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Bird’s Eye View: Jonathan Franzen Looks Down on Climate Activism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The End of the End of the Earth By Jonathan Franzen Published 11.13.2018 Farrar, Straus and Giroux 240 Pages"
book  review  essay  environmental  activism 
9 days ago by tsuomela
Can Stoicism Make Us Happy? | The Nation
A strong critique that ancient Greek stoicism cannot be applied to 21c life because the Greek view was strongly connected to a divine and providential world as created by Zeus.
book  review  stoicism  philosophy  religion  ontology 
11 days ago by tsuomela
A Sadistic Master Storyteller | The New Republic
"THE COLLECTED STORIES OF MACHADO DE ASSIS by Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, edited by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin PattersonLiveright, 960 pp., $35.00"
book  review  fiction  19c  country(Brazil) 
13 days ago by tsuomela
Book Review: 'Future Sounds: The Story of Electronic Music' - The Atlantic
"Future Sounds: The Story of Electronic Music From Stockhausen to Skrillex by David Stubbs Faber & Faber "
book  review  electronic  music  history 
4 weeks ago by tsuomela
Relationship Counseling for the Apocalypse - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Sustainability A Love Story By Nicole Walker Published 08.17.2018 Mad Creek Books 288 Pages"
book  review  anthropocene  climate-change  relationship 
4 weeks ago by tsuomela
Thieves of Experience: How Google and Facebook Corrupted Capitalism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Age of Surveillance Capitalism The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power By Shoshana Zuboff Published 01.15.2019 PublicAffairs 704 Pages"
book  review  internet  technology-effects  social-media  surveillance  business-model  capitalism 
4 weeks ago by tsuomela
Feasting on Precarity - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Uberland How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work By Alex Rosenblat Published 10.23.2018 University of California Press 296 Pages"
book  review  work  labor  technology  arbitrage  regulation  rhetoric  law 
4 weeks ago by tsuomela
Why Are Conservatives So Afraid of Higher Education? - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Diversity Delusion How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture By Heather Mac Donald Published 09.04.2018 St. Martin’s Press 288 Pages"
book  review  academia  conservative  declension-narrative 
5 weeks ago by tsuomela
Understanding Society: The research university
"Jason Owen-Smith's recent Research Universities and the Public Good: Discovery for an Uncertain Future "
book  review  university  research  innovation 
5 weeks ago by tsuomela
What Does Literary Studies Know? - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Paper Minds Literature and the Ecology of Consciousness By Jonathan Kramnick Published 09.07.2018 University of Chicago Press 208 Pages"
book  review  literary-criticism  philosophy 
9 weeks ago by tsuomela
Retirement in America? Too Expensive. | The New Republic
"GRINGOLANDIA: LIFESTYLE MIGRATION UNDER LATE CAPITALISM by Matthew HayesUniversity of Minnesota Press, 276 pp., $26.00"
book  review  retirement  economics  foreign-policy  immigration  poverty 
12 weeks ago by tsuomela
Science’s Freedom Fighters - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Freedom’s Laboratory The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science By Audra J. Wolfe Published 11.18.2018 Johns Hopkins University Press 312 Pages"
book  review  sts  science  history  cold-war  propaganda 
november 2018 by tsuomela
The Gospel According to Mark Fisher
"A review of k-punk: The Collected and Unpublished Writings of Mark Fisher (2004-2016), edited by Darren Ambrose (Repeater Books, 2018)"
book  review  cultural-theory  criticism  politics 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Repeater Books | k-punk: The Collected and Unpublished Writings of Mark Fisher (2004-2016)
" this comprehensive collection brings together the very best work of acclaimed blogger, writer, publisher, political activist and lecturer Mark Fisher (aka k-punk) who died in 2017. Covering the period 2004 – 2016, it includes some of the most incendiary and influential posts from his seminal blog k-punk, as well as a selection of his brilliantly insightful film, television and music reviews, together with his extraordinary writings on politics, activism, precarity, hauntology, mental health and popular modernism for numerous websites and magazines. Also included is his final unpublished k-punk post, the unfinished introduction to his planned book on “Acid Communism”, and a number of important interviews from the last decade."
