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tsuomela : connection   16

[1304.3480] Friendship Paradox Redux: Your Friends Are More Interesting Than You
"Feld's friendship paradox states that "your friends have more friends than you, on average." This paradox arises because extremely popular people, despite being rare, are overrepresented when averaging over friends. Using a sample of the Twitter firehose, we confirm that the friendship paradox holds for >98% of Twitter users. Because of the directed nature of the follower graph on Twitter, we are further able to confirm more detailed forms of the friendship paradox: everyone you follow or who follows you has more friends and followers than you. This is likely caused by a correlation we demonstrate between Twitter activity, number of friends, and number of followers. In addition, we discover two new paradoxes: the virality paradox that states "your friends receive more viral content than you, on average," and the activity paradox, which states "your friends are more active than you, on average." The latter paradox is important in regulating online communication. It may result in users having difficulty maintaining optimal incoming information rates, because following additional users causes the volume of incoming tweets to increase super-linearly. While users may compensate for increased information flow by increasing their own activity, users become information overloaded when they receive more information than they are able or willing to process. We compare the average size of cascades that are sent and received by overloaded and underloaded users. And we show that overloaded users post and receive larger cascades and they are poor detector of small cascades."
social-networks  friendship  connection  community  twitter  mathematics 
april 2013 by tsuomela
Social isolation, loneliness, and all-cause mortality in older men and women
"Both social isolation and loneliness are associated with increased mortality, but it is uncertain whether their effects are independent or whether loneliness represents the emotional pathway through which social isolation impairs health. We therefore assessed the extent to which the association between social isolation and mortality is mediated by loneliness. W"
loneliness  isolation  social  connection  networks  psychology  mortality  health 
march 2013 by tsuomela
Early relationships, not brainpower, key to adult happiness
"The researchers found, on the one hand, a strong pathway from child and adolescent social connectedness to adult well-being. This illustrates the enduring significance of positive social relationships over the lifespan to adulthood. On the other hand, the pathway from early language development, through adolescent academic achievement, to adult well-being was weak, which is in line with existing research showing a lack of association between socioeconomic prosperity and happiness.

The analyses also suggest that the social and academic pathways are not intimately related to one another, and may be parallel paths."
psychology  happiness  children  adult  development  social-psychology  connection  academic  success 
august 2012 by tsuomela
The Secret Life of Data in the Year 2020 | World Future Society
Using these science-fiction visions, we can begin to develop a way to conceptualize the data. From the view of this narrative, our data—the data we created—becomes a kind of simulacrum of ourselves. Like Philip K. Dick’s androids and William Gibson’s cyborgs, data becomes a way to embody who we are, but at the same time it remains external. It allows us to examine who we are and also what we want to do with these systems. As we begin to architect these systems, often the reality is too hard to handle: It’s too complex for us to make any meaningful design decisions. We need these representations, these androids, to be our proxies.
data  sf  human  information-science  connection  understanding  philosophy  future  relationship 
july 2012 by tsuomela
[1207.2743] The evolutionary origins of modularity
"A central biological question is how natural organisms are so evolvable (capable of quickly adapting to new environments). A key driver of evolvability is the widespread modularity of biological networks--their organization as functional, sparsely connected subunits--but there is no consensus regarding why modularity itself evolved. While most hypotheses assume indirect selection for evolvability, here we demonstrate that the ubiquitous, direct selection pressure to reduce the cost of connections between network nodes causes the emergence of modular networks. Experiments with selection pressures to maximize network performance and minimize connection costs yield networks that are significantly more modular and more evolvable than control experiments that only select for performance. These results will catalyze research in numerous disciplines, including neuroscience, genetics and harnessing evolution for engineering purposes. "
evolution  modularity  networks  connection  biology  nature 
july 2012 by tsuomela
Population Density : The Frontal Cortex
What led to the birth of human civilization? - 1. biological change in brains or 2. a change in population density and interconnectedness.
anthropology  archaeology  human-activity  biology  networks  connection  population  density  ancient  civilization  art  cultural-development 
july 2009 by tsuomela

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