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tsuomela : climatology   13

When did the Anthropocene begin? A mid-twentieth century boundary level is stratigraphically optimal
"We evaluate the boundary of the Anthropocene geological time interval as an epoch, since it is useful to have a consistent temporal definition for this increasingly used unit, whether the presently informal term is eventually formalized or not. Of the three main levels suggested – an ‘early Anthropocene’ level some thousands of years ago; the beginning of the Industrial Revolution at ∼1800 CE (Common Era); and the ‘Great Acceleration’ of the mid-twentieth century – current evidence suggests that the last of these has the most pronounced and globally synchronous signal. A boundary at this time need not have a Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP or ‘golden spike’) but can be defined by a Global Standard Stratigraphic Age (GSSA), i.e. a point in time of the human calendar. We propose an appropriate boundary level here to be the time of the world's first nuclear bomb explosion, on July 16th 1945 at Alamogordo, New Mexico; additional bombs were detonated at the average rate of one every 9.6 days until 1988 with attendant worldwide fallout easily identifiable in the chemostratigraphic record. Hence, Anthropocene deposits would be those that may include the globally distributed primary artificial radionuclide signal, while also being recognized using a wide range of other stratigraphic criteria. This suggestion for the Holocene–Anthropocene boundary may ultimately be superseded, as the Anthropocene is only in its early phases, but it should remain practical and effective for use by at least the current generation of scientists."
nthropology  history  anthropocene  climate  climate-change  global-warming  climatology  geology  boundaries 
january 2015 by tsuomela
Future warming likely to be on high side of climate projections, analysis finds | UCAR - University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
"Climate model projections showing a greater rise in global temperature are likely to prove more accurate than those showing a lesser rise, according to a new analysis by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The findings, published in this week’s issue of Science, could provide a breakthrough in the longstanding quest to narrow the range of global warming expected in coming decades and beyond."
climate  climate-change  global-warming  climatology 
november 2012 by tsuomela
New Ways to Gauge the Finite Atmosphere - NYTimes.com
I recently became aware of fascinating efforts by  Adam Nieman to help society appreciate environmental challenges in fresh ways by visualizing volumes that are otherwise abstractions. In 2003 he created the image above, illustrating the volume of the world’s oceans and atmosphere (if the air were all at sea-level density) by rendering them as spheres sitting next to the Earth instead of spread out over its surface. To my eye, this helps powerfully convey the finite nature of these shared global assets.
environment  climate  climatology  visualization  visual-thinking  scale  global-warming 
november 2010 by tsuomela
How We Make Knowledge About Climate Change » American Scientist
A VAST MACHINE: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming. Paul N. Edwards. xxviii + 518 pp. The MIT Press, 2010.
book  review  climate  climatology  meteorology  science  sts  epistemology  knowledge  model 
october 2010 by tsuomela
NRDC: Climate Change, Water, and Risk
Climate change will have a significant impact on the sustainability of water supplies in the coming decades. A new analysis, performed by consulting firm Tetra Tech for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), examined the effects of global warming on water supply and demand in the contiguous United States. The study found that more than 1,100 counties -- one-third of all counties in the lower 48 -- will face higher risks of water shortages by mid-century as the result of global warming. More than 400 of these counties will face extremely high risks of water shortages.
global-warming  climate  drought  water  risk  future  climatology  hydrology 
july 2010 by tsuomela
Hot Air : CJR
Why don’t TV weathermen believe in climate change?
climate  climatology  meteorology  television  environment  science  psychology  journalism  media 
april 2010 by tsuomela

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