book  publisher  cultural-theory  commentary 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Time for Another Reinvention | Dissent Magazine
"Leftism Reinvented: Western Parties from Socialism to Neoliberalism by Stephanie L. Mudge Harvard University Press, 2018, 524 pp"
book  review  leftism  socialism  history 
november 2018 by tsuomela
The Limits of Liberal History | Current Affairs
Review of 'These Truths: A history of the United States' by Jill Lepore
book  review  history  america  labor 
november 2018 by tsuomela
True Enough | The MIT Press
"The development of an epistemology that explains how science and art embody and convey understanding. Philosophy valorizes truth, holding that there can never be epistemically good reasons to accept a known falsehood, or to accept modes of justification that are not truth conducive. How can this stance account for the epistemic standing of science, which unabashedly relies on models, idealizations, and thought experiments that are known not to be true? In True Enough, Catherine Elgin argues that we should not assume that the inaccuracy of models and idealizations constitutes an inadequacy. To the contrary, their divergence from truth or representational accuracy fosters their epistemic functioning. When effective, models and idealizations are, Elgin contends, felicitous falsehoods that exemplify features of the phenomena they bear on. Because works of art deploy the same sorts of felicitous falsehoods, she argues, they also advance understanding. Elgin develops a holistic epistemology that focuses on the understanding of broad ranges of phenomena rather than knowledge of individual facts. Epistemic acceptability, she maintains, is a matter not of truth-conduciveness, but of what would be reflectively endorsed by the members of an idealized epistemic community—a quasi-Kantian realm of epistemic ends."
book  publisher  epistemology  philosophy  truth 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Understanding Ignorance | The MIT Press
"An exploration of what we can know about what we don't know: why ignorance is more than simply a lack of knowledge. Ignorance is trending. Politicians boast, “I'm not a scientist.” Angry citizens object to a proposed state motto because it is in Latin, and “This is America, not Mexico or Latin America.” Lack of experience, not expertise, becomes a credential. Fake news and repeated falsehoods are accepted and shape firm belief. Ignorance about American government and history is so alarming that the ideal of an informed citizenry now seems quaint. Conspiracy theories and false knowledge thrive. This may be the Information Age, but we do not seem to be well informed. In this book, philosopher Daniel DeNicola explores ignorance—its abundance, its endurance, and its consequences. DeNicola aims to understand ignorance, which seems at first paradoxical. How can the unknown become known—and still be unknown? But he argues that ignorance is more than a lack or a void, and that it has dynamic and complex interactions with knowledge. Taking a broadly philosophical approach, DeNicola examines many forms of ignorance, using the metaphors of ignorance as place, boundary, limit, and horizon. He treats willful ignorance and describes the culture in which ignorance becomes an ideological stance. He discusses the ethics of ignorance, including the right not to know, considers the supposed virtues of ignorance, and concludes that there are situations in which ignorance is morally good. Ignorance is neither pure nor simple. It is both an accusation and a defense (“You are ignorant!” “Yes, but I didn't know!”). Its practical effects range from the inconsequential to the momentous. It is a scourge, but, DeNicola argues daringly, it may also be a refuge, a value, even an accompaniment to virtue. Hardcover Out of Print ISBN: 9780262036443 264 pp. | 6 in x 9 in August 2017 Paperback $17.95 T | £13.99 ISBN: 9780262536035 264 pp. | 6 in x 9 in September 2018 Share Share "
book  publisher  epistemology  philosophy  truth  ignorance  agnotology 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Almost Too Sober: On the Appeal of Stoicism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"How to Be Free: An Ancient Guide to the Stoic Life By A. A. Long, Epictetus Published 10.30.2018 Princeton University Press 232 Pages"
book  review  stoicism  philosophy  history 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Wageless Life - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Hinterland: America’s New Landscape of Class and Conflict By Phil A. Neel Published 05.15.2018 Reaktion Books 192 Pages"
book  review  precarity  captitalism  poverty  work  labor 
november 2018 by tsuomela
The Value of W, or, Interdisciplinary Engagements on Culture - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind By Kevin Laland Published 03.07.2017 Princeton University Press 464 Pages"
book  review  culture  evolution  biology  humanism  interdisciplinary 
november 2018 by tsuomela
The Supernatural as Natural, Healthy, and Banal - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Supernatural: Death, Meaning, and the Power of the Invisible World By Clay Routledge Published 07.02.2018 Oxford University press 240 Pages"
book  review  religion  supernatural  experience  meaning 
november 2018 by tsuomela
Dear Reader, Are You Reading? - The Scholarly Kitchen
"MaryAnne Wolf’s Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World (2018) "
book  review  reading  psychology  cognitive-science 
october 2018 by tsuomela
Chambers, C.: The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A Manifesto for Reforming the Culture of Scientific Practice (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us? In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that a lot of research in psychology is based on weak evidence, questionable practices, and sometimes even fraud. The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology diagnoses the ills besetting the discipline today and proposes sensible, practical solutions to ensure that it remains a legitimate and reliable science in the years ahead. In this unflinchingly candid manifesto, Chris Chambers draws on his own experiences as a working scientist to reveal a dark side to psychology that few of us ever see. Using the seven deadly sins as a metaphor, he shows how practitioners are vulnerable to powerful biases that undercut the scientific method, how they routinely torture data until it produces outcomes that can be published in prestigious journals, and how studies are much less reliable than advertised. He reveals how a culture of secrecy denies the public and other researchers access to the results of psychology experiments, how fraudulent academics can operate with impunity, and how an obsession with bean counting creates perverse incentives for academics. Left unchecked, these problems threaten the very future of psychology as a science—but help is here. Outlining a core set of best practices that can be applied across the sciences, Chambers demonstrates how all these sins can be corrected by embracing open science, an emerging philosophy that seeks to make research and its outcomes as transparent as possible."
