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tsuomela : capitalism   299

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Feminism for the 1%
"The Wing, London's new private members' club founded by a former Hillary Clinton aide, is the latest chapter in the story of capitalism covering itself in the veneer of women's empowerment."
feminism  neoliberalism  capitalism 
9 weeks ago by tsuomela
Life Under the Algorithm | The New Republic
"ON THE CLOCK: WHAT LOW-WAGE WORK DID TO ME AND HOW IT DRIVES AMERICA INSANE 
by Emily Guendelsberger 
Little, Brown and Company, 352 pp., $28.00 
 MONGREL FIREBUGS AND MEN OF PROPERTY: CAPITALISM AND CLASS CONFLICT IN AMERICAN HISTORY 
by Steve Fraser Verso, 272 pp., $24.95"
books  review  capitalism  work 
10 weeks ago by tsuomela
Daring to Hope for the Improbable: On Bernard Stiegler’s “The Age of Disruption” - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Age of Disruption Technology and Madness in Computational Capitalism By Bernard Stiegler Published 08.27.2019 Polity 380 Pages"
book  review  technology-critique  technology-effects  capitalism  madness 
november 2019 by tsuomela
301 Moved Permanently
"From a leading expert on addiction, a provocative, singularly authoritative history of how sophisticated global businesses have targeted the human brain’s reward centers, driving us to addictions ranging from oxycodone to Big Macs to Assassin’s Creed to Snapchat—with alarming social consequences. We live in an age of addiction, from compulsive gaming and shopping to binge eating and opioid abuse. Sugar can be as habit-forming as cocaine, researchers tell us, and social media apps are hooking our kids. But what can we do to resist temptations that insidiously and deliberately rewire our brains? Nothing, David Courtwright says, unless we understand the history and character of the global enterprises that create and cater to our bad habits. The Age of Addiction chronicles the triumph of what Courtwright calls “limbic capitalism,” the growing network of competitive businesses targeting the brain pathways responsible for feeling, motivation, and long-term memory. We see its success in Purdue Pharma’s pain pills, in McDonald’s engineered burgers, and in Tencent video games from China. All capitalize on the ancient quest to discover, cultivate, and refine new and habituating pleasures. The business of satisfying desire assumed a more sinister aspect with the rise of long-distance trade, plantation slavery, anonymous cities, large corporations, and sophisticated marketing. Multinational industries, often with the help of complicit governments and criminal organizations, have multiplied and cheapened seductive forms of brain reward, from junk food to pornography. The internet has brought new addictions: in 2018, the World Health Organization added “gaming disorder” to its International Classification of Diseases. Courtwright holds out hope that limbic capitalism can be contained by organized opposition from across the political spectrum. Progressives, nationalists, and traditionalists have made common cause against the purveyors of addiction before. They could do it again."
book  publisher  capitalism  addiction 
october 2019 by tsuomela
Unmaking the Real Estate State - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Capital City Gentrification and the Real Estate State By Samuel Stein Published 03.12.2019 Verso 208 Pages"
book  review  urbanism  cities  development  capitalism 
october 2019 by tsuomela
The Sacrificial Rites of Capitalism We Don’t Talk About | naked capitalism
" Supritha Rajan, an English professor at the University of Rochester, sees the dominant story of capitalism working in this way. Part of a wave of humanities scholars taking a closer look at the meaning and history of capitalism, her book, A Tale of Two Capitalisms, reveals how the fields of anthropology and economics, along with the literary form of the novel, which developed together in the late 18th and 19thcenturies, cross-pollinated each other and worked in tandem to investigate and offer new theories about human nature and culture. Together, they helped create a new story for the citizens of an emerging world."
book  review  capitalism  history  ritual  spirituality 
august 2019 by tsuomela
Virtue and Vice in an Age of Addiction | The American Conservative
"The Age of Addiction: How Bad Habits Became Big Business, David T. Courtwright, Belknap Press, 336 pages Addicted to Lust: Pornography in the Lives of Conservative Protestants, Samuel L. Perry, Oxford University Press, 288 pages"
books  review  addiction  capitalism  culture  pornography  religion 
july 2019 by tsuomela
Bigger Than the USSR: A Conversation with Nick Srnicek, Author of “Platform Capitalism” - Los Angeles Review of Books
"IN THE FOLLOWING conversation, I ask Nick Srnicek, the author of Platform Capitalism, about the nature — and dangers — of digital technology platform companies like Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Walmart."
