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The Gospel According to Mark Fisher
"A review of k-punk: The Collected and Unpublished Writings of Mark Fisher (2004-2016), edited by Darren Ambrose (Repeater Books, 2018)"
book  review  cultural-theory  criticism  politics 
9 hours ago
Repeater Books | k-punk: The Collected and Unpublished Writings of Mark Fisher (2004-2016)
" this comprehensive collection brings together the very best work of acclaimed blogger, writer, publisher, political activist and lecturer Mark Fisher (aka k-punk) who died in 2017. Covering the period 2004 – 2016, it includes some of the most incendiary and influential posts from his seminal blog k-punk, as well as a selection of his brilliantly insightful film, television and music reviews, together with his extraordinary writings on politics, activism, precarity, hauntology, mental health and popular modernism for numerous websites and magazines. Also included is his final unpublished k-punk post, the unfinished introduction to his planned book on “Acid Communism”, and a number of important interviews from the last decade."
book  publisher  cultural-theory  commentary 
9 hours ago
Time for Another Reinvention | Dissent Magazine
"Leftism Reinvented: Western Parties from Socialism to Neoliberalism by Stephanie L. Mudge Harvard University Press, 2018, 524 pp"
book  review  leftism  socialism  history 
2 days ago
The Limits of Liberal History | Current Affairs
Review of 'These Truths: A history of the United States' by Jill Lepore
book  review  history  america  labor 
2 days ago
True Enough | The MIT Press
"The development of an epistemology that explains how science and art embody and convey understanding. Philosophy valorizes truth, holding that there can never be epistemically good reasons to accept a known falsehood, or to accept modes of justification that are not truth conducive. How can this stance account for the epistemic standing of science, which unabashedly relies on models, idealizations, and thought experiments that are known not to be true? In True Enough, Catherine Elgin argues that we should not assume that the inaccuracy of models and idealizations constitutes an inadequacy. To the contrary, their divergence from truth or representational accuracy fosters their epistemic functioning. When effective, models and idealizations are, Elgin contends, felicitous falsehoods that exemplify features of the phenomena they bear on. Because works of art deploy the same sorts of felicitous falsehoods, she argues, they also advance understanding. Elgin develops a holistic epistemology that focuses on the understanding of broad ranges of phenomena rather than knowledge of individual facts. Epistemic acceptability, she maintains, is a matter not of truth-conduciveness, but of what would be reflectively endorsed by the members of an idealized epistemic community—a quasi-Kantian realm of epistemic ends."
book  publisher  epistemology  philosophy  truth 
2 days ago
Understanding Ignorance | The MIT Press
"An exploration of what we can know about what we don't know: why ignorance is more than simply a lack of knowledge. Ignorance is trending. Politicians boast, “I'm not a scientist.” Angry citizens object to a proposed state motto because it is in Latin, and “This is America, not Mexico or Latin America.” Lack of experience, not expertise, becomes a credential. Fake news and repeated falsehoods are accepted and shape firm belief. Ignorance about American government and history is so alarming that the ideal of an informed citizenry now seems quaint. Conspiracy theories and false knowledge thrive. This may be the Information Age, but we do not seem to be well informed. In this book, philosopher Daniel DeNicola explores ignorance—its abundance, its endurance, and its consequences. DeNicola aims to understand ignorance, which seems at first paradoxical. How can the unknown become known—and still be unknown? But he argues that ignorance is more than a lack or a void, and that it has dynamic and complex interactions with knowledge. Taking a broadly philosophical approach, DeNicola examines many forms of ignorance, using the metaphors of ignorance as place, boundary, limit, and horizon. He treats willful ignorance and describes the culture in which ignorance becomes an ideological stance. He discusses the ethics of ignorance, including the right not to know, considers the supposed virtues of ignorance, and concludes that there are situations in which ignorance is morally good. Ignorance is neither pure nor simple. It is both an accusation and a defense (“You are ignorant!” “Yes, but I didn't know!”). Its practical effects range from the inconsequential to the momentous. It is a scourge, but, DeNicola argues daringly, it may also be a refuge, a value, even an accompaniment to virtue. Hardcover Out of Print ISBN: 9780262036443 264 pp. | 6 in x 9 in August 2017 Paperback $17.95 T | £13.99 ISBN: 9780262536035 264 pp. | 6 in x 9 in September 2018 Share Share "
book  publisher  epistemology  philosophy  truth  ignorance  agnotology 
2 days ago
[1710.00027v1] Toward a System Building Agenda for Data Integration
"In this paper we argue that the data management community should devote far more effort to building data integration (DI) systems, in order to truly advance the field. Toward this goal, we make three contributions. First, we draw on our recent industrial experience to discuss the limitations of current DI systems. Second, we propose an agenda to build a new kind of DI systems to address these limitations. These systems guide users through the DI workflow, step by step. They provide tools to address the "pain points" of the steps, and tools are built on top of the Python data science and Big Data ecosystem (PyData). We discuss how to foster an ecosystem of such tools within PyData, then use it to build DI systems for collaborative/cloud/crowd/lay user settings. Finally, we discuss ongoing work at Wisconsin, which suggests that these DI systems are highly promising and building them raises many interesting research challenges. "
research-data  management  integration  sharing  data-science 
6 days ago
Storm -- A Modern Probabilistic Model Checker -- Home
"Storm is a tool for the analysis of systems involving random or probabilistic phenomena. Given an input model and a quantitative specification, it can determine whether the input model conforms to the specification. It has been designed with performance and modularity in mind. "
statistics  modeling 
6 days ago
Almost Too Sober: On the Appeal of Stoicism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"How to Be Free: An Ancient Guide to the Stoic Life By A. A. Long, Epictetus Published 10.30.2018 Princeton University Press 232 Pages"
book  review  stoicism  philosophy  history 
13 days ago
Wageless Life - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Hinterland: America’s New Landscape of Class and Conflict By Phil A. Neel Published 05.15.2018 Reaktion Books 192 Pages"
book  review  precarity  captitalism  poverty  work  labor 
13 days ago
The Value of W, or, Interdisciplinary Engagements on Culture - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind By Kevin Laland Published 03.07.2017 Princeton University Press 464 Pages"
book  review  culture  evolution  biology  humanism  interdisciplinary 
13 days ago
The Supernatural as Natural, Healthy, and Banal - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Supernatural: Death, Meaning, and the Power of the Invisible World By Clay Routledge Published 07.02.2018 Oxford University press 240 Pages"
book  review  religion  supernatural  experience  meaning 
13 days ago
CAP API | Caselaw Access Project
"The Caselaw Access Project API, also known as CAPAPI, serves all official US court cases published in books from 1658 to 2018. The collection includes over six million cases scanned from the Harvard Law Library shelves."
data-sources  law  libraries  database  api 
15 days ago
Dear Reader, Are You Reading? - The Scholarly Kitchen
"MaryAnne Wolf’s Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World (2018) "
book  review  reading  psychology  cognitive-science 
22 days ago
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