book  publisher  psychology  social-science  science  replication 
october 2018 by tsuomela
The Fight for Our Eyeballs - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Stand Out of Our Light Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy By James Williams Published 05.31.2018 Cambridge University Press 144 Pages"
book  review  technology-critique  social-media  attention  business  advertising 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Divided We Stand : Democracy Journal
"The Polarizers: Postwar Architects of Our Partisan Era By Sam Rosenfeld • University Of Chicago Press • 336 pages • $30"
book  review  history  political-science  partisanship 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Humanity’s Halting Problem, Adam Riggio « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective
"Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger have written Re-Engineering Humanity as a sustained and multifaceted critique of how contemporary trends in internet technology are slowly but surely shrinking the territory of human autonomy. Their work is a warning, as well as a description, of how internet technologies that ostensibly make our lives easier do so by taking control of our lives away from our self-conscious decision-making."
book  review  technology  technology-critique  big-data 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Moderan – New York Review Books
"Welcome to Moderan, world of the future. Here perpetual war is waged by furious masters fighting from Strongholds well stocked with “arsenals of fear” and everyone is enamored with hate. The devastated earth is coated by vast sheets of gray plastic, while humans vie to replace more and more of their own “soft parts” with steel. What need is there for nature when trees and flowers can be pushed up through holes in the plastic? Who requires human companionship when new-metal mistresses are waiting? But even a Stronghold master can doubt the catechism of Moderan. Wanderers, poets, and his own children pay visits, proving that another world is possible. “As if Whitman and Nietzsche had collaborated,” wrote Brian Aldiss of David R. Bunch’s work. Originally published in science-fiction magazines in the 1960s and ’70s, these mordant stories, though passionately sought by collectors, have been unavailable in a single volume for close to half a century. Like Anthony Burgess in A Clockwork Orange, Bunch coined a mind-bending new vocabulary. He sought not to divert readers from the horror of modernity but to make us face it squarely."
book  publisher  sf  fiction 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Origgi, G., Holmes, S. and Arikha, N.: Reputation: What It Is and Why It Matters (Hardcover and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"Reputation touches almost everything, guiding our behavior and choices in countless ways. But it is also shrouded in mystery. Why is it so powerful when the criteria by which people and things are defined as good or bad often appear to be arbitrary? Why do we care so much about how others see us that we may even do irrational and harmful things to try to influence their opinion? In this engaging book, Gloria Origgi draws on philosophy, social psychology, sociology, economics, literature, and history to offer an illuminating account of an important yet oddly neglected subject. Origgi examines the influence of the Internet and social media, as well as the countless ranking systems that characterize modern society and contribute to the creation of formal and informal reputations in our social relations, in business, in politics, in academia, and even in wine. She highlights the importance of reputation to the effective functioning of the economy and e-commerce. Origgi also discusses the existential significance of our obsession with reputation, concluding that an awareness of the relationship between our reputation and our actions empowers us to better understand who we are and why we do what we do. Compellingly written and filled with surprising insights, Reputation pins down an elusive subject that affects everyone."
