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Your Art, My Art
"The New York Times today came out with a list of "the 25 works of art made after 1970 that define the contemporary age, by anyone, anywhere." What struck me as most significant was how little any of the works meant to me. Most of them I had never heard of. All of them spoke of an experience or a way of experiencing the world that is alien to me. The list feels like a collection of paper cut-outs that proclaim themselves to be the definitive representation of the digital age. Now to be clear: I am neither an artist nor an art critic, and though I've spent my fair share of time in a museum, I could hardly be said to be educated about art. "
art  contemporary  2h20c  significance  museum 
9 weeks ago by tsuomela
TMI: Confession and Performance - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Art of Confession The Performance of Self from Robert Lowell to Reality TV By Christopher Grobe Published 11.07.2017 NYU Press 320 Pages"
book  review  performance  performativity  confession  art  poetry 
march 2019 by tsuomela
How to Disappear by Akiko Busch | PenguinRandomHouse.com: Books
"Vivid, surprising, and utterly timely, Akiko Busch’s HOW TO DISAPPEAR explores the idea of invisibility in nature, art, and science, in search of a more joyful and peaceful way of living in today’s increasingly surveilled and publicity-obsessed world In our increasingly networked and image-saturated lives, the notion of disappearing has never been both more enchanting and yet fanciful. Today, we are relentlessly encouraged, even conditioned, to reveal, share, and self-promote. The pressure to be public comes not just from our peers, but vast and pervasive technology companies, which want to profit from patterns in our behavior. A lifelong student and observer of the natural world, Busch sets out to explore her own uneasiness with this arrangement, and what she senses is a widespread desire for a less scrutinized way of life–for invisibility. Writing in rich painterly detail about her own life, her family, and some of the world’s most exotic and remote places–from the Cayman Islands to Iceland–she savors the pleasures of being unseen. Discovering and dramatizing a wonderful range of ways of disappearing, from virtual reality goggles that trick the wearer into believing her body has disappeared and to the way Virginia Woolf’s fictional Mrs. Dalloway feels a flickering of personhood as an older woman, Busch deliberates on subjects new and old with equal sensitivity and incisiveness."
book  publisher  invisible  art  science  experience 
february 2019 by tsuomela
Verso
"As ideas move from one context to another, something new is created. This continuous shifting of the line that separates the valuable from the worthless, culture from profanity, is at the centre of Boris Groys's investigation."
book  publisher  aesthetics  art  novelty  culture 
february 2018 by tsuomela
Childress, C.: Under the Cover: The Creation, Production, and Reception of a Novel (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Under the Cover follows the life trajectory of a single work of fiction from its initial inspiration to its reception by reviewers and readers. The subject is Jarrettsville, a historical novel by Cornelia Nixon, which was published in 2009 and based on an actual murder committed by an ancestor of Nixon's in the postbellum South. Clayton Childress takes you behind the scenes to examine how Jarrettsville was shepherded across three interdependent fields—authoring, publishing, and reading—and how it was transformed by its journey. Along the way, he covers all aspects of the life of a book, including the author's creative process, the role of the literary agent, how editors decide which books to acquire, how publishers build lists and distinguish themselves from other publishers, how they sell a book to stores and publicize it, and how authors choose their next projects. Childress looks at how books get selected for the front tables in bookstores, why reviewers and readers can draw such different meanings from the same novel, and how book groups across the country make sense of a novel and what it means to them. Drawing on original survey data, in-depth interviews, and groundbreaking ethnographic fieldwork, Under the Cover reveals how decisions are made, inequalities are reproduced, and novels are built to travel in the creation, production, and consumption of culture."
book  publisher  industry  sociology  art 
december 2017 by tsuomela
The Opera Fanatic: Ethnography of an Obsession, Benzecry
"Though some dismiss opera as old-fashioned, it shows no sign of disappearing from the world’s stage. So why do audiences continue to flock to it? Given its association with wealth, one might imagine that opera tickets function as a status symbol. But while a desire to hobnob with the upper crust might motivate the occasional operagoer, for hardcore fans the real answer, according to The Opera Fanatic, is passion—they do it for love. Opera lovers are an intense lot, Claudio E. Benzecry discovers in his look at the fanatics who haunt the legendary Colón Opera House in Buenos Aires, a key site for opera’s globalization. Listening to the fans and their stories, Benzecry hears of two-hundred-mile trips for performances and nightlong camp-outs for tickets, while others testify to a particular opera’s power to move them—whether to song or to tears—no matter how many times they have seen it before. Drawing on his insightful analysis of these acts of love, Benzecry proposes new ways of thinking about people’s relationship to art and shows how, far from merely enhancing aspects of everyday life, art allows us to transcend it."