interview  platform  capitalism  technology-critique 
march 2019 by tsuomela
Thieves of Experience: How Google and Facebook Corrupted Capitalism - Los Angeles Review of Books
"The Age of Surveillance Capitalism The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power By Shoshana Zuboff Published 01.15.2019 PublicAffairs 704 Pages"
book  review  internet  technology-effects  social-media  surveillance  business-model  capitalism 
january 2019 by tsuomela
Radical Optimization: On “Desperately Seeking Self-Improvement” - Los Angeles Review of Books
"Desperately Seeking Self-Improvement A Year Inside the Optimization Movement By Carl Cederström, André Spicer Published 11.07.2017 OR Books 368 Pages"
book  review  self-improvement  capitalism  ideology 
march 2018 by tsuomela
The Unholy Family
"Melinda Cooper, Family Values: Between Neoliberalism and the New Social Conservatism (Zone Books/MIT Press, 2017)"
book  review  political-science  history  conservatism  neoliberalism  neoconservatism  family  values  capitalism 
february 2018 by tsuomela
The Party’s Over: Looking Back on Communism - Los Angeles Review of Books
Vanguard of the Revolution by A. James McAdams and Red Hangover by Kristen Ghodsee
books  review  communism  history  20c  capitalism 
october 2017 by tsuomela
Hirschman, A.O.: The Passions and the Interests: Political Arguments for Capitalism before Its Triumph (Paperback and eBook) | Princeton University Press
"In this volume, Albert Hirschman reconstructs the intellectual climate of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to illuminate the intricate ideological transformation that occurred, wherein the pursuit of material interests--so long condemned as the deadly sin of avarice--was assigned the role of containing the unruly and destructive passions of man. Hirschman here offers a new interpretation for the rise of capitalism, one that emphasizes the continuities between old and new, in contrast to the assumption of a sharp break that is a common feature of both Marxian and Weberian thinking. Among the insights presented here is the ironical finding that capitalism was originally supposed to accomplish exactly what was soon denounced as its worst feature: the repression of the passions in favor of the "harmless," if one-dimensional, interests of commercial life. To portray this lengthy ideological change as an endogenous process, Hirschman draws on the writings of a large number of thinkers, including Montesquieu, Sir James Steuart, and Adam Smith."
book  publisher  history  economics  capitalism  ideas 
october 2017 by tsuomela
The Great Leveler — Brett Christophers | Harvard University Press
"For all the turmoil that roiled financial markets during the Great Recession and its aftermath, Wall Street forecasts once again turned bullish and corporate profitability soared to unprecedented heights. How does capitalism consistently generate profits despite its vulnerability to destabilizing events that can plunge the global economy into chaos? The Great Leveler elucidates the crucial but underappreciated role of the law in regulating capitalism’s rhythms of accumulation and growth. Brett Christophers argues that capitalism requires a delicate balance between competition and monopoly. When monopolistic forces become dominant, antitrust law steps in to discourage the growth of giant corporations and restore competitiveness. When competitive forces become dominant, intellectual property law steps in to protect corporate assets and encourage investment. These two sets of laws—antitrust and intellectual property—have a pincer effect on corporate profitability, ensuring that markets become neither monopolistic, which would lead to rent-seeking and stagnation, nor overly competitive, which would drive down profits. Christophers pursues these ideas through a close study of the historical development of American and British capitalist economies from the late nineteenth century to the present, tracing the relationship between monopoly and competition in each country and the evolution of legal mechanisms for keeping these forces in check. More than an illuminating study of the economic role of law, The Great Leveler is a bold and fresh dissection of the anatomy of modern capitalism."
book  publisher  history  economics  monopoly  capitalism 
august 2017 by tsuomela
How bosses are (literally) like dictators - Vox
"Elizabeth Anderson is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women's studies at the University of Michigan. She is the author of Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk About It (Princeton University Press, 2017)."
book  excerpt  business  government  power  labor  work  freedom  free-markets  markets-uber-alles  ideology  capitalism 
july 2017 by tsuomela
The United States of Work | New Republic
"PRIVATE GOVERNMENT: HOW EMPLOYERS RULE OUR LIVES (AND WHY WE DON’T TALK ABOUT IT) by Elizabeth AndersonPrinceton University Press, 224pp., $27.95 NO MORE WORK: WHY FULL EMPLOYMENT IS A BAD IDEA by James LivingstonThe University of North Carolina Press, 128pp., $24.00"
book  review  labor  work  ideology  capitalism  neoliberalism  business  management  power 
april 2017 by tsuomela
VersoBooks.com
"In one of the true classics of twentieth-century political economy, R. H. Tawney investigates the way religion has moulded social and economic practice. He tracks the influence of religious thought on capitalist economy and ideology since the Middle Ages, shedding light on the question of why Christianity continues to exert a unique role in the marketplace. The book offers an incisive analysis of the morals and mores of contemporary Western culture. In tough, muscular, richly varied prose, Tawney tells an absorbing and meaningful story. Today, the dividing line between the spheres of religion and the secular is shifting, and Religion and the Rise of Capitalism is more pertinent than ever."
book  publisher  capitalism  religion  economics  fiscal-policy  finance 
february 2017 by tsuomela
Jason W Moore
"Research: capitalism as world-ecology, political ecology, environmental history, food and agriculture, world history, political economy of agrarian change, financialization."
people  research  sociology  academic  environment  capitalism 
october 2016 by tsuomela
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