book  publisher  reputation  information-literacy  philosophy 
september 2018 by tsuomela
Habeas Data » Melville House Books
"Habeas Data shows how the explosive growth of surveillance technology has outpaced our understanding of the ethics, mores, and laws of privacy. Award-winning tech reporter Cyrus Farivar makes the case by taking ten historic court decisions that defined our privacy rights and matching them against the capabilities of modern technology. It’s an approach that combines the charge of a legal thriller with the shock of the daily headlines. Chapters include: the 1960s prosecution of a bookie that established the “reasonable expectation of privacy” in nonpublic places beyond your home (but how does that ruling apply now, when police can chart your every move and hear your every conversation within your own home — without even having to enter it?); the 1970s case where the police monitored a lewd caller — the decision of which is now the linchpin of the NSA’s controversial metadata tracking program revealed by Edward Snowden; and a 2010 low-level burglary trial that revealed police had tracked a defendant’s past 12,898 locations before arrest — an invasion of privacy grossly out of proportion to the alleged crime, which showed how authorities are all too willing to take advantage of the ludicrous gap between the slow pace of legal reform and the rapid transformation of technology."
book  publisher  surveillance  big-data  computer  culture 
september 2018 by tsuomela
A Pioneer of Paranoia | The New Republic
"PALE HORSE RIDER: WILLIAM COOPER, THE RISE OF CONSPIRACY, AND THE FALL OF TRUST IN AMERICA by Mark JacobsonBlue Rider Press, 384 pp., $27.00"
book  review  conspiracy  american-studies  ufos 
august 2018 by tsuomela
What Makes Hunting So Divisive | The New Republic
"THE FAIR CHASE: THE EPIC STORY OF HUNTING IN AMERICA by Philip DrayBasic Books, 416 pp., $32.00"
book  review  american-studies  sports  environmental  history 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Dispossessed Lives | Marisa J. Fuentes
"In the eighteenth century, Bridgetown, Barbados, was heavily populated by both enslaved and free women. Marisa J. Fuentes creates a portrait of urban Caribbean slavery in this colonial town from the perspective of these women whose stories appear only briefly in historical records. Fuentes takes us through the streets of Bridgetown with an enslaved runaway; inside a brothel run by a freed woman of color; in the midst of a white urban household in sexual chaos; to the gallows where enslaved people were executed; and within violent scenes of enslaved women's punishments. In the process, Fuentes interrogates the archive and its historical production to expose the ongoing effects of white colonial power that constrain what can be known about these women. Combining fragmentary sources with interdisciplinary methodologies that include black feminist theory and critical studies of history and slavery, Dispossessed Lives demonstrates how the construction of the archive marked enslaved women's bodies, in life and in death. By vividly recounting enslaved life through the experiences of individual women and illuminating their conditions of confinement through the legal, sexual, and representational power wielded by slave owners, colonial authorities, and the archive, Fuentes challenges the way we write histories of vulnerable and often invisible subjects."
book  publisher  history  archives  slavery 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Collecting the World — James Delbourgo | Harvard University Press
"In 1759 the British Museum opened its doors to the general public—the first free national museum in the world. James Delbourgo’s biography of Hans Sloane recounts the story behind its creation, told through the life of a figure with an insatiable ambition to pit universal knowledge against superstition and the means to realize his dream. Born in northern Ireland in 1660, Sloane amassed a fortune as a London society physician, becoming a member of the Whig establishment and president of the Royal Society and Royal College of Physicians. His wealth and contacts enabled him to assemble an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects—the most famous cabinet of curiosities of its time. For Sloane, however, collecting a world of objects meant collecting a world of people, including slaves. His marriage to the heir of sugar plantations in Jamaica gave Sloane access to the experiences of planters and the folkways of their human property. With few curbs on his passion for collecting, he established a network of agents to supply artifacts from China, India, North America, the Caribbean, and beyond. Wampum beads, rare manuscripts, a shoe made from human skin—nothing was off limits to Sloane’s imagination. This splendidly illustrated volume offers a new perspective on the entanglements of global scientific discovery with imperialism in the eighteenth century. The first biography of Sloane based on the full range of his writings and collections, Collecting the World tells the rich and complex story of one of the Enlightenment’s most controversial luminaries."
