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An interview with historian James McPherson on the New York Times’ 1619 Project - World Socialist Web Site
"The World Socialist Web Site recently spoke to James McPherson, professor emeritus of history at Princeton University, on the New York Times’ 1619 Project. McPherson is the author of dozens of books and articles, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Battle Cry of Freedom, widely regarded as the authoritative account of the Civil War."
interview  history  american-studies  slavery 
11 weeks ago by tsuomela
The Right’s “Judeo-Christian” Fixation | The New Republic
"IMAGINING JUDEO-CHRISTIAN AMERICA: RELIGION, SECULARISM, AND THE REDEFINITION OF DEMOCRACY by K. Healan GastonUniversity of Chicago Press, 360 pp., $25.00"
book  review  history  rhetoric  religion  christian  judaism  american-studies 
november 2019 by tsuomela
American Taxation, American Slavery, Einhorn
"For all the recent attention to the slaveholding of the founding fathers, we still know remarkably little about the influence of slavery on American politics. American Taxation, American Slavery tackles this problem in a new way. Rather than parsing the ideological pronouncements of charismatic slaveholders, it examines the concrete policy decisions that slaveholders and non-slaveholders made in the critical realm of taxation. The result is surprising—that the enduring power of antigovernment rhetoric in the United States stems from the nation’s history of slavery rather than its history of liberty. We are all familiar with the states’ rights arguments of proslavery politicians who wanted to keep the federal government weak and decentralized. But here Robin Einhorn shows the deep, broad, and continuous influence of slavery on this idea in American politics. From the earliest colonial times right up to the Civil War, slaveholding elites feared strong democratic government as a threat to the institution of slavery. American Taxation, American Slavery shows how their heated battles over taxation, the power to tax, and the distribution of tax burdens were rooted not in debates over personal liberty but rather in the rights of slaveholders to hold human beings as property. Along the way, Einhorn exposes the antidemocratic origins of the popular Jeffersonian rhetoric about weak government by showing that governments were actually more democratic—and stronger—where most people were free. A strikingly original look at the role of slavery in the making of the United States, American Taxation, American Slavery will prove essential to anyone interested in the history of American government and politics."
book  publisher  american-studies  taxes  anti-tax  ideology  slavery 
october 2019 by tsuomela
From Bible Belt to Sunbelt | W. W. Norton & Company
"From Bible Belt to Sun Belt tells the dramatic and largely unknown story of “plain-folk” religious migrants: hardworking men and women from Oklahoma, Texas, and Arkansas who fled the Depression and came to California for military jobs during World War II. Investigating this fiercely pious community at a grassroots level, Darren Dochuk uses the stories of religious leaders, including Billy Graham, as well as many colorful, lesser-known figures to explain how evangelicals organized a powerful political machine. This machine made its mark with Barry Goldwater, inspired Richard Nixon’s “Southern Solution,” and achieved its greatest triumph with the victories of Ronald Reagan. "
book  publisher  history  evangelical  religion  american-studies 
june 2019 by tsuomela
The Department of Everything Else - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Global Interior Mineral Frontiers and American Power By Megan Black Published 10.01.2018 Harvard University Press 360 Pages"
book  review  american-studies  history  government  colonialism 
may 2019 by tsuomela
America’s Messiah Complex | The New Republic
"AMERICAN MESSIAHS: FALSE PROPHETS FOR A DAMNED NATION by Adam MorrisLiveright, 432 pp., $28.95"
book  review  history  religion  cult  american-studies  prophecy 
april 2019 by tsuomela
The Rights of the Defenseless: Protecting Animals and Children in Gilded Age America, Pearson
"In 1877, the American Humane Society was formed as the national organization for animal and child protection. Thirty years later, there were 354 anticruelty organizations chartered in the United States, nearly 200 of which were similarly invested in the welfare of both humans and animals. In The Rights of the Defenseless, Susan J. Pearson seeks to understand the institutional, cultural, legal, and political significance of the perceived bond between these two kinds of helpless creatures, and the attempts made to protect them. Unlike many of today’s humane organizations, those Pearson follows were delegated police powers to make arrests and bring cases of cruelty to animals and children before local magistrates. Those whom they prosecuted were subject to fines, jail time, and the removal of either animal or child from their possession. Pearson explores the limits of and motivation behind this power and argues that while these reformers claimed nothing more than sympathy with the helpless and a desire to protect their rights, they turned “cruelty” into a social problem, stretched government resources, and expanded the state through private associations. The first book to explore these dual organizations and their storied history, The Rights of the Defenseless will appeal broadly to reform-minded historians and social theorists alike."
book  publisher  history  19c  american-studies  children  animal-rights 
april 2019 by tsuomela
Valeria Luiselli, Greg Grandin, and the Pioneer Myth - The Atlantic
"Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli Knopf The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America by Greg Grandin Metropolitan "
books  review  frontier  american-studies  myths 
april 2019 by tsuomela
Reading in an Age of Catastrophe | by Edward Mendelson | The New York Review of Books
" Facing the Abyss: American Literature and Culture in the 1940s by George Hutchinson Columbia University Press, 439 pp., $35.0"
book  review  literature  criticism  1940s  history  american-studies 
march 2019 by tsuomela
Winthrop’s “City” Was Exceptional, not Exceptionalist - Los Angeles Review of Books
"As a City on a Hill The Story of America’s Most Famous Lay Sermon By Daniel T. Rodgers Published 11.13.2018 Princeton University Press 368 Pages"
book  review  american-studies  american  history  intellectual  religion  civic  exceptionalism 
february 2019 by tsuomela
Mapping Social Movements
"This project produces and displays free interactive maps showing the historical geography of dozens of social movements that have influenced American life and politics since the start of the 20th century, including radical movements, civil rights movements, labor movements, women's movements, and more."