book  publisher  art  sociology  opera  ethnography 
december 2017 by tsuomela
The Work of Art: Value in Creative Careers | Alison Gerber
"Artists are everywhere, from celebrities showing at MoMA to locals hoping for a spot on a café wall. They are photographed at gallery openings in New York and Los Angeles, hustle in fast-gentrifying cities, and, sometimes, make quiet lives in Midwestern monasteries. Some command armies of fabricators while others patiently teach schoolchildren how to finger-knit. All of these artists might well be shown in the same exhibition, the quality of work far more important than education or income in determining whether one counts as a "real" artist. In The Work of Art, Alison Gerber explores these art worlds to investigate who artists are (and who they're not), why they do the things they do, and whether a sense of vocational calling and the need to make a living are as incompatible as we've been led to believe. Listening to the stories of artists from across the United States, Gerber finds patterns of agreements and disagreements shared by art-makers from all walks of life. For professionals and hobbyists alike, the alliance of love and money has become central to contemporary art-making, and danger awaits those who fail to strike a balance between the two. The stories artists tell are just as much a part of artistic practice as putting brush to canvas or chisel to marble. By explaining the shared ways that artists account for their activities—the analogies they draw, the arguments they make—Gerber reveals the common bases of value artists point to when they say: what I do is worth doing. The Work of Art asks how we make sense of the things we do and shows why all this talk about value matters so much."
book  publisher  art  sociology  work 
december 2017 by tsuomela
Home - Matthew Lincoln, PhD
"I am a data research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, where I use computer-aided analysis of cultural datasets to help model long-term trends in iconography, art markets, and the social relations between artists."
weblog-individual  history  art  network-analysis  people  digital-humanities 
november 2017 by tsuomela
The Art of Survival: On Santiago Zabala’s “Why Only Art Can Save Us” - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Why Only Art Can Save Us Aesthetics and the Absence of Emergency By Santiago Zabala Published 09.05.2017 Columbia University Press 216 Pages"
book  review  art  crisis 
november 2017 by tsuomela
The American Scholar: Sonic Fields of Dark and Light - Sudip Bose
Two of my favorite visual and audible artists together: Mark Rothko and Morton Feldman.
art  music  review 
november 2017 by tsuomela
Ernst Karel | EAR ROOM
Sound artist at the Harvard Sensor Ethnography Lab.
audio  sound  art  anthropology  ethnography 
march 2017 by tsuomela
spot blog
Personal website for software artist - Scott Draves
weblog-individual  art 
november 2016 by tsuomela
Little boxes, anechoic & illuminated | metaLAB (at) Harvard
"A couple of recent projects at metaLAB have me thinking with a fresh, frank ingenuousness about small spaces, and sense and affect, and reverie, and wonder. Each project—A Bit in the Abyss, a shipping-container-based light and sound installation for Boston’s Illuminus festival, about which Cris Magliozzi previously posted; and To Sit Without Echoes, a pop-up, flat-packable anechoic chamber we produced in collaboration with Peter McMurray (Harvard) and Michael Heller (Pitt)—was motivated by its own unique set of questions. Although the projects started from very different places—one began with an attempt to meditate on magnitudes of cyberspace and digital memory in cosmic context; the other emerged from exploration of John Cage’s interest in the impossibility of silence—they quickly plunged us into material encounters. Starting from datasets documenting domain-name registrations and archival research into twentieth-century acoustic science at Harvard, we suddenly found ourselves sorting out knotty problems with mirrored acrylic, transducer speakers, foam insulation, and the acoustic properties of plywood, sorbothane, and medium-density fibreboard."
projects  research  digital-humanities  visualization  art  installation 
november 2015 by tsuomela
www.nytimes.com
Yellin's idea reminds me of my own dream at one time.
community  interdisciplinary  art  science 
july 2015 by tsuomela
DanGrayber.com
self-supported sculptures.
art  sculpture  tension 
june 2015 by tsuomela
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