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Digitally Endangered Species - Digital Preservation Coalition
"The DPC's 'Bit List' of Digitally Endangered Species is a crowd-sourcing exercise to discover which digital materials our community thinks are most at risk, as well as those which are relatively safe thanks to digital preservation. By compiling and maintaining this list over the coming years, the DPC aims to celebrate great digital preservation endeavors as entries become less of a ‘concern,’ whilst still highlighting the need for efforts to safeguard those still considered ‘critically endangered.’ "
digital  digital-library  preservation  risk  assessment 
december 2017
Welcome to the Open Source Policy Center | OSPC
"Policymakers increasingly rely on computational models to predict the budgetary and broader economic impacts of current and proposed policies, especially those involving taxes and entitlements. Estimates from these models often determine a bill’s success or failure in the legislative process and public sphere. The Open Source Policy Center's first focus is supporting community-driven projects that analyze the budgetary and broader economic impact of taxes. These models are completely transparent and freely available to researchers across the country. OSPC also provides an easy-to-use online interface that allows students, policymakers, journalists, and informed citizens to interact with the models and learn for themselves about the effects of policies."
policy  simulation  open-source  think-tank 
november 2017
The left's myopic obsession with fairness
A critical review of The Reactionary Mind by Corey Robin.
book  review  conservatism  reactionary  political-science 
november 2017
Home - Matthew Lincoln, PhD
"I am a data research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, where I use computer-aided analysis of cultural datasets to help model long-term trends in iconography, art markets, and the social relations between artists."
weblog-individual  history  art  network-analysis  people  digital-humanities 
november 2017
RECOMMENDED: Computation in Conversation ← dh+lib
"I want to talk today about some of the current work happening around collections as data and some of the challenges that are holding us back from a collections as data revolution, but I really want to focus on how we as data producers can build better relationships and start productive conversations around our own libraries and how being more inclusive about who we invite into our data design and publishing processes can help us generate more usable datasets and further creative and responsible data reuse by our patrons and staff alike. "
data  collection  libraries 
november 2017
RDA Research Data Collections WG Recommendations | RDA
"Recent efforts of the Research Data Alliance have established a conceptual model for the management of research data that promotes the use of digital objects, transcending the traditional notion of files and decoupling questions of access and use from location and storage. In this context, the need for building aggregations or collections of such objects has become an essential element. However, contemporary work on object collections focuses on primarily describing such collections through metadata, whereas research data management practice requires not only to describe collections, but to make them actionable by automated processes to be able to cope with ever increasing amounts and volumes of data. To this effect, this recommendation provides a comprehensive model for actionable collections and a technical interface specification to enable client-server interaction. It also reports on first adoption and implementation efforts across communities and institutions and provides perspectives on the use of data types in connection with collection structures, highlighting pathways for possible future work."
research-data  collection  automation 
november 2017
Digital History & Argument White Paper – Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
"This white paper is the product of the Arguing with Digital History Workshop organized by Stephen Robertson and Lincoln Mullen of George Mason University, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The two-day workshop, which involved twenty-four invited participants at different stages in their careers, working in a variety of fields with a range of digital methods, was conceived with a focus on one particular form of digital history, arguments directed at scholarly audiences and disciplinary conversations. Despite recurrent calls for digital history in this form from digital and analog historians, few examples exist. The original aim of the workshop was to promote digital history that directly engaged with historiographical arguments by producing a white paper that addressed the conceptual and structural issues involved in such scholarship. Input from the participants expanded the scope of the white paper to also elaborate the arguments made by other forms of digital history and address the obstacles to professional recognition of those interpretations. The result was a document that aims to help bridge the argumentative practices of digital history and the broader historical profession. On the one hand, it aims to demonstrate to the wider historical discipline how digital history is already making arguments in different forms than analog scholarship. On the other hand, it aims to help digital historians weave the scholarship they produce into historiographical conversations in the discipline."
digital-humanities  digital  history  methodology 
november 2017
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