maps  history  social-movement  american-studies 
november 2018 by tsuomela
A Pioneer of Paranoia | The New Republic
"PALE HORSE RIDER: WILLIAM COOPER, THE RISE OF CONSPIRACY, AND THE FALL OF TRUST IN AMERICA by Mark JacobsonBlue Rider Press, 384 pp., $27.00"
book  review  conspiracy  american-studies  ufos 
august 2018 by tsuomela
What Makes Hunting So Divisive | The New Republic
"THE FAIR CHASE: THE EPIC STORY OF HUNTING IN AMERICA by Philip DrayBasic Books, 416 pp., $32.00"
book  review  american-studies  sports  environmental  history 
august 2018 by tsuomela
The Recent Unpleasantness: Understanding the Cycles of Constitutional Time by Jack M. Balkin :: SSRN
"This article, originally given as the 2017 Addison C. Harris Lecture at Indiana University, analyzes recent events in terms of three great cycles of change in American constitutional history. The first is the cycle of the rise and fall of political regimes. The second is the cycle of polarization and depolarization. The third is the cycle of the decay and renewal of republican government--the cycle of constitutional rot. Each of these cycles operates on a different time scale. Their interaction generates "constitutional time." Many commentators worry that the United States is in a period of constitutional crisis, or that American democracy is doomed. These fears, although understandable, are overstated. America is not in a constitutional crisis, although it is suffering from a fairly severe case of constitutional rot, connected to rising polarization and economic inequality. Our current difficulties are a temporary condition. They stem from the fact that the Reagan regime that has structured American politics since the 1980s is dying, but a new regime has yet to be born. This is a difficult, agonizing, and humbling transition; and its difficulty is enhanced by the fact that, unlike the last transition, it occurs at the peak of a cycle of polarization and at the low point of a cycle of constitutional rot. For that reason, the transition to a new political regime is likely to be especially difficult. But we will get through it. And when we get through it, about five to ten years from now, American politics will look quite different. Political renewal is hardly foreordained: it will require persistence and political effort. The point of this lecture is to offer a bit of hope in difficult times. If people misunderstand our situation, and conclude that American decline is inevitable, they may unwittingly help to make that fate a reality; but if they understand the cycles of constitutional time, they may come to believe that their democracy can be redeemed, and do their part to realize that worthy goal. "
political-science  law  constitution  history  american-studies 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Coming Apart? Cultural Distances in the United States over Time
"We analyze temporal trends in cultural distance between groups in the US defined by income, education, gender, race, and political ideology. We measure cultural distance between two groups as the ability to infer an individual's group based on his or her (i) media consumption, (ii) consumer behavior, (iii) time use, or (iv) social attitudes. Gender difference in time use decreased between 1965 and 1995 and has remained constant since. Differences in social attitudes by political ideology and income have increased over the last four decades. Whites and non-whites have converged somewhat on attitudes but have diverged in consumer behavior. For all other demographic divisions and cultural dimensions, cultural distance has been broadly constant over time."
american-studies  america  culture  culture-war  class  partisanship 
july 2018 by tsuomela
The Remaking of Class | The New Republic
"AMITY AND PROSPERITY: ONE FAMILY AND THE FRACTURING OF AMERICA By Eliza Griswold Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 336 pp., $27 CLASS MATTERS: THE STRANGE CAREER OF AN AMERICAN DELUSION By Steve Fraser Yale University Press, 288 pp., $25 HINTERLAND: AMERICA’S NEW LANDSCAPE OF CLASS AND CONFLICT By Phil A. Neel Reaktion, 192 pp., $20"
boos  review  american-studies  class  politics  labor  rural  inequality 
june 2018 by tsuomela
The Persistence of Whitewashing | The New Republic
"DENMARK VESEY’S GARDEN: SLAVERY AND MEMORY IN THE CRADLE OF THE CONFEDERACY by Ethan J. Kytle and Blain RobertsThe New Press, 464 pp., $28.99"
book  review  american-studies  america  history  race  slavery  memory 
may 2018 by tsuomela
The Invention of the “White Working Class” | Public Books
Review of 6 books on the concept of the White Working Class (WWC). What makes us accept the WWC as authentic, or the bedrock of America?
books  review  class  american-studies  poverty  whiteness  race  authenticity 
february 2018 by tsuomela
How John Wayne Became a Hollow Masculine Icon - The Atlantic
"Wayne and Ford: The Films, the Friendship, and the Forging of an American Hero By Nancy Schoenberger Nan A. Talese / Doubleday Hank and Jim: The Fifty-Year Friendship of Henry Fonda and James Stewart By Scott Eyman Simon & Schuster"
books  review  american-studies  culture  film  cinema  history  20c  biography 
november 2017 by tsuomela
Not Tragedy, but Atrocity – Guernica
Essay on the Algiers Hotel incident, the source material for Detroit, a film by Katherine Bigelow.
history  1960s  racism  race  american-studies 
august 2017 by tsuomela
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