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tsuomela : addiction   33

301 Moved Permanently
"From a leading expert on addiction, a provocative, singularly authoritative history of how sophisticated global businesses have targeted the human brain’s reward centers, driving us to addictions ranging from oxycodone to Big Macs to Assassin’s Creed to Snapchat—with alarming social consequences. We live in an age of addiction, from compulsive gaming and shopping to binge eating and opioid abuse. Sugar can be as habit-forming as cocaine, researchers tell us, and social media apps are hooking our kids. But what can we do to resist temptations that insidiously and deliberately rewire our brains? Nothing, David Courtwright says, unless we understand the history and character of the global enterprises that create and cater to our bad habits. The Age of Addiction chronicles the triumph of what Courtwright calls “limbic capitalism,” the growing network of competitive businesses targeting the brain pathways responsible for feeling, motivation, and long-term memory. We see its success in Purdue Pharma’s pain pills, in McDonald’s engineered burgers, and in Tencent video games from China. All capitalize on the ancient quest to discover, cultivate, and refine new and habituating pleasures. The business of satisfying desire assumed a more sinister aspect with the rise of long-distance trade, plantation slavery, anonymous cities, large corporations, and sophisticated marketing. Multinational industries, often with the help of complicit governments and criminal organizations, have multiplied and cheapened seductive forms of brain reward, from junk food to pornography. The internet has brought new addictions: in 2018, the World Health Organization added “gaming disorder” to its International Classification of Diseases. Courtwright holds out hope that limbic capitalism can be contained by organized opposition from across the political spectrum. Progressives, nationalists, and traditionalists have made common cause against the purveyors of addiction before. They could do it again."
book  publisher  capitalism  addiction 
4 days ago by tsuomela
Virtue and Vice in an Age of Addiction | The American Conservative
"The Age of Addiction: How Bad Habits Became Big Business, David T. Courtwright, Belknap Press, 336 pages Addicted to Lust: Pornography in the Lives of Conservative Protestants, Samuel L. Perry, Oxford University Press, 288 pages"
books  review  addiction  capitalism  culture  pornography  religion 
july 2019 by tsuomela
Rage Against the Machines | Ian Bogost | The Baffler
"Like free digital services more broadly, the real purpose of the videogame business—and, indeed, of American business writ large—is not to provide search or social or entertainment features, but to create rapidly accelerating value as quickly as possible so as to convert that aggregated value into wealth. Bingo!"
online  gaming  games  design  business  finance  gambling  addiction  business-model  capitalism 
march 2014 by tsuomela
Tim Harford — Article — Casinos’ worrying knack for consumer manipulation
"Yet it is hard for a free-market enthusiast like me to look unblinkingly at Las Vegas, at row upon row of machines, designed by an elite and needing little human intervention, drawing in consumers, soothing them, entertaining them and eating their money – and not to feel that the invisible hand has slipped."
economics  behavior  psychology  addiction  gambling 
january 2014 by tsuomela
The Gollum Effect
"The concrete idea is something I call the Gollum effect. It is a process by which regular humans are Gollumized: transformed into hollow shells of their former selves, defined almost entirely by their patterns of consumption."
economics  consumerism  behavior  addiction  class  middle-class 
april 2012 by tsuomela
Are you addicted to your PhD? « The Thesis Whisperer
"The hypothesis behind much of this work is that finding information can cause a rush of dopamine – which is called in behavioural science circles a ‘reward stimulus’. Over time our brains can become sensitised to the anticipation of the dopamine reward – even though the reward itself brings us diminishing returns. In other words: the sensation of wanting more information doesn’t have an ‘off switch’."
information  addiction  psychology  stimulus 
july 2011 by tsuomela
PLoS ONE: Microstructure Abnormalities in Adolescents with Internet Addiction Disorder
Recent studies suggest that internet addiction disorder (IAD) is associated with structural abnormalities in brain gray matter. However, few studies have investigated the effects of internet addiction on the microstructural integrity of major neuronal fiber pathways, and almost no studies have assessed the microstructural changes with the duration of internet addiction.
internet  effects  technology-effects  attention  brain-imaging  brain  technology  addiction 
june 2011 by tsuomela
The Acceleration of Addictiveness
"Most people won't, unfortunately. Which means that as the world becomes more addictive, the two senses in which one can live a normal life will be driven ever further apart. One sense of "normal" is statistically normal: what everyone else does. The other is the sense we mean when we talk about the normal operating range of a piece of machinery: what works best."
addiction  health  behavior  future  psychology  technology  culture  acceleration 
april 2011 by tsuomela
Slate Magazine - Seeking
by Emily Yoffe. Summary of research by Jaak Panskeep and Kent Berridge into our desire for additional information. Speculates this desire is akin to addiction systems. "How the brain hard-wires us to love Google, Twitter, and texting. And why that's dangerous."
psychology  neuroscience  mental  technology  information  addiction  behavior  seeking  information-overload  information-use  brain  neurology 
august 2009 by tsuomela
slacktivist: Still not rock bottom
To be confident of the claim that they are better than some other group, they have chosen to compare themselves to a eugenic Nazi regime that euthanizes senior citizens. That such a regime is wholly a figment of their warped imaginations is less revealing than the fact that they have been forced to imagine such a horrifying scenario in order to find something with which they can believe they compare favorably.
anger  outrage  extremism  fundamentalism  psychology  belief  addiction 
august 2009 by tsuomela

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