of 27 July 1890 Van Gogh suffered a gunshot wound while in a wheatfield and he then staggered back to the inn, dying two days later.
art  vangogh  crime 
june 2019 by terry
Schools in England to give extra lessons on dangers of knives
Children at risk of knife crime are known to be vulnerable during the long summer break, especially if they have time on their hands and, with the schools shut, have no safe space. Campaigners say that, due to government cuts to youth services, there is also a shortage of activities for young people during the six-week holiday.
schools  education  children  crime 
june 2019 by terry
Mexicans buy fake cellphones to hand over in muggings
Costing 300 to 500 pesos apiece — the equivalent of $15 to $25 — the “dummies” are sophisticated fakes: They have a startup screen and bodies that are dead ringers for the originals, and inside there is a piece of metal to give the phone the heft of the real article. That comes in handy when trying to fool trigger-happy bandits who regularly attack the buses, big and small, that ferry people from the poorer outlying suburbs to jobs in the city center.
phones  mexico  crime  fake 
may 2019 by terry
Thieves just used a hammer to steal a $3.4 million Pieter Bruegel the Younger painting from a remote Italian church
Using a hammer to break the case, the thieves lifted the picture—worth an estimated $3.4 million, according to press reports—and made off in Peugeot car. Police believe two people were involved in the heist. They are now are investigating CCTV footage from around the town and the province for clues.
art  painting  crime  church  italy 
march 2019 by terry
Italian police reveal '€3m painting' stolen from church was a copy
The town’s mayor, Daniele Montebello, was among the few people privy to the subterfuge, and had to keep up the pretence in the hours after the heist, telling journalists that losing the painting was “a hard blow for the community”.

“Rumours were circulating that someone could steal the work, and so the police decided to put it in a safe place, replacing it with a copy and installing some cameras,” Montebello said on Wednesday night. “I thank the police but also some of the churchgoers, who noticed that the painting on display wasn’t the original but kept up the secret.”
art  painting  church  crime  italy 
march 2019 by terry
Michael Pitt, Imogen Poots to Star in Art-Theft Drama ‘Sleeping Shepherd’
Pitt will portray a failed painter who decided he would rather steal great art than paint it. As he criss-crosses Europe, he meets a bored rich girl — played by Poots — who gets a sexual thrill from art theft. After he’s caught, his co-dependent mother (Huppert) destroys $2 billion worth of irreplaceable masterpieces by chopping them up and tossing them into the nearby Rhine Canal.
movies  art  crime 
march 2019 by terry
Dieorama
Abigail Goldman spends her work days as an investigator for a public defender’s office in Washington state, helping people who are seriously in trouble—which can mean hours of staring at grisly pictures of crime scenes, visiting morgues, even observing autopsies. By night, she dreams up gruesome events, which she then turns into tiny, precise dioramas. Rife with scenes of imminent death and brutal dismemberment, the fruits of Goldman’s painstaking labor would be adorable ... if they weren’t so disturbing.
video  documentary  diorama  sculpture  crime 
march 2019 by terry
The Secrets of the world's greatest art thief
Done right, his technique—daytime, no violence, performed like a magic trick, sometimes with guards in the room—never involves a dash to a getaway car. And done wrong, a parking spot is the least of his worries.
art  crime 
march 2019 by terry
The prison guards who stole a Salvador Dalí painting
In the 1960s Salvador Dalí composed a surrealist painting for the prisoners of Rikers Island. But the real danger it eventually faced was from greedy guards.
crime  dali  painting  prison 
october 2018 by terry
Goodbye, Dali caper an inside job?
Prison guards may have conducted a middle-of-the-night fire drill to provide cover for the theft of a valuable Salvador Dail sketch from a New York City jail, the New York Daily News reported.
crime  dali  painting  prison 
october 2018 by terry
The great Rikers Island art heist
After the drill began and the jail’s lobby was deserted, the thieves got to work. One stood watch. Another slipped off the painting case’s locks. The third kept tabs on the fire drill's progress. Within a few minutes, a replica of the Dalí hung in its place. The substitute was far from a perfect match, and the thief standing guard wasn’t convinced. “That looks ridiculous,” he said.

A few hours later, in the early morning, two prison guards stationed next to the jail’s lobby noticed that something about the painting was off. It seemed markedly smaller, and in place of its carved mahogany wood frame, a brown frame had been painted around the edge of the canvas. A fake.
crime  dali  painting  prison 
october 2018 by terry
The strange reason owl theft may be on the rise
So with societies around the world becoming increasingly cashless, thieves are having to find alternatives to help them make a quick, illegal profit. Here we look at some of the more unusual things that criminals have had their eye on.
business  commerce  currency  economics  birds  crime 
june 2018 by terry
Why does it seem like serial killers all wear the same glasses?
The list of serial killers who wore glasses is long and bloody, from Dahmer to BTK to Harold Shipman and his professorial frames; even the Zodiac Killer, never caught, wears a thick-rimmed pair in a police sketch. The aesthetic of “serial killer glasses” is so pervasive that it pops up everywhere from Urban Dictionary (“Eyeglasses with heavy or severe frames that live somewhere between fashionable and creepy”) to TV Tropes (where “a guy who is cold, emotionless … or even a soulless monster” is given glasses “to quickly tip off the audience to his personality”), and countless Tumblr posts in between.
glasses  crime  fashion 
june 2018 by terry
Wearing glasses may really mean you're smarter, major study finds
In the study, the largest of its kind ever conducted, researchers from the University of Edinburgh analyzed cognitive and genetic data from over 300,000 people aged between 16 and 102 that had been gathered by the UK Biobank and the Charge and Cogent consortia. Their analysis found “significant genetic overlap between general cognitive function, reaction time, and many health variables including eyesight, hypertension, and longevity”. Specifically, people who were more intelligent were almost 30% more likely to have genes which might indicate they’d need to wear glasses.
science  crime  fashion  glasses 
june 2018 by terry
Gangster’s paradise: how organised crime took over Russia
A number of commentators have dubbed Russia a “mafia state”. It is certainly a catchy epithet, but what does it actually mean? To the Spanish prosecutor José Grinda González – a particular scourge of Russian gangs in his country – it means that the Kremlin (or at least the state security apparatus), rather than being under the control of the criminals, is a shadowy puppeteer making the gangs dance on its strings. The truth is more complex. The Kremlin does not control organised crime in Russia, nor is it controlled by it. Rather, organised crime prospers under Putin, because it can go with the grain of his system.
russia  politics  crime 
march 2018 by terry

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