book  publisher  museum  history  imperialism  museology 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Taking Philosophy Forward - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Taking Back Philosophy A Multicultural Manifesto By Bryan W. Van Norden Published 12.05.2017 Columbia University Press 248 Pages"
book  review  philosophy  multiculturalism 
august 2018 by tsuomela
After the Financial Crisis, A Decade of Damage | The New Republic
"CRASHED: HOW A DECADE OF FINANCIAL CRISES CHANGED THE WORLD by Adam ToozeViking, 720 pp., $35.00"
book  review  recession  history  2000s  finance  economics  politics 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Assembling a New Left - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Assembly By Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri Published 09.01.2017 Oxford University Press 368 Pages"
book  review  politics  sociology 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Media democratization and the rise of Trump | ROUGH TYPE
"The following review of the book Trump and the Media appeared originally, in a slightly different form, in the Los Angeles Review of Books."
book  review  technology-effects  media-studies  journalism 
august 2018 by tsuomela
The American Scholar: Too Much Information - Howard P. Segal
"The Efficiency Paradox: What Big Data Can’t Do by Edward Tenner; Knopf, 282 pp., $27.95"
book  review  efficiency  technology-effects 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Neoliberalism From the Left
"In Leftism Reinvented: Western Parties from Socialism to Neoliberalism, Mudge looks at left parties in advanced capitalist countries over the last century and shows how the experts aligned with those parties pushed them in the direction of spin doctors and markets. In the process, left parties’ ability to represent the interests of their own working-class constituencies was eroded — and ordinary people were shut out of the halls of power."
interview  book  neoliberalism  economics  expertise  socialism  activism  ideology 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Data Love - The Seduction and Betrayal of Digital Technologies | Columbia University Press
"Intelligence services, government administrations, businesses, and a growing majority of the population are hooked on the idea that big data can reveal patterns and correlations in everyday life. Initiated by software engineers and carried out through algorithms, the mining of big data has sparked a silent revolution. But algorithmic analysis and data mining are not simply byproducts of media development or the logical consequences of computation. They are the radicalization of the Enlightenment's quest for knowledge and progress. Data Love argues that the "cold civil war" of big data is taking place not among citizens or between the citizen and government but within each of us. Roberto Simanowski elaborates on the changes data love has brought to the human condition while exploring the entanglements of those who—out of stinginess, convenience, ignorance, narcissism, or passion—contribute to the amassing of ever more data about their lives, leading to the statistical evaluation and individual profiling of their selves. Writing from a philosophical standpoint, Simanowski illustrates the social implications of technological development and retrieves the concepts, events, and cultural artifacts of past centuries to help decode the programming of our present."
book  publisher  data-science  data-mining  epistemology 
august 2018 by tsuomela
Matters of Care — University of Minnesota Press
"Matters of Care presents a powerful challenge to conventional notions of care, exploring its significance as an ethical and political obligation for thinking in the more than human worlds of technoscience and naturecultures. A singular contribution to an emerging interdisciplinary debate, it expands agency beyond the human to ask how our understandings of care must shift if we broaden the world. "
book  publisher  ethics-of-care  care-work  nature  culture 
july 2018 by tsuomela
American Scientist
"MARKETING THE MOON: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program. David Meerman Scott and Richard Jurek. xiv + 130 pp. MIT Press, 2014. $39.95."
book  review  space  history  technology  marketing  nasa 
july 2018 by tsuomela
The Author Is Not as Dead as Claimed - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Varieties of Authorial Intention Literary Theory Beyond the Intentional Fallacy By John Farrell Published 03.18.2017 Palgrave Macmillan 274 Pages"
book  review  literature  criticism  authors  intention 
july 2018 by tsuomela
The American Academic Mistaken for a Spy | The New Republic
"MY LIFE AS A SPY: INVESTIGATIONS IN A SECRET POLICE FILE by Katherine VerderyDuke University Press Books, 344 pp., $27.95"
book  review  cold-war  history  anthropology  spying 
july 2018 by tsuomela
The 200-Year Legal Struggle That Led to Citizens United | The New Republic
"WE THE CORPORATIONS: HOW AMERICAN BUSINESSES WON THEIR CIVIL RIGHTS by Adam Winkler Liveright, 496 pp., $28.95"
corporation  law  people  supreme-court  book  review 
june 2018 by tsuomela
Down and Out in Silicon Valley - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Live Work Work Work Die A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley By Corey Pein Published 04.24.2018 Metropolitan Books 320 Pages"
book  review  silicon-valley  technology-critique  work  labor 
june 2018 by tsuomela
The Seymour Hersh Weekly | The New Republic
"REPORTER by Seymour M. HershKnopf, 368 pp., $27.95"
book  review  journalism  autobiography  history 
june 2018 by tsuomela
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